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1. Rakha S, Bayliss C, Sanderson F, Smith R, Seckl M, Savage P: Pituitary hCG production and cerebral tuberculosis mimicking disease progression during chemotherapy for an advanced ovarian germ cell tumour. BMC Cancer; 2010;10:338
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pituitary hCG production and cerebral tuberculosis mimicking disease progression during chemotherapy for an advanced ovarian germ cell tumour.
  • BACKGROUND: Ovarian germ cell tumours (OGCT) are rare but are usually curable with chemotherapy, even when presenting with advanced disease.
  • The majority of OGCT produce the tumour markers, hCG and/or AFP which can be helpful in the diagnosis and monitoring the response to treatment.
  • CASE PRESENTATION: In this case of a 36 year old woman, the elevated hCG level at presentation was helpful in making a clinical diagnosis of OGCT in a patient too unwell to permit a tissue diagnosis.
  • Cisplatin based combination chemotherapy produced an initial normalisation of the hCG level, but later in treatment the patient developed new cerebral lesions and a rising serum hCG suggestive of disease progression.
  • Further investigations suggested that the CNS lesions were cerebral TB and that the low levels of hCG elevations was likely to be pituitary in origin.
  • Chemotherapy treatment was continued along with anti-tuberculous therapy and 24 months after successful completion of therapy the patient remains disease free.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In the treatment of cancer patients it may be helpful to consider the potential non-malignant causes of new CNS lesions and that low hCG elevations may result from physiology rather than pathology in selected cases.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Chorionic Gonadotropin / metabolism. Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal / drug therapy. Ovarian Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pituitary Gland / metabolism. Tuberculosis, Central Nervous System / chemically induced

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  • (PMID = 20587067.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2407
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Chorionic Gonadotropin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2909206
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2. Trachsler J, Gaspert A, Previsdomini M, Wüthrich RP, Fehr T: Massive uric acid nephrolithiasis with progressive renal failure due to spontaneous tumour lysis syndrome. NDT Plus; 2008 Oct;1(5):307-9

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Massive uric acid nephrolithiasis with progressive renal failure due to spontaneous tumour lysis syndrome.
  • Tumour lysis syndrome (TLS) is a constellation of meta- bolic complications due to the rapid destruction of malignant cells, causing renal, cardiac or cerebral dysfunction.
  • TLS-induced renal failure is mainly caused by uric acid and calcium phosphate crystal deposition and usually develops following cytotoxic chemotherapy.
  • Risk factors for occurrence of TLS and current therapeutic management are discussed.

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  • (PMID = 25983919.001).
  • [ISSN] 1753-0784
  • [Journal-full-title] NDT plus
  • [ISO-abbreviation] NDT Plus
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4421287
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; acute renal failure / therapy / tumour lysis syndrome / uric acid nephrolithiasis
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3. Ploegmakers MJ, Pruszczynski M, De Rooy J, Kusters B, Veth RP: Angiosarcoma with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour developing in a patient with klippel-trénaunay-weber syndrome. Sarcoma; 2005;9(3-4):137-40

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  • [Title] Angiosarcoma with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour developing in a patient with klippel-trénaunay-weber syndrome.
  • PURPOSE: We discuss the coexistence of Klippel-Trénaunay-Weber syndrome with various malignancies, the possible histogenetic pathways and therapeutic implications.
  • METHODS: Our patient underwent an above-knee amputation for biopsy-proven malignant vascular tumour, first thought to be a composite hemangio-endothelioma and/or angiosarcoma with lung metastases.
  • RESULTS: In the amputated extremity, a vascular malformation was found with tumour showing various components with foci of angiosarcoma adjacent to diffuse neurofibroma and areas with high-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour.
  • Amputation and palliative chemotherapy were indicated, but he died of pulmonary and cerebral metastases 2 months postoperatively.
  • DISCUSSION: This case describes an angiosarcoma with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour developing in a patient with Klippel-Trénaunay-Weber syndrome.

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  • (PMID = 18521421.001).
  • [ISSN] 1357-714X
  • [Journal-full-title] Sarcoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Sarcoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Egypt
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2395629
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4. Verhoeff JJ, van Tellingen O, Claes A, Stalpers LJ, van Linde ME, Richel DJ, Leenders WP, van Furth WR: Concerns about anti-angiogenic treatment in patients with glioblastoma multiforme. BMC Cancer; 2009;9:444
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  • [Title] Concerns about anti-angiogenic treatment in patients with glioblastoma multiforme.
  • BACKGROUND: The relevance of angiogenesis inhibition in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) should be considered in the unique context of malignant brain tumours.
  • Although patients benefit greatly from reduced cerebral oedema and intracranial pressure, this important clinical improvement on its own may not be considered as an anti-tumour effect.
  • Although this latter component seems inert to anti-angiogenic therapy, it is of major importance for disease progression and survival.
  • Published data support that clinical symptoms are tempered by anti-angiogenic treatment, but that tumour invasion continues.
  • Unfortunately, current imaging modalities are affected by anti-angiogenic treatment too, making it even harder to define tumour margins.
  • To illustrate this we present MRI, biopsy and autopsy specimens from bevacizumab-treated patients.Moreover, while treatment of other tumour types may be improved by combining chemotherapy with anti-angiogenic drugs, inhibiting angiogenesis in GBM may antagonise the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs by normalising the blood-brain barrier function.
  • SUMMARY: Although angiogenesis inhibition is of considerable value for symptom reduction in GBM patients, lack of proof of a true anti-tumour effect raises concerns about the place of this type of therapy in the treatment of GBM.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Glioblastoma / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 20015387.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2407
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors
  • [Number-of-references] 73
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2801683
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5. Becherer A, Jaeger U, Szabo M, Kletter K: Prognostic value of FDG-PET in malignant lymphoma. Q J Nucl Med; 2003 Mar;47(1):14-21
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prognostic value of FDG-PET in malignant lymphoma.
  • Gallium-67 scintigraphy has been shown to be a valuable complementary method in Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin lymphoma for detecting viable residual lesions after chemotherapy and for diagnosis of a relapse.
  • Thallium-201 is of interest in differentiating cerebral lymphomas from infectious lesions in AIDS patients but less useful in extra-cerebral lymphomas.
  • In patients with a positive PET scan after chemotherapy an early relapse occurs in up to 100%, while more than 80% of patients with a negative PET will have a long-term remission.
  • The main reason is that PET is not bound to morphological criteria like lymph node size while CT is often not able to differentiate between residual tumour and post-therapeutic fibrosis.
  • Therefore, based on a considerable number of clinical studies, FDG-PET gains increasing significance for staging, restaging and therapy monitoring in malignant lymphomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Lymphoma / drug therapy. Lymphoma / radionuclide imaging
  • [MeSH-minor] Citrates. Gallium. Hodgkin Disease / radionuclide imaging. Hodgkin Disease / therapy. Indium Radioisotopes. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / radionuclide imaging. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / therapy. Neoplasm Staging / methods. Prognosis. Radiopharmaceuticals. Thallium. Tomography, Emission-Computed / methods. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12714950.001).
  • [ISSN] 1125-0135
  • [Journal-full-title] The quarterly journal of nuclear medicine : official publication of the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine (AIMN) [and] the International Association of Radiopharmacology (IAR)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Q J Nucl Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Citrates; 0 / Indium Radioisotopes; 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18; 27905-02-8 / gallium citrate; 7791-12-0 / thallium chloride; AD84R52XLF / Thallium; CH46OC8YV4 / Gallium
  • [Number-of-references] 59
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6. Bhuva NJ, Ward D, Hughes R: Response of cerebral metastasis secondary to prostate cancer to primary androgen suppression. BMJ Case Rep; 2010;2010
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  • [Title] Response of cerebral metastasis secondary to prostate cancer to primary androgen suppression.
  • We report the case of an 80-year-old man who presented with relapsing prostate cancer and cerebral metastases which showed evidence of radiological and clinical response to androgen suppression alone without additional whole brain radiotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Goserelin / therapeutic use. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged, 80 and over. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease Progression. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Grading. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Transurethral Resection of Prostate

