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1. Tanaka M, Matsuzaki J, Kitami K, Hirokawa M: [A case of primary malignant lymphoma of the pararectal space]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2002 Sep;48(9):561-4
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  • [Title] [A case of primary malignant lymphoma of the pararectal space].
  • Histopathological diagnosis was non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma (diffuse large B-cell type according to the new WHO classification).
  • The results of some examinations were compatible with the diagnosis of primary lymphoma of the pararectal space.
  • The patient underwent 2 courses of combination chemotherapy CHOP (consisting of cyclophosphamide, doxorubichin, vincristine, and prednisolone), and high-dose chemotherapy (ranimustine, etoposide, ifosfamide) with peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.
  • After high-dose chemotherapy, radiation therapy was performed since there was a possibility of residual tumor, and complete remission was achieved.
  • This is probably the first clinical case of malignant lymphoma of the pararectal space ever reported in the Japanese literature.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, B-Cell / therapy. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / therapy. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation. Rectal Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Drug Administration Schedule. Humans. Male. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 12402484.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; CHOP protocol
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2. Watanabe N, Sugimoto N, Matsushita A, Maeda A, Nagai K, Hanioka K, Takahashi T: Association of intestinal malignant lymphoma and ulcerative colitis. Intern Med; 2003 Dec;42(12):1183-7
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  • [Title] Association of intestinal malignant lymphoma and ulcerative colitis.
  • A 42-year-old woman with refractory ulcerative colitis (UC) developed ascites, pleural effusion, pretibial edema and severe anemia.
  • Colonofiberscopic examination showed a bulky submucosal tumor in the sigmoid colon, which was histologically diagnosed as malignant lymphoma (diffuse large, B cell type).
  • The lymphoma was resistant to chemotherapy.
  • Autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) was effective; however, she died of severe infection after the second PBSCT.
  • Although the association of intestinal lymphoma with UC is rare, lymphoma should be taken into consideration when the clinical course of UC is atypical or when UC is refractory to therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Colitis, Ulcerative / complications. Lymphoma / complications. Sigmoid Neoplasms / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bleomycin / therapeutic use. Colonoscopy. Cyclophosphamide / therapeutic use. Doxorubicin / therapeutic use. Etoposide / therapeutic use. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Ifosfamide / therapeutic use. Methotrexate / therapeutic use. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation. Vincristine / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 14714955.001).
  • [ISSN] 0918-2918
  • [Journal-full-title] Internal medicine (Tokyo, Japan)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Intern. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate; CAMBO-VIP protocol
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3. Zambelli A, Lilleri D, Baldanti F, Scelsi M, Villani L, Da Prada GA: Hodgkin's disease as unusual presentation of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder after autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation for malignant glioma. BMC Cancer; 2005;5:109
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  • [Title] Hodgkin's disease as unusual presentation of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder after autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation for malignant glioma.
  • BACKGROUND: Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a complication of solid organ and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); following autologous HSCT only rare cases of PTLD have been reported.
  • Here, a case of Hodgkin's disease (HD), as unusual presentation of PTLD after autologous HSCT for malignant glioma is described.
  • CASE PRESENTATION: 60-years old man affected by cerebral anaplastic astrocytoma underwent subtotal neurosurgical excision and subsequent high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous HSCT.
  • During the post HSCT course, cranial irradiation and corticosteroids were administered as completion of therapeutic program.
  • At day +105 after HSCT, the patient developed HD, nodular sclerosis type, with polymorphic HD-like skin infiltration.
  • [MeSH-major] Glioma / therapy. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / adverse effects. Hodgkin Disease / diagnosis. Lymphoproliferative Disorders / etiology. Transplantation, Homologous / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenal Cortex Hormones / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 16117828.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2407
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenal Cortex Hormones; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1208867
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4. Kröger N, Zander AR, Martinelli G, Ferrante P, Moraleda JM, Da Prada GA, Demirer T, Socie G, Rosti G, European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation: Low incidence of secondary myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia after high-dose chemotherapy as adjuvant therapy for breast cancer patients: a study by the Solid Tumors Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Ann Oncol; 2003 Apr;14(4):554-8
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  • [Title] Low incidence of secondary myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia after high-dose chemotherapy as adjuvant therapy for breast cancer patients: a study by the Solid Tumors Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.
  • BACKGROUND: To determine the incidence of secondary myelodysplasia (sMDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in node-positive breast cancer patients who received high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) followed by autologous stem-cell support as adjuvant therapy.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: The incidence of sMDS/AML was retrospectively assessed in 364 node-positive breast cancer patients who received HDCT followed by autologous stem-cell support as adjuvant therapy between November 1989 and December 1997 and were reported to the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation registry.
  • Two hundred and ninety-one patients received peripheral blood stem cells and 55 patients received autologous bone marrow as stem-cell support.
  • This case of AML was observed 18 months after HDCT consisting of three cycles of epirubicin and cyclophosphamide with a cumulative dose of epirubicin 960 mg and cyclophosphamide 19 g.
  • The French-American-British type of AML was M4, and the cytogenetic analysis showed a translocation t(9;11)(p22;q23).
  • CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to patients with malignant lymphoma there seems to be no increased risk of sMDS/AML after HDCT in breast cancer.


5. Waddington TW, Aboulafia DM: Failure to eradicate AIDS-associated primary effusion lymphoma with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell reinfusion: case report and literature review. AIDS Patient Care STDS; 2004 Feb;18(2):67-73
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  • [Title] Failure to eradicate AIDS-associated primary effusion lymphoma with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell reinfusion: case report and literature review.
  • Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), also known as body cavity-based lymphoma, is a newly recognized AIDS-related malignancy that is etiopathologically linked to Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated human herpes virus type 8 (HHV-8).
  • Tumor cells have high-grade morphologic features, an indeterminate immunophenotype, B-lineage genotype, and contain HHV-8 and often Epstein-Barr virus.
  • PEL rarely responds to systemic chemotherapy.
  • Herein, we describe what we believe is the first patient with AIDS-associated PEL to be treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell reinfusion.
  • Treatment was well tolerated but the patient succumbed to progressive cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome / complications. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / therapy. Pleural Effusion, Malignant / therapy. Stem Cell Transplantation. Transplantation, Autologous
  • [MeSH-minor] Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. CD4 Lymphocyte Count. Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Fatal Outcome. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / therapeutic use. Humans. Ifosfamide / administration & dosage. Immunophenotyping. Male. Middle Aged. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Salvage Therapy / methods. Sarcoma, Kaposi / diagnosis. Sarcoma, Kaposi / therapy. Sarcoma, Kaposi / virology. Skin Neoplasms / diagnosis. Skin Neoplasms / therapy. Skin Neoplasms / virology. Treatment Failure. Vincristine / administration & dosage. Viral Load

