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1. Hosokawa Y, Saiki S, Hanafusa T, Meguro N, Maeda O, Kinouchi T, Kuroda M, Usami M, Kotake T: [A case of adult Wilms' tumor]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2001 Sep;47(9):641-3
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  • [Title] [A case of adult Wilms' tumor].
  • Wilms' tumor is very rarely found in adults and there are no established treatment guidelines for such tumors in adults.
  • Computed tomography scan revealed a large right renal mass with enlarged lymph nodes.
  • Angiography showed a hypovascular tumor.
  • She underwent right nephrectomy and resection of lymph node metastasis with a diagnosis of malignant renal tumor.
  • The disease was classified as stage III according to the National Wilms' Tumor Study classification.
  • The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of ifosfamide, cisplatin, and etoposide.
  • This protocol was selected because of the published poor results with the standard Wilms' tumor chemotherapeutic agents when used in adults.
  • She remained without tumor recurrence as of six months after surgery.
  • Development of better therapeutic approaches to adult Wilms' tumor is awaited.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Neoplasms / therapy. Wilms Tumor / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Ifosfamide. Lymph Node Excision. Lymphatic Metastasis. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Nephrectomy. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11692602.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide
  • [Number-of-references] 12
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2. Djeu JY, Wei S: Clusterin and chemoresistance. Adv Cancer Res; 2009;105:77-92
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  • Resistance to anticancer agents is one of the primary impediments to effective cancer therapy.
  • Chemoresistance occurs not only to clinically established therapeutic agents but also to novel targeted therapeutics.
  • Both intrinsic and acquired mechanisms have been implicated in drug resistance but it remains controversial which mechanisms are responsible that lead to failure of therapy in cancer patients.
  • Its role has been documented in prostate cancer for paclitaxel/docetaxel resistance as well as in renal, breast, and lung tumor cells.
  • Moreover, it is abnormally upregulated in numerous advanced stage and metastatic cancers spanning prostate, renal, bladder, breast, head and neck, colon, cervical, pancreatic, lung carcinomas, melanoma, and lymphoma.
  • It is noteworthy that only the cytoplasmic/secretory clusterin form (sCLU), and not the nuclear form, is expressed in aggressive late stage tumors, which is in line with its antiapoptotic function.
  • Resistance to targeted death-inducing molecules, tumor necrosis factor, Fas and TRAIL, or histone deacetylase inhibitors can also be mediated by sCLU.
  • Expression of sCLU may be an adaptive response to genotoxic and oxidative stresses but this adaptive response could pose a threat in malignant cells being treated with cytotoxic agents by enhancing their survival potential.
  • The actual mechanisms for sCLU induction are unclear but STAT1 is required for its constitutive upregulation in docetaxel-resistant tumor cells.
  • Thus, sCLU has a key role in preventing apoptosis induced by cytotoxic agents and has the potential to be targeted for cancer therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Clusterin / physiology. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Drug Resistance, Multiple. Humans. Oxidative Stress

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  • (PMID = 19879424.001).
  • [ISSN] 0065-230X
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA098080
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CLU protein, human; 0 / Clusterin
  • [Number-of-references] 78
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS539156; NLM/ PMC3889866
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3. Ondrus D, Hornák M, Breza J, Mat'oska J, Schnorrer M, Belan V, Kausitz J: Delayed orchiectomy after chemotherapy in patients with advanced testicular cancer. Int Urol Nephrol; 2001;32(4):665-7
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  • [Title] Delayed orchiectomy after chemotherapy in patients with advanced testicular cancer.
  • INTRODUCTION: The therapeutic procedures in the management of testicular cancer are determined by histological findings in the removed testis and by the extent of the disease at the time of diagnosis.
  • However, all advanced tumors could be treated by primary chemotherapy regardless of the histological findings.
  • The current imaging techniques (ultrasound of the testis, abdominal and chest CT examination) and laboratory tests (determination of serum tumor markers AFP and hCG) provide sufficient evidence for the presence of cancer.
  • When the diagnosis of advanced tumor is evident, it is possible to start the treatment without orchiectomy.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the advantages of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy with delayed orchiectomy in the management of advanced testicular cancer.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 36 patients with advanced germ cell testicular cancer underwent primary PVB or BEP chemotherapy without previous orchiectomy.
  • Detailed medical, surgical and urological examination showed pulmonary metastases and/or extensive abdominal tumorous masses imitating acute abdominal crisis and impaired drainage of the kidney due to ureteral obstruction.
  • Searching for the origin, testicular tumor was detected.
  • Eleven patients had a bulky disease in the retroperitoneum (Stage IIC), two had enlarged retroperitoneal lymph nodes (Stage IIB), two had enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes (Stage III) and other 16 patients had also pulmonary metastases, and 5 pts had pulmonary metastases only.
  • The patients were treated with cisplatin-containing combination chemotherapy.
