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1. Bai J, Sui J, Demirjian A, Vollmer CM Jr, Marasco W, Callery MP: Predominant Bcl-XL knockdown disables antiapoptotic mechanisms: tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-based triple chemotherapy overcomes chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Cancer Res; 2005 Mar 15;65(6):2344-52
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Predominant Bcl-XL knockdown disables antiapoptotic mechanisms: tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-based triple chemotherapy overcomes chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro.
  • Pancreatic cancer is lethal because of its invasiveness, rapid progression, and profound resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy.
  • To identify the molecular mechanisms underlying this, we have examined the expression and potency of three major death receptors: tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF-R), TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor (TRAIL-R), and Fas in mediating cytotoxicity in four invasive pancreatic cancer cell lines.
  • We have analyzed the expression of major antiapoptotic factors, cell cycle regulators and death receptor decoys (DcR) in comparison with normal pancreas tissues and five other human malignant tumor cell lines.
  • We have found that different pancreatic cancer cell lines coexpress high-level TRAIL-R, Fas, and TNF-R1 but are strongly resistant to apoptosis triggered by the death receptors.
  • DcR2 and DcR3 overexpression may partly contribute to the resistance of pancreatic cancer cells to TRAIL-R- and Fas-mediated cytotoxicity.
  • Bcl-XL and Bcl-2 are predominantly overexpressed in pancreatic cancer cell lines, respectively.
  • Bcl-XL is also predominantly overexpressed in prostate, colorectal, and intestinal cancer cells.
  • The knockdown of the predominant Bcl-XL overexpression significantly reduces the viability of pancreatic cancer cells to TNFalpha- and TRAIL-mediated apoptosis by sublethal-dose single and combined antitumor drugs, including geldanamycin, PS-341, Trichostatin A, and doxorubicine.
  • Bcl-XL plays a vital role in pancreatic cancer chemoresistance.
  • Geldanamycin, PS-341, and TRAIL triple combination may be a novel therapeutic strategy for pancreatic cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / pharmacology. Apoptosis / physiology. Pancreatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pancreatic Neoplasms / pathology. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 / deficiency. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins. Benzoquinones. Boronic Acids / administration & dosage. Boronic Acids / pharmacology. Bortezomib. Cell Line, Tumor. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / pharmacology. Drug Synergism. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Gene Silencing. HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins / metabolism. Humans. Hydroxamic Acids / administration & dosage. Hydroxamic Acids / pharmacology. Lactams, Macrocyclic. Membrane Glycoproteins. Pyrazines / administration & dosage. Pyrazines / pharmacology. Quinones / administration & dosage. Quinones / pharmacology. TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand. bcl-X Protein

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  • (PMID = 15781649.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins; 0 / BCL2L1 protein, human; 0 / Benzoquinones; 0 / Boronic Acids; 0 / HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins; 0 / Hydroxamic Acids; 0 / Lactams, Macrocyclic; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2; 0 / Pyrazines; 0 / Quinones; 0 / TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand; 0 / TNFSF10 protein, human; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; 0 / bcl-X Protein; 3X2S926L3Z / trichostatin A; 69G8BD63PP / Bortezomib; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; Z3K3VJ16KU / geldanamycin
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2. Samuels SE, Knowles AL, Tilignac T, Debiton E, Madelmont JC, Attaix D: Protein metabolism in the small intestine during cancer cachexia and chemotherapy in mice. Cancer Res; 2000 Sep 1;60(17):4968-74
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  • [Title] Protein metabolism in the small intestine during cancer cachexia and chemotherapy in mice.
  • The impact of cancer cachexia and chemotherapy on small intestinal protein metabolism and its subsequent recovery was investigated.
  • Cancer cachexia was induced in mice with colon 26 adenocarcinoma, which is a small and slow-growing tumor characteristic of the human condition, and can be cured with 100% efficacy using an experimental nitrosourea, cystemustine (C6H12ClN3O4S).
  • Both healthy mice and tumor-bearing mice were given a single i.p. injection of cystemustine (20 mg/kg) 3 days after the onset of cachexia.
  • Cancer cachexia led to a reduced in vivo rate of protein synthesis in the small intestine relative to healthy mice (-13 to -34%; P < 0.05), resulting in a 25% loss of protein mass (P < 0.05), and decreased villus width and crypt depth (P < 0.05).
  • In treated mice, acute cytotoxicity of chemotherapy did not promote further wasting of small intestinal protein mass, nor did it result in further damage to intestinal morphology.
  • In contrast, mucosal damage and a 17% reduction in small intestinal protein mass (P < 0.05) were evident in healthy mice treated with cystemustine, suggesting that the effects of chemotherapy on the small intestine in a state of cancer cachexia are not additive, which was an unexpected finding.
  • Complete and rapid recovery of small intestinal protein mass in cured mice resulted from an increase in the rate of protein synthesis compared with healthy mice (23-34%; P < 0.05).
  • Northern hybridizations of mRNA encoding components of the major proteolytic systems suggested that proteolysis may not have mediated intestinal wasting or recovery.
  • A major clinical goal should be to design methods to improve small intestinal protein metabolism before the initiation of chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / complications. Antineoplastic Agents / toxicity. Cachexia / metabolism. Colonic Neoplasms / complications. Intestine, Small / metabolism. Nitrosourea Compounds / toxicity. Proteins / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Atrophy. Blotting, Northern. Cathepsin B / biosynthesis. Cathepsin B / genetics. Cathepsin B / metabolism. Eating. Gene Expression. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Neoplasm Transplantation. Protein Biosynthesis. Ubiquitins / biosynthesis. Ubiquitins / genetics. Ubiquitins / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 10987314.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Nitrosourea Compounds; 0 / Proteins; 0 / Ubiquitins; 79955-36-5 / N'-(2-chloroethyl)-N-(2-(methylsulfonyl)ethyl)-N'-nitrosourea; EC 3.4.22.1 / Cathepsin B
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3. Liu ZF, Jiao SC, Yang JL, Dai GH: [Clinical research of 120 cases of primary small intestine malignant tumor]. Nan Fang Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao; 2010 Mar;30(3):602-4, 607

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Clinical research of 120 cases of primary small intestine malignant tumor].
  • OBJECTIVE: To study the clinical and pathological features, diagnosis, therapy and prognosis of primary small intestine malignant tumor.
  • METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data from the 120 cases of primary small intestine malignant tumor.
  • Most tumors originated in the duodenum (54.1%), and adenocarcinoma (55.8%) was the main pathological type.
  • The median survival time of the patients was 19.2 months and the 1-year survival rate was 55.4%.
  • Chemotherapy did not seem to significantly improve the 1-year survival rate of the patients (P=0.842).
  • CONCLUSION: Primary small intestine malignant tumors lack specific clinical manifestations and surgical resection should be performed as early as possible.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma. Intestinal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Intestinal Neoplasms / surgery. Intestine, Small / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 20335150.001).
  • [ISSN] 1673-4254
  • [Journal-full-title] Nan fang yi ke da xue xue bao = Journal of Southern Medical University
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nan Fang Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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4. Kucherlapati MH, Lee K, Nguyen AA, Clark AB, Hou H Jr, Rosulek A, Li H, Yang K, Fan K, Lipkin M, Bronson RT, Jelicks L, Kunkel TA, Kucherlapati R, Edelmann W: An Msh2 conditional knockout mouse for studying intestinal cancer and testing anticancer agents. Gastroenterology; 2010 Mar;138(3):993-1002.e1
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  • [Title] An Msh2 conditional knockout mouse for studying intestinal cancer and testing anticancer agents.
  • BACKGROUND & AIMS: Mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene MSH2 cause Lynch syndromes I and II and sporadic colorectal cancers.
  • Msh2(null) mice predominantly develop lymphoma and do not accurately recapitulate the colorectal cancer phenotype.
  • METHODS: We generated and examined mice with a conditional Msh2 disruption (Msh2(LoxP)), permitting tissue-specific gene inactivation.
  • These mice were given cisplatin or 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX), and their tumors were measured by magnetic resonance imaging.
  • Reverse transcription, polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry from VCMsh2(LoxP/LoxP) mice demonstrated specific loss of Msh2 messenger RNA and protein from epithelial cells of the intestinal tract.
  • Microsatellite instability was observed in all VCMsh2 strains and limited to the intestinal mucosa.
  • Comparison of allelic phase tumors revealed significant differences in multiplicity and size.
  • When treated with cisplatin or FOLFOX, tumor size was reduced in VCMsh2(LoxP/G674D) but not VCMsh2(LoxP/null) tumors.
  • The apoptotic response to FOLFOX was partially sustained in the intestinal mucosa of VCMsh2(LoxP/G674D) animals.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Msh2(LoxP/LoxP) mice in combination with appropriate Cre recombinase transgenes have excellent potential for preclinical modeling of Lynch syndrome, MMR-deficient tumors of other tissue types, and use in drug development.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 19931261.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-0012
  • [Journal-full-title] Gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gastroenterology
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / ES11040; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA084301; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA13330; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA084301-11; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA093484; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA013330-37S49022; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / Z01 ES065089; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA076329; United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / Z01 ES065089-12; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA076329-12; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA084301; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA013330-37S49022; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA093484-08; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA084301-11; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / U01 ES011040-06; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / U01 ES011040; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA93484; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA013330; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA093484-08; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA76329; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA076329-12; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / ES011040-06
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Microfilament Proteins; 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 0 / villin; EC 2.7.7.- / Cre recombinase; EC 2.7.7.- / Integrases; EC 3.6.1.3 / Msh2 protein, mouse; EC 3.6.1.3 / MutS Homolog 2 Protein; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; Q573I9DVLP / Leucovorin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS159931; NLM/ PMC2862591
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5. Higashi D, Ishibashi Y, Tamura T, Nii K, Egawa Y, Koga M, Tomiyasu T, Harimura T, Tanaka R, Futatsuki R, Noda S, Futami K, Maekawa T, Takaki Y, Hirai F, Matsui T: Clinical features of and chemotherapy for cancer of the small intestine. Anticancer Res; 2010 Aug;30(8):3193-7
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  • [Title] Clinical features of and chemotherapy for cancer of the small intestine.
  • BACKGROUND: Cancer of the small intestine is a rare disease, and its clinical features have not been clearly elucidated.
  • Techniques such as double balloon endoscopy and capsule endoscopy allow the preoperative diagnosis of cancer of the small intestine, but this cancer is often detected at an advanced state and in many cases postoperative chemotherapy is required.
  • This study evaluated the pre- and postoperative clinical course of cancer of the small intestine and the effectiveness of chemotherapy.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients who underwent surgery for cancer of the small intestine in this Department from July 1985 to December 2008 were included in this study.
  • Duodenal cancer has vastly different origins, methods of diagnosis, and surgical procedures, so this form of cancer was excluded.
  • There were 8 cases of jejunal or ileal cancer treated during the study period.
  • The pre- and postoperative course of these cases was reviewed, as well as the effectiveness of chemotherapy in cases of recurrence.
  • Six patients underwent a partial resection of the small intestine, and a right hemicolectomy, and a bypass were performed in one case each.
  • The tumor type according to Borrmann's classification indicated that 5 tumors were type 2, 2 were type 3, and 1 was type 5; the mean tumor size was 6.3±5.3 (2.5-18.0) cm.
  • TNM staging indicated that 3 tumors were stage II, 1 was stage III, and 4 were stage IV.
  • Six patients underwent postoperative chemotherapy.
  • One patient underwent adjuvant chemotherapy of, and 5 patients with recurring or advanced cancer underwent therapeutic chemotherapy of.
  • The course of chemotherapy for the 5 patients with recurrent or advanced cancer resulted in 4 patients with progressive disease (PD) and 1 with stable disease (SD).
  • CONCLUSION: The basic treatment for cancer of the small intestine is surgical resection.
  • Palliative surgery and chemotherapy are considered in cases where resection is not possible or the cancer recurs.
  • Nevertheless, there is no established regimen for such chemotherapy.
  • Cancer of the small intestine is currently being treated with chemotherapy based on the treatment strategies for colon cancer, but there are few reports of its success.
  • Chemotherapy was unsuccessful in treating any of the patients with recurring or advanced cancer reviewed in this report.
  • The diagnosis must therefore be improved and postoperative chemotherapy will be needed to treat cancer of the small intestine given its increasing incidence, and therefore physicians are working as quickly as possible to establish an optimal treatment regimen.
  • [MeSH-major] Intestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Intestine, Small / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 20871040.001).
  • [ISSN] 1791-7530
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
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6. Eberhardt B, Dilger S, Musial F, Wedding U, Weiss T, Miltner WH: Medium-term effects of chemotherapy in older cancer patients. Support Care Cancer; 2006 Mar;14(3):216-22
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Medium-term effects of chemotherapy in older cancer patients.
  • PURPOSE: To address the lack of research in older cancer patients, the present study prospectively evaluated their cognitive functions across the first six months following diagnosis and chemotherapy.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 77 younger (n=43, age < 60) and older (n=34, age > or = 60) cancer patients with hematological disease or cancer of the intestinal tract took part in the study.
  • Medium-term effects of chemotherapy were examined in these cancer patients by means of a battery of cognitive tests during baseline and six months after start of treatment.
  • RESULTS: In contrast to baseline verbal learning, word fluency and memory capacity improved in all patients six months after start of treatment.
  • Additionally, depression was neither associated with medium-term effects of chemotherapy nor was it related to age.
  • CONCLUSION: The results suggest that chemotherapy has no negative effects on cognitive functions after the first six months following the onset of treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Hematologic Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cognition / drug effects. Female. Germany. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 16270191.001).
  • [ISSN] 0941-4355
  • [Journal-full-title] Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Support Care Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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7. Bucior J, Ziółko E, Tomczyk A, Sosada K, Knopik J, Kempiński M: [Effect of palliative chemotherapy with topoisomerase inhibitor on the quality of life and survival of patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma]. Pol Merkur Lekarski; 2004 Nov;17(101):457-62
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  • [Title] [Effect of palliative chemotherapy with topoisomerase inhibitor on the quality of life and survival of patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma].
  • The study compared functioning of bone marrow, liver and kidneys during and after the treatment, as well as survival period and quality of life of patients treated with topotecan and patients who underwent symptomatic treatment.
  • 35 patients aged 43-71 of both sexes, with advanced stage of large intestine cancer (IV grade in TNM scale) were included in the study.
  • 20 hospitalized patients were administered topotecan, topoisomerase I inhibitor, intravenously in 5-day courses (1.5 mg/m2 of body surface daily) repeated 5 times with 21-day intervals.
  • Before the beginning of therapy and after it the following were conducted: medical check-ups as well as surveys and test research including groups of somatic and vegetative symptoms connected with the disease (based on the questionnaire QLQ-C30).
  • 15 patients with the similar stage of the disease who had not agreed to palliative treatment with chemotherapy were treated only symptomatically.
  • Applying antineoplastic treatment with topotecan contributes to the extension of the survival time by 4 months on average, and mortality during and after the treatment is lower than in the group of patients with the symptomatic treatment only.
  • Antineoplastic treatment improves the quality of life and delays the disease progression.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Colorectal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Palliative Care. Quality of Life. Topoisomerase I Inhibitors. Topotecan / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15754631.001).
  • [ISSN] 1426-9686
  • [Journal-full-title] Polski merkuriusz lekarski : organ Polskiego Towarzystwa Lekarskiego
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pol. Merkur. Lekarski
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Topoisomerase I Inhibitors; 7M7YKX2N15 / Topotecan
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8. Prelevic GM, Kocjan T, Markou A: Hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women. Minerva Endocrinol; 2005 Mar;30(1):27-36

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women.
  • From the endocrine point of view, menopause is considered a deficiency state and menopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) regarded as restoring the premenopausal endocrine milieu.
  • This review discusses the effects of HRT on menopausal symptoms, cognitive function, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and also breast and bowel cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Estrogen Replacement Therapy / methods. Estrogens / therapeutic use. Postmenopause
  • [MeSH-minor] Alzheimer Disease / prevention & control. Breast Neoplasms / chemically induced. Colorectal Neoplasms / prevention & control. Female. Heart Diseases / chemically induced. Hot Flashes / drug therapy. Humans. Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal / prevention & control

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  • (PMID = 15877011.001).
  • [ISSN] 0391-1977
  • [Journal-full-title] Minerva endocrinologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Minerva Endocrinol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Estrogens
  • [Number-of-references] 84
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9. Sabharwal A, Kerr D: Chemotherapy for colorectal cancer in the metastatic and adjuvant setting: past, present and future. Expert Rev Anticancer Ther; 2007 Apr;7(4):477-87
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  • [Title] Chemotherapy for colorectal cancer in the metastatic and adjuvant setting: past, present and future.
  • There have been significant advances in the use of chemotherapy in the treatment of colorectal cancer patients over the last 20 years.
  • Initial improvements in treatment were made with increased understanding of the pharmacology of 5-fluorouracil and the discovery of modulators of its activity (e.g., leucovorin).
  • However, in the last few years the discovery of new cytotoxic drugs with efficacy in large bowel cancer (e.g., oxaliplatin and irinotecan) and monoclonal antibodies (e.g., bevacizumab and cetuximab) have significantly improved patient outcome and prognosis.
  • Systemic chemotherapy in the metastatic setting has been shown to prolong survival and improve quality of life.
  • Chemotherapy now also has a clear role as an adjunct to surgery to improve survival in stage III and certain 'high-risk' stage II colorectal cancer patients.
  • The evolution of chemotherapy use, current practice in the metastatic and adjuvant setting and possible future directions are discussed.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Colorectal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Colorectal Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / trends. Forecasting. Humans. Neoplasm Staging / trends


10. Wiseman A: Crohn's disease leading to bowel cancer may be avoided by consumption of soya isoflavones: adjunct-chemotherapy with oxaliplatin. Med Hypotheses; 2006;66(5):934-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Crohn's disease leading to bowel cancer may be avoided by consumption of soya isoflavones: adjunct-chemotherapy with oxaliplatin.
  • Crohn's disease (inflammatory bowel syndrome) is caused by gut exposure to harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from oxygen, such as the superoxide anion ((.
  • Crohn's disease predisposes to bowel cancer in susceptible human sub-populations.
  • Oxaliplatin is a platinum-containing Pt(II) organometallic therapeutic agent that binds to tumour DNA.
  • Oxaliplatin may provide, therefore, a form of chemotherapy for some bowel cancers especially when administered in adjunct-chemotherapies that employ inhibitors of proliferation of the tumour cell.
  • Such inhibitors include 5-fluorouracil, which prevents the correct replication of tumour cell DNA that is an essential prerequisite for bowel tumour growth.
  • Furthermore, the therapeutic index for adjunct-chemotherapy with toxic inhibitors of DNA replication and expression could potentially be raised significantly by an associated dietary regime.
  • This should include supplementation daily, per or, with antioxidant isoflavones (or other bioflavonoids) in selected cases of unresponsive cancer of the bowel, to possibly seek to trigger the pathway of apoptosis (programmed cell death) in the tumour cells preferentially.
  • [MeSH-major] Crohn Disease / complications. Crohn Disease / drug therapy. Intestinal Neoplasms / etiology. Intestinal Neoplasms / prevention & control. Isoflavones / administration & dosage. Organoplatinum Compounds / administration & dosage. Precancerous Conditions / prevention & control. Soybean Oil / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / methods. Drug Combinations. Humans. Plant Extracts / administration & dosage. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16431034.001).
  • [ISSN] 0306-9877
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical hypotheses
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Hypotheses
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Isoflavones; 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 0 / Plant Extracts; 04ZR38536J / oxaliplatin; 8001-22-7 / Soybean Oil
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11. Sun YM, Fu J, Zhang W, Zheng ZX, Huang CZ, Yuan XH: [Effects of hyperthermic chemotherapy on gastrointestinal cancer cells in vitro]. Ai Zheng; 2006 Aug;25(8):974-8
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  • [Title] [Effects of hyperthermic chemotherapy on gastrointestinal cancer cells in vitro].
  • BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: Little evidence is known from experimental research for intraoperative hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy.
  • This study was to investigate the effect of hyperthermic chemotherapy on gastrointestinal cancer cells in vitro and explore the possible factors which may affect this method.
  • METHODS: Gastric cancer cell line MGC-803 and intestinal cancer cell line HCT-116 were chosen.
  • Cells were treated with different drugs, temperatures and duration.
  • RESULTS: Significant synergistic effect was observed when the two cancer cell lines were treated with 5-FU, MMC, DDP and THP in combination with elevated hyperthermia from 41 degrees C to 45 degrees C compared with control group (P<0.01).
  • The strongest effect was achieved at 45 degrees C, which the inhibitory effects of these four drugs were 61.7%, 79.2%, 88.7%, 94.7% on MGC-803 and 76.4%, 78.7%, 77.8%, 91.7 on HCT-1116, respectively.
  • The inhibitory effect demonstrated a time and dose-dependent manner in HCT-116 cells within a certain period of time.
  • THP had the strongest effect at any conditions among all tested drugs (P<0.01).
  • Either simple thermotherapy or chemohyperthermia displayed considerable killing effects on cancer cells which were confirmed by microscope observation.
  • [MeSH-major] Colonic Neoplasms / pathology. Doxorubicin / analogs & derivatives. Hyperthermia, Induced. Stomach Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / pharmacology. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / pharmacology. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Survival / drug effects. Cisplatin / pharmacology. Combined Modality Therapy. Fluorouracil / pharmacology. Humans. Mitomycin / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 16965677.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Ai zheng = Aizheng = Chinese journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ai Zheng
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 50SG953SK6 / Mitomycin; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; D58G680W0G / pirarubicin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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12. Sawada T, Nishimura M, Hirose K: [Long-term survival in a case of large bowel cancer--efficacy of CPT-11-based chemotherapy]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2005 Jul;32(7):1059-61
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Long-term survival in a case of large bowel cancer--efficacy of CPT-11-based chemotherapy].
  • A 77-year-old woman underwent an ileocecal resection and a partial resection of the small intestine for cecal cancer.
  • However, ileus caused by a recurrence in the small intestine was detected two years and four months postoperatively, so an ileal resection was performed.
  • Furthermore, metastases to the lungs, lymph nodes, and peritoneum were detected, and CPT-11-based chemotherapy was administered.
  • The patient was initially treated by combination therapy with a small dose of CPT-11 and CDDP.
  • The combination drugs were changed to MMC, 5'-DFUR, etc. while the appearance of adverse reactions was monitored.
  • Three years of continuous treatment served to prevent the proliferation of tumors.
  • At present, TS-1 chemotherapy is ongoing.
  • The results suggest that CPT-11-based chemotherapy can be continued by changing the combination of concomitant drugs while monitoring adverse reactions.
  • It thus may be an effective regimen for advanced and recurrent large bowel cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Camptothecin / administration & dosage. Camptothecin / analogs & derivatives. Colorectal Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Floxuridine / administration & dosage. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Lymphatic Metastasis. Mitomycin / administration & dosage. Peritoneal Neoplasms / secondary. Survivors