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  • (PMID = 15006181.001).
  • [ISSN] 1087-2914
  • [Journal-full-title] AIDS patient care and STDs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AIDS Patient Care STDS
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 143011-72-7 / Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; EPOCH protocol
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6. Nowrousian MR, Waschke S, Bojko P, Welt A, Schuett P, Ebeling P, Flasshove M, Moritz T, Schuette J, Seeber S: Impact of chemotherapy regimen and hematopoietic growth factor on mobilization and collection of peripheral blood stem cells in cancer patients. Ann Oncol; 2003;14 Suppl 1:i29-36
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  • [Title] Impact of chemotherapy regimen and hematopoietic growth factor on mobilization and collection of peripheral blood stem cells in cancer patients.
  • Various chemotherapy regimens, combined with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor(rhG-CSF) or recombinant granulocyte-macrophage CSF (rhGM-CSF) are used in cancer patients to mobilize and collect peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC).
  • In this retrospective study, we evaluated and compared the efficacy of such regimens in 262 patients with different types of malignant diseases.
  • The following chemotherapy regimens were applied: ifosfamide-etoposide-cisplatin or bleomycin (n = 96; mainly patients with testicular cancer); ifosfamide-etoposide plus or minus cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) or vincristine (VCR)(n = 52; mainly patients with lymphoma); cyclophosphamide-anthracycline (n = 53; mainly patients with breast cancer); intermediate to high dose (ID-HD) cyclophosphamide (n = 37; mainly patients with breast or ovarian cancer. or multiple myeloma; and others (n = 24).
  • In patients receiving rhG-CSF, CD34+ cells could be collected earlier (median: day 14 versus day 16) and there was a significantly higher white blood cell count (WBC)(median 11,350 versus 5550/microl) and CD34+ cell count (median 88 versus 43/microl) at the start of apheresis, and a significantly higher CD34+ cell yield (median 7.4 x 10(6) versus 4.6 x 10(6)/kg) than in patients who receivedrhGM-CSF.
  • Among the various chemotherapeutic regimens used, each combined with rhG-CSF, ifosfamide-etoposide plus or minus Ara-C or VCR mobilized a significantly higher number of CD34+ cells (median 119/microl) and produced a significantly higher harvest of these cells (median 13 x 10(6)/kg) than cyclophosphamide-anthracycline (median 87/microl and 7 x 10(6)/kg, respectively) or ID-HD cyclophosphamide (median 59/microl and 5 x I 0(6)/kg, respectively).
  • The outcome of PBSC mobilization and collection appeared to be negatively influenced by the number of relapses before the current salvage treatment.
  • These data indicate that mobilization and collection of PBSCstrongly depend on the type of hematopoietic growth factor and chemotherapeutic regimen used.
  • The data further show rhG-CSF is a more effective growth factor than rhGM-CSF and ifosfamide-etoposide-based regimens, particularly ifosfamide-etoposide plus or minus Ara-C or VCR, are highly effective regimens in mobilizing and collecting CD34+ cells.

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  • (PMID = 12736228.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-7534
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hematopoietic Cell Growth Factors; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 143011-72-7 / Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor; 83869-56-1 / Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
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7. Tsukasaki K, Hermine O, Bazarbachi A, Ratner L, Ramos JC, Harrington W Jr, O'Mahony D, Janik JE, Bittencourt AL, Taylor GP, Yamaguchi K, Utsunomiya A, Tobinai K, Watanabe T: Definition, prognostic factors, treatment, and response criteria of adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma: a proposal from an international consensus meeting. J Clin Oncol; 2009 Jan 20;27(3):453-9
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  • [Title] Definition, prognostic factors, treatment, and response criteria of adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma: a proposal from an international consensus meeting.
  • Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) is a distinct peripheral T-lymphocytic malignancy associated with a retrovirus designated human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1).
  • The diversity in clinical features and prognosis of patients with this disease has led to its subclassification into the following four categories: acute, lymphoma, chronic, and smoldering types.
  • The chronic and smoldering subtypes are considered indolent and are usually managed with watchful waiting until disease progression, analogous to the management of some patients with chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL) or other indolent histology lymphomas.
  • Patients with aggressive ATL generally have a poor prognosis because of multidrug resistance of malignant cells, a large tumor burden with multiorgan failure, hypercalcemia, and/or frequent infectious complications as a result of a profound T-cell immunodeficiency.
  • Under the sponsorship of the 13th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV, a group of ATL researchers joined to form a consensus statement based on established data to define prognostic factors, clinical subclassifications, and treatment strategies.
  • A set of response criteria specific for ATL reflecting a combination of those for lymphoma and CLL was proposed.
  • A treatment strategy based on the clinical subclassification and prognostic factors is suggested, including watchful waiting approach, chemotherapy, antiviral therapy, allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (alloHSCT), and targeted therapies.

