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1. Webb TR, Slavish J, George RE, Look AT, Xue L, Jiang Q, Cui X, Rentrop WB, Morris SW: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase: role in cancer pathogenesis and small-molecule inhibitor development for therapy. Expert Rev Anticancer Ther; 2009 Mar;9(3):331-56
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  • [Title] Anaplastic lymphoma kinase: role in cancer pathogenesis and small-molecule inhibitor development for therapy.
  • Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), a receptor tyrosine kinase in the insulin receptor superfamily, was initially identified in constitutively activated oncogenic fusion forms - the most common being nucleophosmin-ALK - in anaplastic large-cell lymphomas, and subsequent studies have identified ALK fusions in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, systemic histiocytosis, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, esophageal squamous cell carcinomas and non-small-cell lung carcinomas.

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  • (PMID = 19275511.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-8328
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert review of anticancer therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Rev Anticancer Ther
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA069129-10; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA69129; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA069129; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA21765; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA021765; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA069129-10
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Carrier Proteins; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Nuclear Proteins; 117896-08-9 / nucleophosmin; 134034-50-7 / pleiotrophin; 137497-38-2 / midkine; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / anaplastic lymphoma kinase
  • [Number-of-references] 304
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS105118; NLM/ PMC2780428
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2. Majhail NS, Burns LJ: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the treatment of peripheral T-cell lymphomas. Curr Hematol Rep; 2005 Jul;4(4):252-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the treatment of peripheral T-cell lymphomas.
  • Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) are a rare group of heterogeneous lymphoproliferative disorders with their origin in the post-thymic T cells.
  • Most PTCL have a relatively poor outcome, with a 5-year overall survival of less than 30%.
  • Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) has a better prognosis compared with other subtypes of PTCL.
  • As with aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation should be offered to patients with PTCL in their first relapse.
  • Patients with poor-risk features (alk-negative ALCL, histologic subtypes other than ALCL, and high International Prognostic Index score at presentation) may be candidates for autologous stem cell transplantation as first-line therapy.
  • Initial results of allogeneic stem cell transplantation, both with standard and nonmyeloablative conditioning, look promising.
  • Randomized, multi-institutional clinical trials are needed to optimally define the role of stem cell transplantation in PTCL.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Immunophenotyping. Prognosis. Stem Cell Transplantation. Transplantation, Autologous

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  • (PMID = 16009039.001).
  • [ISSN] 1541-0714
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hematology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Hematol. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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3. Chow L, Lai R, Dabbagh L, Belch A, Young JD, Cass CE, Mackey JR: Analysis of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) protein in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma by immunohistochemistry. Mod Pathol; 2005 Apr;18(4):558-64
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  • [Title] Analysis of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) protein in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma by immunohistochemistry.
  • Deficiency in hENT1 confers resistance to toxicity of these drugs in a variety of model systems.
  • Since some nucleoside analogs have a role in treating patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), this study was undertaken to assess hENT1 abundance in NHL.
  • A total of 115 cases of NHL of various subtypes and 15 reactive lymph nodes were evaluated for the presence of hENT1 protein using immunohistochemistry applied to frozen tissues.
  • Samples were considered positive when >or=50% of neoplastic cells showed immunostaining.
  • In NHL, a relatively high frequency of hENT1 positivity was found in Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia (63%), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLCL; 45%), and follicular lymphoma (40%).
  • In DLCL, 26% of cases were positive for CD10, and CD10-positive DLCL cases were more likely to be hENT1 positive than CD10-negative cases (P=0.025).
  • A lower frequency of hENT1 positivity was found in mantle cell lymphoma (13%) and peripheral T-cell lymphomas (37%).
  • All marginal zone lymphomas (n=5), chronic lymphocytic leukemia small lymphocytic lymphomas (n=10), plasmacytoma (n=3), acute lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia, and anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (n=5) were negative.