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  • (PMID = 22789555.001).
  • [ISSN] 1757-790X
  • [Journal-full-title] BMJ case reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMJ Case Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0F65R8P09N / Goserelin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3029044
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7. Snyder EL, Saenz CC, Denicourt C, Meade BR, Cui XS, Kaplan IM, Dowdy SF: Enhanced targeting and killing of tumor cells expressing the CXC chemokine receptor 4 by transducible anticancer peptides. Cancer Res; 2005 Dec 1;65(23):10646-50
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  • [Title] Enhanced targeting and killing of tumor cells expressing the CXC chemokine receptor 4 by transducible anticancer peptides.
  • Protein transduction domains (PTDs), such as the TAT PTD, have been shown to deliver a wide variety of cargo in cell culture and to treat preclinical models of cancer and cerebral ischemia.
  • Consequently, PTDs resemble small-molecule therapeutics in their lack of pharmacologic tissue specificity in vivo.
  • However, several human malignancies overexpress specific receptors, including HER2 in breast cancer, GnRH in ovarian carcinomas, and CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) in multiple malignancies.
  • To target tumor cells that overexpress the CXCR4 receptor, we linked the CXCR4 DV3 ligand to two transducible anticancer peptides: a p53-activating peptide (DV3-TATp53C') and a cyclin-dependent kinase 2 antagonist peptide (DV3-TAT-RxL).
  • Treatment of tumor cells expressing the CXCR4 receptor with either the DV3-TATp53C' or DV3-TAT-RxL targeted peptides resulted in an enhancement of tumor cell killing compared with treatment with nontargeted parental peptides.
  • In contrast, there was no difference between DV3 targeted peptide and nontargeted, parental peptide treatment of non-CXCR4-expressing tumor cells.
  • These observations show that a multidomain approach can be used to further refine and enhance the tumor selectivity of biologically active, transducible macromolecules for treating cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Gene Products, tat / pharmacology. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms / metabolism. Peptide Fragments / pharmacology. Receptors, CXCR4 / biosynthesis. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Acid Sequence. Animals. Cell Line, Tumor. Humans. Molecular Sequence Data. Protein Structure, Tertiary. Transfection

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  • (PMID = 16322205.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA96098
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Gene Products, tat; 0 / Peptide Fragments; 0 / Receptors, CXCR4; 0 / TP53 protein, human; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
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8. Schuette W: Treatment of brain metastases from lung cancer: chemotherapy. Lung Cancer; 2004 Aug;45 Suppl 2:S253-7
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  • [Title] Treatment of brain metastases from lung cancer: chemotherapy.
  • Brain metastases are a frequent complication in patients suffering from Lung cancer, and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality.
  • Brain metastases are found in about 10% of patients at the time of diagnosis, and approximately 40% of all patients with lung cancer develop brain metastases during the course of their disease.
  • The standard treatment for brain metastases, so far, has been whole-brain radiation therapy and surgery focussing on symptom palliation.
  • The use of chemotherapy for the treatment of brain metastases has been limited because of a presumed lack of effectiveness due to the blood-brain barrier.
  • However, the importance of the blood-brain barrier is probably overrated in the case of macroscopic metastases or relapsed disease as the blood-brain barrier has already been disrupted at this stage resulting from the newly developed blood vessels not provided with the physiological properties of the common blood-brain barrier.
  • Chemotherapeutic agents initially lipid-insoluble or liquor-impermeable can also penetrate into the brain and, therefore, trigger action against tumour cells.
  • A number of clinical trials have demonstrated that brain metastases resulting from both small-cell lung cancer and non-small-cell lung cancer are susceptible to systemic chemotherapy.
  • In small-cell lung cancer, cerebral response rates up to 50% were observed even in the second-line situation and were comparable to the response rates observed in the primary tumour.
  • In non-small-cell lung cancer, similar results were achieved.
  • Therefore, it seems justified to further evaluate the significance of chemotherapy compared to whole-brain radiation therapy.
  • Whether chemotherapy alone is superior to whole-brain radiation therapy, or whether the combination of both therapeutic modalities should be preferred for the management of brain metastases, has not yet been proven, and further randomised phase-III studies are clearly needed.
  • Based on the current available data, and the promising response rates in patients with lung cancer, chemotherapy should be considered for the management of brain metastases as part of a multimodality (or "interdisciplinary") treatment concept.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / secondary. Carcinoma, Small Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Small Cell / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Palliative Care
  • [MeSH-minor] Blood-Brain Barrier. Clinical Trials as Topic. Humans. Prognosis