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  • (PMID = 16044974.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 039LU44I5M / Floxuridine; 50SG953SK6 / Mitomycin; 7673326042 / irinotecan; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; V1JK16Y2JP / doxifluridine; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
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13. Xu ZY, Zhu YW, Zhou WD: [Clinical and experimental study on effect of shuanghuang shengbai granule on myelosuppression induced by chemotherapy and ultrastructure observation of bone marrow in mice]. Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi; 2001 May;21(5):328-31
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  • [Title] [Clinical and experimental study on effect of shuanghuang shengbai granule on myelosuppression induced by chemotherapy and ultrastructure observation of bone marrow in mice].
  • OBJECTIVE: To observe the leukocyte increasing effects of Shaunghuang Shengbai Granule (SHSBG) in tumor patients treated by chemotherapy (CT) and its function on bone marrow hematopoietic microenvironment in mice.
  • METHODS: Patients of non-small-cell lung cancer and breast, gastric or intestinal cancer, who were retreated with CT, were enrolled and divided into 4 groups randomly.
  • CONCLUSION: SHSBG has obvious protecting and treating effect on CT caused bone marrow suppression in tumor patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Drugs, Chinese Herbal / therapeutic use. Leukopenia / prevention & control. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Phytotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Animals. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Cisplatin / adverse effects. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Hematopoietic Stem Cells / ultrastructure. Humans. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Middle Aged. Mitomycins / adverse effects. Vinblastine / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 12577413.001).
  • [ISSN] 1003-5370
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhongguo Zhong xi yi jie he za zhi Zhongguo Zhongxiyi jiehe zazhi = Chinese journal of integrated traditional and Western medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drugs, Chinese Herbal; 0 / Mitomycins; 0 / shuanghuang shengbai; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; MVP protocol 2
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14. Gray B, Van Hazel G, Hope M, Burton M, Moroz P, Anderson J, Gebski V: Randomised trial of SIR-Spheres plus chemotherapy vs. chemotherapy alone for treating patients with liver metastases from primary large bowel cancer. Ann Oncol; 2001 Dec;12(12):1711-20
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Randomised trial of SIR-Spheres plus chemotherapy vs. chemotherapy alone for treating patients with liver metastases from primary large bowel cancer.
  • PURPOSE: SIR-Spheres are radioactive yttrium90 microspheres (SIR-Spheres, Sirtex Medical Limited, Australia) used to selectively target high levels of ionising radiation to tumors within the liver.
  • This trial was designed to measure any increased patient benefit by adding a single administration of SIR-Spheres to a regimen of regional hepatic artery chemotherapy (HAC) administered as a 12 day infusion of floxuridine and repeated at monthly intervals, vs. the same chemotherapy alone.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: A phase III randomised clinical trial entering 74 patients was undertaken on patients with bi-lobar non-resectable liver metastases from primary adenocarcinoma of the large bowel.
  • Patient benefit criteria assessed in the trial were tumor response, time to disease progression in the liver, overall survival, quality of life, and treatment related toxicity.
  • Tumor response was measured by serial changes in both cross-sectional tumor areas and total tumor volumes, provided any response lasted not less than three months as well as changes in serum carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA).
  • RESULTS: The partial and complete response rate (PR + CR) was significantly greater for patients receiving SIR-Spheres when measured by tumor areas (44%) vs. 17.6%, P = 0.01) tumor volumes (50% vs. 24%, P = 0.03) and CEA (72% vs. 47%, P = 0.004).
  • The median time to disease progression in the liver was significantly longer for patients receiving SIR-Spheres in comparison to patients receiving HAC alone when measured by either tumor areas (9.7 vs. 15.9 months, P = 0.001), tumor volumes (7.6 vs. 12.0 months, P = 0.04) or CEA (5.7 vs. 6.7 months, P = 0.06).
  • There was no increase in grade 3-4 treatment related toxicity and no loss of quality of life for patients receiving SIR-Spheres in comparison to patients receiving HAC alone.
  • CONCLUSION: The combination of a single injection of SIR-Spheres plus HAC is substantially more effective in increasing tumor responses and progression free survival than the same regimen of HAC alone.

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  • (PMID = 11843249.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-7534
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase III; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Yttrium Radioisotopes; 039LU44I5M / Floxuridine
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15. Lee T, Noda E, Maeda K, Inoue T, Nagahara H, Amano R, Kubo N, Tanaka H, Muguruma K, Takashima T, Yamada N, Yashiro M, Onoda N, Sawada T, Nakata B, Ohira M, Ishikawa T, Hirakawa K: [Two cases of the primary small intestine cancer successfully treated with S-1 and UFT/LV therapy]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2010 Nov;37(12):2789-91
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  • [Title] [Two cases of the primary small intestine cancer successfully treated with S-1 and UFT/LV therapy].
  • The primary small intestinal cancer is rare in gastrointestinal cancer, and there are much advanced/recurrent cases.
  • However, there were a few case reports about chemotherapy for advanced or recurrent small intestinal cancer, and a treatment resume was inconsistent.
  • We reported that S-1 and UFT/LV therapy was effective with the two cases as an oral chemotherapy for the primary small intestinal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Jejunal Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Drug Combinations. Humans. Leucovorin / administration & dosage. Male. Middle Aged. Oxonic Acid / administration & dosage. Tegafur / administration & dosage. Uracil / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 21224714.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Drug Combinations; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 56HH86ZVCT / Uracil; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid; Q573I9DVLP / Leucovorin; 1-UFT protocol
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16. Ilveskoski E, Nikus K, Tanner M, Eskola M: [Coronary artery disease attack caused by cytotoxic chemotherapy]. Duodecim; 2009;125(9):997-1001
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  • [Title] [Coronary artery disease attack caused by cytotoxic chemotherapy].
  • Capesitabine is a orally administered cytotoxic drug metabolized to 5-fluorouracil and is widely used in large intestine cancer and breast cancer therapy.
  • We describe four patients, who were diagnosed with an attack of coronary artery disease during capesitabine therapy on the basis of coronary spasm.
  • This adverse effect should be kept in mind as a cause of chest pain symptoms and the medication discontinued in a suspected case.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / adverse effects. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Chest Pain / chemically induced. Coronary Vasospasm / chemically induced. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Fluorouracil / analogs & derivatives. Intestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 19517869.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-7183
  • [Journal-full-title] Duodecim; lääketieteellinen aikakauskirja
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Duodecim
  • [Language] fin
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Finland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; 6804DJ8Z9U / Capecitabine; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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17. Chua TC, Koh JL, Yan TD, Liauw W, Morris DL: Cytoreductive surgery and perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy for peritoneal carcinomatosis from small bowel adenocarcinoma. J Surg Oncol; 2009 Aug 1;100(2):139-43
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cytoreductive surgery and perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy for peritoneal carcinomatosis from small bowel adenocarcinoma.
  • BACKGROUND: Small bowel adenocarcinoma is a rare malignancy that presents both a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.
  • We review our experience with small bowel peritoneal carcinomatosis following treatment with cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (PIC).
  • METHODS: From a prospective database of CRS and PIC, seven patients were identified to have undergone treatment for small bowel peritoneal carcinomatosis with CRS and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (Mitomycin C) and early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (5FU).
  • Tumor histology of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with signet ring, lymphovascular invasion and perineural invasion appeared to be associated with a poor outcome.
  • CONCLUSION: Cytoreductive surgery and perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy is a treatment option for small bowel cancer peritoneal carcinomatosis with encouraging survival results.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Hyperthermia, Induced. Ileal Neoplasms / therapy. Jejunal Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Peritoneal Neoplasms / mortality. Peritoneal Neoplasms / therapy. Prospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 19544356.001).
  • [ISSN] 1096-9098
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Li H, Li H, Tang Z: [Effect of chang'ai kangfu decoction on immunity in postoperational patients with large intestine cancer]. Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi; 2000 Aug;20(8):580-2

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Effect of chang'ai kangfu decoction on immunity in postoperational patients with large intestine cancer].
  • OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of Chinese drug Chang'ai Kangfu decoction (CAKF) on immunity in post-operational patients with large intestine cancer (LIC).
  • METHODS: Forty-eight patients with LIC in Dukes' B, C stage after operation were randomly assigned to 3 groups, the CAKF group (16 cases), chemotherapy group (17 cases) and combination therapy (CAKF plus chemotherapy) group (15 cases).
  • 5-FU and mitomycin C were given to the chemotherapy group.
  • RESULTS: Before operation, the CD3+, CD4+, CD4+/CD8+ and the activity of NK cells in LIC patients were lower, but CD8+ was higher than that of normal level (P < 0.01), which indicated that cellular immunity in LIC was in immunosuppressive state, they all further reduced 1 week after operation, particularly CD3+ cell counts, but CD3+, CD4+ and the activity of NK cells normalized 1 month after operation in CAKF group, and 2 months were needed to normalize in combination therapy group.
  • Both groups recovered to a certain extent in comparing with before treatment, but the chemotherapy group recovered slower.

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  • (PMID = 11789186.001).
  • [ISSN] 1003-5370
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhongguo Zhong xi yi jie he za zhi Zhongguo Zhongxiyi jiehe zazhi = Chinese journal of integrated traditional and Western medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi
  • [Language] CHI
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drugs, Chinese Herbal
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19. Zhang AP, Liu BH, Zhang LY, Tong WD, He YJ, Fu T, Luo DL: [Effects of p53 inhibitor-alpha on the proliferation and apoptosis in large intestinal epithelial cells damaged by hyperthermic chemotherapy]. Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi; 2006 Jan 10;86(2):93-7
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  • [Title] [Effects of p53 inhibitor-alpha on the proliferation and apoptosis in large intestinal epithelial cells damaged by hyperthermic chemotherapy].
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of p-fifty three inhibitor-alpha (PFT-alpha), a p53 inhibitor, on the proliferation and apoptosis of colon epithelial cells damaged by hyperthermic chemotherapy.
  • METHODS: Normal epithelial cells were obtained from the mucosa at least 10 cm away from the cancer tissue in a specimen of large intestine cancer resected during operation and cultured.
  • Epithelial cell in logarithmic growth phase were inoculated in 6-well plate and divided into 3 groups: normal control (CON) group; hyperthermic chemotherapy (HTC) group, undergoing treatment of cisplatin and bath in water at 43 degrees C; and PFT-alpha + HTC group, undergoing treatment of PFT-alpha at different concentrations, cisplatin, and warm water bath.
  • RESULTS: PFT-alpha at the concentration > 60 micromol/L significantly inhibited the proliferation of the large intestine epithelial cells.
  • The natural apoptosis rate of the large intestine epithelial cells (CON group) was 2.9% +/- 0.4%, the apoptosis rate was 27.0% +/- 2.1% in the HTC group, and the apoptosis rates of the PFT-alpha + HTC group were 14.8% +/- 1.5%, 9.7% +/- 1.2%, 6.1% +/- 1.3%, and 3.8% +/- 0.3%, on a downward trend, corresponding to the increase of PFT-alpha concentration from 0, 20, 30, to 40 micromol/L (all P < 0.05).
  • The G(0)/G(1) phase rate of epithelial cells was higher and the S phase rate was lower significantly in the PFT-alpha + HTC group.
  • The G(2)/M phase rate was higher since the PFT-alpha concentration reached 10 micromol/L and then increased along with the increase of the PFT-alpha concentration; the S phase rates of the PFT-alpha + HTC group with different PFT-alpha concentrations were all significantly higher than that of the HTC group (all P < 0.01), however, were still lower than that of the CON group (all P < 0.01).
  • CONCLUSION: PFT-alpha dose-dependently protects the hyperthermic chemotherapy-induced damage to the large intestine epithelial cells via upregulation of protein and mRNA expression of cyclinB1, increasing the phosphorylation level of Cdc2, decreasing the cyclinB1/Cdc2 activity, and increasing the G(2)/M phase rate of the cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis / drug effects. Benzothiazoles / pharmacology. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Epithelial Cells / drug effects. Toluene / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Blotting, Western. CDC2 Protein Kinase / metabolism. Cells, Cultured. Colon / drug effects. Colon / metabolism. Colon / pathology. Cyclin B / genetics. Cyclin B / metabolism. Cyclin B1. Flow Cytometry. Humans. Hyperthermia, Induced / adverse effects. RNA, Messenger / genetics. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / antagonists & inhibitors

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  • (PMID = 16620711.001).
  • [ISSN] 0376-2491
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua yi xue za zhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Benzothiazoles; 0 / CCNB1 protein, human; 0 / Cyclin B; 0 / Cyclin B1; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; 0 / pifithrin; 3FPU23BG52 / Toluene; EC 2.7.11.22 / CDC2 Protein Kinase
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20. Sasaki T, Maeda Y, Kandaba-shi K, Ono M: [Combination chemotherapy for gastric cancer including LV/5-FU]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2004 Nov;31(12):1952-6
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  • [Title] [Combination chemotherapy for gastric cancer including LV/5-FU].
  • LV (l-LV)/5-FU therapy has been used broadly and is considered to be a standard treatment for large bowel cancer due to an enhancing therapeutic effect of 5-FU.
  • According to recent clinical study reports on large bowel cancer in Europe and the United States, various administration methods of LV/5-FU with a combination of other drugs have been devised.
  • Although the basis of combination therapy for gastric cancer seemed to be LV/5-FU, there were many reports on TS-1 combined with other drugs because the oral medicine TS-1 was domestically available for the past one or two years.
  • Currently, controlled randomized trials of LV/5-FU therapy and TS-1 have been ongoing.
  • However, when patients cannot take oral intakes, LV/5-FU therapy is important.
  • It seems that LV/5-FU therapy in combination with other drugs, in particular, CDDP, CPT-11, paclitaxel, docetaxel, oxaliplatin, and ETP will be given as candidates for the standard treatment of gastric cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Stomach Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Drug Administration Schedule. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Leucovorin / administration & dosage. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 15570919.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; Q573I9DVLP / Leucovorin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
  • [Number-of-references] 23
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21. Cao J, Zuo Y, Lv F, Chen Z, Li J: Primary small intestinal malignant tumors: survival analysis of 48 postoperative patients. J Clin Gastroenterol; 2008 Feb;42(2):167-73
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  • [Title] Primary small intestinal malignant tumors: survival analysis of 48 postoperative patients.
  • BACKGROUND: Primary small intestinal malignant tumor is relatively uncommon compared to gastric and colorectal cancer.
  • It is difficult to make an early diagnosis due to the atypical primary symptoms and lack of effective diagnostic methods.
  • GOALS: To analyze the relationship between the prognoses, histologic type, and therapeutic strategy in postoperative patients with small intestinal tumor.
  • STUDY: The parameters that affect survival were evaluated using multivariate Cox analysis in 48 cases of small intestinal tumor (confirmed by operation and pathology) for the past 10 years.
  • The median OS for all the 20 stage II/III patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy was 28 months, whereas the median OS for the 15 patients who did not receive the therapy was 37 months (P=0.276).
  • The median time to progression for 8 patients with adenocarcinoma who received 5-fluorouracil or platinum-based palliative chemotherapy was 7 months, whereas for the patients who did not receive the therapy it was 3 months (P=0.06).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The prognosis for small intestinal malignancies is associated with clinical stage, and palliative chemotherapy with a 5-fluorouracil or platinum-based regimen offers a potential benefit to patients with adenocarcinoma.
  • Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy seems to hold no therapeutic or survival benefit for patients with primary small bowel malignancies.
  • [MeSH-major] Intestinal Neoplasms / mortality. Intestinal Neoplasms / surgery. Intestine, Small / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. Fluorouracil / therapeutic use. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Platinum / therapeutic use. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 18209587.001).
  • [ISSN] 0192-0790
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 49DFR088MY / Platinum; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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22. Zagani R, Hamzaoui N, Cacheux W, de Reyniès A, Terris B, Chaussade S, Romagnolo B, Perret C, Lamarque D: Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors down-regulate osteopontin and Nr4A2-new therapeutic targets for colorectal cancers. Gastroenterology; 2009 Oct;137(4):1358-66.e1-3
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  • [Title] Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors down-regulate osteopontin and Nr4A2-new therapeutic targets for colorectal cancers.
  • BACKGROUND & AIMS: Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors reduce colon cancer risk by mechanisms that are not fully understood.
  • We performed microarray analysis of adenomas from Apc(Delta14/+) mice to identify genes that respond to these drugs.
  • METHODS: Apc(Delta14/+) mice were given a single daily injection of parecoxib for up to 9 weeks; intestinal tracts of these and control mice were analyzed by microarray analysis, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.
  • Findings were further assessed using Apc(lox/lox)vil-CreER(T2) mice, the CT26 cancer cell line, and human colon tumor samples.
  • RESULTS: Microarray analysis revealed that osteopontin, a marker of colon cancer progression, was down-regulated in polyps from Apc(Delta14/+) mice given parecoxib compared with controls.
  • Apc(Delta14/+) mice given parecoxib had longer survival times and reduced polyp burdens.
  • Osteopontin was quickly down-regulated by parecoxib in intestinal polyps from Apc(Delta14/+) mice, and 2 components of the osteopontin regulatory network-the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A2 and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling-were sequentially repressed.
  • NR4A2 levels were increased throughout tumor progression in Apc(Delta14/+) mice but, unlike osteopontin, did not correlate with tumor stage.
  • These factors might be developed as therapeutic targets for intestinal cancers.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenomatous Polyposis Coli / drug therapy. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Colonic Polyps / drug therapy. Colorectal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Cyclooxygenase 2 / metabolism. Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. DNA-Binding Proteins / metabolism. Osteopontin / metabolism. Transcription Factors / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Survival. Down-Regulation. Gene Expression Profiling / methods. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Genes, APC. Humans. Isoxazoles / therapeutic use. Lactones / therapeutic use. Mice. Mice, Mutant Strains. Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 4, Group A, Member 2. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis. Promoter Regions, Genetic. RNA Interference. Signal Transduction. Sulfones / therapeutic use. Time Factors. Transfection. Wnt Proteins / metabolism. beta Catenin / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19549529.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-0012
  • [Journal-full-title] Gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gastroenterology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / CTNNB1 protein, mouse; 0 / Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / Isoxazoles; 0 / Lactones; 0 / NR4A2 protein, human; 0 / Nr4a2 protein, mouse; 0 / Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 4, Group A, Member 2; 0 / SPP1 protein, human; 0 / Spp1 protein, mouse; 0 / Sulfones; 0 / Transcription Factors; 0 / Wnt Proteins; 0 / beta Catenin; 0QTW8Z7MCR / rofecoxib; 106441-73-0 / Osteopontin; 9TUW81Y3CE / parecoxib; EC 1.14.99.- / Ptgs2 protein, mouse; EC 1.14.99.1 / Cyclooxygenase 2; EC 1.14.99.1 / PTGS2 protein, human
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23. Yodfat Y: [Is there a future for COX-2 inhibitors?]. Harefuah; 2004 Nov;143(11):820-4, 837