  • Prospective studies to assess the value of hENT1 immunostaining in predicting resistance to nucleoside chemotherapy for NHL are warranted.
  • [MeSH-major] Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 / analysis. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / pathology

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  • (PMID = 15529184.001).
  • [ISSN] 0893-3952
  • [Journal-full-title] Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mod. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1; 0 / SLC29A1 protein, human; EC 3.4.24.11 / Neprilysin
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4. Day MJ, Henderson SM, Belshaw Z, Bacon NJ: An immunohistochemical investigation of 18 cases of feline nasal lymphoma. J Comp Pathol; 2004 Feb-Apr;130(2-3):152-61
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  • [Title] An immunohistochemical investigation of 18 cases of feline nasal lymphoma.
  • This report details clinical, histopathological and immunohistochemical findings in 18 cats with chronic nasal disease diagnosed as nasal lymphoma.
  • Eight of the cats were female and 10 were male, with a median age of 10.5 years (range 7-14 years).
  • Nine cats received multi-agent chemotherapy or radiation therapy, or both, with survival times ranging from 14 to >541 days.
  • In 13 tissues, expression of class II molecules of the major histocompatibility complex and the myelomonocytic antigen MAC387 was also determined.
  • Twelve of the tumours were classified as diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, four as lymphoblastic B-cell lymphomas, and one as a follicular B-cell lymphoma.
  • One tumour was an anaplastic large cell neoplasm, in which the neoplastic cells expressed MHC class II alone in the absence of either lymphoid marker.
  • There was a variable infiltration of reactive small T lymphocytes into these tumours, and zones of necrosis within the tumour tissue were sometimes heavily infiltrated by MAC387+ phagocytic cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Cat Diseases / pathology. Lymphoma / pathology. Lymphoma / veterinary. Nose Neoplasms / pathology. Nose Neoplasms / veterinary
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cats. Female. Immunohistochemistry. Immunophenotyping. Male. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15003473.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-9975
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of comparative pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Comp. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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5. Duvic M, Reddy SA, Pinter-Brown L, Korman NJ, Zic J, Kennedy DA, Lorenz J, Sievers EL, Kim YH: A phase II study of SGN-30 in cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma and related lymphoproliferative disorders. Clin Cancer Res; 2009 Oct 1;15(19):6217-24
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  • [Title] A phase II study of SGN-30 in cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma and related lymphoproliferative disorders.
  • PURPOSE: An open-label, multicenter, phase II study was conducted to define the safety and antitumor activity of the monoclonal antibody SGN-30 in patients with CD30(+) primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (pc-ALCL), lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP), or transformed mycosis fungoides (T-MF).
  • Overall, clinical benefit of SGN-30, as assessed by achieving a response to therapy or stable disease (CR + PR + stable disease), was shown by 87% of patients during the study, including all patients with pc-ALCL or LyP and two thirds of patients with T-MF or with multiple clinical diagnoses.
  • CONCLUSIONS: SGN-30 was clinically active in 16 of 23 patients with heavily pretreated pc-ALCL, LyP, and T-MF and was well tolerated in this study.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / therapy. Lymphoproliferative Disorders / therapy. Skin Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Algorithms. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Female. Humans. Immunotherapy / methods. Male. Middle Aged. Survival Analysis. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19789316.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ClinicalTrials.gov/ NCT00099255
  • [Grant] United States / PHS HHS / / K24
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / SGN-30 monoclonal antibody
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6. Savage KJ: Prognosis and primary therapy in peripheral T-cell lymphomas. Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program; 2008;:280-8
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  • [Title] Prognosis and primary therapy in peripheral T-cell lymphomas.
  • Peripheral NK/T-cell neoplasms are an uncommon group of diseases that show distinct racial and geographic variation.
  • The prognostic significance of the T-cell phenotype has been clearly defined in recent studies by using modern lymphoma classification systems.