9. Clayton J, Vloeberghs M, Jaspan T, Walker D, MacArthur D, Grundy R: Intrathecal chemotherapy delivered by a lumbar-thecal catheter in metastatic medulloblastoma: a case illustration. Acta Neurochir (Wien); 2008 Jul;150(7):709-12
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  • [Title] Intrathecal chemotherapy delivered by a lumbar-thecal catheter in metastatic medulloblastoma: a case illustration.
  • BACKGROUND: Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumour in children.
  • Further improvement in survival is dependent upon the development of strategies to attack the tumour more effectively, but with less toxicity.
  • Intrathecal chemotherapy, is an ideal but currently underused method of directly targeting residual tumour within the area of resection and the leptomeningeal disease commonly associated with this tumour.
  • CONCLUSION: This method represents a simple, safe and effective method of delivering an even and widespread distribution of drug within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of the neuroaxis.
  • With new agents being identified and others in the early stages of development, intrathecal chemotherapy may emerge as an important therapeutic option to consider when faced with such challenging cases.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Cerebellar Neoplasms / drug therapy. Cerebellar Neoplasms / pathology. Cerebral Ventricle Neoplasms / drug therapy. Medulloblastoma / drug therapy. Medulloblastoma / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Arachnoid / pathology. Catheterization. Child. Female. Humans. Injections, Spinal / methods. Lumbosacral Region. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Pia Mater / pathology. Radiography, Thoracic. Topotecan / administration & dosage. Topotecan / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 18401539.001).
  • [ISSN] 0942-0940
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta neurochirurgica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Neurochir (Wien)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Austria
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 7M7YKX2N15 / Topotecan
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10. Crabb SJ, McKendrick JJ, Mead GM: Brain as sanctuary site of relapse in germ cell cancer patients previously treated with chemotherapy. Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol); 2002 Aug;14(4):287-93
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  • [Title] Brain as sanctuary site of relapse in germ cell cancer patients previously treated with chemotherapy.
  • BACKGROUND: Post chemotherapy isolated relapse to the brain of germ cell cancer is potentially curable.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: We reviewed the experience of germ cell cancer with cerebral metastases at the CRC Wessex Medical Oncology Unit in Southampton.
  • Patients were classified according to their presentation (initial diagnosis, solitary relapse or widespread).
  • Treatment and outcome of these patients is presented and compared with previous series.
  • RESULTS: Of 1049 patients treated for metastatic germ cell cancer, 15 were diagnosed with cerebral metastases.
  • Six patients had cerebral sanctuary site relapse, and underwent resection and cranial irradiation.
  • Four of these are continuously disease free after treatment at 2, 67, 96, and 145 months from therapy, another is receiving chemotherapy for limited systemic relapse and the sixth has relapsed and died.
  • Three further patients relapsed with cerebral disease in the presence of active disease elsewhere and each progressed and died.
  • The final six patients had cerebral disease at presentation of whom five have progressed and died.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Isolated cerebral metastases occurring after successful systemic chemotherapy for germ cell cancer are curable.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Germinoma / secondary. Testicular Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Chorionic Gonadotropin / analysis. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Remission Induction. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome. alpha-Fetoproteins / analysis

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  • (PMID = 12206639.001).
  • [ISSN] 0936-6555
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical oncology (Royal College of Radiologists (Great Britain))
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Chorionic Gonadotropin; 0 / alpha-Fetoproteins
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11. al Barbarawi M, Smith SF, Qudsieh S, Sekhon LH: Multiple cerebral and leptomeningeal metastases from ovarian carcinoma: unusual early presentation. J Clin Neurosci; 2005 Aug;12(6):697-9
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  • [Title] Multiple cerebral and leptomeningeal metastases from ovarian carcinoma: unusual early presentation.
  • Although virtually any systemic malignancy is capable of metastasizing to the brain, ovarian carcinoma, one of the more common female genital malignancies, is one of the rarer forms of brain metastases.
  • In general, the outcome for ovarian carcinoma with brain metastases is extremely poor as most of these patients have widespread lesions elsewhere.
  • This report describes the first known case of multiple cerebral and leptomeningeal metastases as the initial manifestation of ovarian carcinoma in a 41-year old woman who presented with a one-week history of headache, vomiting and confusion.
  • CT scan of the brain was unremarkable, but lumbar puncture revealed atypical cells in the CSF.
  • MRI scan of the brain showed multiple small enhancing lesions.
  • A large ovarian tumour identified on pelvic CT scan was resected and the patient subsequently received chemotherapy and radiotherapy.
  • Unlike primary tumours such as malignant melanoma, ovarian carcinoma does not have a predilection for the central nervous system (CNS), but the rare instances with CNS involvement occur at an advanced stage of the disease.
  • Once the CNS is involved, the outcome is abysmal, even with multimodality therapy.
  • It is extremely unusual for ovarian carcinoma to present with multiple CNS involvement.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Carcinoma / pathology. Meningeal Neoplasms / secondary. Ovarian Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Craniotomy / methods. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / methods

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  • (PMID = 16115553.001).
  • [ISSN] 0967-5868
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical neuroscience : official journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Neurosci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
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12. Birbilis TA, Matis GK, Eleftheriadis SG, Theodoropoulou EN, Sivridis E: Spinal metastasis of glioblastoma multiforme: an uncommon suspect? Spine (Phila Pa 1976); 2010 Apr 1;35(7):E264-9
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  • SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: GBM constitutes the most common adult malignant brain tumor with poor prognosis.
  • However, recent advances in cancer treatment prolongate survival and provide adequate time for these metastases to give clinical symptoms.
  • METHODS: We hereby present a case of a 57-year-old woman with a history of pineal GBM treated by stereotactic biopsy, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, readmitted 38 months later due to gait disturbance, spastic paraparesis, edema of lower limbs, bilateral positive Babinski response, and loss of bladder control.
  • No further treatment was given, and the patient died 2 months after the diagnosis of the spinal metastasis.
  • CONCLUSION: Spinal metastases should be commonly suspected in patients with a history of intracranial GBM who complain about symptoms not explained by the primary lesion.Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was first described by Rudolph Virchow in 1863 and represents the most common and most malignant tumor of the cerebral hemispheres, usually arising between the ages of 40 and 60 years.
  • The incidence in Europe and North America is 2 to 3 cases/100,000 per year, and 75% of the patients die within 18 months after diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / pathology. Glioblastoma / secondary. Pineal Gland / pathology. Spinal Neoplasms / secondary