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  • The two cyclooxygenase isoforms (COX-1 and COX-2--coxibs) have overlapping functions and both are involved in the regulation of homeostatic and inflammatory processes in the various tissues.
  • Treatment with highly selective COX-2 inhibitors is associated with significantly fewer serious adverse gastrointestinal events than is treatment with the dual inhibitors--the non-selective NSAIDs.
  • Of the two coxibs, rofecoxib was shown to be much more selective than celecoxib and with less interaction with other drugs.
  • Various clinical studies have demonstrated that the coxibs are equivalent, in anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic efficacy to comparator non-selective NSAIDs in osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, post surgery pain and dysmenorrhea.
  • Perioperative use of coxibs reduces pain, opioid consumption and the risk of bleeding caused by the non-selective NSAIDs.
  • The coxibs show similar tolerability for renal, liver and cardiothrombotic events as compared to the non-selective NSAIDs.
  • These drugs do not interfere with the aspirin anti-platelet aggregation activity.
  • Emerging evidence suggest that the coxibs may also find potential use as supportive therapy in various malignant tumors and intestinal polyps where COX-2 is overly expressed.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / adverse effects. Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors / adverse effects. Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Arthritis, Rheumatoid / drug therapy. Cyclooxygenase 2. Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors. Dysmenorrhea / drug therapy. Female. Humans. Lactones / adverse effects. Lactones / therapeutic use. Membrane Proteins. Osteoarthritis / drug therapy. Pain, Postoperative / drug therapy. Sulfones / adverse effects. Sulfones / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 15603272.001).
  • [ISSN] 0017-7768
  • [Journal-full-title] Harefuah
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Harefuah
  • [Language] heb
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Israel
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors; 0 / Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors; 0 / Lactones; 0 / Membrane Proteins; 0 / Sulfones; 0QTW8Z7MCR / rofecoxib; EC 1.14.99.1 / Cyclooxygenase 2; EC 1.14.99.1 / PTGS2 protein, human; EC 1.14.99.1 / Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases
  • [Number-of-references] 36
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24. Stark LA, Reid K, Sansom OJ, Din FV, Guichard S, Mayer I, Jodrell DI, Clarke AR, Dunlop MG: Aspirin activates the NF-kappaB signalling pathway and induces apoptosis in intestinal neoplasia in two in vivo models of human colorectal cancer. Carcinogenesis; 2007 May;28(5):968-76
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  • [Title] Aspirin activates the NF-kappaB signalling pathway and induces apoptosis in intestinal neoplasia in two in vivo models of human colorectal cancer.
  • Substantial evidence indicates that aspirin has antitumour activity against large bowel cancer and modulation of the NF-kappaB (NF-kappaB) signalling pathway has been identified as a key mechanism in this effect.
  • However, studies examining how aspirin affects the NF-kappaB pathway to promote apoptosis have been restricted to in vitro analysis in tissue culture systems and have produced contrasting results.
  • Here, we employed two animal models of human colorectal cancer to determine aspirin effects on the NF-kappaB pathway in colorectal neoplasia in vivo, and the relationship of such effects to the induction of apoptosis.
  • Furthermore, we show that this response occurs in a time-dependent manner and is paralleled by nuclear translocation of p65 and caspase activation.
  • Using high performance liquid chromatography analysis, we demonstrate that >0.5 mM salicylate levels are achievable in xenografted tumours after low-dose aspirin (40 mg/kg) treatment and that these levels, which are pharmacologically relevant to humans, are sufficient to stimulate an NF-kappaB and apoptotic response.
  • We demonstrate that activation of the NF-kappaB pathway is associated with increased apoptosis in neoplastic epithelial cells, but found that aspirin has a minimal effect on nuclear p65 and apoptosis in normal intestinal mucosa from APC(Min+/-) mice.
  • These data have considerable relevance to cancer prevention and therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Aspirin / pharmacology. Colorectal Neoplasms / metabolism. NF-kappa B / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Apoptosis. Disease Models, Animal. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. HT29 Cells. Humans. Mice. Precancerous Conditions / drug therapy. Signal Transduction / drug effects. Time Factors. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays

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  • (PMID = 17132819.001).
  • [ISSN] 0143-3334
  • [Journal-full-title] Carcinogenesis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Carcinogenesis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / G0301154; United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / MC/ U127527198
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / NF-kappa B; R16CO5Y76E / Aspirin
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25. Mazhar D, Stebbing J, Heller W: Recent advances in the systemic management of colorectal cancer. Future Oncol; 2006 Oct;2(5):643-50
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  • [Title] Recent advances in the systemic management of colorectal cancer.
  • Colorectal cancer represents one of the most prevalent malignancies.
  • In terms of systemic management, 5-fluorouracil, usually with leucovorin, has remained the mainstay of chemotherapy for colorectal cancer in both the adjuvant and metastatic settings.
  • These novel agents are now being incorporated into treatment schedules for colorectal cancer.
  • This review assesses recent improvements in the systemic management of large bowel cancer and highlights future challenges.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols. Colorectal Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 17026455.001).
  • [ISSN] 1479-6694
  • [Journal-full-title] Future oncology (London, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Future Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal
  • [Number-of-references] 43
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26. Slavik E, Ivanović S, Grujicić D: Cancer pain (classification and pain syndromes). Acta Chir Iugosl; 2004;51(4):9-14
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  • [Title] Cancer pain (classification and pain syndromes).
  • Cancer pain is often experienced as several different types of pain, with combined somatic and neuropathic types the most frequently.
  • If the acute cancer pain does not subside with initial therapy, patients experience pain of more constant nature, the characteristics of wich vary with the cause and the involved sites.
  • Chronic pain related to cancer can be considered as tumor-induced pain, chemotherapy-induced pain, and radiation therapy-induced pain.
  • Certain pain mechanisms are present in cancer patients.
  • These include inflammation due to infection, such as local sepsis or the pain of herpes zoster, and pain due to the obstruction or occlusion of a hollow organ, such as that caused by large bowel in cancer of colon.
  • Pain also is commonly due to destruction of tissue, such as is often seen with bony metastases.
  • Pain may be produced by the growth of tumor in a closed area richly supplied with pain receptors (nociceptors).
  • Examples are tumors growing within the capsule of an organ such as the pancreas.
  • Chest pain occurring after tumor of the lung or the mediastinum due to invasion of the pleura.
  • Certain tumors produce characteristic types of pain.
  • For example, back pain is seen with multiple myeloma, and severe shoulder pain and arm pain is seen with Pancoast tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms / complications. Pain / physiopathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Bone Neoplasms / complications. Headache / etiology. Humans. Radiotherapy / adverse effects. Viscera

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  • (PMID = 16018403.001).
  • [ISSN] 0354-950X
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta chirurgica Iugoslavica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Chir Iugosl
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Serbia and Montenegro
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 42
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27. Kashfi K, Borgo S, Williams JL, Chen J, Gao J, Glekas A, Benedini F, Del Soldato P, Rigas B: Positional isomerism markedly affects the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells by nitric oxide-donating aspirin in vitro and in vivo. J Pharmacol Exp Ther; 2005 Mar;312(3):978-88
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  • [Title] Positional isomerism markedly affects the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells by nitric oxide-donating aspirin in vitro and in vivo.
  • NO-donating aspirin (NO-ASA), a novel pharmacological agent currently undergoing clinical testing, consists of ASA to which a nitrate group is covalently linked via a spacer molecule.
  • We synthesized the three positional isomers of NO-ASA with respect to the -CH(2)ONO(2) group (ortho, meta, and para) and examined whether this isomerism affects the biological activity of NO-ASA on HT-29 human colon cancer cells.
  • Treatment for 3 weeks of Min (Apc(min)(/+)) mice, a model of intestinal cancer, with equimolar amounts of meta- and para-NO-ASA decreased the number of tumors in the small intestine by 36 and 59% (P < 0.01), respectively, compared with vehicle-treated controls, thus confirming their in vitro differences in potency.
  • Thus, positional isomerism is critical for the pharmacological properties of NO-ASA against colon cancer and it should be taken into consideration in rational drug design.
  • [MeSH-major] Aspirin / analogs & derivatives. Aspirin / pharmacology. Colonic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Growth Inhibitors / pharmacology. Nitrates / pharmacology. Nitric Oxide Donors / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Apoptosis / drug effects. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. HT29 Cells. Humans. Isomerism. Nitric Oxide / secretion. Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen / analysis. Structure-Activity Relationship

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  • (PMID = 15528453.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3565
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA92423; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA92423-S1
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Growth Inhibitors; 0 / N-acetyl-S-(alpha-methyl-4-(2-methylpropyl)benzeneacetyl)cysteine 4-(nitrooxy)butyl ester; 0 / Nitrates; 0 / Nitric Oxide Donors; 0 / Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen; 31C4KY9ESH / Nitric Oxide; R16CO5Y76E / Aspirin
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28. Borie F, Daurès JP, Millat B, Puch P, Tretarre B: Influence of environment and healthcare structures on the survival of patients with colorectal cancer: a French population-based study. J Surg Oncol; 2002 Jul;80(3):137-42
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Influence of environment and healthcare structures on the survival of patients with colorectal cancer: a French population-based study.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Colorectal cancer is one of the highest-ranking cancers in France, both sexes combined, with 33000 new cases per year.
  • To report on the practice and the efficiency of the healthcare system, an evaluation of the therapeutic management of colorectal cancer was carried out in the department of the Herault, in the south of France.
  • METHODS: Cases of colorectal cancer in 1992 (344 colorectal cancer incidental cases) in the department of the Herault were reviewed.
  • The diversity of the therapeutic choices and survival were evaluated for the different types of healthcare facilities (private hospitals, nonspecialized and specialized hospitals) and residential areas (rural, semi-urban, urban).
  • RESULTS: Two hundred seventy-one patients with colorectal cancer (78.8%) and 234 patients with colorectal cancer (67.7%) were respectively diagnosed and treated in the private sector.
  • Sixteen cases (23.5%) in the public sector (29.7% in the university hospital) and 24 cases (19%) in the private sector involved surgical emergencies (peritonitis, intestinal obstructions) (P = 0.003).
  • Radiotherapy was performed in 59% of patients with rectal cancer.
  • Preoperative radiotherapy was used primarily in specialized hospitals (80% of radiated rectal cancer; P = 0.002), as opposed to postoperative radiotherapy, which was used predominantly in private hospitals (P = 0.005).
  • Forty-five percent of the patients with colorectal cancer who had lymph node involvement have been treated with chemotherapy.
  • In multivariate analysis, lymph node metastasis and the presence of metastases (Dukes stage) were the most important independent pejorative prognostic factors, followed by the initial treatment in nonspecialized hospitals, complicated colorectal cancer (intestinal obstruction, peritonitis), lack of histological differentiation, and rural and urban residential areas.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Apart from independent prognostic factors, such as parietal, ganglionic, or metastatic extensions, the lack of histological differentiation, and the complicated forms, heterogeneity and inequality persist in the distribution, treatment for, and the survival of patients with colorectal cancer based on the type of healthcare facility and the living area of this French population.
  • [MeSH-major] Colonic Neoplasms / mortality. Colonic Neoplasms / therapy. Delivery of Health Care. Environment. Rectal Neoplasms / mortality. Rectal Neoplasms / therapy

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 12115796.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-4790
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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29. Shehata M, Chu F, Saunders V, Kam PC, Links M, Morris DL: Peritoneal carcinomatosis from colorectal cancer and small bowel cancer treated with peritonectomy. ANZ J Surg; 2006 Jun;76(6):467-71
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  • [Title] Peritoneal carcinomatosis from colorectal cancer and small bowel cancer treated with peritonectomy.
  • BACKGROUND: This study aims to assess the survival of patients who underwent peritonectomy, to assess the morbidity and mortality associated with the procedure and to review the published reports on the survival of patients with peritoneal spread of colorectal cancer (CRC).
  • METHODS: Peritonectomy involves resection of all visible peritoneal tumour and is followed by heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy.
  • Peritonectomy with heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy is associated with a 3-year survival of 30-50% in patients with low peritoneal cancer index (PCI) with peritoneal carcinomatosis from CRC.
  • This study describes 22 patients with peritoneal spread of gastrointestinal cancer treated with peritonectomy between 1996 and March 2005.
  • Twenty of these patients had primary colorectal cancer and two patients had primary small bowel cancer.
  • We found that those patients with all macroscopic residual tumour removed at the end of the procedure (completeness of cancer resection, CCR O) had improved 24-month survival compared with patients in whom there was incomplete tumour resection (53.3% survival vs 22.2%, respectively, P = 0.024).
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / mortality. Carcinoma / surgery. Intestinal Neoplasms / pathology. Peritoneal Neoplasms / mortality. Peritoneal Neoplasms / surgery. Postoperative Complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16768770.001).
  • [ISSN] 1445-1433
  • [Journal-full-title] ANZ journal of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] ANZ J Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
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30. Mistrangelo M, Mobiglia A, Bellò M, Beltramo G, Cassoni P, Mussa A: [The technique of sentinel lymph nodes in patients with anus neoplasm]. Suppl Tumori; 2005 May-Jun;4(3):S32-3
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [The technique of sentinel lymph nodes in patients with anus neoplasm].
  • [Transliterated title] La tecnica del linfonodo sentinella nei pazienti affetti da neoplasia dell'ano.
  • Anal cancer is a rare neoplasm, representing 1-2% of all large bowel cancers.
  • Surgical excision by abdominoperineal resection has been the standard treatment.
  • In the 1950s it was evident that the morbidity associated with lymphnode dissection was much greater than any survival benefit and this procedure was abandoned.
  • Since 1974 "multimodality treatment" with a combination of radiation and chemotherapy has become the standard treatment.
  • In order to assess inguinal lymph node status we applied the sentinel node technique to patients affected by anal cancer.
  • A surgical biopsy of sentinel node was performed in all patients with a detection rate of 100%.
  • Twelve patients (80%) were treated in local anesthesia and they were dismissed the same day of surgical procedure.
  • Considering the strong correlation between prognosis and node involvement, we consider this technique an important and simple method for evaluating the lymph node status and for an adequate pre-treatment staging of anal carcinoma. fundamental in the choice of radiation plane.
  • In particular inguinal radiotherapy could be reserved for N1 patients only. avoiding the morbidity related to this procedure in N0 patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / pathology. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy

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  • (PMID = 16437886.001).
  • [ISSN] 2283-5423
  • [Journal-full-title] I supplementi di Tumori : official journal of Società italiana di cancerologia ... [et al.]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Suppl Tumori
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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31. Ishihara R, Tatsuta M, Iishi H, Baba M, Uedo N, Higashino K, Mukai M, Ishiguro S, Kobayashi S, Murakami-Murofushi K: Attenuation by cyclic phosphatidic acid of peritoneal metastasis of azoxymethane-induced intestinal cancers in Wistar rats. Int J Cancer; 2004 Jun 10;110(2):188-93

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Attenuation by cyclic phosphatidic acid of peritoneal metastasis of azoxymethane-induced intestinal cancers in Wistar rats.
  • The effect of cyclic phosphatidic acid, a unique analogue of lysophosphatidic acid, on the induction of bombesin-enhanced peritoneal metastases from intestinal adenocarcinomas induced by azoxymethane was investigated in male Wistar rats.
  • Cyclic phosphatidic acid at both dosages significantly decreased the incidence of bombesin-enhanced cancer metastases to the peritoneum but had little or no effect on the location, histologic type, depth of involvement or infiltrating growth patterns of the tumors.
  • Cyclic phosphatidic acid at either dose decreased significantly the incidence of lymphatic vessel invasion of adenocarcinomas and the activity of RhoA protein in the tumors, both of which were enhanced by bombesin.
  • Our findings indicate that cyclic phosphatidic acid inhibits cancer metastasis through inhibition of RhoA protein activation.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Intestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lysophospholipids / therapeutic use. Peritoneal Neoplasms / secondary. rhoA GTP-Binding Protein / antagonists & inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Azoxymethane. Cyclic AMP / biosynthesis. Male. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Rats. Rats, Wistar

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 15069680.001).
  • [ISSN] 0020-7136
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Lysophospholipids; E0399OZS9N / Cyclic AMP; EC 3.6.5.2 / rhoA GTP-Binding Protein; MO0N1J0SEN / Azoxymethane
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32. Yonemura Y, Tsukiyama G, Miyata R, Sako S, Endou Y, Hirano M, Mizumoto A, Matsuda T, Takao N, Ichinose M, Miura M, Hagiwara A, Li Y: Indication of peritonectomy for peritoneal dissemination. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2010 Nov;37(12):2306-11
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • A total of 521 patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) were treated by peritonectomy and perioperative chemotherapy.
  • Each of the 95, 58, 316, 31, 10 and 11 patients were from gastric, colorectal, appendiceal, ovarian, small bowel cancer and mesothelioma, respectively.
  • Peritonectomy was performed with a radical resection of the primary tumor and all gross PC with involved organs, peritoneum, or tissue that was deemed technically feasible and safe for the patient.
  • The survival of gastric cancer patients with a PCI score ≤ 6 was significantly better than those with a PCI score ≥ 7.
  • In appendiceal neoplasm, patients with PCI score less than 28 showed significantly better survival than those with PCI score greater than 29.
  • The survival of colorectal cancer patients with a PCI score ≥ 11 was significantly poorer than those with a PCI score ≤ 10.
  • Among the various prognostic factors in appendiceal neoplasm and gastric cancer patients, CC-0 complete cytoreduction was the most important independent prognostic factor.
  • Peritonectomy is done to remove macroscopic disease and perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy to eradicate microscopic residual disease aiming to remove disease completely with a single procedure.
  • Peritonectomy combined with perioperative chemotherapy may achieve long-term survival in a selected group of patients with PC.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / surgery. Peritoneal Neoplasms / surgery. Peritoneum / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Appendiceal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Appendiceal Neoplasms / surgery. Colorectal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Colorectal Neoplasms / surgery. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Intestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Intestinal Neoplasms / surgery. Male. Mesothelioma / drug therapy. Mesothelioma / surgery. Ovarian Neoplasms / drug therapy. Ovarian Neoplasms / surgery. Postoperative Complications. Stomach Neoplasms / drug therapy. Stomach Neoplasms / surgery. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 21224556.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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33. Aoki Y, Kameda A, Miyahara E, Funakoshi M: [A patient with small intestinal cancer and extensive lymph node metastasis who responded to S-1]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2010 May;37(5):927-30

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [A patient with small intestinal cancer and extensive lymph node metastasis who responded to S-1].
  • He had undergone gastrectomy and Roux-en Y reconstruction.
  • Upper digestive tract endoscopy revealed a flat plate-like ulcer in the jejunum on the anal side of the gastrojejunostomy site.
  • Computed tomography (CT) showed cervical, mediastinal, and intraperitoneal lymph node swelling, suggesting metastasis.
  • Therefore, surgery was not performed, and systemic hemotherapy with S-1 (80 mg/body/day) was administered.
  • After the end of the second course, upper digestive tract endoscopy revealed cicatrization of the ulcer, and CT showed a marked decrease in the lymph node size; a complete response (CR) was achieved.
  • During the 7-month follow-up after the initial consultation (7 courses of S-1 therapy in all), there has been no exacerbation, and the quality of life (QOL) has been maintained.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Intestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Intestinal Neoplasms / pathology. Intestine, Small / pathology. Oxonic Acid / therapeutic use. Tegafur / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged, 80 and over. Biopsy. Drug Combinations. Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Quality of Life. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 20495331.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drug Combinations; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid
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34. Mandir N, Goodlad RA: Conjugated linoleic acids differentially alter polyp number and diameter in the Apc(min/+) mouse model of intestinal cancer. Cell Prolif; 2008 Apr;41(2):279-91