  • However, within this heterogenous group of neoplasms, some have a more favorable prognosis, such as ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell leukemia (ALCL) and primary cutaneous ALCL, and some have ultimately fatal courses with standard chemotherapy programs (e.g., hepatosplenic gammadelta T-cell lymphomas).
  • Further, unlike the benefits observed with CHOP chemotherapy in the treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL), other than ALK-positive ALCL, are relatively chemoresistant to this regimen.
  • Given disease rarity and biological heterogeneity, advances in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment have lagged behind DLBCL.
  • Recently, however, studies are emerging that focus specifically on PTCLs with the ultimate goal of better understanding disease biology and developing more effective therapies.

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  • (PMID = 19074097.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-4391
  • [Journal-full-title] Hematology. American Society of Hematology. Education Program
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / anaplastic lymphoma kinase; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone
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7. Visco C, Medeiros LJ, Jones D, Smith T, Rodriguez MA, McLaughlin P, Romaguera J, Cabanillas F, Sarris AH: Primary cutaneous non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with aggressive histology: inferior outcome is associated with peripheral T-cell type and elevated lactate dehydrogenase, but not extent of cutaneous involvement. Ann Oncol; 2002 Aug;13(8):1290-9
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  • [Title] Primary cutaneous non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with aggressive histology: inferior outcome is associated with peripheral T-cell type and elevated lactate dehydrogenase, but not extent of cutaneous involvement.
  • BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to explore the association between extent of cutaneous involvement, presenting features and progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with primary cutaneous non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (PCNHL) of aggressive histology.
  • METHODS: Previously untreated patients with localized or extensive PCNHL of aggressive histology, treated with combination chemotherapy, but excluding lymphoblastic lymphoma and mycosis fungoides and its variants, were reviewed retrospectively.
  • Median age was 52 years (range 25-81 years), and disease was localized and extensive in 37 and 16 patients, respectively.
  • Twenty-four patients had diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, nine had grade 3 follicular lymphoma, 13 had peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL; not otherwise specified) and seven had anaplastic large cell lymphoma (WHO classification).
  • With a median follow-up of 101 months (range 2-237 months) for survivors, the 10-year PFS was 65 +/- 7% and overall survival was 72 +/- 8%.
  • The first failure involved the skin in 33% of B-cell and 91% of relapsing T-cell lymphomas.
  • Univariate analysis revealed that PTCL (P = 0.005), lymphopenia (P = 0.01) and high serum levels of beta(2)-microglobulin (P = 0.0006) and LDH (P = 0.002), but not extent of skin involvement, were associated with inferior PFS.
  • CONCLUSIONS: PTCL and elevated serum LDH level, but not extent of cutaneous involvement are associated with inferior PFS in aggressive PCNHL treated with combination chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 12181254.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-7534
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-16672
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 1.1.1.27 / L-Lactate Dehydrogenase
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8. Caparević Z, Stojanović D, Bojković G, Lalosević D, Stojanović M: [Malignant lymphoma of the thyroid gland]. Med Pregl; 2002 Nov-Dec;55(11-12):485-9
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  • [Title] [Malignant lymphoma of the thyroid gland].
  • [Transliterated title] Maligni limfom tireoidne zlezde.
  • INTRODUCTION: Malignant lymphoma of the thyroid gland can be defined as a lymphoma arising from the thyroid gland.
  • Lymphomas of the thyroid gland represent less than 5% of primary thyroid neoplasms and are two to three times more common in women than in men, whereas the median age is usually close to 60 years.
  • Majority of thyroid lymphomas are diffuse, large-cell lymphomas.
  • The incidence of thyroid lymphomas in patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis has markedly increased and this phenomenon is probably related to their pathogenesis.
  • CLINICAL PRESENTATION: Unlike most other thyroid neoplasms, lymphomas are usually rapidly enlarging masses and local symptoms are common: pain, hoarseness, dysphagia, and dyspnea or stridor.
  • DIAGNOSIS: To evaluate the extent of disease, a chest x-ray and CT scans of the head and neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis are necessary.