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  • (PMID = 20195200.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-1159
  • [Journal-full-title] Spine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Spine
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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13. Ortega-Martínez M, Cabezudo-Artero JM, Fernández-Portales I, Pimentel JJ, Gómez de Tejada R: Diffuse leptomeningeal seeding from benign choroid plexus papilloma. Acta Neurochir (Wien); 2007 Dec;149(12):1229-36; discussion 1236-7
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  • Neither the initial tumour nor the recurrence showed malignant histological features.
  • Treatment with systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy was ineffective in this patient.
  • [MeSH-major] Cerebral Ventricle Neoplasms / surgery. Fourth Ventricle / surgery. Meningeal Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplasm Seeding. Papilloma, Choroid Plexus / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Biopsy. Disease Progression. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Ki-67 Antigen / analysis. Laminectomy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Meninges / pathology. Reoperation. S100 Proteins / analysis

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  • (PMID = 17924056.001).
  • [ISSN] 0942-0940
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta neurochirurgica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Neurochir (Wien)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Austria
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Ki-67 Antigen; 0 / S100 Proteins
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14. Norden AD, Drappatz J, Wen PY: Novel anti-angiogenic therapies for malignant gliomas. Lancet Neurol; 2008 Dec;7(12):1152-60
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  • [Title] Novel anti-angiogenic therapies for malignant gliomas.
  • BACKGROUND: Despite optimum treatment with surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, most patients with malignant glioma have a poor prognosis.
  • Malignant gliomas are vascular tumours that produce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is an important mediator of angiogenesis.
  • Preclinical data indicate that angiogenesis is essential for the proliferation and survival of malignant glioma cells, which suggests that inhibition of angiogenesis might be an effective therapeutic strategy.
  • Anti-angiogenic therapies that target VEGF and the VEGF receptor (VEGFR) are effective adjuncts to the treatment of solid tumours.
  • Normalisation of dilated and leaky tumour vasculature might also enable anti-angiogenic therapy to increase the efficacy of radiation therapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy.
  • RECENT DEVELOPMENTS: Several studies have investigated the use of bevacizumab--a humanised monoclonal antibody against VEGF--for patients with recurrent malignant glioma.
  • Treatment with bevacizumab is commonly combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy and results in dramatic responses seen on radiographs, prolongation of progression-free survival, and less need for corticosteroids.
  • Anti-angiogenic treatment is generally well tolerated but common adverse effects include hypertension and proteinuria, whereas the potentially more serious adverse effects, such as thromboembolic disease and haemorrhage, occur infrequently.
  • At least half of patients fail to respond to anti-angiogenic treatment and the response duration is variable.
  • Resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy might implicate alternative pro-angiogenic factors, such as basic fibroblast growth factor, stromal-derived factor-1alpha, the angiopoietin receptor Tie2, and placental growth factor.
  • Anti-angiogenic therapy might also lead to mobilisation of circulating endothelial cells towards the tumour, which supports angiogenesis.
  • Another possible mechanism of resistance of malignant glioma cells might be upregulation of pro-invasive molecules, which would result in increased infiltrative tumour growth along the blood vessels.
  • WHERE NEXT? : Although anti-angiogenic therapies are promising, the duration of response with available regimens is modest.
  • Continuing investigations will determine whether these drugs are best used for newly diagnosed or recurrent tumours and will establish the optimum combinations with radiation, cytotoxic chemotherapy, and other targeted molecular compounds.
  • As yet, there are no effective treatments for patients on anti-angiogenic therapies whose tumours progress.
  • Further understanding of the mechanisms of resistance to anti-angiogenic therapies and better selection of patients will be crucial to improve outcomes for patients with malignant glioma.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Brain Neoplasms / blood supply. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Glioma / blood supply. Glioma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal / pharmacology. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Cerebral Arteries / drug effects. Cerebral Arteries / immunology. Cerebral Arteries / metabolism. Endothelial Cells / drug effects. Endothelial Cells / immunology. Endothelial Cells / metabolism. Humans. Neovascularization, Pathologic / drug therapy. Neovascularization, Pathologic / metabolism. Neovascularization, Pathologic / physiopathology. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 / drug effects. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 / immunology. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19007739.001).
  • [ISSN] 1474-4422
  • [Journal-full-title] The Lancet. Neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lancet Neurol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; EC 2.7.10.1 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2
  • [Number-of-references] 84
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15. Freudenstein D, Wagner A, Bornemann A, Ernemann U, Bauer T, Duffner F: Primary melanocytic lesions of the CNS: report of five cases. Zentralbl Neurochir; 2004;65(3):146-53
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  • Primary melanocytic tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) form a rare entity which is histologically and clinically distinct from metastatic cutaneous or retinal malignant melanoma.
  • They can be classified into diffuse melanocytosis (diffuse melanosis), malignant melanoma and benign melanocytoma with a small number of intermediate variants.
  • In this paper, 5 cases treated neurosurgically in our department for spinal or cerebral primary CNS malignant melanoma are reported.
  • Compared to metastatic disease, primary CNS malignant melanoma shows a more benign clinical course with long-term tumour control and a good quality of life.
  • Although therapeutic experience for primary melanocytic lesions of the CNS is based on a small number of published cases, prognosis seems highly dependent on complete tumour resection.
  • Adjuvant radiation seems to be of additional therapeutic benefit.
  • Except for meningeosis melanomatosa chemotherapy must be regarded as experimental.
  • Unfortunately, a standardised therapy concept is still lacking.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / surgery. Melanocytes / pathology. Melanoma / surgery. Neurosurgical Procedures. Spinal Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Quality of Life. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15306980.001).
  • [ISSN] 0044-4251
  • [Journal-full-title] Zentralblatt für Neurochirurgie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zentralbl. Neurochir.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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16. Gautschi OP, Cadosch D, Collen TD, Land M, Hoederath P, Hildebrandt G, Fournier JY, Hundsberger T: [Glioblastoma multiforme--new hope due to modern therapeutical approaches]. Praxis (Bern 1994); 2010 Mar 3;99(5):295-308
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  • Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequently encountered malignant cerebral tumor.
  • Despite significant improvements in the treatment of GBM, this disease remains associated with a high morbidity and mortality, with more than half of all affected patients dying within the first year after diagnosis.
  • GBM can be identified by means of cerebral imaging modalities and subsequently confirmed histopathologically through biopsy or resection.
  • At present, surgical resection followed by radiotherapy with concomitant chemotherapy with temozolomide and subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide is considered the standard therapy for patients with GBM.
  • [MeSH-major] Glioblastoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Algorithms. Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Dacarbazine / analogs & derivatives. Dacarbazine / therapeutic use. Humans. Prognosis. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 20205087.001).
  • [ISSN] 1661-8157
  • [Journal-full-title] Praxis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Praxis (Bern 1994)