  • Following completion of chemotherapy, orchiectomy was performed alone or simultaneously with retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND) and/or lung metastasectomy in cases with persistent residual mass.
  • Following orchiectomy the patients were regularly checked and in cases with viable malignant tumor found in the testis sequential chemotherapy was administered.
  • Similarly when the relapse of the disease was detected, the patients were treated with sequential chemotherapy.
  • RESULTS: Complete disappearance of metastases was observed in 12 patients following chemotherapy alone.
  • The viable tumor in the removed tissue was found in one patient.
  • Delayed orchiectomy was performed simultaneously with surgical removal of residual mass in the retroperitoneum in 24 patients and as a separate procedure in 12 patients who have been considered to be complete responders following chemotherapy alone.
  • Residual viable tumor in testicular specimen was found in three patients, necrotic or fibrotic tissue in 18, and mature teratoma in 15 patients.
  • Overall survival of the patients was 26/36 (72.7%) at mean of 56.9 months (range 7-145 months, median 50 months) since the start of the treatment.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In patients with advanced germ cell testicular cancer preference must be given to the early beginning of intensive chemotherapy without the need of tissue diagnosis of primary tumor that should be obtained by orchiectomy.
  • Benefit of this therapeutic approach is the timely management of acute abdominal and/or pulmonary symptoms of life-threatening distant metastases.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bleomycin / therapeutic use. Cisplatin / therapeutic use. Germinoma / drug therapy. Orchiectomy. Testicular Neoplasms / drug therapy. Vinblastine / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm, Residual. Survival Rate. Teratoma / secondary. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11989561.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-1623
  • [Journal-full-title] International urology and nephrology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int Urol Nephrol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; PVB protocol
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4. Stephenson AJ: Current treatment options for clinical stage I seminoma. World J Urol; 2009 Aug;27(4):427-32
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  • [Title] Current treatment options for clinical stage I seminoma.
  • Adjuvant radiotherapy, surveillance, and single-agent carboplatin chemotherapy are all accepted treatment options for clinical stage (CS) I seminoma with cure rates approaching 100%.
  • Low-dose (25-35 Gy) adjuvant radiotherapy to the retroperitoneum and ipsilateral pelvis has been the mainstay of treatment for decades and is associated with excellent long-term survival and acceptable short-term toxicity.
  • The use of lower radiation doses (20 Gy) and the omission of pelvic radiation have been investigated to reduce toxicity.
  • However, the risk of late toxicity (specifically cardiovascular disease and secondary malignant neoplasms) resulting from radiation exposure have diminished the appeal of this approach, particularly given the fact that 80-85% of patients are cured by orchiectomy.
  • The appeal of surveillance is the avoidance of treatment-related morbidity in 80-85% of patients and the successful salvage of relapses with 30-35 Gy radiotherapy in most cases.
  • However, given the prolonged time course to relapse in CS I seminoma on surveillance, long-term follow-up with frequent abdominal-pelvic imaging is required.
  • However, concerns about the risk of inadequate therapy and late toxicity limit the acceptance of this approach until long-term results are available.
  • With potential of avoiding treatment-related toxicity without compromising curability and given the overall low risk of occult metastasis in clinical stage I seminoma, surveillance is the recommended treatment option.
  • [MeSH-major] Seminoma / drug therapy. Seminoma / radiotherapy. Testicular Neoplasms / drug therapy. Testicular Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carboplatin / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Population Surveillance. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant

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  • (PMID = 19370354.001).
  • [ISSN] 1433-8726
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin
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5. Pinthus JH, Sheffer Y, Nagler A, Fridman E, Mor Y, Genina O, Pines M: Inhibition of Wilms tumor xenograft progression by halofuginone is accompanied by activation of WT-1 gene expression. J Urol; 2005 Oct;174(4 Pt 2):1527-31
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  • [Title] Inhibition of Wilms tumor xenograft progression by halofuginone is accompanied by activation of WT-1 gene expression.
  • PURPOSE: Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common malignant neoplasm of the urinary tract in children.
  • Although it is curable with long-term survival, the combination of surgery, chemotherapy and often radiotherapy in some cases results in severe complications in adulthood.
  • Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies that would decrease treatment burden and improve outcome for high risk patients are required.
  • We evaluated the efficacy of halofuginone, an inhibitor of collagen type I synthesis and angiogenesis, to inhibit WT development in xenografts models.
  • RESULTS: Independent of disease stage, tumor location or administration route, halofuginone caused a decrease in angiogenesis that resulted in marked inhibition of tumor development.
  • This result was accompanied by a reduction in collagen synthesis, reduced levels of hepatocyte growth factor receptor MET and increased levels of the tumor suppressor protein WT1.
  • In culture halofuginone increased the synthesis of WT1 in the human WT cell-line SK-NEP-1 and in other cancer cell lines such as hepatocellular carcinoma and prostate cancer.