  • An excisional or large-needle biopsy may also be necessary to make the correct diagnosis.
  • Occasionally, these tumors can be confused with anaplastic thyroid carcinomas, which can lead to serious mistakes in management.
  • A gallium scan or a positron emission tomography (PET) scan can help later to establish whether any residual abnormality, observed on x-ray studies after treatment, contains active lymphoma or scar tissue.
  • After diagnosis, patients are clinically staged (without surgery) using appropriate computed tomography scans or magnetic resonance imaging.
  • THERAPY: Assessment of the extent of thyroid lymphomas is crucial for prognosis and treatment.
  • Total thyroidectomy may improve the prognosis in patients with intrathyroidal disease only.
  • It is very important to identify patients with favorable prognostic factors and to treat them with standard chemotherapy (CHOP) and radiotherapy protocols.
  • Patients with diffuse large-cell primary thyroid lymphomas should not be treated with radiation therapy alone.
  • CONCLUSION: The best treatment results for malignant lymphomas of the thyroid gland are achieved using a combined-modality therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma / diagnosis. Thyroid Neoplasms / diagnosis


9. Vural F, Akad Soyer N, Özen P, Dönmez A, Ocakçı S, Saydam G, Çağırgan S, Tombuloğlu M: Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with bone involvement: a single center experience with 18 patients. Turk J Haematol; 2010 Mar 5;27(1):29-33
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  • [Title] Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with bone involvement: a single center experience with 18 patients.
  • OBJECTIVE: Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) of bone is a rare entity.
  • The most common histological subtype is diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL).
  • The major presenting symptoms are soft tissue swelling, bone pain and pathological fracture.
  • Treatment options are chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery, or a combination of these modalities.
  • Tru-cut biopsy was performed for diagnosis in most of the cases.
  • Diagnosis in five patients (27.8%) required open biopsy.
  • RESULTS: DLBCL (77.8%) was the most common histological type among all patients.
  • Other histological subtypes were anaplastic large cell lymphoma (11.1%), Burkitt-like lymphoma (5.6%) and marginal zone lymphoma (5.6%).
  • All patients except one were treated with anthracycline-containing regimens and eight patients (44.4%) received rituximab combination with chemotherapy.
  • Radiation therapy was performed as the first-line therapy in 9 (50%) patients.
  • CONCLUSION: The treatment of bone lymphoma can be planned according to the stage and location of the disease.
  • Although we had a relatively low number of patients, it could be concluded that whether or not radiation therapy is performed, rituximab in combination with systemic chemotherapy has been proven beneficial on survival.

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  • (PMID = 27265795.001).
  • [ISSN] 1300-7777
  • [Journal-full-title] Turkish journal of haematology : official journal of Turkish Society of Haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Turk J Haematol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Turkey
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10. Zamkoff KW, Matulis MD, Mehta AC, Beaty MW, Hutchison RE, Gentile TC: High-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplant does not result in long-term disease-free survival in patients with recurrent chemotherapy-sensitive ALK-negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2004 Mar;33(6):635-8
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  • [Title] High-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplant does not result in long-term disease-free survival in patients with recurrent chemotherapy-sensitive ALK-negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.
  • Primary systemic anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) has a poor prognosis.
  • This study sought to determine if high-dose therapy and ASCT results in long-term disease-free survival (DFS) in patients with recurrent, chemotherapy-sensitive ALK-negative ALCL.
  • All patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) who underwent ASCT at Wake Forest University and Upstate Medical University from 1 January 1990 to 12 December 2002 were reviewed to determine if they had T-, B- or null-cell NHL that was CD30+/CD15-/ALK negative.
  • In all, 16 patients were thus identified as having ALK-negative ALCL.
  • All 16 patients underwent ASCT at the time of first relapse and form the basis of this report.
  • International prognostic index scores in 12 patients at the time of relapse were: low 3, LI 6 and HI 3.