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  • (PMID = 19064971.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / Intramural NIH HHS / /
  • [Publication-type] Consensus Development Conference; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 61
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2737379
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8. Uozumi K: Treatment of adult T-cell leukemia. J Clin Exp Hematop; 2010;50(1):9-25
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  • [Title] Treatment of adult T-cell leukemia.
  • Adult T-cell Leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive malignant disease of CD4+ T-cells associated with human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I).
  • Treatment of the aggressive forms (acute and lymphoma types) of ATL remains inadequate, as most ATL patients receive conventional chemotherapy without stem cell rescue.
  • At present, LSG15 is the standard chemotherapy for the treatment of aggressive ATL, but the efficacy of LSG15 in most patients is transient.
  • To prolong median survival time, additional therapies for maintenance of complete response (CR) are needed after achieving CR by induction chemotherapy.
  • Improved outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT), despite a high incidence of graft-versus-host disease, has been reported.
  • Recently, reduced-intensity conditioning stem cell transplantation was also reported to be effective for ATL.
  • Although several issues, including selection criteria for patients and sources of stem cells remain to be resolved, allo-SCT may be considered as a treatment option for patients with aggressive ATL.
  • To evaluate whether allo-SCT is more effective than the standard chemotherapy (LSG15) for aggressive ATL, an up front phase II clinical trial of JCOG-LSG is now being planned.
  • Novel innovative targeted strategies, such as antiretroviral therapy, arsenic trioxide, nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, several monoclonal antibodies including anti-CC chemokine receptor 4, anti-folate, purine nucleotide phosphorylase inhibitor, mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitor, bendamustine, small molecule Bcl-2 inhibitors and Tax-targeted immunotherapy, should be promptly studied in order to develop curative treatments for ATL in the near future.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell / therapy

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  • (PMID = 20505272.001).
  • [ISSN] 1880-9952
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical and experimental hematopathology : JCEH
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Exp Hematop
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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9. Joyce RM, Regan M, Ottaway J, Umiel T, Tetreault JC, Levine J, McDermott D, Hurley D, Giallombardo N, Smith T, Lamontagne D, Uhl L, Avigan D: A phase I-II study of rituximab, ifosfamide, mitoxantrone and etoposide (R-IME) for B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma prior to and after high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDC-ASCT). Ann Oncol; 2003;14 Suppl 1:i21-7
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  • [Title] A phase I-II study of rituximab, ifosfamide, mitoxantrone and etoposide (R-IME) for B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma prior to and after high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDC-ASCT).
  • This phase I-II study describes the safety of rituximab, ifosfamide, mitoxantrone and etoposide (R-IME) as an induction regimen prior to high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDC-ASCT), and rituximab given post-HDC-ASCT for B cell non-Hodgkins's lymphoma.
  • This study also measured the effect on disease burden and stem cell contamination.
  • Patients with relapsed, refractory or poor risk B cell lymphomas were eligible.
  • Patients were treated with two cycles of R-IME; all non-progressing patients under-went a third cycle and peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collection.
  • Tumor cell contamination was measured at baseline and in the PBSC.
  • Patients were followed for time to treatment failure (TTF) and overall survival (OS).
  • Twenty-nine underwent stem cell collection.
  • Stem cell mobilization was successful in 93% (27/29) of patients.
  • The response rate to R-IME induction and HDC-ASCT was 95% with a confirmed CR of 68%.
  • There was a significant decline in stem cell tumor cell contamination and a significant decline in IgG without an increase in infections.
  • There appears to be a reduction in the number of lymphoma cells in the stem cell product and the toxicity is manageable.

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  • (PMID = 12736227.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-7534
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase I; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; BZ114NVM5P / Mitoxantrone; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide
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10. Suzuki Y, Tokuda Y, Okumura A, Saito Y, Ohta M, Kubota M, Makuuchi H, Tajima T, Umemura S, Osamura RY: Three cases of malignant lymphoma of the breast. Jpn J Clin Oncol; 2000 Jan;30(1):33-6
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  • [Title] Three cases of malignant lymphoma of the breast.
  • We report three cases of malignant lymphoma (ML) of the breast and discuss diagnosis and management.
  • Mastectomy was performed without any adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Histology revealed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of REAL classification.
  • She underwent eight cycles of CHOP regimen, but 1 month after the chemotherapy a brain metastasis was detected.
  • Histology of the tumor revealed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
  • The patient underwent eight cycles of CHOP regimen and high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT).
  • Histology of the tumor revealed low-grade B-cell lymphoma of MALT type.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / diagnosis. Lymphoma, B-Cell / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Biopsy, Needle. Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cranial Irradiation. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis / pathology. Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / diagnosis. Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / pathology. Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / therapy. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / pathology. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / therapy. Mastectomy, Extended Radical. Middle Aged. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant

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  • (PMID = 10770567.001).
  • [ISSN] 0368-2811
  • [Journal-full-title] Japanese journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Jpn. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
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11. Auner HW, Sill H, Mulabecirovic A, Linkesch W, Krause R: Infectious complications after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: comparison of patients with acute myeloid leukemia, malignant lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. Ann Hematol; 2002 Jul;81(7):374-7
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  • [Title] Infectious complications after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: comparison of patients with acute myeloid leukemia, malignant lymphoma, and multiple myeloma.
  • It is yet undetermined whether patients with different hematological malignancies have different propensities to infectious complications after high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).
  • We retrospectively analyzed 136 cycles of HDC and autologous HSCT in 114 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, 24 cycles), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma/Hodgkin's disease (NHL/HD, 55 cycles), and multiple myeloma (MM, 57 cycles) with respect to early infectious complications.
  • Median duration of neutropenia was longer in patients with AML and NHL/HD than in patients with MM (11 days vs 8 days) and after conditioning including total body irradiation (TBI) compared with chemotherapy only preparative regimens (11 days vs 7 days).
  • Fever requiring antimicrobial therapy was observed in 88 percent of cycles, with fever of unknown origin (FUO) accounting for 60 percent of febrile episodes.
  • Response to first-line empirical antibiotic therapy was better for FUO than for documented infections (70 percent vs 40 percent).
  • There were no differences with respect to the type or incidence of infections between patients with AML, NHL/HD, and MM.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / adverse effects. Infection / etiology. Leukemia, Myeloid / surgery. Lymphoma / surgery. Multiple Myeloma / surgery. Transplantation, Autologous / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Adult. Aged. Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Female. Fever / drug therapy. Fever / etiology. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neutropenia / etiology. Retrospective Studies. Transplantation Conditioning / adverse effects. Whole-Body Irradiation / adverse effects