  • Because of its unique mode of action, halofuginone may decrease the treatment burden when combined with chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / pharmacology. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Quinazolines / pharmacology. WT1 Proteins / biosynthesis. Wilms Tumor / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 16148645.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-5347
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Piperidines; 0 / Quinazolines; 0 / Quinazolinones; 0 / WT1 Proteins; 9007-34-5 / Collagen; EC 2.7.10.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-met; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, ErbB-2; L31MM1385E / halofuginone
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6. Pascual Samaniego M, Calleja Escudero J, Alvarez Gago T, Gonzalo Rodríguez V, Müller Arteaga C, Fernández del Busto E: [Adult Wilms' tumor]. Actas Urol Esp; 2004 Jul-Aug;28(7):544-8
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  • [Title] [Adult Wilms' tumor].
  • [Transliterated title] Tumor de Wilms del adulto.
  • Wilms' tumor is a malignant embryonic renal neoplasm that is exceptional in adults.
  • There are not clinical data or radiographic investigations that can distinguish it from renal cell carcinoma.
  • It may be cystic and must be consider in the differential diagnosis of cystic lesions of the kidney.
  • The prognosis of Wilms' tumor in adults is worse than in children because of the high recurrence, the lower response rate to chemotherapy regimens and the advanced stage at the time of clinical presentation, like an asymptomatic abdominal mass in 75% of the cases.
  • We report a new case of nephroblastoma in a 29 years old woman presenting like a renal colic, with a cystic configuration by abdominal ultrasound initially, that changed into a solid renal mass later.
  • There is not a definitive treatment protocol currently but some authors suggest a combination chemotherapy with carboplatin and etoposide because it is very effective in recurrent or refractory adult Wilms' tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Wilms Tumor / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Female. Humans. Nephrectomy / methods. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome. Urography

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  • (PMID = 15384282.001).
  • [ISSN] 0210-4806
  • [Journal-full-title] Actas urologicas espanolas
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Actas Urol Esp
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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7. Suita S, Kinoshita Y, Tajiri T, Hara T, Tsuneyoshi M, Mizote H, Inada H, Takamatsu H, Kawano Y, Inomata Y, Nagasaki A, Ono Y, Handa N, Okamura J, Ishii E, Kawakami K, Committee for pediatric solid malignant tumors in the Kyushu area: Clinical characteristics and outcome of Wilms tumors with a favorable histology in Japan: a report from the Study Group for Pediatric Solid Malignant Tumors in the Kyushu Area, Japan. J Pediatr Surg; 2006 Sep;41(9):1501-5
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  • [Title] Clinical characteristics and outcome of Wilms tumors with a favorable histology in Japan: a report from the Study Group for Pediatric Solid Malignant Tumors in the Kyushu Area, Japan.
  • BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Since 1996, the standard treatment of Wilms tumors in Japan has been based on the regimen of the Japanese Wilms Tumor Study.
  • This study aims to assess the clinical characteristics of patients with Wilms tumor with a favorable histology from a retrospective standpoint in the Kyushu area in Japan and, furthermore, to analyze the historical changes of clinical features and outcome from the 1980s to the 1990s.
  • RESULTS: The clinical features (age, sex, initial symptom, location, stage) demonstrated no definite differences between group A and group B.
  • All stage V cases in group B undewent a bilateral tumor biopsy instead of a radical nephrectomy as the initial operation.
  • Of particular note, the outcome of patients with stage I and stage V in group B substantially improved in comparison to that in group A.
  • The present study suggested that in the early-stage cases, an initially complete resection followed by standard postoperative chemotherapy substantially improved the outcome of the patients in group B.
  • In the stage V cases, the performance of renal salvage surgery may have positively contributed to the improvement in the outcome in group B.
  • However, in the advanced stage cases, no definite improvement was noted.
  • In the future, an improved efficacy of the treatments for Wilms tumors based on the standard protocol established by the Japanese Wilms Tumor Study in 1996 is expected in Japan.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Neoplasms / mortality. Wilms Tumor / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Japan. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Nephrectomy. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16952581.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-5037
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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8. Radhika S, Bakshi A, Rajwanshi A, Nijhawan R, Das A, Kakkar N, Joshi K, Marwaha RK, Rao KL: Cytopathology of uncommon malignant renal neoplasms in the pediatric age group. Diagn Cytopathol; 2005 May;32(5):281-6
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  • [Title] Cytopathology of uncommon malignant renal neoplasms in the pediatric age group.
  • Malignant renal neoplasms are common solid tumors in pediatric oncology practice.
  • These include the common Wilms' tumor/nephroblastoma and the uncommon neoplasms such as clear-cell sarcoma of the kidney (CCSK), rhabdoid tumor, renal-cell carcinoma, and others.
  • The aim of this study was to describe in detail the cytopathological features of the histopathologically proven uncommon pediatric renal tumors.
  • Aspirates from Wilms' tumor, which are mesenchyme predominant, show clusters of spindle cells associated with the matrix material.