  • Of 15 patients, 10 have died; nine of recurrent disease.
  • In our experience, high-dose therapy and ASCT does not produce long-term DFS in patients with recurrent chemotherapy-sensitive ALK-negative ALCL.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / therapy. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / analysis. Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / analysis. Stem Cell Transplantation / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Recurrence. Survival Analysis. Transplantation, Autologous

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  • (PMID = 15004538.001).
  • [ISSN] 0268-3369
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / anaplastic lymphoma kinase
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11. Shimamoto T, Hayashi S, Ando K, Yguchi M, Miyazawa K, Kimura Y, Mukai K, Serizawa H, Ohyashiki K: Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma which showed severe inflammatory status and myelodysplasia with increased VEGF and IL-6 serum levels after long-term immunosuppressive therapy. Am J Hematol; 2001 Jan;66(1):49-52
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  • [Title] Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma which showed severe inflammatory status and myelodysplasia with increased VEGF and IL-6 serum levels after long-term immunosuppressive therapy.
  • We report a patient with anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) who has been given immunosuppressive therapy for Evans syndrome for 10 years.
  • Examination of biopsy specimens obtained by para-aortic lymph nodes and liver masses resulted in a diagnosis of ALCL.
  • Immunohistochemically, these cells were reactive to anti-CD30 antibody but were not of B- or T-lineage.
  • He was treated with combination chemotherapy (ABVD regimen), achieving complete remission.
  • Myelodysplasia and serum IL-6 and VEGF also normalized after treatment.
  • We assumed that ALCL resulted from long-term immunosuppressive therapy and that the up-regulation of IL-6 and VEGF played a role in pathogenesis of this type of lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Autoimmune Diseases / drug therapy. Cyclosporine / adverse effects. Endothelial Growth Factors / blood. Immunosuppressive Agents / adverse effects. Interleukin-6 / blood. Lymphokines / blood. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / drug therapy. Myelodysplastic Syndromes / etiology. Pancytopenia / drug therapy. Prednisolone / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Abdominal Pain / etiology. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bleomycin / administration & dosage. Bone Marrow / pathology. CD4-CD8 Ratio. Cell Lineage. Combined Modality Therapy. DNA, Neoplasm / analysis. DNA, Viral / analysis. Dacarbazine / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Fever / etiology. Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 / blood. Gene Rearrangement, B-Lymphocyte. Humans. Immunocompromised Host. Inflammation. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Remission Induction. Splenectomy. Syndrome. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors. Vinblastine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 11426493.001).
  • [ISSN] 0361-8609
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 0 / DNA, Viral; 0 / Endothelial Growth Factors; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Interleukin-6; 0 / Lymphokines; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors; 103107-01-3 / Fibroblast Growth Factor 2; 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 83HN0GTJ6D / Cyclosporine; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone; ABVD protocol
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12. Frankel WL, Shapiro P, Weidner N: Primary anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the adrenal gland. Ann Diagn Pathol; 2000 Jun;4(3):158-64
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  • [Title] Primary anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the adrenal gland.
  • Primary adrenal lymphomas are rare.
  • Most reported cases are of B-cell phenotype and follow an aggressive clinical course.
  • We report a case of primary anaplastic large cell, CD30+ adrenal lymphoma developing in a 62-year-old woman.
  • Computed tomography revealed bilateral adrenal masses.
  • Histologic evaluation showed islands of large atypical cells surrounded by eosinophilic acellular material.
  • The tumor cells stained positive for CD45, CD45RO, CD43, and CD30.
  • The patient was treated with chemotherapy and a 23-month follow-up examination showed no change in the size of the opposite adrenal gland and no other evidence of lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / pathology. Antigens, CD. Epstein-Barr Virus Infections / pathology. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenalectomy. Antigens, CD30 / analysis. Antigens, CD43. Antigens, CD45 / analysis. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Herpesvirus 4, Human / isolation & purification. Humans. Middle Aged. Sialoglycoproteins / analysis

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  • (PMID = 10919386.001).