12. NAGAI Y, MORI M, INOUE D, KIMURA T, SHIMOJI S, TOGAMI K, TABATA S, MATSUSHITA A, NAGAI K, Imai Y, Takafuta T, Takahashi T: Successful treatment with autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related malignant lymphoma. Rinsho Ketsueki; 2009 Nov;50(11):1641-6
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  • [Title] Successful treatment with autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related malignant lymphoma.
  • Laboratory examination revealed CD4(+) lymphocyte count 16 cells/mul and HIV loading 150,000 copies/ml at presentation.
  • Histologic diagnosis of a biopsied lymph node was diffuse, large, B cell-type malignant lymphoma.
  • The karyotype of the lymphoma cells was t(8;14)(q24;q32), which was confirmed by G-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization.
  • Positron emission tomography (PET)-combined CT scanning revealed systemic extranodal tumors involving the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and bone marrow.
  • The clinical stage of the lymphoma was IVB and the international prognosis index was categorized as high.
  • Complete remission (CR) of the lymphoma was obtained after 2 courses of CHOP (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, prednisolone) chemotherapy and 4 subsequent courses of rituximab-combined CHOP (R-CHOP).
  • Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was started at the initiation of CHOP.
  • Because of the poor prognosis of AIDS-related lymphoma, he received autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation with the MEAM protocol (ranimustine, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan) as a conditioning procedure without a severe infectious episode.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / therapy. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / therapy. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide. Doxorubicin. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prednisolone. Remission Induction. Rituximab. Transplantation Conditioning. Transplantation, Autologous. Treatment Outcome. Vincristine

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  • (PMID = 20009441.001).
  • [ISSN] 0485-1439
  • [Journal-full-title] [Rinshō ketsueki] The Japanese journal of clinical hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rinsho Ketsueki
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone; VAP-cyclo protocol
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13. Ishitsuka K, Tamura K: Treatment of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma: past, present, and future. Eur J Haematol; 2008 Mar;80(3):185-96
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  • [Title] Treatment of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma: past, present, and future.
  • Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a peripheral T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type I.
  • Clinical manifestations of ATLL range from smoldering to chronic, lymphoma and acute.
  • Patients with acute and lymphoma type ATLL require therapeutic intervention.
  • Conventional chemotherapeutic regimens used against other malignant lymphoma have been administered to ATLL patients, but the therapeutic outcomes of acute and lymphoma type ATLL remain very poor.
  • Promising results of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) for ATLL patients have recently been reported and the treatment outcome might be improved for some ATLL patients.
  • Besides conventional chemotherapy and SCT, interferon, zidovudine, arsenic trioxide, targeted therapy against surface molecule on ATLL cells, retinoid derivatives, and bortezomib have been administered to ATLL patients in pilot or phase I/II studies.
  • Further studies are required to confirm the clinical benefits of these novel therapeutics.
  • This article reviews the current status and future directions of ATLL treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Human T-lymphotropic virus 1. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Clinical Trials as Topic / trends. Forecasting. France / epidemiology. Humans. Japan / epidemiology. Prospective Studies. Stem Cell Transplantation / trends

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  • (PMID = 18081707.001).
  • [ISSN] 1600-0609
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Number-of-references] 157
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14. Yoshimura C, Nomura S, Katsura K, Yamaguchi K, Fukuhara S: Thrombopoietin levels in patients undergoing autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Vox Sang; 2000;78(2):106-12
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  • [Title] Thrombopoietin levels in patients undergoing autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: High-dose chemotherapy with peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) has become an important treatment for hematological and solid tumors.
  • Several reports on endogeneous production of thrombopoietin (TPO) in patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy have been published.
  • We measured TPO levels in patients undergoing autologous PBSCT in order to elucidate the role of TPO in megakaryopoiesis and platelet recovery following stem cell transplantation.
  • We also examined whether PBSC from different patient groups (patients with lung cancer and malignant lymphoma) had different effects on TPO levels.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Serum levels of TPO and other cytokines were determined by ELISA before and after PBSCT in 10 patients with lung cancer and 18 patients with malignant lymphoma.
  • Platelet counts exhibited a significant recovery and TPO levels also decreased significantly in malignant lymphoma patients after transplantation.
  • There were no significant differences in TPO levels in lung cancer patients, although the same tendencies as for malignant lymphoma patients were observed for both platelet count and TPO level.
  • On analysis of transfused PBSC, we found that the numbers of CFU-GM were similar in lung cancer and malignant lymphoma patients.
  • However, the numbers of CD34+ cells were significantly higher in lung cancer patients than in malignant lymphoma patients.
  • CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that TPO plays a critical role in the reconstitution of megakaryopoiesis and platelet production following PBSCT, and that the type of stem cell, tumor, and preceding chemotherapy affect serum TPO levels after transplantation.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Thrombopoietin / blood. Thrombopoietin / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antigens, CD / blood. Antigens, CD34 / blood. Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic / blood. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Blood Platelets / cytology. Cell Adhesion Molecules / blood. Cytokines / blood. Female. Graft Survival. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / blood. Lung Neoplasms / therapy. Lymphoma / blood. Lymphoma / therapy. Male. Megakaryocytes / drug effects. Megakaryocytes / physiology. Middle Aged. Platelet Count. Sialic Acid Binding Ig-like Lectin 3. Stem Cells / metabolism. Transplantation, Autologous