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Conjugated linoleic acids differentially alter polyp number and diameter in the Apc(min/+) mouse model of intestinal cancer.
  • CLAs have also been linked to altered rates of cell renewal and cell proliferation so this was also studied, as was a further means of increasing tissue mass, namely crypt fission.
  • RESULTS: The stomach and small intestine were significantly heavier in the t10c12, and in the mixture-treated groups (P < 0.001).
  • Crypt fission was increased in the middle small intestine by the t10c12 diet while colonic weight was reduced by c9t11 provision and crypts were 20% shorter.
  • The t10c12 and the mixture significantly reduced polyp number in the proximal small intestine but they increased polyp diameter in the middle and distal small intestine, to an extent that the polyp burden was significantly increased at these sites.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenomatous Polyposis Coli / drug therapy. Intestinal Neoplasms / prevention & control. Intestinal Polyps / drug therapy. Linoleic Acids, Conjugated / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Chemoprevention. Dietary Supplements. Disease Models, Animal. Female. Isomerism. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Mitosis / drug effects. beta Catenin / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 18336472.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2184
  • [Journal-full-title] Cell proliferation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cell Prolif.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Linoleic Acids, Conjugated; 0 / beta Catenin; 0 / cis-9, trans-11-conjugated linoleic acid; 0 / trans-10,cis-12-conjugated linoleic acid
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35. Okuno K: Surgical treatment for digestive cancer. Current issues - colon cancer. Dig Surg; 2007;24(2):108-14

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Surgical treatment for digestive cancer. Current issues - colon cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: Due to the westernization of the diet in Japan, the incidence of colorectal cancer has increased 4.5 times in the last 25 years.
  • In this review, the recent results of surgical treatment for colonic cancer and the future perspectives in Japan are described.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: A multi-institutional registry of large bowel cancer in Japan of 10,809 patients with colonic cancer treated from 1991 to 1994 was investigated.
  • The data have been published in the Guidelines of the Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum (2005).
  • Regarding laparoscopic surgery, 1,495 patients with colon cancer were examined in a multicenter study between April 1993 and August 2002.
  • This treatment protocol has now been accepted as a 'standard' operation by Japanese colorectal surgeons.
  • For patients undergoing a curative resection for colon cancer, the 5-year survival rates vary between 62 (stage III) and 91% (stage I).
  • Adjuvant chemotherapy using 5-FU/leucovorin or oral compounds is commonly administered to patients with stage III disease.
  • Laparoscopic surgery for colonic cancer yielded a comparable oncological outcome to that reported for conventional open surgery in the Japanese registry for all disease stages.
  • CONCLUSION: Radical resection with a D3 lymphadenectomy provided satisfactory 5-year survival for patients with stage I-III colon cancer in Japan.
  • Any further improvements depend on both identifying such patients at an earlier stage as well as developing new and effective treatment modalities.
  • [MeSH-major] Colonic Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Staging

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 17446704.001).
  • [ISSN] 0253-4886
  • [Journal-full-title] Digestive surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dig Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Number-of-references] 21
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36. Kobayashi K, Yano S, Kato K, Tatsukawa T, Ikeda T, Tokushima T: [Case with double primary cancers occurring synchronously in both the lung and jejunum diagnosed according to TTF-1 expression]. Nihon Kokyuki Gakkai Zasshi; 2005 Feb;43(2):84-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Case with double primary cancers occurring synchronously in both the lung and jejunum diagnosed according to TTF-1 expression].
  • He received chemotherapy and radiotherapy.
  • The lymph node was near by the Treitz' ligament, and a tumor measuring 30 mm was observed in the jejunum.
  • The differential diagnosis between small intestine metastasis and primary small intestine cancer was difficult.
  • As adenocarcinoma of the jejunum was negative for TTF-1 in immunohistochemical staining and adenocarcinoma of the lung was positive, we diagnosed this patient as having primary jejunal cancer.
  • We report this rare case of double cancer involving the lung and jejunum.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / diagnosis. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Intestine, Small. Jejunal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Lung Neoplasms / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / diagnosis. Nuclear Proteins / analysis. Transcription Factors / analysis
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 15770938.001).
  • [ISSN] 1343-3490
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon Kokyūki Gakkai zasshi = the journal of the Japanese Respiratory Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nihon Kokyuki Gakkai Zasshi
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Nuclear Proteins; 0 / Transcription Factors; 0 / thyroid nuclear factor 1
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37. Macdonald JS: Clinical overview: adjuvant therapy of gastrointestinal cancer. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol; 2004 Sep;54 Suppl 1:S4-11
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clinical overview: adjuvant therapy of gastrointestinal cancer.
  • Adjuvant therapy has been tested widely in the treatment of cancers of the stomach, pancreas, and large bowel.
  • In the USA, the use of postoperative chemoradiation in stomach cancer is considered a standard of care after the publication of the Intergroup Study 0116 in September 2001.
  • This study demonstrated significant benefit in overall and disease-free survival for patients receiving postoperative treatment with fluorouracil (5-FU)/leucovorin chemotherapy and radiation after gastric resection.
  • Adjuvant chemotherapy is not considered to be of significant benefit, and such therapy for patients with resected gastric cancer is investigational.
  • There is interest in the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy strategies as preoperative treatment followed by surgical resection.
  • This study demonstrated that patients receiving preoperative and postoperative epirubicin, cisplatin, 5-FU (ECF) chemotherapy, had a downstaging of tumor size, an increase in rates of curative resection, and an increase in disease-free but not overall survival.
  • With pancreatic cancer, there is a controversy over postoperative chemoradiation after pancreatic resection.
  • A recently completed Intergroup Study compared gemcitabine to 5-FU chemotherapy given before and after radiation in resected pancreatic cancer.
  • In Western Europe, the results of a large clinical trial (ESPAC) have suggested that chemoradiation is not beneficial in patients with resected pancreatic cancer.
  • In large bowel cancer, 5-FU-based adjuvant chemotherapy regimens are superior to surgery alone, particularly in node-positive patients.
  • The use of newer combinations including 5-FU/leucovorin plus irinotecan and 5-FU/ leucovorin plus oxaliplatin are also of interest as chemotherapy in resected colon cancer patients.
  • Another area of interest in resected colon cancer is the use of molecular genetic monitoring to assess the likelihood of patient relapse.
  • The data over the past several years have demonstrated that patients whose tumors do not have deletion of the deleted in colon cancer (DCC) gene on chromosome 18 have an improved outcome.
  • Recent data are available with tumors that demonstrate microsatellite instability (MSI).
  • Such tumors represent about 15% of all colon cancers and have an improved outcome when compared to those not expressing MSI, and may not benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / therapy. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant
  • [MeSH-minor] Colorectal Neoplasms / genetics. Forecasting. Humans. Microsatellite Repeats. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Pancreatic Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 15309508.001).
  • [ISSN] 0344-5704
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer chemotherapy and pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Number-of-references] 27
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38. Macdonald JS, Astrow AB: Adjuvant therapy of colon cancer. Semin Oncol; 2001 Feb;28(1):30-40
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Adjuvant therapy of colon cancer.
  • The primary curative therapy of colorectal cancer is surgical resection.
  • However, within the last 15 years, prospectively randomized appropriately powered clinical trials have convincingly demonstrated that adjunctive postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy is of benefit to all patients with node-positive disease (stage III) and arguably to high-risk node-negative (stage II) cases.
  • In the United States, the clinical trials encompassing greater than 5,000 cases have demonstrated that fluorouracil (5-FU)/leucovorin used in a variety of doses and schedules improves disease-free and overall survival in resected node-positive (stage III) colorectal cancer.
  • Current clinical trials are evaluating the role of nonfluorinated pyrimidine chemotherapeutic agents in adjuvant chemotherapy for resected large bowel cancer.
  • These clinical trials will be important in defining the appropriate standard of care for patients with resected colorectal cancer, since recent studies in advanced colorectal cancer in the United States and in Western Europe have demonstrated that combinations of 5-FU/leucovorin and CPT-11 or 5-FU/ leucovorin and oxaliplatin are superior to 5-FU/leucovorin alone.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Camptothecin / analogs & derivatives. Colonic Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Leucovorin / administration & dosage. Organoplatinum Compounds / administration & dosage. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 11254865.001).
  • [ISSN] 0093-7754
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 04ZR38536J / oxaliplatin; 7673326042 / irinotecan; Q573I9DVLP / Leucovorin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
  • [Number-of-references] 63
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39. Damia G, D'Incalci M: Genetic instability influences drug response in cancer cells. Curr Drug Targets; 2010 Oct;11(10):1317-24

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Genetic instability influences drug response in cancer cells.
  • One of the main reasons why most patients with advanced cancer are not curable with the therapies available is the broad heterogeneity of cancer cells, inherently related to their genomic instability that reflects defects of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA mismatch repair (MMR).
  • Microsatellite (DNA repetitive sequences) instability (MSI) used as a surrogate marker of MMR defects was associated with a predisposition to somatic mutations of several genes including those involved in the neoplastic transformation and tumor progression.
  • Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome caused by germ line mutation in genes involved in MMR such as hMLH1 or hMLH2, or less frequently hMLH6 or hPMS2; it is associated with a high risk of intestinal cancer (CRC) and other tumors including endometrial, stomach, kidney and brain.
  • There is ample preclinical evidence that cells deficient in MMR are resistant to methylating agents and to some antimetabolites, including 5FU, which is the drug used most for the CRC, whereas they are equally sensitive to oxaliplatin and possibly more sensitive to irinotecan.
  • More studies are needed on the importance of MMR for sensitivity to different anticancer regimens and drugs, so this knowledge can guide rational therapy according to the tumor MMR status.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. DNA Mismatch Repair. Neoplasms / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Disease Progression. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Genetic Predisposition to Disease. Genomic Instability. Humans. Microsatellite Repeats

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  • (PMID = 20840074.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-5592
  • [Journal-full-title] Current drug targets
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Drug Targets
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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40. Heinrich S, Clavien PA: Ampullary cancer. Curr Opin Gastroenterol; 2010 May;26(3):280-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Ampullary cancer.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This manuscript reviews the recent literature on ampullary cancer, including new staging definitions, histological characteristics and treatment options.
  • RECENT FINDINGS: Recent publications emphasize the importance of the histological differentiation (intestinal vs. pancreatobiliary), which is one of the most important prognostic factors for ampullary cancer.
  • These histological subtypes can be differentiated by immunohistochemistry: while positivity for mucin-2 (MUC2) and caudal homeobox gene transcription factor-2 (CDX2) excludes the pancreatobiliary subtype, positivity for MUC1 and cytokeratin-17 (CK17) excludes the intestinal subtype.
  • Also, different mechanisms of cancer development have been described, which might be related to the type of differentiation.
  • Due to the very low risk of lymphatic spread, local resections appear sufficient for well differentiated T1 cancer smaller than 1 cm, whereas larger, less differentiated or more invasive cancer requires a radical resection.
  • As cancer with intestinal differentiation shares a similar biology with colon cancer, and the pancreatobiliary differentiation is close to ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas, adjuvant chemotherapy should probably be given according to colon cancer (intestinal) and pancreatic cancer (pancreatobiliary), respectively.
  • SUMMARY: The recent research suggests that the histological differentiation of periampullary cancer is more important than the anatomical location (ampulla).
  • [MeSH-major] Ampulla of Vater. Common Bile Duct Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 20168227.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-7056
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Opin. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 43
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41. Chandanos E, Lindblad M, Rubio CA, Jia C, Warner M, Gustafsson JA, Lagergren J: Tamoxifen exposure in relation to gastric adenocarcinoma development. Eur J Cancer; 2008 May;44(7):1007-14
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Epidemiological research has indicated that the anti-oestrogen tamoxifen, used in breast cancer therapy, may increase the risk of gastric adenocarcinoma of the intestinal but not of the diffuse type.
  • To test this hypothesis, and evaluate possible involvement of oestrogen receptors (ERs), we conducted a study amongst tamoxifen users and non-users.
  • The study participants comprised women in the county of Stockholm who in the Swedish Cancer Register were first recorded with breast cancer and subsequently gastric cancer during the period January 1958-August 2005.
  • Medical records were scrutinised to verify the diagnoses and classify into use or non-use of tamoxifen.
  • Tumour material was reviewed histologically to verify gastric adenocarcinoma diagnosis and classify these cancers into intestinal or diffuse type.
  • Intestinal adenocarcinomas were analysed immunohistochemically for the presence of ER alpha, beta and beta cx.
  • The intestinal type of gastric adenocarcinoma was not more frequent amongst tamoxifen users (27%) than amongst non-users (34%) (p=0.601).
  • There were no material differences between the tamoxifen groups regarding distribution of any of the three ERs of the intestinal adenocarcinoma specimens.
  • Tamoxifen users had a shorter latency between breast cancer and gastric adenocarcinoma (4 versus 13 years) which was similar in the intestinal and diffuse types.
  • This study does not support the hypothesis that tamoxifen increases the isolated risk of the intestinal type, but it indicates that tamoxifen use might accelerate the tumour progression or increase the overall risk of gastric adenocarcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / chemically induced. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / adverse effects. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Stomach Neoplasms / chemically induced. Tamoxifen / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Age of Onset. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Cohort Studies. Disease Progression. Female. Gastric Mucosa / metabolism. Humans. Middle Aged. Receptors, Estrogen / metabolism. Risk Factors. Stomach / metabolism. Sweden

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  • (PMID = 18394879.001).
  • [ISSN] 0959-8049
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Receptors, Estrogen; 094ZI81Y45 / Tamoxifen
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42. Pandya KJ, Lefkopoulou M, Petrelli NJ, Vaughn DJ, Smith TJ, Harris JE, Haller DG, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group: Phase II study of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (PF) and mitomycin C, vincristine, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (MVPF) in patients with metastatic large bowel cancer: an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group study (EST 1285). Oncology; 2004;66(2):118-25
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  • [Title] Phase II study of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (PF) and mitomycin C, vincristine, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (MVPF) in patients with metastatic large bowel cancer: an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group study (EST 1285).
  • PURPOSE: To compare the efficacy and the toxicity of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (PF) and mitomycin C, vincristine, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (MVPF) in patients with metastatic large bowel cancer.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 94 patients with no prior chemotherapy and measurable metastatic large bowel cancer were randomly assigned to one of the two treatment regimens.
  • CONCLUSION: Both treatment regimens showed clinical activity.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Colonic Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Disease Progression. Disease-Free Survival. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Mitomycin / administration & dosage. Procarbazine / administration & dosage. Proportional Hazards Models. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome. Vinblastine / administration & dosage. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel
  • (PMID = 15138363.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-2414
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA07190; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA11083; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA12296; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA15488; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA21115; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA22318; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA25988; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA66636
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 35S93Y190K / Procarbazine; 50SG953SK6 / Mitomycin; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; MVPF protocol
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43. Scotti ML, Bamlet WR, Smyrk TC, Fields AP, Murray NR: Protein kinase Ciota is required for pancreatic cancer cell transformed growth and tumorigenesis. Cancer Res; 2010 Mar 1;70(5):2064-74
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  • [Title] Protein kinase Ciota is required for pancreatic cancer cell transformed growth and tumorigenesis.
  • Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, with an overall 5-year survival rate of <5%.
  • Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common form of pancreatic cancer, is highly resistant to conventional chemotherapies, underscoring the critical need for new molecular targets for pancreatic cancer chemotherapy.
  • Protein kinase Ciota (PKCiota) is required for the oncogenic Ras-mediated transformed growth of lung cancer and intestinal epithelial cells.
  • However, little is known about the role of PKCiota in pancreatic cancer.
  • In this study, we evaluated the expression of PKCiota in human pancreatic cancer and the requirement for PKCiota for the transformed growth and tumorigenicity of PDAC cells.
  • We find that PKCiota is significantly overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer, and high PKCiota expression correlates with poor patient survival.
  • Inhibition of PKCiota expression in pancreatic tumors also significantly reduces tumor angiogenesis and metastasis.
  • Taken together, our data show a required role for PKCiota in the transformed growth of pancreatic cancer cells and reveal a novel role for PKCiota in pancreatic cancer cell metastasis and angiogenesis in vivo.
  • Our results strongly indicate that PKCiota will be an effective target for pancreatic cancer therapy.

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  • (PMID = 20179210.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-7445
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA081436; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA081436-12; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA081436-12; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA128661; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA102701; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R21 CA128661
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Isoenzymes; 0 / RNA, Messenger; EC 2.7.11.13 / Protein Kinase C; EC 2.7.11.13 / protein kinase C lambda; EC 2.7.11.24 / Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1; EC 2.7.11.24 / Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3; EC 3.6.5.2 / rac1 GTP-Binding Protein
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS170593; NLM/ PMC2881466
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44. Zouhairi ME, Venner A, Charabaty A, Pishvaian MJ: Small bowel adenocarcinoma. Curr Treat Options Oncol; 2008 Dec;9(4-6):388-99
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  • [Title] Small bowel adenocarcinoma.
  • Small bowel cancers are rare, accounting for only about 6000 cases/year in the United States, approximately 25% of which are small bowel adenocarcinomas.
  • Small bowel adenocarcinomas have traditionally been considered to be highly fatal due to their nonspecific presentation at the time of diagnosis, and to the lack of responsiveness to older chemotherapy regimens.
  • Newer diagnostic techniques such as video capsule and double balloon enteroscopy may facilitate earlier diagnosis.
  • In addition, modern chemotherapy regimens have produced improved response rates and survival rates, when compared to historical controls.
  • Still, there remains great need for multi-institutional, cooperative group studies to define the optimal treatment of small bowel adenocarcinoma, both in the adjuvant and advanced/metastatic setting.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / epidemiology. Intestinal Neoplasms / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Age of Onset. Animals. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Disease Models, Animal. Female. Fluorouracil / therapeutic use. Humans. Intestine, Small / pathology. Male. Mice. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Risk Factors. United States / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 19365735.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-6277
  • [Journal-full-title] Current treatment options in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Treat Options Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
  • [Number-of-references] 40
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45. Waldmann A, Lautz E, Hampe J, Schreiber S, Schafmayer C, Katalinic A: [Utilization of inpatient rehabilitation of younger patients with colorectal neoplasms--results of the project "Popgen-colorectal cancer"]. Rehabilitation (Stuttg); 2007 Dec;46(6):349-55
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  • [Title] [Utilization of inpatient rehabilitation of younger patients with colorectal neoplasms--results of the project "Popgen-colorectal cancer"].
  • [Transliterated title] Popgen-Darmkrebs: Reha-Inanspruchnahme von jüngeren Patienten mit kolorektalem Tumor.
  • INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND: Colorectal neoplasms (ICD-10 diagnoses C18-C21) are the second-leading malignancies in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany (women: 17% of all neoplasms, men: 16%) and are the second-leading cause of death when only the cancer-related deaths are taken into account (women: 14%, men: 12%).
  • At time of diagnosis women are 5 years older than men (median: 73 vs. 68 years).
  • Up to now, data on frequency and predictors of utilization of rehabilitation of patients with colorectal neoplasms are not available.
  • Therefore, we evaluated this topic in a population-based cohort of patients with colorectal cancer from Schleswig-Holstein.
  • For this project younger patients (<65 yrs) with colorectal neoplasms (ICD-10 diagnosis C18-C21) who where living in Schleswig-Holstein and who had received the diagnosis between Jan.
  • Eligible study participants were identified in the epidemiological cancer registry of Schleswig-Holstein.
  • RESULTS: In all, 245 patients participated and sent back the questionnaire (37+/-15 months after receiving the primary diagnosis).
  • In a regression model in which T-category, N-category, gender, age, education, health insurance (private or statutory), living with a partner, stoma, radiation, chemotherapy, complications or side effects of the therapy were included as independent predictors for the utilization of rehabilitation, only the factor "living with a partner" was identified as a significant predictor: patients without a partner more often received inpatient rehabilitation than patients living with a partner (odds ratio=3.8; 95% confidence interval [1.3; 11.7]).
  • DISCUSSION: Colorectal neoplasms are a huge burden for the patients due to therapy and comorbidity.
  • Therefore, colorectal neoplasms are an important indication for attending rehabilitation.
  • About one half of the Popgen study participants took part in inpatient rehabilitation.
  • [MeSH-major] Colectomy / rehabilitation. Colorectal Neoplasms / rehabilitation. Postoperative Complications / rehabilitation
  • [MeSH-minor] Colostomy / rehabilitation. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Marital Status. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Patient Acceptance of Health Care. Socioeconomic Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18188806.001).
  • [ISSN] 0034-3536
  • [Journal-full-title] Die Rehabilitation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rehabilitation (Stuttg)
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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46. Cervantes A, Rodríguez Braun E, Pérez Fidalgo A, Chirivella González I: Molecular biology of gastric cancer. Clin Transl Oncol; 2007 Apr;9(4):208-15
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  • [Title] Molecular biology of gastric cancer.
  • Despite its decreasing incidence overall, gastric cancer is still a challenging disease.
  • Therapy is based mainly upon surgical resection when the tumour remains localised in the stomach.
  • Conventional chemotherapy may play a role in treating micrometastatic disease and is effective as palliative therapy for recurrent or advanced disease.
  • However, the knowledge of molecular pathways implicated in gastric cancer pathogenesis is still in its infancy and the contribution of molecular biology to the development of new targeted therapies in gastric cancer is far behind other more common cancers such as breast, colon or lung.
  • This review will focus first on the difference of two well defined types of gastric cancer: intestinal and diffuse.
  • A discussion of the cell of origin of gastric cancer with some intriguing data implicating bone marrow derived cells will follow, and a comprehensive review of different genetic alterations detected in gastric cancer, underlining those that may have clinical, therapeutic or prognostic implications.
  • [MeSH-major] Stomach Neoplasms / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Biomarkers, Tumor. Cell Adhesion / genetics. Gastrectomy. Genes, Tumor Suppressor. Genetic Markers. Humans. Male. Microsatellite Instability. Mutation. Neovascularization, Pathologic. Prognosis. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / genetics. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / metabolism. Proto-Oncogenes. Signal Transduction. Stomach / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17462972.001).
  • [ISSN] 1699-048X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical & translational oncology : official publication of the Federation of Spanish Oncology Societies and of the National Cancer Institute of Mexico
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Transl Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Genetic Markers; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
  • [Number-of-references] 46
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47. Yim DJ, Kim OJ, An HJ, Kang H, Ahn DH, Hwang SG, Oh D, Kim NK: Polymorphisms of thymidylate synthase gene 5'- and 3'-untranslated region and risk of gastric cancer in Koreans. Anticancer Res; 2010 Jun;30(6):2325-30
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  • [Title] Polymorphisms of thymidylate synthase gene 5'- and 3'-untranslated region and risk of gastric cancer in Koreans.
  • Polymorphisms of the TS gene affect the expression of the gene, which in turn may result in differences in the outcome of cancer chemotherapy and the progression of gastric cancer.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: These types of TS polymorphism were investigated in 318 gastric cancer patients and 280 controls.
  • RESULTS: The TSER 2R/2R genotype had a high odds ratio in gastric cancer and for the intestinal type, but was not statistically significant (adjusted odds ratio, AOR=2.31, 95% confidence interval, CI=0.94-5.65; and AOR=2.53, 95% CI=0.98-6.54, respectively).
  • Among the combined genotypes of TSER VNTR-3'-UTR 6 bp ins/del, 2R2R-6 bp/6 bp having 4 risk alleles conferred a significantly high risk of gastric cancer, particularly of the intestinal type (AOR=8.70, 95% CI=1.09-68.93; and AOR=10.86, 95% CI=1.32-89.09, respectively).
  • CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that the 2R/2R-6 bp/6 bp combined genotype may be related to high gastric cancer susceptibility.
  • [MeSH-major] 3' Untranslated Regions / genetics. 5' Untranslated Regions / genetics. Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide. Stomach Neoplasms / genetics. Thymidylate Synthase / genetics