  • Renal-cell carcinoma of childhood shows similar cytological features as its adult counterpart.
  • Rhabdoid tumor of the kidney is characterized by a monomorphic population of cells with abundant cytoplasm, eccentric nuclei with prominent nucleoli.
  • Intrarenal yolk sac tumor is a rare neoplasm and shows severely pleomorphic cells on aspiration.
  • Further, non-Wilms' renal malignant neoplasms must be distinguished from the common Wilms' tumor so that appropriate chemotherapy protocols may be instituted in cases where the tumor is in an advanced stage of malignancy.
  • [MeSH-major] Biopsy, Fine-Needle / methods. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Endodermal Sinus Tumor / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Rhabdoid Tumor / pathology. Sarcoma, Clear Cell / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Cell Nucleus / pathology. Child. Child, Preschool. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Infant. Staining and Labeling. Wilms Tumor / pathology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 15830360.001).
  • [ISSN] 8755-1039
  • [Journal-full-title] Diagnostic cytopathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Diagn. Cytopathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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9. Li Q, Feng FY, Chen Q, Jiao SC, Li F, Wang HQ, Huang WX, Ling CQ, Li MZ, Ren J, Zhang Y, Qin FZ, Zhou MZ, Zhu RZ: [Multicenter phase II clinical trial of uroacitides injection in the treatment for advanced malignant tumors]. Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi; 2008 Jul;30(7):534-7
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  • [Title] [Multicenter phase II clinical trial of uroacitides injection in the treatment for advanced malignant tumors].
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy, safety and the life quality improvement of uroacitides injection in the treatment for patients with advanced malignant tumors.
  • METHODS: A total of 160 patients with advanced stage cancers were enrolled into this multicenter, open and non-randomized phase II clinical trial, including cancers of the lung (33 cases), liver (45 cases), breast (17 cases), esophagus (11 cases), stomach (18 cases), colon (19 cases), pancreas (3 cases) and kidney (4 cases), and glioma (10 cases).
  • The total objective response rate (ORR, CR + PR)) and tumor control rate (CR + PR + MR + SD) of the 138 evaluable patients were 5.8% and 65.2%, respectively.
  • [MeSH-major] Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Methyltransferases / therapeutic use. Peptides / therapeutic use. Phenylacetates / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Breast Neoplasms / blood. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. CA-19-9 Antigen / blood. Carcinoembryonic Antigen / blood. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / blood. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / pathology. Catheterization, Central Venous. Colorectal Neoplasms / blood. Colorectal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Humans. Nausea / chemically induced. Neoplasm Staging. Quality of Life. Remission Induction. Salvage Therapy. Treatment Outcome. Vomiting / chemically induced. alpha-Fetoproteins / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19062723.001).
  • [ISSN] 0253-3766
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua zhong liu za zhi [Chinese journal of oncology]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; English Abstract; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CA-19-9 Antigen; 0 / Carcinoembryonic Antigen; 0 / Peptides; 0 / Phenylacetates; 0 / alpha-Fetoproteins; 0 / cell differentiation agent II; EC 2.1.1.- / Methyltransferases
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10. Tröbs RB, Hänsel M, Friedrich T, Bennek J: A 23-year experience with malignant renal tumors in infancy and childhood. Eur J Pediatr Surg; 2001 Apr;11(2):92-8
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  • [Title] A 23-year experience with malignant renal tumors in infancy and childhood.
  • A retrospective analysis of 77 children treated between 1974 and 1996 was undertaken to evaluate morbidity and the evolution of therapy.
  • A Wilms' tumor (WT) was present in 73 children.
  • High-risk WT were diagnosed in 12 of 63 patients (19%) (NB with anaplasia 10, clear cell sarcoma 1, malignant rhabdoid tumor 1).
  • We observed 3 children of school age with renal carcinoma and one patient with an intrarenal neuroblastoma.
  • Comparing relapse-free survival of stages I, II and III, respectively, there was a reduced survival rate for stage III (p=0.019).
  • According to the SIOP/GPOH protocol in 1989, the regimen was switched from primary surgery to preoperative chemotherapy without biopsy in 1989 (11 pats.).
  • In 3 patients preoperative diagnosis by means of imaging failed.
  • During preoperative chemotherapy a venous occlusive disease of the liver occurred in 2 patients.
  • Preoperative chemotherapy led to an impressive tumor shrinkage in the majority of patients.
  • In our experience, reduction of tumor volume due to preoperative chemotherapy facilitates tumor removal by surgery and may prevent tumor spillage and the deleterious effects of radiation in young children.
  • Surgery without delay is necessary if the diagnosis is unclear or the tumor fails to respond to preoperative chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Wilms Tumor / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / epidemiology. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 11371043.001).