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  • (PMID = 10765146.001).
  • [ISSN] 0042-9007
  • [Journal-full-title] Vox sanguinis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vox Sang.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] SWITZERLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / Antigens, CD34; 0 / Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / CD33 protein, human; 0 / Cell Adhesion Molecules; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Sialic Acid Binding Ig-like Lectin 3; 9014-42-0 / Thrombopoietin
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15. Sano F, Tasaka T, Nishimura H, Akiyama T, Kubo Y, Matsuhashi Y, Wada H, Sugihara T, Sadahira Y: Small cell variant of anaplastic large cell lymphoma diagnosed by a novel chromosomal abnormality t(2;5;3)(p23;q35;p21) of bone marrow cells. Pathol Int; 2008 Aug;58(8):494-7
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  • [Title] Small cell variant of anaplastic large cell lymphoma diagnosed by a novel chromosomal abnormality t(2;5;3)(p23;q35;p21) of bone marrow cells.
  • Because of the rarity and the morphological variations, small cell variant of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) represents a diagnostic challenge.
  • Herein is reported a case of leukemic type of small cell variant of ALCL, in which the diagnosis was established by a cytogenetic analysis.
  • The patient was a 23-year-old woman who presented with fever and leukocytosis with circulatory atypical lymphoid cells.
  • The initial differential diagnosis on bone marrow trephine biopsy sections included viral infection and peripheral T-cell lymphoma unspecified.
  • But a cytogenetic study on bone marrow cells indicated a novel complex translocation, t(2;5;3)(p23;q35;p21), which led to confirmation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive pleomorphic small to medium-sized cells scattered in bone marrow cells, on immunohistochemistry.
  • ALK was distributed in both nuclear and cytoplasmic regions of neoplastic cells.
  • The patient achieved complete remission after four courses of combination chemotherapy, and received autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation (auto-PBSCT) after two additional courses of combination chemotherapy, but relapsed 2 months after auto-PBSCT in the bilateral lung.
  • Allogeneic stem cell transplantation led to a second remission.
  • This case demonstrates the diagnostic importance of cytogenetic study for malignant lymphoma involving bone marrow.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Marrow Cells / pathology. Chromosomes, Human, 1-3 / genetics. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 5 / genetics. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / diagnosis. Translocation, Genetic
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Chromosome Banding. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral / diagnosis. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / immunology. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / metabolism. Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases. Remission Induction. Spectral Karyotyping. Virus Diseases / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 18705769.001).
  • [ISSN] 1440-1827
  • [Journal-full-title] Pathology international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathol. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / anaplastic lymphoma kinase
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16. Plosker GL, Figgitt DP: Rituximab: a review of its use in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Drugs; 2003;63(8):803-43
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  • [Title] Rituximab: a review of its use in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.
  • Rituximab is an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that has demonstrated efficacy in patients with various lymphoid malignancies, including indolent and aggressive forms of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL).
  • While the optimal use of the drug in many clinical settings has yet to be clarified, two pivotal trials have established rituximab as a viable treatment option in patients with relapsed or refractory indolent NHL, and as a standard first-line treatment option when combined with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy in elderly patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (the most common type of aggressive NHL).
  • The latter was a randomised comparison of eight cycles of CHOP plus rituximab 375 mg/m(2) intravenously (one dose per cycle) versus CHOP alone in previously untreated elderly patients (60 to 80 years of age) with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
  • Treatment with rituximab is generally well tolerated, particularly in terms of adverse haematological effects and serious or opportunistic infections relative to standard chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Clinical trials with rituximab indicate that the drug has broad application to B-cell malignancies, although further clarification is needed to determine its optimal use in many of these clinical settings.
  • Importantly, rituximab in combination with CHOP chemotherapy has emerged as a new treatment standard for previously untreated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, at least in elderly patients.
  • Compared with conventional chemotherapy, rituximab is associated with markedly reduced haematological events such as severe neutropenia, as well as associated infections.
  • Rituximab may be particularly suitable for elderly patients or those with poor performance status, and its tolerability profile facilitates its use in combination with cytotoxic drugs.
  • PHARMACODYNAMIC PROPERTIES: Rituximab is a mouse/human chimaeric IgG(1)-kappa monoclonal antibody that targets the CD20 antigen found on the surface of malignant and normal B lymphocytes.
  • Although treatment with rituximab induces lymphopenia in most patients, typically lasting about 6 months, a full recovery of B lymphocytes in the peripheral blood is usually seen 9-12 months after therapy, as CD20 is not expressed on haematopoietic stem cells.
  • CD20 is, however, expressed on >90% of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) and to a lesser degree on B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cells.
  • Although not fully elucidated, the cytotoxic effects of rituximab on CD20-positive malignant B cells appears to involve complement-dependent cytotoxicity, complement-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and induction of apoptosis.
  • In addition, in vitro data indicate that rituximab sensitises tumour cells to the effects of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs.
  • PHARMACOKINETIC PROPERTIES: Serum rituximab concentrations increased in proportion to dose across a wide range of single- and multiple-dose intravenous regimens in patients with B-cell NHL.
  • When administered at a dose of 375 mg/m(2) once weekly for 4 weeks in a pivotal trial in patients with relapsed or refractory indolent B-cell NHL (follicular or small lymphocytic subtypes), peak serum concentrations essentially doubled from the first (239.1 mg/L) to the fourth (460.7 mg/L) infusion, while elimination half-life (t(1/2)) increased from 76.3 to 205.8 hours (3.2 to 8.6 days).
  • The concomitant increase in serum rituximab concentrations and t(1/2) with each successive infusion may be due, at least in part, to the elimination of circulating CD20-positive B cells and reduction or saturation of CD20-binding sites after the initial infusions of rituximab.
  • The pharmacokinetic properties of rituximab are also characterised by wide inter-individual variability, and serum drug concentrations that are correlated with clinical response.
  • Although pharmacokinetic data are limited in patients with aggressive forms of NHL, such as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, rituximab appears to have a similar pharmacokinetic profile in these patients to that in patients with indolent B-cell NHL.
  • The pharmacokinetics of rituximab are also reported to be similar whether the drug is administered with or without cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy.
  • THERAPEUTIC USE: A number of studies have demonstrated efficacy of intravenous rituximab in patients with various lymphoid malignancies of B-cell origin, including indolent (e.g. follicular lymphoma) and aggressive (e.g. diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) forms of NHL, and CLL, but the drug has not yet been approved for use in CLL, and approved indications in NHL vary between countries.
  • In the US, for example, rituximab is available for the treatment of patients with low-grade or follicular, relapsed or refractory, CD20-positive B-cell NHL.
  • In Europe, the drug has similar approval for relapsed or refractory follicular NHL as in the US, but has also been approved for use in combination with CHOP chemotherapy for the most common aggressive form of NHL (CD20-positive, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma).
  • In Japan, rituximab has been approved for indolent B-cell NHL and mantle cell lymphoma (an aggressive form of B-cell NHL), primarily on the basis of results of a Japanese phase II trial.
  • Indolent NHL: Results of several studies evaluating rituximab 375 mg/m(2) once weekly for 4 weeks in patients with indolent forms of B-cell NHL (primarily follicular and small lymphocytic lymphomas) showed objective response (OR) rates ranging from approximately 40-60% in those receiving the drug for relapsed or refractory indolent B-cell NHL, and slightly higher (50-70%) for those receiving rituximab as first-line therapy.
  • In a pivotal trial in 166 patients with relapsed or refractory low-grade or follicular B-cell NHL, intent-to-treat (ITT) analysis showed an OR rate of 48%, and a projected median time to progression of 13 months.
  • CHOP, fludarabine-containing regimens) or other drugs (e.g. interferon-alpha2a) in previously untreated patients with indolent forms of B-cell NHL (primarily follicular and small lymphocytic subtypes).
  • Follow-up data from a study in 40 patients with low-grade or follicular B-cell NHL treated with rituximab plus CHOP as first-line therapy showed that responses were durable with a progression-free survival and median duration of response >5 years.Bcl-2 gene rearrangement (t14;18) occurs in malignant cells in up to 85% of patients with follicular lymphoma, and minimal residual disease in peripheral blood and bone marrow can be monitored using polymerase chain reaction (PCR).
  • Aggressive NHL: Studies with rituximab as monotherapy in aggressive B-cell NHL, a potentially curable disorder, have generally been restricted to patients with relapsed or recurrent disease, since CHOP has traditionally been the standard first-line treatment regimen.
  • However, promising results from phase II monotherapy studies prompted further clinical investigation of rituximab in conjunction with chemotherapy.
  • Thus, most studies with rituximab in patients with aggressive forms of B-cell NHL have involved combination therapy, including a pivotal randomised trial comparing eight cycles of standard CHOP therapy plus rituximab 375 mg/m(2) (one dose per cycle) versus CHOP alone in 399 previously untreated elderly patients (60-80 years of age) with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
  • Other, smaller trials with rituximab in combination with CHOP or other chemotherapeutic regimens, either as first-line therapy or for patients with relapsed or refractory aggressive B-cell NHL, have also shown promising results in terms of clinical response rates.CLL: In relatively small trials (n < 40) conducted primarily in patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell CLL, rituximab monotherapy (various regimens) achieved OR rates of 23-45%, with median duration of response ranging from approximately 3-10 months. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / pharmacology. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Administration Schedule. Humans. Rituximab