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  • (PMID = 20651387.001).
  • [ISSN] 1791-7530
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 3' Untranslated Regions; 0 / 5' Untranslated Regions; EC 2.1.1.45 / Thymidylate Synthase
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48. Low A, Love M, Walt R, Kane K, Eksteen B, Goh J: Understanding of chemoprophylaxis and concordance in inflammatory bowel disease. World J Gastroenterol; 2010 Feb 07;16(5):578-82
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  • [Title] Understanding of chemoprophylaxis and concordance in inflammatory bowel disease.
  • AIM: To assess patients' understanding for the reasons for taking 5-aminosalicylic acid or ursodeoxycholic acid as chemoprophylaxis against colorectal carcinoma associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
  • One hundred and ninety-two patients with colitis only and 74 patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and IBD were invited to take part.
  • Seventy-five percent stated they understood the reasons for taking the drugs.
  • However, only 50% of the patients were aware of any link of their condition to bowel cancer.
  • Seventy-nine percent of patients felt their concordance and understanding would be improved if they were informed of the chemoprophylactic potential of the medication.
  • CONCLUSION: Despite good self-reported concordance, half of the patients were unaware of an association between colitis and bowel cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Cholagogues and Choleretics / therapeutic use. Colorectal Neoplasms / prevention & control. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases / drug therapy. Mesalamine / therapeutic use. Patient Compliance. Ursodeoxycholic Acid / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Male. Patient Education as Topic. Surveys and Questionnaires. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20128025.001).
  • [ISSN] 2219-2840
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / G0601816
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Cholagogues and Choleretics; 4Q81I59GXC / Mesalamine; 724L30Y2QR / Ursodeoxycholic Acid
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2816269
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49. Faro A, Boj SF, Clevers H: Fishing for intestinal cancer models: unraveling gastrointestinal homeostasis and tumorigenesis in zebrafish. Zebrafish; 2009 Dec;6(4):361-76
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  • [Title] Fishing for intestinal cancer models: unraveling gastrointestinal homeostasis and tumorigenesis in zebrafish.
  • Given that the molecular pathways involved in epithelial carcinogenesis appear to be conserved across vertebrates, zebrafish is now considered as a valid model to study tumor biology.
  • The Wnt signaling pathway is a major signaling pathway during embryonic development and is the key regulator of self-renewal homeostasis in several adult tissues.
  • A large body of knowledge on adult stem-cell biology has arisen from the study of the intestinal epithelium over the past 20 years.
  • Moreover, most cancers of the intestine are caused by activating mutations in the Wnt pathway.
  • Recently, zebrafish models have been developed to study Wnt pathway-induced cancer.
  • An appealing avenue for cancer research in zebrafish is large-scale screens to identify chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agents in conjunction with the in vivo imaging approaches that zebrafish affords.
  • [MeSH-major] Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / metabolism. Homeostasis. Intestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Intestinal Neoplasms / metabolism. Zebrafish / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19929219.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-8542
  • [Journal-full-title] Zebrafish
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zebrafish
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Wnt Proteins
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50. Takenaka R, Okada H, Kato J, Makidono C, Hori S, Kawahara Y, Miyoshi M, Yumoto E, Imagawa A, Toyokawa T, Sakaguchi K, Shiratori Y: Helicobacter pylori eradication reduced the incidence of gastric cancer, especially of the intestinal type. Aliment Pharmacol Ther; 2007 Apr 1;25(7):805-12
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Stomach Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Helicobacter pylori eradication reduced the incidence of gastric cancer, especially of the intestinal type.
  • BACKGROUND: Although Helicobacter pylori infection is closely associated with gastric cancer development, follow-up studies after H. pylori eradication are still scarce.
  • AIM: To clarify the cancer preventive effect of H. pylori eradication, with special attention to differences in effect according to histology.
  • METHODS: Patients who underwent H. pylori eradication therapy and were followed-up endoscopically for at least 1 year were analysed.
  • The incidence of gastric cancer and factors associated with cancer development were investigated.
  • Six of 1519 H. pylori eradicated and five of 288 persistent subjects developed gastric cancer.
  • Four of the eradicated subjects developed the intestinal type and two the diffuse type, while four of the persistent subjects developed the intestinal type and one the diffuse type.
  • The incidence of intestinal type was significantly lower than in eradicated patients, while the diffuse type could not be evaluated because of the low incidence.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Helicobacter pylori-eradicated patients had a reduced incidence of gastric cancer compared with H. pylori-persistent patients, particularly the intestinal type, suggesting that H. pylori is strongly associated with intestinal-type gastric cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Helicobacter Infections / prevention & control. Helicobacter pylori. Stomach Neoplasms / microbiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Disease-Free Survival. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Incidence. Japan / epidemiology. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 17373919.001).
  • [ISSN] 0269-2813
  • [Journal-full-title] Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] England
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51. Hannoud S, Rixe O, Bloch J, Le Pelletier F, Lebrun-Vignes B, Doarika A, Khayat D, Chosidow O: [Skin signs associated with epidermal growth factor inhibitors]. Ann Dermatol Venereol; 2006 Mar;133(3):239-42
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  • [Transliterated title] Manifestations cutanées des inhibiteurs du récepteur du facteur de croissance épidermique.
  • BACKGROUND: Inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) constitute a new alternative treatment for patients presenting certain advanced stage solid cancers (bowel, breast, ovary).
  • Adverse cutaneous effects of these drugs are now starting to be described.
  • OBSERVATIONS: Our study involved 2 men and 2 women with no previous history of acne included in a treatment protocol comprising EGFR inhibitors.
  • The primary cancers were breast, ovary, bowel and unidentified.
  • The severity of the rash resulted in discontinuation of treatment in 2 patients with complete disappearance of skin lesions in both cases.
  • DISCUSSION: EGFR inhibitors act by inhibiting mechanisms oftumour proliferation in certain cancers at advanced stages or refractory to other treatments.
  • This treatment must be instituted rapidly and patients must be informed about the cutaneous side-effects of EGFR inhibitors before the start of therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Drug Eruptions / etiology. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / antagonists & inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Female. Folliculitis / chemically induced. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 16800173.001).
  • [ISSN] 0151-9638
  • [Journal-full-title] Annales de dermatologie et de vénéréologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Dermatol Venereol
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor
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52. Kotake M, Murakami N, Bandou H, Morita K, Koizumi H, Yoshino H, Tawaraya K, Ishiguro K, Kinoshita S, Yamada T: [A case of primary small intestinal cancer accompanied by virchow lymph node metastasis undergoing TS-1 treatment]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2005 Nov;32(12):1955-7

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [A case of primary small intestinal cancer accompanied by virchow lymph node metastasis undergoing TS-1 treatment].
  • Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed wall thickening of the small intestine and multiple lymph node metastases.
  • Barium meal study of the small intestine showed circular stenosis.
  • The patient was operated on under a diagnosis of tumor of the small intestine and left neck lymph node swelling.
  • Needle biopsy of the left neck lymph node and partial resection of the small intestine was done without regional lymph node dissection because of Virchow lymph node metastasis.
  • On the resected material a 5 x 4 cm type 2 tumor was identified.
  • The patient received the chemotherapy with TS-1.
  • TS-1(80 mg/body/day) orally administered for 4 weeks followed by a drug-free 2-week period as one course.
  • There were no drug side effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Intestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Intestine, Small. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Oxonic Acid / therapeutic use. Pyridines / therapeutic use. Tegafur / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Combinations. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Remission Induction

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  • (PMID = 16282734.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Pyridines; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid
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53. Piccart MJ, Lohrisch C, Duchateau L, Buyse M: Taxanes in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer: why not yet? J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr; 2001;(30):88-95
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  • [Title] Taxanes in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer: why not yet?
  • The taxanes paclitaxel and docetaxel represent the most active chemotherapeutic agents developed for the treatment of advanced breast cancer in the last decade, and they are now being incorporated into adjuvant chemotherapy trials for lymph node-positive breast cancer with the hope of improving on the results achieved with CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil) or anthracycline-based regimens.
  • So far, three randomized paclitaxel-based adjuvant clinical trials enrolling 3170 women (Cancer and Leukemia Group B [CALGB] 9344), 3060 women (National Surgical Adjuvant Project for Breast and Bowel Cancers [NSABP]-B28), and 524 women (M. D.
  • Anderson), respectively, have been reported with respective median follow-up times of 52, 34, and 43 months.
  • This article critically reviews these three studies and gives an overview of the many other randomized clinical trials, due to accrue more than 17 000 women, which are investigating the potential of taxanes in adjuvant breast cancer therapy.
  • Given that the early promise of taxanes suggested by CALGB 9344 is not yet confirmed by the two other trials, only level 2 evidence has been reached to date in regard to a positive contribution of these agents to breast cancer outcome in the adjuvant setting.
  • It is anticipated that a meta-analysis will be needed to comprehensively define the value of taxanes in early breast cancer, and a new model of international collaboration is proposed to find a balance between the need to offer new, more effective therapies to patients as soon as possible and the danger of drawing wrong, premature conclusions regarding the magnitude of benefit of a new regimen.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Paclitaxel / analogs & derivatives. Paclitaxel / therapeutic use. Taxoids
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / trends. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / utilization. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Meta-Analysis as Topic. Patient Selection. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic / standards. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic / statistics & numerical data

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  • (PMID = 11773299.001).
  • [ISSN] 1052-6773
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Monographs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Natl. Cancer Inst. Monographs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Taxoids; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
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54. Iishi H, Tatsuta M, Baba M, Yano H, Sakai N, Akedo H: Genistein attenuates peritoneal metastasis of azoxymethane-induced intestinal adenocarcinomas in Wistar rats. Int J Cancer; 2000 May 1;86(3):416-20
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. GENISTEIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Genistein attenuates peritoneal metastasis of azoxymethane-induced intestinal adenocarcinomas in Wistar rats.
  • The effects of the soybean isoflavonoid genistein on the development of bombesin-enhanced peritoneal metastasis from intestinal adenocarcinomas induced by azoxymethane (AOM) were investigated in male inbred Wistar rats.
  • Bombesin significantly increased the incidence of intestinal tumors and of cancer metastasis to the peritoneum.
  • Although genistein administered at either dose had little or no effect on the enhancement of intestinal carcinogenesis by bombesin or on the location, histologic type, depth of involvement, labeling index, or growth pattern of intestinal cancers, it significantly decreased the incidence of cancer metastasis.
  • Our findings indicate that genistein attenuates cancer metastasis by inhibiting cancer cell invasion into lymphatic vessels through activities that do not affect the growth of intestinal cancers.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Genistein / administration & dosage. Intestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Intestinal Neoplasms / pathology. Peritoneal Neoplasms / prevention & control

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 10760831.001).
  • [ISSN] 0020-7136
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Carcinogens; DH2M523P0H / Genistein; MO0N1J0SEN / Azoxymethane
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55. Dickson MA, Shah MA, Rathkopf D, Tse A, Carvajal RD, Wu N, Lefkowitz RA, Gonen M, Cane LM, Dials HJ, Schwartz GK: A phase I clinical trial of FOLFIRI in combination with the pan-cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor flavopiridol. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol; 2010 Nov;66(6):1113-21
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  • We conducted a phase I trial of FOLFIRI + flavopiridol in patients with advanced solid tumors.
  • Clinical activity included 2 partial responses in small bowel cancer and bladder cancer and 1 complete response in mucosal melanoma.
  • Clinical benefit was correlated with the presence of wild-type p53.
  • Of 25 patients with colorectal cancer, 11 had as best response SD for >3 m (median 6 m, range 4.2-15.4 m), despite failing ≥1 irinotecan-containing regimen.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with flavopiridol and FOLFIRI is a safe and effective regimen.
  • Clinical activity is encouraging and includes prolonged stable disease in patients with irinotecan-refractory colorectal cancer.

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  • (PMID = 20953860.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-0843
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer chemotherapy and pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA067819; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01CA67819
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Flavonoids; 0 / Piperidines; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 45AD6X575G / alvocidib; 7673326042 / irinotecan; Q573I9DVLP / Leucovorin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS195344; NLM/ PMC2957673
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56. Takano M, Kikuchi Y, Kato M, Yoshikawa T, Kita T: [Bowel perforation associated with bevacizumab therapy in recurrent ovarian cancers without bowel obstruction or bowel involvement]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2008 Nov;35(11):1981-4
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Ovarian Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Bowel perforation associated with bevacizumab therapy in recurrent ovarian cancers without bowel obstruction or bowel involvement].
  • Recent reports showed that bevacizumab, a humanized recombinant antibody binding to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), harbored a significant activity in advanced or recurrent epithelial ovarian cancers.
  • A Japanese case of bowel perforation associated with bevacizumab treatment in heavily pretreated ovarian cancers is reported.
  • The case affected with refractory ovarian cancer had no signs of bowel obstruction and bowel thickness which are now recognized as risk factors of GIP associated with bevacizumab.
  • After obtaining a written informed consent, a combination of weekly paclitaxel and weekly bevacizumab was administered as the fourth-line therapy.
  • After nine cycles of the regimen, the case developed GIP, although the recurrent tumor showed a stable disease.
  • After conservative therapy for two months, the patient died.
  • Therefore, we do recommend that special cautions are required for the bevacizumab- based chemotherapy, especially severely pretreated ovarian cancer patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / adverse effects. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Intestinal Perforation / chemically induced. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Ovarian Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Bevacizumab. Female. Humans. Intestinal Obstruction / radiography. Middle Aged. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Failure

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  • (PMID = 19011357.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 2S9ZZM9Q9V / Bevacizumab
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57. Hennig IM, Naik JD, Brown S, Szubert A, Anthoney DA, Jackson DP, Melcher AM, Crawford SM, Bradley C, Brown JM, Seymour MT: Severe sequence-specific toxicity when capecitabine is given after Fluorouracil and leucovorin. J Clin Oncol; 2008 Jul 10;26(20):3411-7
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. LEUCOVORIN .

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  • PURPOSE: Options for single-agent fluoropyrimidine adjuvant therapy after bowel cancer resection include intravenous fluorouracil with leucovorin (FU/LV) or oral capecitabine.
  • These treatments have similar efficacy but differ in convenience and toxicity.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients scheduled for adjuvant single-agent fluoropyrimidine therapy were randomly assigned to receive once-weekly FU/LV (425 mg/m(2) FU, 45 mg LV) for 6 weeks, followed by two 3-week cycles of capecitabine (1,250 mg/m(2) twice daily, days 1 through 14), or the same treatments but in reverse order.
  • After 12 weeks, the patients were asked which treatment they preferred, and received the preferred treatment for an additional 12 weeks.
  • RESULTS: After 40 of the planned 74 patients had been randomly assigned, real-time adverse event monitoring led to early trial closure because of excess sequence-specific toxicity.
  • Eleven of 14 patients (79%) receiving capecitabine as their second treatment experienced grade >/= 3 toxicity.
  • This compared with five of 18 patients (28%) receiving capecitabine as the first treatment, and no patients receiving FU/LV as the first treatment (zero of 16) or the second treatment (zero of 12).
  • Similar imbalances were seen in the proportion of patients requiring interruption of treatment.
  • CONCLUSION: In chemotherapy-naïve patients, capecitabine produced more toxicity than FU/LV, but at levels in line with previously reported data.
  • However, treatment with capecitabine after FU/LV caused markedly increased toxicity, indicating a sequence-specific interaction.
  • The mechanism has not been determined, but interaction with intracellularly retained folate after FU/LV therapy is a possibility.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Colorectal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Colorectal Neoplasms / mortality. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Fluorouracil / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Biopsy, Needle. Capecitabine. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Colectomy / methods. Cross-Over Studies. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Interactions. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Leucovorin / administration & dosage. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Probability. Prospective Studies. Reference Values. Risk Assessment. Single-Blind Method. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18612156.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Cancer Research UK / /
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; 6804DJ8Z9U / Capecitabine; Q573I9DVLP / Leucovorin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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58. Wilkinson E: Is the online drugs market putting patients at risk? Nurs Times; 2006 Nov 14-20;102(46):23-4
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Drug Safety.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Is the online drugs market putting patients at risk?
  • A leading oncologist has warned that some patients with cancer are ordering drugs on the internet because they cannot access them in the UK.
  • Examples include bevacizumab (Avastin) for the treatment of advanced bowel cancer, and erlotinib (Tarceva) for the treatment of lung cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Consumer Product Safety. Drug and Narcotic Control. Internet. Pharmaceutical Services
  • [MeSH-minor] Great Britain. Humans. International Cooperation. Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 17144224.001).
  • [ISSN] 0954-7762
  • [Journal-full-title] Nursing times
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nurs Times
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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59. van der Vliet HJ, van Bodegraven AA: [Megacolon during treatment with lactulose]. Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd; 2004 May 15;148(20):998-1001
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. HYDROGEN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Megacolon during treatment with lactulose].
  • Two female patients aged 88 and 82 who were being treated for constipation with lactulose, developed life-threatening dilatation of the bowel.
  • One of them was found to have cancer of the bowel; she had an uneventful postoperative recovery.
  • The resulting production of gas in the colon can contribute to a non-toxic megacolon, particularly in patients with delayed intestinal passage.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Carbon Dioxide / metabolism. Colonic Neoplasms / complications. Constipation / drug therapy. Fatal Outcome. Fatty Acids, Volatile / metabolism. Female. Humans. Hydrogen / metabolism. Pneumonia, Aspiration / complications. Postoperative Complications. Respiratory Insufficiency / etiology

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  • (PMID = 15181726.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-2162
  • [Journal-full-title] Nederlands tijdschrift voor geneeskunde
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd
  • [Language] dut
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fatty Acids, Volatile; 0 / Gastrointestinal Agents; 142M471B3J / Carbon Dioxide; 4618-18-2 / Lactulose; 7YNJ3PO35Z / Hydrogen
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60. Kobayashi M, Kawato N, Nakata I, Ozaki S, Tabuse K, Tsuji T, Arii K: [Efficacy of lidocaine cream in protecting against thermal stress during hyperthermia]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2001 Jan;28(1):69-73
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  • Hyperthermia is performed in combination with chemotherapy as multimodal treatment for recurrent and advanced cancer.
  • The subjects were eighteen patients with stomach cancer, liver cancer, or large intestine cancer.
  • The pain scores in the treatment group were significantly lower than in the no-treatment group (p < 0.05).
  • The scores for sensation of heat in the treatment group were lower, though not to a significant extent, than those in the no-treatment group.
  • [MeSH-major] Anesthetics, Local / therapeutic use. Heat Stress Disorders / prevention & control. Hyperthermia, Induced / methods. Lidocaine / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / therapy. Humans. Ointments