  • [ISSN] 0939-7248
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of pediatric surgery : official journal of Austrian Association of Pediatric Surgery ... [et al] = Zeitschrift für Kinderchirurgie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Pediatr Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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11. Amel L, Leila BF, Lamia K, Olfa G, Abdelfattah Z, Mondher G, Faouzi M, Chakib K, Abdelatif N, Amor G, Slim BA: [Histologic and prognostic study of nephroblastoma in central Tunisia]. Ann Urol (Paris); 2003 Aug;37(4):164-9
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  • [Transliterated title] Etude anatomoclinique et pronostique des néphroblastomes dans le centre tunisien.
  • Nephroblastoma is a common malignant tumour in childhood that benefited from therapeutic progress.
  • We report and compare clinical features, therapeutic results and prognostic factors with those reported in the literature.
  • Pre-operative chemotherapy was done in 32 cases and the objective response rate was 58%.
  • Using the classification of the international society of pediatric oncology, 11.4% of tumours were stage I, 48.6% stage II, 5.7% stage III, 11.4% stage IV and 2.9% stage V.
  • Prognosis of nephroblastoma has been improved with chemotherapy and the pluridisciplinar treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Nephrectomy. Wilms Tumor / drug therapy. Wilms Tumor / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Age of Onset. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Tunisia

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  • (PMID = 12951705.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-4401
  • [Journal-full-title] Annales d'urologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Urol (Paris)
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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12. Camassei FD, Arancia G, Cianfriglia M, Bosman C, Francalanci P, Ravà L, Jenkner A, Donfrancesco A, Boldrini R: Nephroblastoma: multidrug-resistance P-glycoprotein expression in tumor cells and intratumoral capillary endothelial cells. Am J Clin Pathol; 2002 Mar;117(3):484-90
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  • [Title] Nephroblastoma: multidrug-resistance P-glycoprotein expression in tumor cells and intratumoral capillary endothelial cells.
  • The development of chemoresistance in a variety of cancers seems related to overexpression of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) drug pump.
  • Nephroblastoma, the most common malignant renal tumor of childhood, usually is responsive to treatment, and prognosis is favorable in most cases.
  • However, the disease in a subset of patients is refractory to treatment, and the disease follows an aggressive course.
  • To study P-gp expression in this tumor and its correlation with outcome, tumor samples from 93 patients were examined by immunohistochemical analysis.
  • P-gp expression was determined separately in both tumor cells and intratumoral capillary endothelium.
  • The likelihood ratio test, the Kaplan-Meier method, and the log-rank test were used to evaluate its association with clinical course, grade, stage, and administration of preoperative chemotherapy.
  • While no association of P-gp expression in tumor cells with clinical course, stage, and grade could be demonstrated, positivity in endothelial cells correlated significantly with unfavorable outcome, suggesting that chemoresistance depended on an active blood-tumor barrier.
  • Previous chemotherapy induced P-gp overexpression in tumor cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Neoplasms / chemistry. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. P-Glycoprotein / analysis. Wilms Tumor / chemistry. Wilms Tumor / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Capillaries. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Dactinomycin / therapeutic use. Endothelium, Vascular / chemistry. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Infant. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Postoperative Care. Preoperative Care. Radiotherapy. Remission Induction. Retrospective Studies. Vincristine / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 11888090.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-9173
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of clinical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Clin. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / P-Glycoprotein; 1CC1JFE158 / Dactinomycin; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; SIOP protocol
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13. Cozzi DA, Schiavetti A, Morini F, Castello MA, Cozzi F: Nephron-sparing surgery for unilateral primary renal tumor in children. J Pediatr Surg; 2001 Feb;36(2):362-5
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  • [Title] Nephron-sparing surgery for unilateral primary renal tumor in children.
  • PURPOSE: Definition of the role of nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) in the treatment of children with primary unilateral renal tumor (URT).
  • Criteria for selection of patients eligible for NSS were at least 50% of affected kidney preservable and stage I at surgery (frozen section biopsies from regional lymph nodes, perirenal fat, and surrounding renal parenchyma).
  • Preoperative 2-drug chemotherapy was given to all patients more than 6 months of age.
  • Between 1992 and 1995, 3-drug chemotherapy was used after NSS.
  • Thereafter, following NSS, 2-drug chemotherapy was given if no microscopic residual disease was found on final histologic examination.
  • Seven children had standard histology nephroblastoma, 1 highly differentiated epithelial type nephroblastoma, 1 oncocytoma, and 1 cystic nephroma.
  • All children are alive and disease free with good functioning of the affected kidney after NSS, at a mean follow-up of 40.7 months (range, 2 to 100 months).
  • CONCLUSION: NSS should be considered in selected children with URT, especially in patients with increased risk for metachronous tumor or renal disease, and in patients with benign or low-grade malignant URT.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Nephrectomy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Child, Preschool. Eligibility Determination. Female. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Life Expectancy. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Postoperative Complications. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 11172435.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3468
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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14. Srivastava K, Singh S, Srivastava M, Srivastava AN: Incisional skin metastasis of a squamous cell cervical carcinoma 3.5 years after radical treatment--a case report. Int J Gynecol Cancer; 2005 Nov-Dec;15(6):1183-6
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  • [Title] Incisional skin metastasis of a squamous cell cervical carcinoma 3.5 years after radical treatment--a case report.