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  • (PMID = 12662126.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-6667
  • [Journal-full-title] Drugs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Review
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab
  • [Number-of-references] 177
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17. Nelarabine: new drug. T-lymphoblastic leukaemia/lymphoma: more evaluation needed. Prescrire Int; 2009 Feb;18(99):3-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Nelarabine: new drug. T-lymphoblastic leukaemia/lymphoma: more evaluation needed.
  • 1) Acute T-lymphoblastic leukaemia and T-lymphoblastic lymphoma are closely related malignant haemopathies.
  • There is no consensus treatment in case of relapses.
  • However, only haematopoietic stem cell transplantation following chemotherapy offers a chance of long-term survival;.
  • It is marketed for the treatment of children and adults with one or the other of these two malignant haemopathies, after failure of at least two lines of chemotherapy;.
  • But this type of non-comparative trial cannot demonstrate whether a specific drug increases survival time compared with existing alternatives;.
  • Some adverse effects were serious, and they did not all resolve after treatment cessation.
  • 5) In practice, there are too many outstanding questions to determine whether nelarabine represents a therapeutic advance compared with clofarabine, or even whether it should be used outside the clinical trial setting.
  • [MeSH-major] Arabinonucleosides / therapeutic use. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Child. Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Approval. Europe. Humans. Orphan Drug Production. Recurrence

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  • (PMID = 19382393.001).
  • [ISSN] 1167-7422
  • [Journal-full-title] Prescrire international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prescrire Int
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Arabinonucleosides
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18. Marcus R, Hagenbeek A: The therapeutic use of rituximab in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Eur J Haematol Suppl; 2007 Jan;(67):5-14
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The therapeutic use of rituximab in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • The non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs) comprise a heterogeneous collection of lymphoproliferative malignancies, which are most common in people aged over 55 years.
  • Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of NHL, accounting for approximately 30% of all new patients.
  • Follicular lymphoma (FL) is the second most common NHL sub-type, and accounts for a further 22% of cases.
  • Over the last five years, the introduction of monoclonal antibodies, and specifically the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab, has radically changed treatment of B-cell NHL.
  • This antigen is expressed on over 95% of all B cell NHLs, and on normal B cells, but not on haematopoietic stem cells, normal or malignant plasma cells.
  • The Fc domain of rituximab recruits immune effector functions to mediate B cell lysis.
  • Possible mechanisms of cytotoxicity include complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) resulting from C1q binding, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediated by one or more of the Fcgamma receptors on the surface of granulocytes, macrophages and NK cells.
  • It is also possible that the binding of rituximab to the CD20 antigen on the cell surface may directly induce apoptosis.
  • For patients with both follicular and diffuse large B-cell NHL, several large scale prospective randomised trials have demonstrated prolongation of remission when rituximab is incorporated into first line treatment, and, in follicular lymphoma, as a component of salvage therapy.
  • As a result of these studies, current European indications for rituximab include: the treatment of previously untreated patients with stage III-IV follicular lymphoma in combination with cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisone (CVP) chemotherapy; as maintenance therapy in patients with relapsed follicular lymphoma responding to induction therapy with chemotherapy or immuno-chemotherapy; the treatment of patients with diffuse large B cell NHL in combination with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Humans. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Recurrence. Rituximab. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 17206982.001).
  • [ISSN] 0902-4506
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of haematology. Supplementum
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Haematol Suppl
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; CHOP protocol
  • [Number-of-references] 39
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19. Tichelli A, Bhatia S, Socié G: Cardiac and cardiovascular consequences after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Br J Haematol; 2008 Jul;142(1):11-26
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cardiac and cardiovascular consequences after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
  • Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) is the treatment of choice for defined malignant and non-malignant haematological disorders.
  • Early complications are usually associated with patient history before transplantation, primary diagnosis, age of the patient and associated comorbidities, and the type of transplantation and conditioning used.
  • Late cardiac and cardiovascular events may occur years and even decades after HCT, and are related to cardiotoxic chemotherapy, mediastinal radiation therapy, gender, age at transplantation, cardiovascular risk factors and graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic HCT.
  • As has been observed in long-term survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma, where the incidence of cardiovascular complications emerged as a significant problem with increasing follow-up, it is anticipated that the incidence of these complications after HCT will also increase significantly with increasing follow-up of the survivors.
  • [MeSH-major] Cardiovascular Diseases / etiology. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Age Factors. Amyloidosis / etiology. Anthracyclines / adverse effects. Graft vs Host Disease / etiology. Heart Diseases / etiology. Heart Diseases / prevention & control. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization / adverse effects. Humans. Radiotherapy / adverse effects. Risk Factors. Survivors