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; 85622-93-1 / temozolomide
  • [Number-of-references] 50
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17. Perek D, Brozyna A, Dembowska-Baginska B, Stypinska M, Sojka M, Bacewicz L, Polnik D, Kalicinski P: [Tumours in newborns and infants up to three months of life. One institution experience]. Med Wieku Rozwoj; 2006 Jul-Sep;10(3 Pt 1):711-23
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  • INTRODUCTION: Newborns and infants up to three months of life are a specific group of population in paediatric oncology due to immaturity of tissues and organs and rarity of neoplastic diseases in this group of patients (pts).
  • There are no strict therapeutic procedures established for these children.
  • THE AIM of our study was to examine distribution of tumours in newborns and infants up to 3 months of age treated in our institution and to present our own experience in the treatment of these patients.
  • Distribution of tumour types in newborns and babies from 1 to 3 months of age was analyzed separately.
  • Due to similar growth pattern, response to treatment and it's side effects in newborns and small infants, treatment results were evaluated for the whole group.
  • The most common diagnosis in this group was germ cell tumours (GCT) which constituted 60% of all tumours, amongst them 52% were mature teratomas (MT).
  • There were also 3 cases of soft tissue sarcomas (STS), 2 central nervous system tumours (CNS), 2 retinoblastoma (RB), 2 hepatoblastoma (HB).
  • In the group of 21 babies aged 1-3 months NBL was the commonest (37%) followed by RB, CNS tumours (14% of each) HB and MT (10% of each) and Wilms tumour (WT) and immature teratoma (IT) each 5%.
  • It concerned pts with MT--28, IT--3 pts, yolk sac tumour (YST)--1 pt and malignant tumours (stage I and II): 8-NBL, 2-CNS tumours, 2 STS, 3-HB, 1-WT.
  • It was a patient with severe infantile cerebral palsy.
  • One pt died of disease--relapse of yolk sac tumour, 2 years 4 months after surgery of MT.
  • Eleven pts underwent combined treatment of chemotherapy and surgery: 5 with stage III and IV NBL, 6 with other tumours.
  • One pt with STS at the age of 1 yr 6 months was the tumour bed irradiated after surgery for microscopic tumour residual.
  • Chemotherapy alone was administered to 7 pts in whom local advancement of disease enabled surgery and to pts with RBL.
  • One pt relapsed at age of 2 yrs 3 mths, probably at the primary site which was not visualized at primary diagnosis.
  • One pt, critically ill, died before any treatment.
  • 2. Newborns and small infants with advanced neoplastic disease, similarly to older children can be cured with chemotherapy.
  • 3. Individual approach is warranted in newborns and small infants and treatment should be carried out in specialized centres.
  • 4. All patients who completed treatment of any tumour type should be followed up by a pediatric oncologist.
  • [MeSH-major] Infant Welfare / statistics & numerical data. Neoplasms / epidemiology. Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 17317902.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Medycyna wieku rozwojowego
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Wieku Rozwoj
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
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18. Blasel S, Franz K, Mittelbronn M, Morawe G, Jurcoane A, Pellikan S, Zanella F, Hattingen E: The striate sign: peritumoural perfusion pattern of infiltrative primary and recurrent gliomas. Neurosurg Rev; 2010 Apr;33(2):193-203; discussion 203-4
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  • MR perfusion depicts angiogenesis as a key factor for growth and malignancy in gliomas by means of increased regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV).
  • The rCBV increase is not limited to the tumour area, but may also produce a stripe-like pattern of peritumoural rCBV increase that we defined as the "striate sign".
  • We evaluated if prior radiochemotherapy influences perfusion values and pattern in and adjacent to malignant gliomas comparing rCBV of treated recurrent gliomas with untreated gliomas.
  • There were fewer cases with a striate sign in treated recurrent WHO grade III tumours than in untreated malignant transformed WHO grade II tumours.
  • These differences might be due to post-therapeutic changes of the tumour-associated microvasculature by radiochemotherapy.
  • Spectroscopic and susceptibility-weighted MR imaging may provide further insights into the tumour biology.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / blood supply. Brain Neoplasms / therapy. Glioma / blood supply. Glioma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Drug Therapy. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Radiotherapy. Regional Blood Flow. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20195675.001).
  • [ISSN] 1437-2320
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgical review
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurg Rev
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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19. Modi A, Vohra HA, Weeden DF: Does surgery for primary non-small cell lung cancer and cerebral metastasis have any impact on survival? Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg; 2009 Apr;8(4):467-73
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  • [Title] Does surgery for primary non-small cell lung cancer and cerebral metastasis have any impact on survival?
  • The question addressed was whether surgical resection of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with cerebral metastasis prolongs survival.
  • The author, date, journal, country of publication, study type, patient group studied, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses were tabulated.
  • A vast majority of patients with synchronous presentation underwent cerebral metastasectomy prior to lung resection which led to a rapid regression of neurological symptoms.
  • In these studies, the median survival for the curative intent groups (bifocal therapy+/-adjuvant treatment) ranged from 19 to 27 months (mean 23.12+/-3.3 months) and at 1, 2 and 5 years from 56% to 69% (mean=63.9+/-5.6%), 28% to 54% (mean=38.7+/-11%) and 11% to 24% (mean=18+/-5.7%), respectively.
  • We conclude that in the absence of mediastinal lymph node involvement, surgical resection of NSCLC with complete resection of the brain metastasis improves prognosis.
  • Further, adenocarcinoma, low CEA levels at presentation, response to preoperative chemotherapy before focal treatment and a high Karnofsky performance score (KPS) may have a positive prognostic value.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / surgery. Brain Neoplasms / surgery. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / surgery. Craniotomy. Lung Neoplasms / surgery. Pneumonectomy
  • [MeSH-minor] Benchmarking. Carcinoembryonic Antigen / blood. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Evidence-Based Medicine. Humans. Karnofsky Performance Status. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Risk Assessment. Risk Factors. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19155223.001).
  • [ISSN] 1569-9285
  • [Journal-full-title] Interactive cardiovascular and thoracic surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carcinoembryonic Antigen
  • [Number-of-references] 12
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20. Weiss E, Albrecht CF, Herms J, Behnke-Mursch J, Pekrun A, Brockmann K, Hess CF: Malignant ectomesenchymoma of the cerebrum. Case report and discussion of therapeutic options. Eur J Pediatr; 2005 Jun;164(6):345-9
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  • [Title] Malignant ectomesenchymoma of the cerebrum. Case report and discussion of therapeutic options.
  • Malignant ectomesenchymoma is a rare tumour that contains both ectodermal and mesenchymal elements.
  • Only three patients with a manifestation in the cerebrum and clinicopathological data have been reported until now.
  • We present a patient with an intracerebral ectomesenchymoma, review the literature and discuss currently available therapeutic options.
  • In a 10-year-old girl, a left suprasellar temporo-parieto-occipitally localised tumour was diagnosed.
  • The tumour was completely excised macroscopically in two surgical sessions.
  • For the mesenchymal part of the tumour she subsequently underwent multidrug chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy.
  • Considering the neuroectodermal element of the tumour, radiotherapy was applied to the craniospinal axis with a local boost.
  • Therapy was tolerated well without any severe side effects.
  • Six years from diagnosis, the patient is alive without a tumour relapse.
  • CONCLUSION: Due to the sparcity of reported cases with malignant ectomesenchymoma, the role of adjuvant therapy is unclear.
  • Multimodal therapy may be able to improve outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms. Cerebral Cortex. Mesenchymoma. Neuroectodermal Tumors
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans

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  • (PMID = 15747131.001).
  • [ISSN] 0340-6199
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Pediatr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Number-of-references] 17
  •  go-up   go-down


21. Mandat T, Roszkowski M, Barszcz S, Podgórski JK, Jurkiewicz E: [Neuroendoscopy in the treatment of third ventricular hydrocephalus accompanying tumors of the posterior part of the third ventricle in children]. Neurol Neurochir Pol; 2002 Jul-Aug;36(4):711-22
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  • [Title] [Neuroendoscopy in the treatment of third ventricular hydrocephalus accompanying tumors of the posterior part of the third ventricle in children].
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) in non-communicating hydrocephalus secondary to tumour of the posterior part of the third ventricle tumours in children.
  • In 22 cases benign tectal mass (BTM) and 10 malignant neoplasms (including 9 germ cell tumours and 1 ependymoma) were diagnosed.
  • 8 patients with malignant neoplasms after initial chemotherapy underwent residual tumor excision (more than 3 months after ETVs) and in two of them the CFS meningeal tumor spreads were detected.
  • 3 of them were children with benign tectal masses and 3 with malignant tumours.
  • The reason of failure in 2 cases was associated with meningeal tumor dissemination, and in one with postoperative bleeding after surgical tumor excision (communicating hydrocephalus).
  • Five out of 6 patients underwent shunt placements and in 1 case with late ventriculostomy occlusion another endoscopic procedure (after 26 months) was successfully performed.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The endoscopic third ventriculostomy was an efficient method to control non-communicating hydrocephalus in children with posterior part of the third ventricle brain tumours.
  • The PC MR flow study was a useful diagnostic tool in the stomy patency evaluation and in further treatment planning in cases of failures.
  • [MeSH-major] Cerebral Ventricle Neoplasms / complications. Cerebral Ventricle Neoplasms / surgery. Endoscopy. Hydrocephalus / etiology. Hydrocephalus / surgery. Third Ventricle. Ventriculostomy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Male. Treatment Outcome. Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt

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  • (PMID = 12418136.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-3843
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurologia i neurochirurgia polska
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurol. Neurochir. Pol.
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Poland
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22. Haines SJ: Moving targets and ghosts of the past: outcome measurement in brain tumour therapy. J Clin Neurosci; 2002 Mar;9(2):109-12
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  • [Title] Moving targets and ghosts of the past: outcome measurement in brain tumour therapy.
  • Evaluation of novel therapies for brain tumours should logically consider quality and quantity of patient survival as primary endpoints.
  • To examine the impact of the use of surrogate endpoints and historical controls on the evaluation of innovative brain tumour therapy, selective literature review of three content areas (intraarterial chemotherapy for malignant glioma, interstitial brachytherapy for malignant glioma and stereotactic radiosurgery for cerebral metastasis and malignant glioma) was carried out.
  • In the evaluation of both intraarterial chemotherapy and interstitial brachytherapy, promising results in early phase trials were not confirmed in randomised clinical trials.
  • This result can be explained by selection bias and predicted by the use of controls carefully selected from large treatment data bases.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Brachytherapy / methods. Brachytherapy / statistics & numerical data. Clinical Trials as Topic / statistics & numerical data. Humans. Infusions, Intra-Arterial. Radiosurgery / methods. Radiosurgery / statistics & numerical data. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 11922695.001).
  • [ISSN] 0967-5868
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical neuroscience : official journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Neurosci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
  • [Number-of-references] 25
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23. Kosteljanetz M, Poulsen HS: [Chemotherapeutic wafers in treatment of malignant cerebral glioma. Assessment of a Cochrane review]. Ugeskr Laeger; 2010 Jan 18;172(3):214-7
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  • [Title] [Chemotherapeutic wafers in treatment of malignant cerebral glioma. Assessment of a Cochrane review].
  • The present Cochrane review deals with implantation of chemotherapeutic wafers in the surgical cavity after resection of a malignant glioma.
  • The authors found two controlled, randomised studies concerning this treatment modality after first-time surgical treatment and one study dealing with treatment of recurrent tumour.
  • An effect was shown in the first with an increase in median survival of 2 months equivalent to the survival seen after standard (concomitant) treatment.
  • No effect was shown in recurrent tumour.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / administration & dosage. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Carmustine / administration & dosage. Glioma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Drug Implants. Evidence-Based Medicine. Humans. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Prognosis. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20089214.001).
  • [ISSN] 1603-6824
  • [Journal-full-title] Ugeskrift for laeger
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ugeskr. Laeg.
  • [Language] dan
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 0 / Drug Implants; U68WG3173Y / Carmustine
  • [Number-of-references] 5
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24. Jenkinson MD, Smith TS, Haylock B, Husband D, Shenoy A, Vinjamuri S, Walker C, Pietronigro D, Warnke PC: Phase II trial of intratumoral BCNU injection and radiotherapy on untreated adult malignant glioma. J Neurooncol; 2010 Aug;99(1):103-13
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. THALLIUM, ELEMENTAL .

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  • [Title] Phase II trial of intratumoral BCNU injection and radiotherapy on untreated adult malignant glioma.
  • DTI-015 (BCNU dissolved in ethanol) utilizes solvent facilitated perfusion (SFP) for intratumoral drug delivery.
  • A phase II clinical trial of DTI-015 and fractionated external beam radiotherapy on newly diagnosed, malignant gliomas investigated early changes in tumour physiology and metabolism, clinical outcome and safety.
  • Pre- and post DTI-015 injection neuro-imaging included computed tomography (CT) cerebral blood flow and volume, glucose and thallium single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
  • Three days after DTI-015 injection, mean tumour blood flow (Paired t-test; P < 0.001) and blood volume (Paired t-test; P = 0.001) were significantly reduced.
  • Tumour blood volume had a sustained reduction (Paired t-test; P = 0.001) at 26 days after DTI-015.
  • The imaging data forms a biological basis for understanding the effects of high dose BCNU delivered intratumorally by SFP, and suggests early effects on tumour vasculature and metabolism.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Brain Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Carmustine / therapeutic use. Glioma / drug therapy. Glioma / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Brain Mapping. Cerebrovascular Circulation / drug effects. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Humans. Injections, Intramuscular / methods. Karnofsky Performance Status. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Male. Middle Aged. Thallium. Tomography Scanners, X-Ray Computed. Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon / methods. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / methods

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  • (PMID = 20063175.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-7373
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18; AD84R52XLF / Thallium; U68WG3173Y / Carmustine
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25. Goetz C, Hasan A, Stummer W, Heimann A, Kempski O: Experimental research photodynamic effects in perifocal, oedematous brain tissue. Acta Neurochir (Wien); 2002 Feb;144(2):173-9; discussion 179
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  • [Title] Experimental research photodynamic effects in perifocal, oedematous brain tissue.
  • BACKGROUND: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been under discussion as additional treatment option for malignant gliomas.
  • However, damage not only to tumour tissue but also to normal brain has been demonstrated.
  • Spreading of photosensitiser with oedema after disruption of the blood-brain-barrier and potential sensitisation of normal tissue has been found previously.
  • The present study investigates the time- and dose-dependency of normal tissue damage to photodynamic therapy using Photofrin II after disruption of the blood-brain-barrier.
  • METHODS: Male wistar rats anaesthetised with chloral hydrate were subjected to focal, cerebral cold lesions.
  • ; p<0.01). This effect was time-dependent.
  • INTERPRETATIONS: Damage to oedematous tissue after photodynamic therapy using i.v.
  • PFII and laser light at 630 nm depends on laser dose, sensitiser dose and the time point of laser irradiation.
  • The time point of PDT should be considered to prevent unwanted tissue reactions.
  • In the clinical setting however, defined damage to peritumoural tissue may be advantageous.
  • This should be achievable by optimised timing and dosage of photodynamic therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Blood-Brain Barrier. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Dihematoporphyrin Ether / adverse effects. Edema / pathology. Photochemotherapy / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Brain / pathology. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Light. Male. Necrosis. Rats. Rats, Wistar