  • Metastatic carcinoma in an abdominal wall incision from internal malignant neoplasm is an uncommon and often a preterminal event.
  • Most commonly metastatic skin incisional cancers have been reported with cancers of colon, kidney, and bladder.
  • We report a postoperative case of squamous cell carcinoma cervix FIGO stage IIA in a patient who after 3.5 years of completion of radical treatment (postoperative external and intravaginal radiation therapy) developed incisional skin metastasis followed by extensive subcutaneous metastasis in the vulval region.
  • She received salvage chemotherapy; however, she did not show any response and finally succumbed to the disease.
  • The intent of treatment remains palliation either by radiation/chemotherapy/surgery alone or in combinations.
  • As far as we know, this is the first case of squamous cell carcinoma cervix stage IIA having incisional scar recurrence 3.5 years after postoperative radiotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / secondary. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Fatal Outcome. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Gynecologic Surgical Procedures. Humans. Radiotherapy


15. Stage AC, Pollock RE, Matin SF: Bilateral metastatic renal synovial sarcoma. Urology; 2005 Feb;65(2):389
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  • [Title] Bilateral metastatic renal synovial sarcoma.
  • Synovial sarcoma is a malignant soft-tissue neoplasm, usually arising in close association with the joints and generally carrying a poor prognosis.
  • We describe the first report of bilateral renal metastases from synovial sarcoma in a long-term survivor.
  • Treatment consisted of systemic therapy with bilateral partial nephrectomies.
  • [MeSH-major] Forearm. Kidney Neoplasms / secondary. Sarcoma, Synovial / secondary. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Amputation. Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Ifosfamide / therapeutic use. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / surgery. Middle Aged. Nephrectomy / methods

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  • (PMID = 15708068.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide
  • [Number-of-references] 3
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16. Basta-Jovanović G, Radonjic V, Stolic I, Nenadovic M, Brasanac D, Jovanovic D, Radojevic-Skodric S: Significance of proto-oncogene Bcl-X(S/L) expression in Wilms tumor. Ren Fail; 2005;27(1):13-8
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  • [Title] Significance of proto-oncogene Bcl-X(S/L) expression in Wilms tumor.
  • The rate of apoptosis varies in malignant tumors, and it can be involved in diminishing tumor size.
  • In human renal diseases, such as the experimental model of acute renal failure, and many tumors, including Wilms' tumor, the expression of antiapoptotic members of Bcl-2 family is increased, while the expression of proapoptotic members is low.
  • AIM: The aim of our study was to investigate Bcl-X(S/L) protein expression in Wilms' tumor, to compare it with the expression in normal renal tissue, as well as to see if there is a correlation between Bcl-X(S/L) expression in Wilms' tumor with tumor stage, histological type, prognostic group, or response to preoperative chemotherapy.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-eight cases of Wilms' tumor (two cases with metastasis) and two samples of normal kidney tissue were studied using streptavidin-biotin-complex technique.
  • RESULTS: The expression of Bcl-X(S/L) was observed in the majority of cases (60.7%), more often in the blastemal than in the epithelial component of Wilms' tumor: 60.7% and 28.6%, respectively (p=0.02).
  • There was a statistically significant inverse relationship between Bcl-X(S/L) expression and tumor stage (p=0.015).
  • Expression of Bcl-X(S/L) was detected in various histological types of Wilms' tumor, but there was no statistically significant association (p=0.82) except in cases with diffuse anaplasia (p=0.012), which were always negative.
  • No Bcl-X(S/L) immunostaining was observed in two cases of metastasis or in one case of bilateral Wilms' tumor.
  • CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the expression of Bcl-X(S/L) protein is associated with prognostic group, tumor stage, and presence of anaplasia.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney / pathology. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 / biosynthesis. Wilms Tumor / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Anaplasia. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Apoptosis. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. bcl-X Protein

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  • (PMID = 15717629.001).
  • [ISSN] 0886-022X
  • [Journal-full-title] Renal failure
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ren Fail
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / BCL2L1 protein, human; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2; 0 / bcl-X Protein
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17. Eilber FC, Eilber KS, Eilber FR: Retroperitoneal sarcomas. Curr Treat Options Oncol; 2000 Aug;1(3):274-8
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  • Imaging of the abdomen and pelvis by computed tomography (CT) provides both an imaging modality and a method by which to obtain tissue for diagnosis.
  • Because a histologic diagnosis is essential in treatment planning, adequate tissue can usually be obtained by a CT-guided core biopsy.