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  • (PMID = 11201383.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anesthetics, Local; 0 / Ointments; 98PI200987 / Lidocaine
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61. Ogata Y, Yamaguchi K, Sasatomi T, Uchida S, Akagi Y, Shirouzu K: [Treatment and outcome in small bowel cancer]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2010 Aug;37(8):1454-7

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Treatment and outcome in small bowel cancer].
  • In adenocarcinoma of the small intestine, delays in diagnosis are frequent, and the majority of patients present with advanced- stage disease and either lymph node involvement or distant metastatic disease.
  • Surgical resection is a mainstay in treatment of this disease, but the role of adjuvant therapy is unclear.
  • Recent retrospective and prospective studies have helped to clarify the optimal chemotherapy approach for advanced small bowel adenocarcinoma.
  • Further clinical studies on this rare type of tumor are needed.
  • The 72nd Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum have conducted a retrospective review of Japanese patients with adenocarcinoma of the jejunum or ileum.
  • The data indicated that although not statistically significant, there was a trend in median overall survival favoring the chemotherapy for advanced jejunal or ileal adenocarcinoma (17 months vs. 8 months, p=0.114).
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Intestinal Neoplasms / therapy. Intestine, Small
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Prognosis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20716869.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Number-of-references] 13
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62. Nagano T, Yasunaga M, Goto K, Kenmotsu H, Koga Y, Kuroda J, Nishimura Y, Sugino T, Nishiwaki Y, Matsumura Y: Antitumor activity of NK012 combined with cisplatin against small cell lung cancer and intestinal mucosal changes in tumor-bearing mouse after treatment. Clin Cancer Res; 2009 Jul 1;15(13):4348-55
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  • [Title] Antitumor activity of NK012 combined with cisplatin against small cell lung cancer and intestinal mucosal changes in tumor-bearing mouse after treatment.
  • PURPOSE: To investigate the advantages of treatment with the SN-38-incorporating polymeric micelles NK012 over CPT-11 in combination with cisplatin [cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum (II) (CDDP)] in mice bearing a small cell lung cancer xenograft in terms of antitumor activity and toxicity, particularly intestinal toxicity.
  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Cytotoxic effects were evaluated in human small cell lung cancer cell lines [H69, H82, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-secreting cells (SBC-3/VEGF and its mock transfectant SBC-3/Neo)].
  • In vivo antitumor effects were evaluated in SBC-3/Neo-bearing and SBC-3/VEGF-bearing mice after NK012/CDDP or CPT-11/CDDP administration on days 0, 7, and 14.
  • Drug distribution was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography or fluorescence microscopy, and the small intestine was pathologically examined.
  • A significant difference in the relative tumor volume on day 30 was found between NK012/CDDP and CPT-11/CDDP treatments (P = 0.0058).
  • Inflammatory changes in the small intestinal mucosa were rare in all NK012-treated mice but were commonly observed in CPT-11-treated mice.
  • Moreover, a large amount of CPT-11 was excreted into the feces and high CPT-11 concentration was detected in the small intestinal epithelium.
  • CONCLUSIONS: NK012/CDDP combination may be a promising candidate regimen against lung cancer without severe diarrhea toxicity and therefore warrants further clinical evaluation.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Camptothecin / analogs & derivatives. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Intestinal Mucosa / drug effects. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Small Cell Lung Carcinoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Female. Humans. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Mice, Nude. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / genetics. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / metabolism. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays

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  • (PMID = 19509138.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / VEGFA protein, human; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; 7673326042 / irinotecan; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
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63. Moreno-Salazar SF, Robles-Zepeda RE, Johnson DE: Plant folk medicines for gastrointestinal disorders among the main tribes of Sonora, Mexico. Fitoterapia; 2008 Feb;79(2):132-41
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  • This paper describes the herbal remedies used by ethnic groups from Sonora, Mexico, for treatment of gastrointestinal diseases.
  • Twelve types of these illnesses are cured using 85 different species which belong to 38 families.
  • Thirty nine spp. are used to treat diarrhea, 28 for stomach-ache, 12 for constipation, 9 for intestinal parasites, 6 for indigestion, 3 for stomach or intestinal cancer, 3 for stomach inflammation and only 1 to treat gastrointestinal sicknesses, ulcers, gastritis, colitis and colic.
  • [MeSH-major] Ethnobotany. Gastrointestinal Diseases / drug therapy. Phytotherapy. Plant Extracts / therapeutic use. Plants, Medicinal

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  • (PMID = 17881152.001).
  • [ISSN] 0367-326X
  • [Journal-full-title] Fitoterapia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Fitoterapia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Plant Extracts
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64. Huang XL, Yi WQ, Zhang M, Ouyang Q, Gan HT: [Expression of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and effects of wortmannin on the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in ulcerative colitis]. Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi; 2007 Feb 6;87(6):379-82
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Expression of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and effects of wortmannin on the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in ulcerative colitis].
  • OBJECTIVE: To elucidate the role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC) and provide experimental evidence that PI3K inhibitor wortmannin can be used as a possible novel approach for treatment of UC.
  • METHODS: Samples of intestinal mucosa were collected from 30 UC patients, 22 males and 8 females, aged 35 +/- 11, during enteroscopy.
  • Samples of normal intestinal mucosa 10 cm beyond the cancerous tissues were collected from 15 patients with intestinal cancer, 9 males and 6 females, aged 40 +/- 9, as normal controls.
  • Another tissues of intestinal mucosa were cultured and divided into 3 groups: UC + wortmannin group, (n = 10, wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3K/Akt pathway, of the concentration of 0.002 nmol/microl was added), UC control group (n = 10, without addition of wortmannin), and peri-cancer normal intestinal tissue group (n = 10).
  • 4.5 hours after the culture, immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) in the intestinal mucosa and ELISA was used to detect the content of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) in intestinal mucosa. RESULTS:.
  • (1) The A value of p-Akt in the intestinal mucosa of the UC control group was 73.6 +/- 5.2, significantly higher than that of the normal control group (18.0 +/- 2.6, P < 0.05), the positive area of the UC control group was 720 +/- 58, significantly larger than that of the normal control group (133 +/- 29, P < 0.05). (2) The level of TNF-alpha in intestinal mucosa of the UC + wortmannin group was 135 +/- 11, significantly lower than that of the UC control group (296 +/- 39, P < 0.05), however, still significantly higher than that of the normal control group (26 +/- 5, P < 0.05). (3) The A value of p-Akt in the intestinal mucosa biopsy specimens of the UC + wortmannin group was 35.3 +/- 5.6, significantly lower than that of the UC control group (72.3 +/- 6.2, P < 0.05), however, still significantly higher than that of the normal control group (18.0 +/- 2.2, P < 0.05); and the positive area of the UC + wortmannin group was 351 +/- 50, significantly lower than that of the UC control group (716 +/- 94, P < 0.05), however, still significantly higher than that of the normal control group (129 +/- 30, P < 0.05).
  • CONCLUSIONS:. (1) PI3K/Akt signal transduction pathway is a critical factor in regulating the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine, and plays a role in the pathogenesis of UC. (2) Decreasing the levels of relevant cytokines in UC by inhibiting PI3K/Akt signal transduction pathway, wortmannin may be a novel approach for the treatment of UC.
  • [MeSH-major] Androstadienes / therapeutic use. Colitis, Ulcerative / drug therapy. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Intestinal Mucosa / drug effects. Intestinal Mucosa / metabolism. Intestinal Mucosa / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases / biosynthesis. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Signal Transduction / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 17456377.001).
  • [ISSN] 0376-2491
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua yi xue za zhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androstadienes; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; EC 2.7.1.- / Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; XVA4O219QW / wortmannin
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65. Hahn SM, Putt ME, Metz J, Shin DB, Rickter E, Menon C, Smith D, Glatstein E, Fraker DL, Busch TM: Photofrin uptake in the tumor and normal tissues of patients receiving intraperitoneal photodynamic therapy. Clin Cancer Res; 2006 Sep 15;12(18):5464-70
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Photofrin uptake in the tumor and normal tissues of patients receiving intraperitoneal photodynamic therapy.
  • PURPOSE: A phase II trial of Photofrin-mediated i.p. photodynamic therapy shown in a previous report limited efficacy and significant acute, but not chronic, toxicity.
  • A secondary aim of this trial and the subject of this report is to determine Photofrin uptake in tumor and normal tissues.
  • Photofrin uptake was measured by spectroflurometric analysis of drug extracted from tumor and normal tissues removed at surgery.
  • Differences in drug uptake among these tissues were statistically considered using mixed-effects models.
  • In normal tissues, drug uptake significantly (P<0.0001) differed as a function of seven different tissue types.
  • In the toxicity-limiting tissue of intestine, the model-based mean (SE) Photofrin level was 2.70 ng/mg (0.32 ng/mg) and 3.42 ng/mg (0.24 ng/mg) in full-thickness large and small intestine, respectively.
  • In tumors, drug uptake significantly (P=0.0015) differed as a function of patient cohort: model-based mean Photofrin level was 3.32 to 5.31 ng/mg among patients with ovarian, gastric, or small bowel cancer; 2.09 to 2.45 ng/mg among patients with sarcoma and appendiceal or colon cancer; and 0.93 ng/mg in patients with pseudomyxoma.
  • Ovarian, gastric, and small bowel cancers showed significantly higher Photofrin uptake than full-thickness large and/or small intestine.
  • However, the ratio of mean drug level in tumor versus intestine was modest (<or=2.31).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Some selectivity is found in Photofrin uptake between tumor and normal tissues of the peritoneal cavity, but absolute differences in drug uptake relative to toxicity-limiting normal tissues (intestine) are small.
  • This narrow differential in drug selectivity likely contributes to a narrow window in therapeutic application, which has been previously reported.
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy. Cohort Studies. Female. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Humans. Injections, Intraperitoneal. Models, Biological. Organ Specificity. Ovarian Neoplasms / drug therapy. Sarcoma / drug therapy. Tissue Distribution

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  • (PMID = 17000681.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA-87971; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA-85831
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 97067-70-4 / Dihematoporphyrin Ether
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66. Zhang L, Irinotecan Cooperative Group Of Clinic Research: [Campto (CPT-11) treatment of advanced large intestinal cancer: clinical experience]. Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi; 2003 Nov;25(6):607-9

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Campto (CPT-11) treatment of advanced large intestinal cancer: clinical experience].
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of campto (CPT-11) monotherapy or combined with 5Fu + leucovorin (CF) in advanced large intestinal cancer.
  • METHODS: 186 such patients were divided into campto monotherapy group and CPT-11 plus 5Fu + CF [De Gramont (DGM) or Mayo protocal] groups.
  • There were 2 treatment-related deaths.
  • [MeSH-major] Camptothecin / analogs & derivatives. Camptothecin / therapeutic use. Intestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bone Marrow / drug effects. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 14690576.001).
  • [ISSN] 0253-3766
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua zhong liu za zhi [Chinese journal of oncology]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 7673326042 / irinotecan; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
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67. Nordlinger B, Peschaud F, Malafosse R: Resection of liver metastases from colorectal cancer--how can we improve results? Colorectal Dis; 2003 Sep;5(5):515-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Resection of liver metastases from colorectal cancer--how can we improve results?
  • Resection of liver metastases due to large bowel cancer has become an important part of treatment.
  • Resection combined with chemotherapy may offer improved survival, but more data are needed.
  • Chemotherapy may cause regression of metastases to permit resection where initially they were considered unresectable.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Liver Neoplasms / surgery. Patient Selection
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans

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  • (PMID = 12925092.001).
  • [ISSN] 1462-8910
  • [Journal-full-title] Colorectal disease : the official journal of the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Colorectal Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 17
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68. Winburn GB: Anal carcinoma or "just hemorrhoids"? Am Surg; 2001 Nov;67(11):1048-58
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  • Cancers of the anal margin and anal canal are extremely rare and often misdiagnosed.
  • Only one to two per cent of large bowel cancers arise in this area.
  • Current management of these cancers includes surgery, combined chemoradiation, or both.
  • From January 1985 through July 2000, 50 patients were diagnosed with anal cancer at two institutions.
  • This retrospective review includes all available cases of anal cancer including all histologies.
  • Patient charts were analyzed for diagnosis, staging, treatment, survival, and recurrence rate.
  • The pathologic diagnosis included 44 (88%) with squamous cell carcinoma, three (6%) with melanoma, two (4%) with adenocarcinoma, and one (2%) with Paget's disease.
  • Chemoradiotherapy was the primary treatment modality in 25 patients (50%).
  • Three patients (6%) received an APR as primary treatment, three (6%) in combination with chemoradiation, and four (8%) for salvage therapy.
  • Fourteen patients (28%) underwent wide local excision (WLE) as the primary treatment.
  • Two patients (4%) underwent WLE plus chemoradiation therapy.
  • One patient (2%) underwent WLE and chemotherapy.
  • Thirteen patients (26%) died of anal cancer; the average time to death from diagnosis was 13.2 months.
  • Thirty-two patients (64%) are alive, and 30 (60%) of these patients are free of disease (mean time since diagnosis 32.5 months, range 2-151 months).
  • Six patients (12%) had recurrence after treatment (mean time to recurrence 12.6 months; range 3-26 months).
  • Anal cancers continue to present at an advanced stage, with a high mortality rate.
  • Anal melanoma in particular is an aggressive and highly fatal cancer.
  • APR remains the recommended salvage therapy for advanced anal carcinomas that fail primary treatment.
  • Early recognition and detection of primary and recurrent disease is necessary for improved outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Hemorrhoids / diagnosis. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 11730221.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-1348
  • [Journal-full-title] The American surgeon
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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69. Guimarães AP, Matos D, Segreto R, Forones NM: [Squamous cell carcinoma of the canal anal]. Arq Gastroenterol; 2001 Jan-Mar;38(1):9-13
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Transliterated title] Carcinoma espinocelular de canal anal: análise de 11 casos.
  • BACKGROUND: Anal cancer is an uncommon malignancy accounting for only a small (4%) percentage of intestinal cancer.
  • The authors described the clinical aspects and the treatment of the patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the canal anal.
  • RESULTS: The most common symptoms were rectal bleeding, local tumor and pain.
  • Six of them had previous anal benign disease and two had metastases at the diagnosis.
  • All were submitted to systemic chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin and radiotherapy with 4500 cGy.
  • The chemo radiation can be a curable treatment in patients with local disease; conversely in patients with residual disease, abdominoperineal resection must be done.
  • Although anal cancer is an often curable disease, four patients died because the diagnosis was done in advanced stage.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Sex Factors

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  • (PMID = 11582966.001).
  • [ISSN] 0004-2803
  • [Journal-full-title] Arquivos de gastroenterologia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arq Gastroenterol
  • [Language] por
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
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70. Rajamanickam S, Velmurugan B, Kaur M, Singh RP, Agarwal R: Chemoprevention of intestinal tumorigenesis in APCmin/+ mice by silibinin. Cancer Res; 2010 Mar 15;70(6):2368-78
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  • [Title] Chemoprevention of intestinal tumorigenesis in APCmin/+ mice by silibinin.
  • Chemoprevention is a practical and translational approach to reduce the risk of various cancers including colorectal cancer (CRC), which is a major cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States.
  • Accordingly, here we assessed chemopreventive efficacy and associated mechanisms of long-term silibinin feeding on spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis in the APC(min/+) mice model.
  • Silibinin feeding strongly prevented intestinal tumorigenesis in terms of polyp formation in proximal, middle, and distal portions of small intestine by 27% (P < 0.001), 34% (P < 0.001), and 49% (P < 0.001), respectively.
  • In colon, we observed 55% (P < 0.01) reduction in number of polyps by silibinin treatment.
  • In size distribution analysis, silibinin showed significant decrease in large-size polyps (>3 mm) by 66% (P < 0.01) and 88% (P < 0.001) in middle and distal portions of small intestine, respectively.
  • These results show for the first time the efficacy and associated mechanisms of long-term p.o. silibinin feeding against spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis in the APC(min/+) mice model, suggesting its chemopreventive potential against intestinal cancers including CRC.

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  • (PMID = 20215518.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-7445
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA112304-05; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA112304; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA112304-05
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antioxidants; 0 / Silymarin; 0 / beta Catenin; 136601-57-5 / Cyclin D1; 4RKY41TBTF / silybin; EC 1.14.99.1 / Cyclooxygenase 2; K7Q1JQR04M / Dinoprostone
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS172766; NLM/ PMC2840193
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71. Nozawa H, Yamada Y, Muto Y, Endo J, Asakage M, Oka T, Furukawa Y, Arai M: Double primary adenocarcinomas of the jejunum and descending colon with lung metastases presenting rare immunohistochemical phenotypes: a case report. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol; 2010 Feb;22(2):228-33
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  • We report a male patient with double advanced tumors in the jejunum and descending colon and multiple lung tumors.
  • The intestinal cancers were surgically resected.
  • Immunoprofiling of the specimens revealed a rare phenotype: the jejunal cancer was positive for cytokeratin (CK) 7, partially positive for CK20, and Cdx-2-negative, whereas the colon cancer was CK7(+), CK20(-), and Cdx-2(-).
  • Biopsied lung tumor was diagnosed as tubular adenocarcinoma, and CK7(+)/CK20(+)/Cdx-2(-).
  • Moreover, postoperative oxaliplatin, including chemotherapy, significantly reduced the lung metastases, suggesting that this regimen is a promising treatment option for advanced small bowel adenocarcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Colonic Neoplasms / pathology. Immunohistochemistry. Jejunal Neoplasms / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Biopsy. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Colectomy. Fatal Outcome. Fluorouracil / therapeutic use. Homeodomain Proteins / analysis. Humans. Keratin-20 / analysis. Keratin-7 / analysis. Leucovorin / therapeutic use. Lymph Node Excision. Male. Middle Aged. Organoplatinum Compounds / administration & dosage. Organoplatinum Compounds / therapeutic use. Phenotype. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19923997.001).
  • [ISSN] 1473-5687
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of gastroenterology & hepatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / CDX2 protein, human; 0 / Homeodomain Proteins; 0 / KRT20 protein, human; 0 / KRT7 protein, human; 0 / Keratin-20; 0 / Keratin-7; 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 04ZR38536J / oxaliplatin; Q573I9DVLP / Leucovorin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; Folfox protocol
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72. Figueroa-Hernández JL, Sandoval González G, Ascencio VJ, Figueroa-Espitia JL, Fernández Saavedra G: Plant products with anti-cancer properties employed in the treatment of bowel cancer: literature review 1985 and 2004. Proc West Pharmacol Soc; 2005;48:77-83

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  • [Title] Plant products with anti-cancer properties employed in the treatment of bowel cancer: literature review 1985 and 2004.
  • The use of extracts of plant origin for the treatment of cancer has seen renewed interest.
  • In Mexico, "Herbalists" have practiced since before Spanish times, but now at Mexican medical schools the alternative medicines are not taught.
  • The aim of this work was to carry out a review of the international literature to identify and analyze the use of articles in the treatment of cancer with principles of plant origin.
  • An online review was conducted of citations published between 1985 and 2004, selecting those works in which plant products demonstrated pharmacological activity useful against cancer with particular reference to bowel carcinoma.
  • In 45 articles, we looked for common and scientific names, part of plant and/or its products used as treatment or preventive, used in an experimental in vivo or in vitro model, pharmacological effects and actions, human or animal species studied and apparent efficacy.
  • Fifty-five percent used human cancer cell lines as a model, incubated with plant extracts; 40% used animal species to induce tumors and protect them with plant extracts; only 5% were clinical studies.
  • Additionally, we determined which of these natural products are included in relevant references: two are marketed in Mexico; none were listed in the academic Mexican book "Vademecum Academico de Medicamentos"; one was found in Goodman Gilman's The Pharmacologic Basis of Therapeutics, while three were listed in Katzung's Medical Pharmacology.
  • Experimental data support the empirical use of natural plant products against cancer by their chemopreventive effects, but they are not considered drugs.
  • Despite not being listed as drugs, these remedies should be covered in pharmacology courses when evidence of mechanisms of action is available.
  • Our review suggests that medical schools should review "traditional medicines" in order that graduates know what treatments patients are using and those that may be of value.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. Humans. Mexico. Plants, Medicinal / chemistry