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  • (PMID = 18430191.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2141
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA 30206
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anthracyclines
  • [Number-of-references] 130
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20. Tsujioka T, Wada H, Suemori S, Sadahira Y, Sugihara T: [CD56-positive peripheral T-cell lymphoma primarily presenting with tonsillar swelling]. Rinsho Ketsueki; 2004 Oct;45(10):1119-23
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [CD56-positive peripheral T-cell lymphoma primarily presenting with tonsillar swelling].
  • After tonsillectomy was performed, she was diagnosed as having CD56-positive T-cell lymphoma, mainly composed of small and medium-sized atypical cells.
  • An immunohistochemical study showed that the malignant lymphocytes were positive for CD3, CD8, CD56, TIA-1 and granzyme B, while negative for CD20, CD5 and CD10.
  • Southern blot analysis revealed a rearrangement of the T-cell receptor gamma chain.
  • We provided MCEC therapy followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, and complete remission (CR) was achieved.
  • It is rare for CD56-positive T-cell lymphoma to occur primarily in the tonsils.
  • Because small bowel ulcers were revealed during the course of induction chemotherapy, we report a valuable case in which suspected CD56-positive enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma (ETL) occurred primarily in the tonsils.
  • [MeSH-major] Ileal Neoplasms. Lymphoma, T-Cell / diagnosis. Lymphoma, T-Cell / therapy. Neoplasms, Second Primary. Tonsillar Neoplasms / diagnosis. Tonsillar Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antigens, CD56 / analysis. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Fatal Outcome. Female. Gene Rearrangement, gamma-Chain T-Cell Antigen Receptor. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Nitrosourea Compounds / administration & dosage. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation. Remission Induction. Transplantation, Autologous

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  • (PMID = 15553048.001).
  • [ISSN] 0485-1439
  • [Journal-full-title] [Rinshō ketsueki] The Japanese journal of clinical hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rinsho Ketsueki
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD56; 0 / Nitrosourea Compounds; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; RYH2T97J77 / ranimustine
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21. Itälä M, Aho H, Remes K: Reduced-intensity conditioning and blood stem cell transplantation from an HLA-identical sibling for severe aplastic anaemia: two patients with successful engraftment but a fatal post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in the other. Hematol J; 2004;5(5):440-3
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYCLOSPORIN A .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Reduced-intensity conditioning and blood stem cell transplantation from an HLA-identical sibling for severe aplastic anaemia: two patients with successful engraftment but a fatal post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in the other.
  • Allogeneic stem cell transplantation with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) can be offered to patients who are ineligible for high-dose conditioning because of their age or comorbidities.
  • Malignant haematological diseases have so far been the most common indication of this new treatment modality; it has been less often used for nonmalignant diseases, and there are only a few reports of RIC and allotransplantation to treat acquired severe aplastic anaemia (SAA).
  • We report two elderly patients (62 and 65 years of age) with SAA who underwent RIC (fludarabine + cyclophosphamide + ATG) and HLA-identical sibling allogeneic blood stem cell transplantation.
  • First, both of our patients who had failed standard immunological treatments and had a heavy transfusion history experienced successful engraftment after RIC and blood allografting, and one of them continues in full haematological remission 20+ months post-transplant.

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  • (PMID = 15448671.001).
  • [ISSN] 1466-4860
  • [Journal-full-title] The hematology journal : the official journal of the European Haematology Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hematol. J.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenal Cortex Hormones; 0 / Antilymphocyte Serum; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 83HN0GTJ6D / Cyclosporine; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone
  • [Number-of-references] 20
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22. Schmiegelow K, Al-Modhwahi I, Andersen MK, Behrendtz M, Forestier E, Hasle H, Heyman M, Kristinsson J, Nersting J, Nygaard R, Svendsen AL, Vettenranta K, Weinshilboum R, Nordic Society for Paediatric Haematology and Oncology: Methotrexate/6-mercaptopurine maintenance therapy influences the risk of a second malignant neoplasm after childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: results from the NOPHO ALL-92 study. Blood; 2009 Jun 11;113(24):6077-84
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHOTREXATE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Methotrexate/6-mercaptopurine maintenance therapy influences the risk of a second malignant neoplasm after childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: results from the NOPHO ALL-92 study.
  • Among 1614 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated with the Nordic Society for Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO) ALL-92 protocol, 20 patients developed a second malignant neoplasm (SMN) with a cumulative risk of 1.6% at 12 years from the diagnosis of ALL.
  • In Cox multivariate analysis, longer duration of oral 6-mercaptopurine (6MP)/methotrexate (MTX) maintenance therapy (P = .02; longest for standard-risk patients) and presence of high hyperdiploidy (P = .07) were related to increased risk of SMN.
  • Among 427 TPMT wild-type patients for whom the 6MP dose was registered, those who developed SMN received higher average 6MP doses than the remaining patients (69.7 vs 60.4 mg/m2; P = .03).
  • This study indicates that the duration and intensity of 6MP/MTX maintenance therapy of childhood ALL may influence the risk of SMNs in childhood ALL.