  • If the diagnosis is sarcoma, additional tests necessary for staging include plain chest radiography and evaluation of the liver by either CT scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
  • The treatment options for primary retroperitoneal sarcomas include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery, or a combination of these modalities; therefore, a multidisciplinary group best manages treatment planning.
  • Primary radiation therapy for cure is seldom effective for retroperitoneal sarcomas but can provide palliation in select cases.
  • Systemic chemotherapy for chemosensitive lesions, such as poorly differentiated liposarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH), synovial cell sarcoma, and primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET), can be useful when used in a neoadjuvant manner.
  • Consequently, surgical resection continues to be the mainstay of treatment for retroperitoneal sarcomas and requires en bloc resection of the primary tumor.
  • Frequently this includes adjacent organs such as colon, small bowel, kidney, adrenal, and pancreas.
  • Postoperative adjuvant therapy with chemotherapy or radiation has not been proven to be of any additional benefit.
  • Overall treatment results are predominantly influenced by tumor stage, grade, size, and margins of surgical resection.
  • [MeSH-major] Retroperitoneal Neoplasms / therapy. Sarcoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Biopsy / methods. Clinical Trials as Topic. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Radiotherapy. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 12057171.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-2729
  • [Journal-full-title] Current treatment options in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Treat Options Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 21
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18. García-Campelo R, Quindós M, Vázquez DD, López MR, Carral A, Calvo OF, Soto JM, Grande E, Durana J, Antón-Aparicio LM: Renal cell carcinoma: complete pathological response in a patient with gastric metastasis of renal cell carcinoma. Anticancer Drugs; 2010 Jan;21 Suppl 1:S13-5
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  • [Title] Renal cell carcinoma: complete pathological response in a patient with gastric metastasis of renal cell carcinoma.
  • A 75-year-old-man, with a 2-month history of abdominal pain, underwent a standard diagnostic workup that included a CT scan that showed a large right renal mass and subcentimeter nodes in the right and left lung lobes.
  • In December 2003, the patient underwent right nephrectomy with adrenalectomy and a diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma (pT3N0M0 stage) was made.
  • No further treatment was proposed and patient was followed up regularly.
  • In October 2006, the annual gastrointestinal endoscopy showed asymptomatic multilobulated and polypoid masses in the gastric fundus and gastric body that corresponded to metastasis of the renal carcinoma that had been resected three years ago.
  • Surgical treatment was refused and oral treatment with sunitinib (50 mg/day consecutively for 4 weeks followed by 2 weeks off) was initiated.
  • Patient completed one cycle and development of acute toxicity (grade 3 asthenia, anorexia and mucositis) led to treatment interruption.
  • After recovering from acute toxicity, the patient was proposed to reinitiate treatment with dose reduction, but he refused any medical treatment.
  • At the follow-up visit, three months later, the gastrointestinal endoscopy showed four unspecific 2 mm nodules without malignant evidence.
  • PET scan six months after treatment confirmed complete gastric response.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / secondary. Indoles / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Pyrroles / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenalectomy. Aged. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Metastasis. Nephrectomy. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20110781.001).
  • [ISSN] 1473-5741
  • [Journal-full-title] Anti-cancer drugs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Indoles; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Pyrroles; 0 / sunitinib
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19. Parmeggiani F, Costagliola C, D'Angelo S, Incorvaia C, Perri P, Sebastiani A: Clear cell renal cell carcinoma associated with bilateral atypical acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy. Oncology; 2004;66(6):502-9
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  • [Title] Clear cell renal cell carcinoma associated with bilateral atypical acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy.
  • BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) is a malignant neoplasm frequently associated with an increase in circulating immune complexes (CIC).
  • Histopathologic review of his surgically removed organs (kidney and lung), periodical laboratory immunologic tests and ophthalmologic examinations, including fluorescein and indocyanine green angiographies, were performed.
  • RESULTS: The patient underwent total left nephrectomy (May 1997) and total left pneumonectomy (March 2001) for the presence of stage III CCRCC and CCRCC lung metastasis, respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Long-standing tumorous disease, through a pathogenic mechanism triggered by CIC spreading, can be responsible, over time, for a progressive choroidal occlusive microangiopathy (atypical APMPPE pattern), associated with a high risk of poor visual outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Choroidal Neovascularization / etiology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Pigment Epithelium of Eye / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Humans. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / surgery. Male. Middle Aged. Nephrectomy. Pneumonectomy. Vision Disorders / etiology


20. Albert A, Cruz O, Montaner A, Vela A, Badosa J, Castañón M, Morales L: [Congenital solid tumors. A thirteen-year review]. Cir Pediatr; 2004 Jul;17(3):133-6
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  • This is an interesting group of tumors because their type, relative incidence, natural history and response to treatment differ from those seen in older children.
  • Neuroblastoma was the commonest tumor (10 cases, 37%), of which 4 were stage I, 4 stage IV-S and 2 stage III.