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  • (PMID = 16416667.001).
  • [ISSN] 0083-8969
  • [Journal-full-title] Proceedings of the Western Pharmacology Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Proc. West. Pharmacol. Soc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic
  • [Number-of-references] 52
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73. Sugarbaker PH: Strategies for the prevention and treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis from gastrointestinal cancer. Cancer Invest; 2005;23(2):155-72
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  • [Title] Strategies for the prevention and treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis from gastrointestinal cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: Peritoneal surface malignancy can result from full thickness invasion of gastrointestinal cancer through the bowel wall or from dissemination of cancer cells from the trauma of cancer surgery.
  • METHODS: An aggressive approach to peritoneal surface malignancy involves peritonectomy procedures, perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy and knowledgeable patient selection.
  • The clinical assessments necessary for valid clinical judgements include the cancer histopathology (invasive vs. expansive progression), the preoperative abdominal and pelvic CT, the peritoneal cancer index and the completeness of cytoreduction score.
  • Proper patient selection is mandatory for optimizing the results of treatment.
  • RESULTS: In a series of phase II studies, appendiceal tumors with peritoneal seeding became the paradigm for success with an 85% long-term survival in selected patients.
  • Carcinomatosis from colon cancer had an overall 5-year survival of 50% with selected patients.
  • In all malignancies, early aggressive treatment of minimal peritoneal surface dissemination showed the greatest benefit.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Oncologists must accept responsibility for knowledgeable management of peritoneal surface dissemination of cancer because a curative approach has been demonstrated in both phase II studies and phase III studies.
  • Surgical interventions combined with perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy in diseases where peritoneal surface spread occurs must be considered a treatment option.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Carcinoma / prevention & control. Colonic Neoplasms / pathology. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / pathology. Peritoneal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Peritoneal Neoplasms / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Infusions, Parenteral. Intraoperative Period. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplastic Cells, Circulating. Patient Selection. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 15813509.001).
  • [ISSN] 0735-7907
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer investigation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Invest.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 37
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74. Ryan BM, Russel MG, Langholz E, Stockbrugger RW: Aminosalicylates and colorectal cancer in IBD: a not-so bitter pill to swallow. Am J Gastroenterol; 2003 Aug;98(8):1682-7
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  • [Title] Aminosalicylates and colorectal cancer in IBD: a not-so bitter pill to swallow.
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with an increased risk of developing intestinal cancer at sites of chronic inflammation.
  • On balance, the body of literature to date suggests that aminosalicylates confer some protection against the development of colonic neoplasia in patients with IBD and in a variety of models, including in the noninflamed gut.
  • [MeSH-major] Aminosalicylic Acids / therapeutic use. Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Anticarcinogenic Agents / therapeutic use. Colorectal Neoplasms / prevention & control. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 12907319.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-9270
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Aminosalicylic Acids; 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 86
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75. Mbah N: Hospital frequency of large bowel cancer: factors thought to influence outcome. Niger J Clin Pract; 2009 Mar;12(1):37-41
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  • [Title] Hospital frequency of large bowel cancer: factors thought to influence outcome.
  • BACKGROUND: One of the leading causes of death from malignancies is cancer of the large gut.
  • Elsewhere in the developed world, the disease severity and operative mortality are falling due to increased use of screening, earlier diagnosis and improvement in surgical techniques.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: This is an 8-year retrospective analysis (January 1998 December 2005) of all established cases of large bowel cancer managed at the surgical services of the Usmanu Danfodio University Teaching Hospital (UDUTH), Sokoto.
  • RESULTS: A total of 40 cases of colorectal cancer were seen in this centre during the study period.
  • All were symptomatic at time of detection.
  • Another 22 (55.0%) cases had palliative surgical treatment.
  • The remainder were either inoperable (n= 3; 7.5%), refused colostomy (9; 22.5%) or died before surgical treatment (1; 2.5%).
  • CONCLUSION: Cancers of the large intestine are not uncommon in this part of the world.
  • A rising frequency of colorectal cancers in our locality is observed.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 19562919.001).
  • [ISSN] 1119-3077
  • [Journal-full-title] Nigerian journal of clinical practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Niger J Clin Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Nigeria
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76. Pentheroudakis G, Greco FA, Pavlidis N: Molecular assignment of tissue of origin in cancer of unknown primary may not predict response to therapy or outcome: a systematic literature review. Cancer Treat Rev; 2009 May;35(3):221-7
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  • [Title] Molecular assignment of tissue of origin in cancer of unknown primary may not predict response to therapy or outcome: a systematic literature review.
  • BACKGROUND: Gene expression profiling platforms were recently shown to accurately assign cancer of unknown primary (CUP) to a primary tissue of origin, with unknown impact on patient outcome.
  • We examined chemotherapy activity and outcome in CUP trials and in metastatic solid tumour trials in order to screen for a distinct biological behaviour of CUP.
  • Chemotherapy activity and patient survival data were narratively compared to data from phase III chemotherapy trials on patients with metastatic breast, lung, pancreatic and colon cancer, to which CUP is most commonly classified by molecular profiling.
  • 14 phase II trials managed 918 CUP patients with platinum-based chemotherapy resulting in objective response rate (ORR) of 32%.
  • Six trials administered anthracycline-containing or gastrointestinal-type chemotherapy in 401 CUP patients, reporting ORR of 22%.
  • The median of quoted median survival times was nine months for platinum and seven for anthracycline or GI-type regimens.
  • Though tumour shrinkage and median survival in CUP patients were similar to those of patients with metastatic lung and pancreatic cancer, they were vastly inferior to response rates of 40-70% and median survival of 15-24 months seen in patients with metastatic breast and bowel cancer.
  • These should be sought and the impact of molecularly classified primary site-directed therapy on patient outcome prospectively validated in trials.
  • [MeSH-major] Gene Expression Profiling. Neoplasms, Unknown Primary / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Anthracyclines / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Autopsy. Clinical Trials as Topic / statistics & numerical data. DNA, Neoplasm / analysis. Female. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Metastasis / drug therapy. Neoplasm Metastasis / pathology. Neoplasm Proteins / analysis. Organ Specificity. Organoplatinum Compounds / administration & dosage. Prognosis. RNA, Neoplasm / analysis. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19046817.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-1967
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer treatment reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Treat. Rev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anthracyclines; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 0 / RNA, Neoplasm
  • [Number-of-references] 67
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77. Bara T, Bancu S, Gyorgy-Fazakas I, Muresan M, Bara T Jr, Podeanu D, Muresan S: Two-step hepatectomy with right portal branch ligature for a right lobe metastasis. Hepatogastroenterology; 2008 May-Jun;55(84):1071-2
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  • Hepatic resection is the only treatment with possible curative effect both for primary and secondary tumors.
  • An increase of the rate of resectability for tumors considered inoperable at first, and a decrease of the postoperative morbidity and mortality can be realized by right portal branch ligature and two-step hepatectomy.
  • We would like to present the case of a patient with left bowel cancer with a hepatic metastasis.
  • Right portal branch ligature was performed which was followed by systemic postoperative chemotherapy.
  • The portal branch ligature can be made in several cases of hepatic tumors to increase the resectability rate.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Colonic Neoplasms / surgery. Hepatectomy / methods. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Portal Vein / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Ligation. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 18705330.001).
  • [ISSN] 0172-6390
  • [Journal-full-title] Hepato-gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hepatogastroenterology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
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78. Kokkola A, Sipponen P, Arkkila P, Danielson H, Puolakkainen P: Does the eradication of Helicobacter pylori delay the diagnosis of gastric cancer? Scand J Gastroenterol; 2008;43(12):1456-60
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  • [Title] Does the eradication of Helicobacter pylori delay the diagnosis of gastric cancer?
  • OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of gastric cancer patients having received eradication treatment of Helicobacter pylori, and whether this treatment has any influence on the delay in the diagnosis or the stage of the tumours at the time of the operation.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 119 consecutive patients with gastric cancer were interviewed preoperatively between 2001 and 2003 at the Department of Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital.
  • Abdominal symptoms, previous endoscopies, previous H. pylori testing and eradication therapies were recorded.
  • RESULTS. Of these patients, 112 (94%) had abdominal symptoms before the cancer diagnosis, and in 110 patients (92%) these symptoms were alarming or had changed before the cancer diagnosis.
  • Thirty-five patients (29%) had received H. pylori eradication therapy prior to the diagnosis of gastric cancer (15 after onset or change in symptoms, 10 more than 5 years prior to the cancer diagnosis).
  • The median duration of alarm, new or changed symptoms was longer among patients with H. pylori eradication therapy after the onset or change in their symptoms as compared to other patients (12.0 versus 4.5 months, p=0.001).
  • However, there was no difference in the tumour stages at time of the operation between the eradication and no eradication groups.
  • A previous gastroscopy within 2 years prior to the cancer diagnosis was performed in 17 (14%) patients.
  • Diffuse-type cancers were missed significantly more often in endoscopies than cancers of intestinal type.
  • CONCLUSION: Previous H. pylori eradication may delay the detection of gastric cancer if it is given during symptoms caused by tumour.
  • [MeSH-major] Helicobacter Infections / complications. Helicobacter pylori / drug effects. Stomach Neoplasms / microbiology. Stomach Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Gastroscopy. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging

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  • (PMID = 18663664.001).
  • [ISSN] 1502-7708
  • [Journal-full-title] Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Scand. J. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Norway
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79. Kabeer MA, Lloyd-Davies E, Maskell G, Hohle R, Mathew J: Metastatic prostate cancer masquerading clinically and radiologically as a primary caecal carcinoma. World J Surg Oncol; 2007;5:2
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  • [Title] Metastatic prostate cancer masquerading clinically and radiologically as a primary caecal carcinoma.
  • BACKGROUND: Prostatic carcinoma is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in males in the West.
  • We describe the case of a patient with metastatic prostate cancer to the bowel presenting clinically and radiologically as a primary caecal cancer.
  • The patient was being treated (Zoladex) for prostatic cancer diagnosed 6 years previously and was known to have bony metastases.
  • The patient underwent adjuvant chemotherapy and is free from recurrence a year later.
  • CONCLUSION: Metastasis of prostatic carcinoma to the bowel is a very rare occurrence and presents a challenging diagnosis.
  • The diagnosis is supported by immunohistochemistry for PSA.
  • The treatment for metastatic prostate cancer is mainly palliative.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Cecal Neoplasms / secondary. Cecal Neoplasms / therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Biopsy, Needle. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Colectomy / methods. Diagnosis, Differential. Follow-Up Studies. Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage / diagnosis. Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage / etiology. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Prostatectomy / methods. Rectum. Risk Assessment. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17207288.001).
  • [ISSN] 1477-7819
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1779271
  • [General-notes] NLM/ Original DateCompleted: 20070802
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80. Zimmers TA, Gutierrez JC, Koniaris LG: Loss of GDF-15 abolishes sulindac chemoprevention in the ApcMin/+ mouse model of intestinal cancer. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol; 2010 Apr;136(4):571-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Loss of GDF-15 abolishes sulindac chemoprevention in the ApcMin/+ mouse model of intestinal cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: Growth-differentiation factor (GDF)-15, a member of the TGF-beta superfamily, is potently induced in the intestine following mechanical injury, genotoxic insult and following non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) exposure.
  • GDF-15 expression correlates with apoptosis in intestinal cells and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer formation and the anti-tumor effects of NSAIDs.
  • We sought to determine the effect of loss of Gdf15 on animal tumor models of hereditary colon cancer and in the NSAID-mediated prevention of heritable colorectal cancer.
  • RESULTS: In Gdf15 ( -/- ), Apc ( min/+ ) mice, intestinal neoplasia formation rate and size were indistinguishable from that in Gdf15 ( +/+ ), Apc ( min/+ ) mice.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate in a murine model that GDF-15 does not significantly regulate heritable in vivo intestinal carcinogenesis but does mediate sulindac chemoprevention in heritable colon cancer.
  • These data suggest that the use of GDF-15 activated signaling pathways may allow improved chemoprevention and therapies for colorectal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Anticarcinogenic Agents / therapeutic use. Colorectal Neoplasms / prevention & control. Genes, APC. Growth Differentiation Factor 15 / genetics. Sulindac / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Disease Models, Animal. Intestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Intestinal Neoplasms / genetics. Mice. Mice, Transgenic. Mutation

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  • (PMID = 19784846.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-1335
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cancer research and clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cancer Res. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Growth Differentiation Factor 15; 184SNS8VUH / Sulindac
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81. Namikawa T, Hanazaki K: Clinical analysis of primary anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine. World J Gastroenterol; 2009 Feb 7;15(5):526-30

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clinical analysis of primary anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine.
  • Primary anaplastic carcinoma is a rare variant of small intestinal cancer.
  • Most reports of primary anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine are isolated case reports, therefore the clinicopathological features, therapeutic management, and surgical outcome of this tumor type remain unclear.
  • This review analyzes the available clinical characteristics of primary anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine and investigates key differences from differentiated adenocarcinoma of the small intestine.
  • A Medline search was performed using the keywords 'small intestine' and 'anaplastic carcinoma' or 'undifferentiated carcinoma'.
  • The literature revealed a poor prognosis for patients who underwent surgical resection for anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine, which gave a 3-year overall survival rate of 10.8% and a median survival time of 5.0 mo.
  • The literature suggests that anaplastic carcinoma is markedly more aggressive than differentiated adenocarcinoma of the small intestine.
  • Surgical resection with the aim of complete tumor removal provides the only beneficial therapeutic option for patients with anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine, because chemotherapy and radiation therapy have no significant effect on the rate of survival.
  • However, despite complete tumor resection, most patients with anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine are at great risk of disease recurrence.
  • Multicenter clinical trials are expected to provide additional therapeutic strategies and establish the efficacy of multimodality adjuvant therapy.
  • This report also highlights the importance of a systematic diagnostic approach for anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / pathology. Intestinal Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Intestinal Mucosa / pathology. Intestine, Small / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Survivors

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  • (PMID = 19195053.001).
  • [ISSN] 2219-2840
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Editorial
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2653339
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82. Renehan AG, Frystyk J, Howell A, O'dwyer ST, Shalet SM, Flyvbjerg A: The effects of sex steroid replacement therapy on an expanded panel of IGF-related peptides. Growth Horm IGF Res; 2007 Jun;17(3):210-9
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The effects of sex steroid replacement therapy on an expanded panel of IGF-related peptides.
  • DESIGN: Using an open-labelled cross-sectional design within a bowel cancer screening trial (aged 55-64 years), we determined total IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 in fasted serum from 210 healthy women and free IGF-I (by ultrafiltration), insulin, IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-1:IGF-I binary complex in a selected subset of 92 women.
  • RESULTS: Among EA users, mean concentrations for total IGF-I (adjusted P=0.004) and free IGF-I (P<0.001) were reduced, whereas mean concentrations of IGFBP-1 (P=0.001) and binary complex (P=0.01) were increased compared with non-users.
  • [MeSH-major] Disease / etiology. Estrogens / adverse effects. Hormone Replacement Therapy / adverse effects. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins / blood. Progestins / adverse effects. Somatomedins / analysis
  • [MeSH-minor] Disease Susceptibility. Drug Therapy, Combination. Estrogen Replacement Therapy / adverse effects. Female. Gonadal Steroid Hormones / administration & dosage. Gonadal Steroid Hormones / adverse effects. Humans. Middle Aged. Peptides / blood

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  • (PMID = 17360217.001).
  • [ISSN] 1096-6374
  • [Journal-full-title] Growth hormone & IGF research : official journal of the Growth Hormone Research Society and the International IGF Research Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Growth Horm. IGF Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Estrogens; 0 / Gonadal Steroid Hormones; 0 / Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins; 0 / Peptides; 0 / Progestins; 0 / Somatomedins
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83. Goodlad RA, Ryan AJ, Wedge SR, Pyrah IT, Alferez D, Poulsom R, Smith NR, Mandir N, Watkins AJ, Wilkinson RW: Inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 signaling reduces tumor burden in the ApcMin/+ mouse model of early intestinal cancer. Carcinogenesis; 2006 Oct;27(10):2133-9
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 signaling reduces tumor burden in the ApcMin/+ mouse model of early intestinal cancer.
  • The Apc(Min/+) mouse model is a clinically relevant model of early intestinal cancer.
  • In the early-intervention study, AZD2171 reduced the number of macroscopic polyps in the small bowel and colon.
  • Macropolyp diameter was lower in the small bowel, but remained unchanged in the colon.
  • In animals receiving AZD2171, microscopic evaluation of the small intestine showed a significant reduction in the number of larger lesions.
  • In the late-intervention study, AZD2171 treatment reduced macropolyp diameter (but not number) in the small intestine.
  • Microscopic analysis revealed that AZD2171 significantly reduced the number of larger micropolyps in the small bowel, with no large micropolyps present in the colon.
  • AZD2171 treatment had no effect on microvessel density or localization of beta-catenin staining in adenomas or non-tumor intestinal tissue, but significantly reduced the number of cells expressing VEGFR-2 mRNA.
  • In conclusion, the effects of AZD2171 in the small intestine of Apc(Min/+) mice are consistent with an antiangiogenic mechanism of action, limiting growth of adenomas to < or =1 mm.
  • Together, these results indicate that VEGFR-2 signaling may play key roles in the development and progression of intestinal adenomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoma / prevention & control. Genes, APC / physiology. Intestinal Neoplasms / prevention & control. Intestinal Polyps / drug therapy. Quinazolines / therapeutic use. Signal Transduction / drug effects. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 / antagonists & inhibitors

  • KOMP Repository. gene/protein/disease-specific - KOMP Repository (subscription/membership/fee required).
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  • (PMID = 16782971.001).
  • [ISSN] 0143-3334
  • [Journal-full-title] Carcinogenesis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Carcinogenesis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Quinazolines; 0 / RNA, Messenger; EC 2.7.10.1 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2; NQU9IPY4K9 / cediranib
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84. Ito M, Tanaka S, Kamada T, Haruma K, Chayama K: Causal role of Helicobacter pylori infection and eradication therapy in gastric carcinogenesis. World J Gastroenterol; 2006 Jan 7;12(1):10-6
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Stomach Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Causal role of Helicobacter pylori infection and eradication therapy in gastric carcinogenesis.
  • Several genetic and epigenetic alterations contribute to the initiation, promotion, and progression of the cancer cells in a multi-step manner.
  • By eradicating H pylori, gastric inflammation can be cured; the therapy diminishes the levels not only of inflammatory cell infiltration, but also atrophy/intestinal metaplasia in part.
  • A randomized controlled trial revealed that the eradication therapy diminished the gastric cancer prevalence in cases without pre-cancerous conditions.
  • In addition, recent epidemiological studies from Japanese groups demonstrated that the development of gastric cancer, especially of the intestinal type, was decreased by successful eradication therapy, although these were designed in a non-randomized manner.
  • However, it should be mentioned that endoscopic detection is the only way to evaluate the degree of gastric carcinogenesis.
  • We have reported that the endoscopic and histological morphologies could be modified by eradication therapy and it might contribute to the prevalence of gastric cancer development.
  • Considering the biological nature of cancer cell proliferation, it is considered that a sufficiently long-term follow-up would be essential to discuss the anticancer effect of eradication therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Helicobacter Infections / complications. Helicobacter Infections / drug therapy. Helicobacter pylori / drug effects. Stomach Neoplasms / prevention & control

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  • (PMID = 16440410.001).
  • [ISSN] 1007-9327
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Editorial; Review
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, Bacterial; 0 / Bacterial Proteins; 0 / cagA protein, Helicobacter pylori
  • [Number-of-references] 66
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4077482
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85. Benoist S, Pautrat K, Mitry E, Rougier P, Penna C, Nordlinger B: Treatment strategy for patients with colorectal cancer and synchronous irresectable liver metastases. Br J Surg; 2005 Sep;92(9):1155-60
ClinicalTrials.gov. clinical trials - ClinicalTrials.gov .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment strategy for patients with colorectal cancer and synchronous irresectable liver metastases.
  • BACKGROUND: The aim of this case-matched study was to determine the best treatment strategy for patients with asymptomatic colorectal cancer and irresectable synchronous liver metastases.
  • METHODS: Between 1997 and 2002, 27 patients with asymptomatic colorectal cancer and irresectable synchronous liver metastases were treated by chemotherapy without initial primary resection (chemotherapy group).
  • These 27 patients were compared with 32 patients matched for age, sex, performance status, primary tumour location, number of liver metastases, nature of irresectable disease and type of chemotherapy, but who were treated initially by resection of primary tumour (resection group).
  • RESULTS: The 2-year actuarial survival rate was 41 per cent in the chemotherapy group and 44 per cent in the resection group (P = 0.753).
  • In the chemotherapy group, intestinal obstruction related to the primary tumour occurred in four of 27 patients.
  • The mean overall hospital stay was 11 days in the chemotherapy group and 22 days in the resection group (P = 0.003).
  • CONCLUSION: Systemic chemotherapy without resection of the bowel cancer is the option of choice because, for most patients, it is associated with a shorter hospital stay and avoids surgery without a detrimental effect on survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Colorectal Neoplasms. Liver Neoplasms / secondary