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  • (PMID = 11862518.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6268
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta neurochirurgica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Neurochir (Wien)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Austria
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 97067-70-4 / Dihematoporphyrin Ether
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26. Aouba A, Dezamis E, Sermet A, Rothschild C, Hermine O, Lasne D, Torchet MF: Uncomplicated neurosurgical resection of a malignant glioneuronal tumour under haemostatic cover of rFVIIa in a severe haemophilia patient with a high-titre inhibitor: a case report and literature review of rFVIIa use in major surgeries. Haemophilia; 2010 Jan;16(1):54-60
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  • [Title] Uncomplicated neurosurgical resection of a malignant glioneuronal tumour under haemostatic cover of rFVIIa in a severe haemophilia patient with a high-titre inhibitor: a case report and literature review of rFVIIa use in major surgeries.
  • The development of inhibitors following factor VIII replacement therapy is a serious complication in severe inherited haemophilia.
  • A 56-year-old severe haemophilia A patient with a high-titre inhibitor was diagnosed for probable right temporoparietal malignant glioneuronal tumour on cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (4 cm x 3 cm cerebromeningeal tumour with perilesional oedema and transfalcial herniation) requiring total resection.
  • Pre- and postoperative courses were uneventful, the surgical procedure being assessed at optimal haemostatic condition without any unusual haemorrhage on MRI controls, diffuse intravascular coagulation criteria or thromboembolic event.
  • Intensive rFVIIa therapy has shown to be safe and effective in this first reported neurosurgery about a malignant tumour exhibiting to a high-bleeding risk notably in haemophilia with high-titre inhibitor.
  • The use of lower doses of rFVIIa might have been possible; however, in the absence of accurate test for monitoring rFVIIa therapy, the potentially life-threatening complications of this procedure required maximum haemostasis with high rFVIIa doses.
  • [MeSH-major] Blood Coagulation Factor Inhibitors / blood. Cerebral Ventricle Neoplasms / surgery. Factor VIIa / therapeutic use. Hemophilia A / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Hemostasis, Surgical. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Postoperative Hemorrhage / prevention & control. Prothrombin Time. Recombinant Proteins / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 19709314.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2516
  • [Journal-full-title] Haemophilia : the official journal of the World Federation of Hemophilia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Haemophilia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Blood Coagulation Factor Inhibitors; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 0 / recombinant FVIIa; EC 3.4.21.21 / Factor VIIa
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27. Fumal I, Piérard-Franchimont C, Piérard GE: [Arsenical keratoses and carcinomas]. Rev Med Liege; 2005 Apr;60(4):217-21
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  • Within a few months, the patient developed multiple large superficial basal cell carcinomas on the trunk and several invasive squamous cell carcinomas.
  • A pulmonary cancer with cerebral metastases was also identified.
  • The recognition of the cutaneous warning signs allows to focus on the overall cancer risk of these patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Arsenic / adverse effects. Carcinoma, Basal Cell / chemically induced. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / chemically induced. Keratosis / chemically induced. Skin Neoplasms / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Humans. Male. Psoriasis / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 15943097.001).
  • [ISSN] 0370-629X
  • [Journal-full-title] Revue médicale de Liège
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Med Liege
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Belgium
  • [Chemical-registry-number] N712M78A8G / Arsenic
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28. Allard E, Hindre F, Passirani C, Lemaire L, Lepareur N, Noiret N, Menei P, Benoit JP: 188Re-loaded lipid nanocapsules as a promising radiopharmaceutical carrier for internal radiotherapy of malignant gliomas. Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging; 2008 Oct;35(10):1838-46
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  • [Title] 188Re-loaded lipid nanocapsules as a promising radiopharmaceutical carrier for internal radiotherapy of malignant gliomas.
  • PURPOSE: Lipid nanocapsules (LNC) entrapping lipophilic complexes of (188)Re ((188)Re(S(3)CPh)(2)(S(2)CPh) [(188)Re-SSS]) were investigated as a novel radiopharmaceutical carrier for internal radiation therapy of malignant gliomas.
  • The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of intra-cerebral administration of (188)Re-SSS LNC by means of convection-enhanced delivery (CED) on a 9L rat brain tumour model.
  • Rats were put into random groups according to the dose infused: 12, 10, 8 and 3 Gy in comparison with blank LNC, perrhenate solution (4 Gy) and non-treated animals.
  • The radionuclide brain retention level was evaluated by measuring (188)Re elimination in faeces and urine over 72 h after the CED injection.
  • The therapeutic effect of (188)Re-SSS LNC was assessed based on animal survival.
  • RESULTS: CED of (188)Re perrhenate solution resulted in rapid drug clearance with a brain T (1/2) of 7h.
  • In contrast, when administered in LNC, (188)Re tissue retention was greatly prolonged, with only 10% of the injected dose being eliminated at 72 h.
  • Rat median survival was significantly improved for the group treated with 8 Gy (188)Re-SSS LNC compared to the control group and blank LNC-treated animals.
  • The increase in the median survival time was about 80% compared to the control group; 33% of the animals were long-term survivors.
  • The dose of 8 Gy proved to be a very effective dose, between toxic (10-12 Gy) and ineffective (3-4 Gy) doses.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These findings show that CED of (188)Re-loaded LNC is a safe and potent anti-tumour system for treating malignant gliomas.
  • Our data are the first to show the in vivo efficacy of (188)Re internal radiotherapy for the treatment of brain malignancy.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Drug Carriers / chemistry. Gliosarcoma / radiotherapy. Lipids / chemistry. Nanostructures / chemistry. Radioisotopes / administration & dosage. Rhenium / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Bacterial Proteins. Cell Line, Tumor. Female. Glucosyltransferases. Radiopharmaceuticals / administration & dosage. Radiopharmaceuticals / chemistry. Rats. Rats, Inbred F344. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Brain Tumors.
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  • (PMID = 18465130.001).
  • [ISSN] 1619-7070
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Nucl. Med. Mol. Imaging
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bacterial Proteins; 0 / Drug Carriers; 0 / Lipids; 0 / Radioisotopes; 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 7440-15-5 / Rhenium; EC 2.4.1.- / Glucosyltransferases; EC 2.4.1.- / Tts protein, Streptococcus pneumoniae
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ HALMS343438; NLM/ PMC2737004
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29. Debernardis A, Alfonsi G, Santacroce L, Bottalico L, Sabatini R, Flace P, Vermesan D, Auteri P, Sisto G, Cagiano R: Antiviral properties of antineoplastic drugs. From herpes simplex-1 disappearance to a wide antiviral action: a serendipity case report. Acta Biomed; 2009;80(3):265-7
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VINBLASTINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Antiviral properties of antineoplastic drugs. From herpes simplex-1 disappearance to a wide antiviral action: a serendipity case report.
  • Herein we report the clinical case of a 46 year old female affected by lung cancer and cerebral metastases who showed, one month after the beginning of an oncologic therapy with vinorelbine and cisplatin, the complete remission of periodic (every 15 days) recurrences of herpetic mouth lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / pharmacology. Antiviral Agents / pharmacology. Herpes Labialis / drug therapy. Herpesvirus 1, Human. Vinblastine / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Brain Neoplasms / epidemiology. Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Comorbidity. Female. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / epidemiology. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Middle Aged. Small Cell Lung Carcinoma / drug therapy. Small Cell Lung Carcinoma / epidemiology. Small Cell Lung Carcinoma / secondary

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  • (PMID = 20578421.001).
  • [ISSN] 0392-4203
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta bio-medica : Atenei Parmensis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Biomed
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Antiviral Agents; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; Q6C979R91Y / vinorelbine
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