  • There were 8 teratomas (3 sacrocoxigeal, 1 retroperitoneal, 1 in the CNS, 1 orbitary and two oronasal), two hepatic tumors (1 hepatoblastoma, 1 hemangioendothelioma, two CNS tumors, two giant nevus (one on a hamartoma), and one each Wilms tumor, infantile fibrosarcoma and myofibroblastic tumor.
  • Treatment was surgical resection alone in 17 cases (68%) and surgery + chemotherapy in 8 (32%) (5 neuroblastomas, one CNS tumor, one Wilms tumor and one presacral teratoma who developed a yolk sac tumor); 3 patients died (11%): one at surgery, one of tumoural airway obstruction at birth and one with craniopharyngioma.
  • Among the 14 tumors that were initially not malignant, two can be locally agressive, one was an immature teratoma, the giant nevus with hamartoma developed in situ melanoma, the other nevus had meningeal melanosis with hydrocephalus, and one mature presacral teratoma developed a yolk sac tumor.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Diagnosis of congenital tumors is performed earlier in recent years due to the wide use of prenatal ultrasound.
  • Complete surgical excision is the treatment of choice, most cases not need adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • We ought to pass this message on to our colleagues in prenatal diagnosis, so parents get reliable information.
  • [MeSH-major] Central Nervous System Neoplasms / congenital. Kidney Neoplasms / congenital. Liver Neoplasms / congenital. Neuroblastoma / congenital. Skin Neoplasms / congenital. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / congenital. Teratoma / congenital. Wilms Tumor / congenital
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Infant, Newborn. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Postoperative Complications. Pregnancy. Prenatal Diagnosis. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 15503950.001).
  • [ISSN] 0214-1221
  • [Journal-full-title] Cirugía pediátrica : organo oficial de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Pediátrica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cir Pediatr
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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21. Mizutani Y, Wada H, Yoshida O, Fukushima M, Nakanishi H, Nakao M, Miki T: Significance of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase activity in renal cell carcinoma. Eur J Cancer; 2003 Mar;39(4):541-7
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  • [Title] Significance of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase activity in renal cell carcinoma.
  • DPD is also the principal enzyme involved in the degradation of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), an anticancer chemotherapeutic agent that is used clinically to treat renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • The levels of DPD activity in RCC and normal kidney samples were determined by the 5-FU degradation assay.
  • The activity of DPD was approximately 2-fold higher in normal kidney compared with RCC.
  • DPD activity in Stage I/II RCC was approximately 2-fold higher than that in Stage III/IV RCC.
  • These results suggest that a low DPD activity may be associated with the malignant potential of RCC.
  • In addition, it may be possible to overcome 5-FU resistance by using DPD inhibitors in the treatment protocols of 5-FU-based chemotherapy for RCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / enzymology. Fluorouracil / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms / enzymology. Oxidoreductases / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Dihydrouracil Dehydrogenase (NADP). Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 12751387.001).
  • [ISSN] 0959-8049
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; EC 1.- / Oxidoreductases; EC 1.3.1.2 / Dihydrouracil Dehydrogenase (NADP); U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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22. van den Hoek J, de Krijger R, van de Ven K, Lequin M, van den Heuvel-Eibrink MM: Cystic nephroma, cystic partially differentiated nephroblastoma and cystic Wilms' tumor in children: a spectrum with therapeutic dilemmas. Urol Int; 2009;82(1):65-70
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  • [Title] Cystic nephroma, cystic partially differentiated nephroblastoma and cystic Wilms' tumor in children: a spectrum with therapeutic dilemmas.
  • BACKGROUND: Cystic renal tumors are a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.
  • Cystic nephroma (CN), cystic partially differentiated nephroblastoma (CPDN) and cystic Wilms' tumor (CWT) are a spectrum with CN at the benign end, CWT at the malignant end and CPDN in the intermediate position.
  • CN and stage 1 CPDN are often treated with surgery alone.
  • International Society of Pediatric Oncology (SIOP) protocols for Wilms' tumor (WT) advocate preoperative chemotherapy, which may be unnecessary and potentially harmful in CN and in stage 1 CPDN.
  • There are difficulties in differentiating the three types using imaging techniques.
  • Therefore, controversies exist regarding the optimal treatment.
  • METHODS: We describe 6 children, who each had a postoperative diagnosis of CN, CPDN or CWT, and we retrospectively evaluate the treatment strategies.
  • RESULTS: The three types cannot be differentiated using imaging techniques, although the presence of solid components in the tumor is indicative of WT.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Surgery as first-line therapy should be seriously considered in children who have a cystic renal tumor, but further collaborative studies are needed since the distinction line between CPDN and CWT is not always clear.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Diseases, Cystic / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Nephrectomy. Wilms Tumor / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols. Biopsy. Cell Differentiation. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child, Preschool. Diagnosis, Differential. Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Infant. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome. Ultrasonography

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 19172100.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-0399
  • [Journal-full-title] Urologia internationalis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urol. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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