86. Fung CL, Chan C, Jankova L, Dent OF, Robertson G, Molloy M, Bokey L, Chapuis PH, Lin BP, Clarke SJ: Clinicopathological correlates and prognostic significance of maspin expression in 450 patients after potentially curative resection of node-positive colonic cancer. Histopathology; 2010 Feb;56(3):319-30
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clinicopathological correlates and prognostic significance of maspin expression in 450 patients after potentially curative resection of node-positive colonic cancer.
  • AIMS: The tumour suppressor maspin has been investigated for its association with conventional histopathological features in colorectal cancer and for its potential as an independent predictor of survival and response to adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • METHODS AND RESULTS: Nuclear and cytoplasmic maspin expression in both superficial and deep parts of the tumour were assessed retrospectively by tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry in specimens from 450 patients whose other histopathology had been recorded in a prospective hospital registry of large bowel cancer resections from 1971 to 2001 with a minimum follow-up of 5 years.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In this large and thoroughly documented series of patients with clinicopathological stage C colonic tumour, maspin expression was correlated with few other conventional histopathology variables and was not a significant prognostic factor.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / metabolism. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Colonic Neoplasms / metabolism. Serpins / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Lymphatic Metastasis / pathology. Male. Prognosis. Tissue Array Analysis

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  • (PMID = 20459532.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2559
  • [Journal-full-title] Histopathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Histopathology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / SERPIN-B5; 0 / Serpins
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87. Bilimoria KY, Bentrem DJ, Wayne JD, Ko CY, Bennett CL, Talamonti MS: Small bowel cancer in the United States: changes in epidemiology, treatment, and survival over the last 20 years. Ann Surg; 2009 Jan;249(1):63-71
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Small bowel cancer in the United States: changes in epidemiology, treatment, and survival over the last 20 years.
  • BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown an increasing incidence of small bowel tumors in the United States.
  • Our objective was to assess this increase by examining changes in histology-specific incidence, treatment, and survival.
  • METHODS: Patients with small bowel malignancies were identified from the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB, 1985-2005) and the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER, 1973-2004) database.
  • Treatment and survival trends over time were examined using the National Cancer Data Base.
  • Regression models were developed to assess survival over time.
  • RESULTS: Sixty-seven thousand eight hundred forty-three patients were identified with small bowel malignancies: 37.4% carcinoid, 36.9% adenocarcinomas, 8.4% stromal tumors, and 17.3% lymphomas.
  • From 1973 to 2004, the incidence of carcinoid tumors increased more than 4-fold (2.1 to 9.3 per million), whereas changes in adenocarcinomas, stromal tumors, and lymphomas were less pronounced.
  • From 1985 to 2005, utilization of surgery increased significantly for carcinoid tumors from 78.8% to 87.4% (P < 0.0001).
  • Adjuvant chemotherapy utilization for adenocarcinoma increased from 8.1% in 1985 to 23.8% in 2005 (P < 0.0001).
  • Treatment over time was generally unchanged for lymphoma and stromal tumors.
  • Five-year survival after resection remained unchanged over time for all histologic subtypes even after adjusting for changes in patient demographics, tumor characteristics, and treatment approaches.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The overall incidence of small intestine malignancies has increased considerably, primarily because of carcinoid tumors which are now the most common small bowel cancer.
  • With current treatments, survival has remained relatively unchanged over the last 20 years.
  • Novel therapeutic options need to be investigated.
  • [MeSH-major] Intestinal Neoplasms. Intestine, Small
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Female. Humans. Incidence. Male. Middle Aged. Survival Rate. Time Factors. United States / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 19106677.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-1140
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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88. Hutfless SM, Weng X, Liu L, Allison J, Herrinton LJ: Mortality by medication use among patients with inflammatory bowel disease, 1996-2003. Gastroenterology; 2007 Dec;133(6):1779-86
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Mortality by medication use among patients with inflammatory bowel disease, 1996-2003.
  • BACKGROUND & AIMS: Most previous population-based studies of mortality in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) did not account for medication use.
  • We evaluated mortality by IBD medication use among members of the Kaiser Permanente Northern California IBD Registry.
  • Age, sex, and smoking adjusted odds ratios measured the association of mortality by IBD medication use.
  • CD was associated with increased mortality from infectious and parasitic diseases (4.1; 95% CI, 1.7-8.5), septicemia (6.8; 95% CI, 2.2-15.8), small intestinal cancer (48.1; 95% CI, 5.8-17.4), respiratory diseases (1.9; 95% CI, 1.3-2.7), digestive diseases other than IBD (2.4; 95% CI, 1.0-4.8), and liver diseases (2.6; 95% CI, 1.0-5.3).
  • IBD medication use has varying associations with mortality.
  • [MeSH-major] Inflammatory Bowel Diseases / drug therapy. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Anti-Inflammatory Agents / therapeutic use. Comorbidity. Crohn Disease / drug therapy. Crohn Disease / epidemiology. Crohn Disease / mortality. Digestive System Diseases / epidemiology. Gastrointestinal Agents / therapeutic use. Humans. Infection / epidemiology. Lung Diseases / epidemiology. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 18054550.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-0012
  • [Journal-full-title] Gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gastroenterology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 0 / Gastrointestinal Agents
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89. McMurrick P, Dorien S, Shapiro J: Bowel cancer - guide for the GP. Aust Fam Physician; 2006 Apr;35(4):192-7

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Bowel cancer - guide for the GP.
  • BACKGROUND: Many patients will remain asymptomatic until the advanced stages of colorectal cancer and hence, will only be identified by means of a coordinated screening program.
  • OBJECTIVE: This article outlines the risk assessment, early detection primary prevention and management of colorectal cancer.
  • DISCUSSION: It is vital that general practitioners recognise the enormous variation in the patterns of clinical presentation of colorectal neoplasia such as rectal bleeding, iron deficiency anaemia, change in bowel habit, and unexplained weight loss.
  • In patients in whom a colorectal neoplasm has been diagnosed, preoperative workup and counselling is of paramount importance.
  • Primary treatment of colorectal cancer is surgical resection and often adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Patients with node positive cancer remain at significant risk for recurrence, despite optimal surgery and removal of the primary tumour.
  • Adding oxaliplatin to standard (5FU based) chemotherapy has improved disease free survival for high risk patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Family Practice / methods. Family Practice / standards. Intestinal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Intestinal Neoplasms / therapy. Practice Guidelines as Topic
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Colonoscopy. Diagnosis, Differential. Digestive System Surgical Procedures. Female. Hemorrhoids / diagnosis. Humans. Male. Medical History Taking / methods. Middle Aged. Occult Blood. Palliative Care / methods. Prognosis. Risk Assessment / methods

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  • [CommentIn] Aust Fam Physician. 2006 Aug;35(8):569 [16918006.001]
  • (PMID = 16642233.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-8495
  • [Journal-full-title] Australian family physician
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Aust Fam Physician
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 7
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90. Eberhardt B, Dilger S, Musial F, Wedding U, Weiss T, Miltner WH: Short-term monitoring of cognitive functions before and during the first course of treatment. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol; 2006 Apr;132(4):234-40
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Short-term monitoring of cognitive functions before and during the first course of treatment.
  • PURPOSE: Side effects of chemotherapy on cognitive functions in older patients have rarely been investigated.
  • Addressing this lack of research, the present study evaluated cognitive functions in older cancer patients.
  • METHODS: A total of 130 younger (n=59; age<60) and older (n=71; age>or=60) cancer patients with hematological disease or cancer of the intestinal tract took part in the study.
  • To explore short-term effects of chemotherapy, a group of patients assessed before the start of chemotherapy was compared with patients who already received their first course of chemotherapy.
  • RESULTS: Cognitive impairments of verbal learning, word fluency, and memory were observed following the first few days after treatment onset.
  • Older patients showed stronger memory impairments after start of chemotherapy than younger cancer patients.
  • Additionally, depression was neither associated with short-term effect of chemotherapy nor with age.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that chemotherapy has negative short-term effects on some cognitive functions.
  • [MeSH-major] Aging. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Cognition / drug effects. Memory Disorders / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Attention / drug effects. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Female. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Hematologic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Humans. Male. Memory / drug effects. Middle Aged. Time Factors. Verbal Learning / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 16416107.001).
  • [ISSN] 0171-5216
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cancer research and clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cancer Res. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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91. Bara T, Bancu S, Gyorgy-Fazahas I, Muresan M, Bara T Jr, Podeanu D, Muresan S: Two-step hepatectomy with right portal branch ligature for a right lobe metastasis. Hepatogastroenterology; 2008 Jul-Aug;55(85):1370-2
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • AIMS/BACKGROUND: Hepatic resection is the only treatment with possible curative effect both for primary and secondary tumors.
  • An increase of the rate of resectability for tumors considered inoperable at first and a decrease of the postoperative morbidity and mortality can be realized by right portal branch ligature and two-step hepatectomy.
  • METHODOLOGY: This paper presents the case of a patient with left bowel cancer with a hepatic metastasis.
  • A right portal branch ligature was performed followed by systemic postoperative chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Portal branch ligature can be performed in certain cases of hepatic tumors to increase the resectability rate.
  • [MeSH-major] Colonic Neoplasms / pathology. Hepatectomy / methods. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Liver Neoplasms / surgery. Portal System / surgery

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  • (PMID = 18795692.001).
  • [ISSN] 0172-6390
  • [Journal-full-title] Hepato-gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hepatogastroenterology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
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92. Buchanan FG, Holla V, Katkuri S, Matta P, DuBois RN: Targeting cyclooxygenase-2 and the epidermal growth factor receptor for the prevention and treatment of intestinal cancer. Cancer Res; 2007 Oct 1;67(19):9380-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Targeting cyclooxygenase-2 and the epidermal growth factor receptor for the prevention and treatment of intestinal cancer.
  • Clinical and animal studies indicate a role for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in the development and progression of intestinal polyps and cancers.
  • Although this combination of enzyme inhibition has shown synergy in intestinal polyp and tumor models, the exact mechanism for these effects remains undefined.
  • We observed a significant reduction in the number and size of small intestinal polyps in APC(min+/-) mice treated with either celecoxib (a selective COX-2 inhibitor) or erlotinib (Tarceva, an EGFR inhibitor).
  • Furthermore, we observed a 70% reduction of colorectal xenograft tumors in mice treated with the combination and microarray analysis revealed genes involved in cell cycle progression were negatively regulated.
  • Although we did not observe significant changes in mRNAs of genes with known apoptotic function, there was a significant increase of apoptosis in tumors from animals treated with the combination.
  • We observed similar effects on the prevention of intestinal adenomas and reduction of xenograft tumor volume when nonselective COX inhibitors were used in combination with erlotinib.
  • Together, these findings suggest that the inhibition of both COX-2 and EGFR may provide a better therapeutic strategy than either single agent through a combination of decreased cellular proliferation and prostaglandin signaling as well as increased apoptosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / pharmacology. Colorectal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors / pharmacology. Pyrazoles / pharmacology. Quinazolines / pharmacology. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / antagonists & inhibitors. Sulfonamides / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / administration & dosage. Celecoxib. Erlotinib Hydrochloride. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Intestinal Polyps / drug therapy. Intestinal Polyps / enzymology. Intestinal Polyps / metabolism. Intestine, Small / enzymology. Intestine, Small / pathology. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis. Prostaglandins / biosynthesis. Prostaglandins / metabolism. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays

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  • (PMID = 17909047.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01-CA-77839; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01DK 62112; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R37-DK47297
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors; 0 / Prostaglandins; 0 / Pyrazoles; 0 / Quinazolines; 0 / Sulfonamides; DA87705X9K / Erlotinib Hydrochloride; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor; JCX84Q7J1L / Celecoxib
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93. McMurray JJ: Angiotensin inhibition in heart failure. J Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone Syst; 2004 Sep;5 Suppl 1:S17-22
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  • Survival in patients with heart failure remains very poor, and is worse than that for most common cancers, including bowel cancer in men and breast cancer in women.
  • Consequently, ACE-Is and ARBs might be complementary or even additive treatments; recent trials have tested these hypotheses.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers / therapeutic use. Benzimidazoles / therapeutic use. Cardiac Output, Low / drug therapy. Tetrazoles / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 15526237.001).
  • [ISSN] 1470-3203
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system : JRAAS
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone Syst
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers; 0 / Benzimidazoles; 0 / Tetrazoles; S8Q36MD2XX / candesartan
  • [Number-of-references] 31
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94. Fiorentini G, Giovanis P, Leoni M, De Giorgi U, Cariello A, Dazzi C, Caldeo A: Amifostine (Ethyol) as modulator of hepatic and biliary toxicity from intraarterial hepatic chemoembolization: results of a phase I study. Hepatogastroenterology; 2001 Mar-Apr;48(38):313-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND/AIMS: Hepatic and biliary toxicity are still significant problems after intraarterial hepatic chemoembolization for liver metastases from large bowel cancers.
  • In about 30-60% of the patients hepatic and biliary toxicity are the limiting aspects of intraarterial hepatic chemoembolization and exclude a lot of patients from a repeated beneficial treatment.
  • Amifostine (Ethyol) is a prodrug that must be dephosphorylated to the free thiol in which form it can detoxify free oxygen radicals generated by radiation, hypoxia and by drugs such anthracyclines, platinum analogues and alkylating agents.
  • Amifostine as inactive prodrug is primarily metabolized at the tissue site by membrane alkaline phosphatase, which is highly active in the cell membranes of normal endothelial cells and biliary tree cells but not in the cell membranes and neovascular capillaries of tumor.
  • The resulting high thiol content in normal liver tissue (biliary cells and hepatocytes) compared with the negligible concentration in liver metastases from large bowel cancers probably provides for selective drug resistance to intraarterial hepatic chemoembolization protecting normal tissue and allowing full therapeutic effect on tumor.
  • METHODOLOGY: From May 1997 we planned a phase I study in patients receiving intraarterial hepatic chemoembolization for liver metastases from large bowel cancers.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Amifostine can be certainly administered at 300 mg/m2 as intraarterial infusion and could be a significant step to ameliorate the therapeutic ratio of intraarterial hepatic chemoembolization.
  • [MeSH-major] Amifostine / administration & dosage. Biliary Tract / drug effects. Chemoembolization, Therapeutic / adverse effects. Liver / drug effects. Liver Neoplasms / therapy. Prodrugs / administration & dosage. Radiation-Protective Agents / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intra-Arterial. Intestinal Neoplasms / pathology. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 11379297.001).
  • [ISSN] 0172-6390
  • [Journal-full-title] Hepato-gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hepatogastroenterology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Prodrugs; 0 / Radiation-Protective Agents; M487QF2F4V / Amifostine
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95. Evans J: Ablative and catheter-delivered therapies for colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). Eur J Surg Oncol; 2007 Dec;33 Suppl 2:S64-75
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  • [Title] Ablative and catheter-delivered therapies for colorectal liver metastases (CRLM).
  • Colorectal liver metastases occur in a significant number of patients with bowel cancer.
  • Palliative chemotherapy has been the mainstay of treatment for the remainder of patients with unresectable disease.
  • Targeted treatment of liver metastases with ablative or trans-arterial techniques allows localised, minimally invasive therapy without significant toxicity or morbidity.
  • Catheter-delivered trans-arterial treatments include conventional chemoembolisation, drug-eluting beads and selective internal radiation spheres.
  • The combination of these treatment options with or without systemic chemotherapy may have a synergistic effect.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / therapy. Liver Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Brachytherapy. Catheter Ablation. Cryotherapy. Embolization, Therapeutic. Ethanol / administration & dosage. Humans. Injections, Intralesional. Laser Therapy. Microwaves / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 18061390.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-2157
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of surgical oncology : the journal of the European Society of Surgical Oncology and the British Association of Surgical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 3K9958V90M / Ethanol
  • [Number-of-references] 110
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96. Tatsuta A, Iishi H, Baba M, Yano H, Murata K, Mukai M, Akedo H: Suppression by apigenin of peritoneal metastasis of intestinal adenocarcinomas induced by azoxymethane in Wistar rats. Clin Exp Metastasis; 2000;18(8):657-62
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  • [Title] Suppression by apigenin of peritoneal metastasis of intestinal adenocarcinomas induced by azoxymethane in Wistar rats.
  • The effect of a naturally occurring flavonoid apigenin on the development of bombesin-enhanced peritoneal metastasis from intestinal adenocarcinomas induced by azoxymethane was investigated in male Wistar rats.
  • Bombesin significantly increased the incidence of intestinal tumors and cancer metastasis to the peritoneum in week 45.
  • It also significantly increased the labeling index of intestinal cancers.
  • Although administration of apigenin at either dose with bombesin had little or no effect on the enhancement of intestinal carcinogenesis by bombesin, the location, histologic type, depth of involvement, infiltrating growth patterns and labeling index, it was found to decrease significantly the incidence of cancer metastasis.
  • Our findings indicate that apigenin inhibits cancer metastasis through inhibition of phosphorylation of MAPK.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Flavonoids / therapeutic use. Intestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Peritoneal Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 11827069.001).
  • [ISSN] 0262-0898
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical & experimental metastasis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Exp. Metastasis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Carcinogens; 0 / Flavonoids; 0 / Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen; 7V515PI7F6 / Apigenin; EC 2.7.12.2 / Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinases; EC 3.4.24.35 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 9; MO0N1J0SEN / Azoxymethane; PX9AZU7QPK / Bombesin
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97. Reeder RE, Mika RO: Ectropion secondary to bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil. Optometry; 2001 Feb;72(2):112-6
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUOROURACIL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) targets rapidly dividing cancer cell populations.
  • In turn, it may cause inflammation in such rapidly dividing tissues as the corneal epithelium, conjunctiva, and tear duct.
  • His medical history was significant for 5-FU bolus injections for intestinal cancer since May 1998.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Injections, Intravenous. Intestinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Male. Remission, Spontaneous

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  • (PMID = 11243427.001).
  • [ISSN] 1529-1839
  • [Journal-full-title] Optometry (St. Louis, Mo.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Optometry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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98. Mayor S: NICE recommends new treatment for breast and bowel cancer. BMJ; 2003 May 31;326(7400):1166
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUOROURACIL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] NICE recommends new treatment for breast and bowel cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Colonic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Paclitaxel / analogs & derivatives. Taxoids
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Capecitabine. Female. Fluorouracil / analogs & derivatives. Humans. Practice Guidelines as Topic. Tegafur / administration & dosage. Uracil / administration & dosage

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  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DOCETAXEL .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CAPECITABINE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. TAXOL .
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  • (PMID = 12775610.001).
  • [ISSN] 1756-1833
  • [Journal-full-title] BMJ (Clinical research ed.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMJ
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] News
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Taxoids; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; 56HH86ZVCT / Uracil; 6804DJ8Z9U / Capecitabine; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1174771
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99. Ng SY, Wilkinson J: A salutary case of Fumaderm potentially masking the symptoms of bowel cancer and partial bowel obstruction. Br J Dermatol; 2007 Oct;157(4):825-6
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DIMETHYL FUMARATE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A salutary case of Fumaderm potentially masking the symptoms of bowel cancer and partial bowel obstruction.
  • [MeSH-major] Dermatologic Agents / adverse effects. Fumarates / adverse effects. Intestinal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Intestinal Obstruction / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnosis, Differential. Dimethyl Fumarate. Gastrointestinal Diseases / chemically induced. Humans. Male. Psoriasis / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 17672877.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0963
  • [Journal-full-title] The British journal of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Letter
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dermatologic Agents; 0 / Fumarates; FO2303MNI2 / Dimethyl Fumarate
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100. Junker A, Kretzschmar A, Böhm U, Tannapfel A, Langenbahn D, Pieck AC, Jaehde U: [Treatment of patients with intestinal cancer. Increased neurotoxicity after oxaliplatin and related liver metastasis]. Med Monatsschr Pharm; 2004 Oct;27(10):349-52
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. PLATINUM .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Treatment of patients with intestinal cancer. Increased neurotoxicity after oxaliplatin and related liver metastasis].
  • [Transliterated title] Therapie eines Patienten mit Darmkrebs. Verstärkte Neurotoxizität nach Oxaliplatin und anschliessender Entfernung der Lebermetastasen.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Colonic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Colonic Neoplasms / pathology. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Neurotoxicity Syndromes / physiopathology. Organoplatinum Compounds / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 15527179.001).
  • [ISSN] 0342-9601
  • [Journal-full-title] Medizinische Monatsschrift für Pharmazeuten
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Monatsschr Pharm
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 04ZR38536J / oxaliplatin; 49DFR088MY / Platinum
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