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  • (PMID = 19224761.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-0020
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM028157; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / U01 GM061388; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01-GM28157; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / U01 GM61388
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] E7WED276I5 / 6-Mercaptopurine; EC 2.1.1.- / Methyltransferases; EC 2.1.1.67 / thiopurine methyltransferase; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2699230
  • [Investigator] Schmiegelow K; Hejl M; Østergård M; Schrøder H; Pihkala U; Ilanmaa E; Antila K; Korpela K; Vuorinen O; Perkkiö M; Kojo N; Nyman R; Pere M; Lanning M; Niemi A; Vuoristo A; Niemi S; Isotalo J; Laapas H; Mäkipernaa A; Salmi T; Varsamäki T; Kristinsson J; Zeller B; Danielsen O; Madsen B; Nielsen B; Stensvold K; Lund JH; Danielsen K; Brekke P; Stamnes O; Glomstein A; Widing E; Hapnes C; Stokland T; Kolmannskog S; Halvorsen B; Spangen S; Carlsson G; Bergkvist M; Skanka N; Korlén B; Dimberg A; Adrian BA; Mellander L; Aronson S; Jensen D; Winiarski J; Lagerwall A; Jonsson NO; Cervin T; Samuelsson U; Berg A; Nilsson H; Behrendtz M; Wiebe T; Ljung R; Tessin I; Ljungren CG; Dohlwitz A; Christensen HO; Ronge E; Berglund M; Björk O; Fransson D; Eriksson M; Forestier E; Kreuger A; Blomgren M; Rönnblad B; Eriksson B; Berg T; Hedling L; Forsberg T; Lindquist B; Kriström B; Hjalmars U
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23. Benboubker L, Cartron G, Roingeard F, Delain M, Degenne M, Linassier C, Hérault O, Truglio D, Bout M, Petit A, Brémond JL, Desbois I, Colombat P, Binet C, Domenech J: Long-term marrow reconstitutive ability of autologous grafts in lymphoma patients using peripheral blood mobilized with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor compared to bone marrow. Exp Hematol; 2003 Jan;31(1):89-97
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Long-term marrow reconstitutive ability of autologous grafts in lymphoma patients using peripheral blood mobilized with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor compared to bone marrow.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Marrow progenitor cell recovery was assessed for up to 4 years in 227 patients.
  • One hundred patients were treated for malignant lymphomas by autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and 127 by peripheral blood progenitor cell transplantation (PBPCT).
  • RESULTS: Marrow progenitor cell counts were decreased for several years with both bone marrow and peripheral blood grafts.
  • They were not different according to the origin of the graft, despite the reduced duration of peripheral blood cell recovery observed after PBPCT.
  • Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) used for PB graft mobilization and after transplantation resulted in faster neutrophil recovery compared to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) with no evidence of decreased marrow progenitor cell recoveries.
  • Factors that influenced marrow progenitor cell reconstitution have been identified by univariate and multivariate analysis: age, gender, type of lymphoma, and postgraft administration of hematopoietic growth factors (HGF) for the whole patient group; gender, graft progenitor cell yields, and type of HGF (G-CSF vs GM-CSF) for the PBPCT group; and only type of HGF for the BMT group.
  • Despite faster peripheral blood cell recovery, persistent deficiency of marrow progenitor cells was found several years after PBPCT, as observed after BMT.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Marrow Transplantation. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / pharmacology. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor / pharmacology. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization / methods. Lymphoma / therapy. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation. Transplantation, Autologous
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Child. Colony-Forming Units Assay. Female. Graft Survival. Hematopoiesis. Hodgkin Disease / drug therapy. Hodgkin Disease / mortality. Hodgkin Disease / therapy. Humans. Leukemia, Myeloid / etiology. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / mortality. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / therapy. Male. Myelodysplastic Syndromes / etiology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / etiology. Salvage Therapy. Transplantation Conditioning. Whole-Body Irradiation

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Marrow Transplantation.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Lymphoma.
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  • (PMID = 12543111.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-472X
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 143011-72-7 / Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor; 83869-56-1 / Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
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24. Karube K, Ohshima K, Tsuchiya T, Yamaguchi T, Suefuji H, Suzumiya J, Harada M, Kikuchi M: Non-B, non-T neoplasms with lymphoblast morphology: further clarification and classification. Am J Surg Pathol; 2003 Oct;27(10):1366-74
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We studied the morphologic, immunohistochemical, and clinical characteristics of 158 cases of lymphoblastic lymphoma.
  • Based on immunophenotyping and cell lineage, cases were classified into B-cell type (CD20,CD19 or CD79a+, n = 53), T-cell type (surface CD3+, n = 84), and non-B, non-T type (B cell marker- and surface CD3-, n = 21).
  • 1) CD7+ stem cell lymphoma (CD7+SCL) [CD4-, CD7+, CD33+/-, CD56-], 2) blastic natural killer cell lymphoma (B-NKL) [CD4-, CD7+/-, CD33-, CD56+, CD123-], 3) myeloid/NK precursor cell leukemia (M/NKL) [CD4-, CD7+, CD33+, CD56+], and 4) CD4+CD56+ hematodermic malignancy (CD4+CD56+) type [CD4+, CD7+/-, CD33-, CD56+, CD123+].
  • The CD7+SCL and M/NKL types frequently exhibited bone marrow invasion and mediastinal masses.
  • All CD4+CD56+ types were associated with skin lesions.
  • B-NKL type is included into Blastic NK lymphoma in new World Health Organization classification with CD4+CD56+ type.
  • But the cases of B-NKL were more reminiscent of CD7+SCL or M/NKL type than the CD4+CD56+ type, both clinically and histologically.
  • We propose that blastic NK lymphoma, a disease entity in the new WHO classification, should be divided into two types based on phenotypes and clinical features.
  • The non-B, non-T lymphomas exhibited poorer prognoses, similar to that of B-cell lymphomas, than T-cell type tumors (P = 0.009).
  • Among the 21 tumors, the prognosis of the four subtypes did not differ significantly; however, cases receiving aggressive chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation had a more favorable prognosis than those receiving only traditional chemotherapy and radiation therapy (P = 0.0089).
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD / immunology. Lymphocytes / immunology. Myeloid Cells / immunology. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / classification. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / classification. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / immunology. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / pathology. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / therapy. Male. Middle Aged. Stem Cell Transplantation. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] Am J Surg Pathol. 2004 Jun;28(6):835-7; author reply 837 [15166681.001]
  • (PMID = 14508398.001).
  • [ISSN] 0147-5185
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD
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