  • [ISSN] 1092-9134
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of diagnostic pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Diagn Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / Antigens, CD30; 0 / Antigens, CD43; 0 / Sialoglycoproteins; 0 / UN1 sialoglycoprotein, human; EC 3.1.3.48 / Antigens, CD45
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13. Andersson PO, Braide I, Nilsson-Ehle H: Trofosfamide as salvage therapy for anaplastic large cell lymphoma relapsing after high-dose chemotherapy. Leuk Lymphoma; 2002 Dec;43(12):2351-3
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  • [Title] Trofosfamide as salvage therapy for anaplastic large cell lymphoma relapsing after high-dose chemotherapy.
  • Patients with relapsed aggressive lymphoma after high dose chemotherapy have a very poor prognosis and long-term survival is rare.
  • Most patients are not eligible for allogeneic stem cell transplantation in this setting and treatment, therefore, becomes palliative.
  • A few studies have shown that trofosfamide, an oral alkylating agent, may be effective as palliative treatment in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • Trofosfamide therapy is considered rather non-toxic with an overall response rate from 50 to 80%.
  • We report a patient with a very aggressive ALK + anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), relapsing shortly after high dose chemotherapy.
  • After several radio/chemotherapy regimens trofosfamide was started as palliative treatment.
  • This therapy resulted in a complete remission, still ongoing, 27 months after termination of intravenous cytotoxic therapy and 16 months after withdrawal of trofosfamide.
  • Thus, in this particular case, trofosfamide turned out to be an unexpectedly effective salvage therapy for an otherwise very aggressive relapsing ALCL.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / administration & dosage. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Cyclophosphamide / analogs & derivatives. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / drug therapy. Salvage Therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Humans. Male. Palliative Care. Recurrence. Remission Induction

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  • (PMID = 12613523.001).
  • [ISSN] 1042-8194
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia & lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; H64JRU6GJ0 / trofosfamide
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14. Stine KC, Saylors RL, Saccente CS, Becton DL: Treatment of deep vein thrombosis with enoxaparin in pediatric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Clin Appl Thromb Hemost; 2007 Apr;13(2):161-5
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  • [Title] Treatment of deep vein thrombosis with enoxaparin in pediatric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.
  • There are few data regarding the use of enoxaparin in children undergoing myelosuppressive therapy for malignancies even though thrombosis is a known risk in pediatric patients with malignancies.
  • The purpose of this study was to review the utilization of low-molecular-weight heparin, enoxaparin (Lovenox), in children with cancer at our institution who had thrombosis while undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy.
  • In particular we were interested in the efficacy of enoxaparin in these patients, and in whether these children were able to continue their chemotherapy without adjustment or interruption secondary to bleeding complications.
  • Diagnosis included B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (n=three), T-ALL, Hodgkin's disease, anaplastic large cell lymphoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma (n=one each).
  • Treatment was enoxaparin, 1-1.5 mg/kg/dose twice daily to maintain a heparin anti-Xa level of 0.5-1.5 IU/mL till clot resolution.
  • The dose was then decreased to daily for a total of 3-6 months of therapy.
  • All patients had resolution of their thrombosis within 1-2 months of initiation of enoxaparin, and none required delays or dose reduction of their chemotherapy regimens while on anticoagulation, though some were supported by blood and platelet transfusions.
  • Enoxaparin was safely administered to this series of seven patients for thrombotic complications in children undergoing cancer chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Enoxaparin / therapeutic use. Neoplasms / complications. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Venous Thrombosis / complications. Venous Thrombosis / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Blood Coagulation Disorders / complications. Blood Coagulation Disorders / drug therapy. Blood Coagulation Disorders / pathology. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Male. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 17456625.001).
  • [ISSN] 1076-0296
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical and applied thrombosis/hemostasis : official journal of the International Academy of Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Appl. Thromb. Hemost.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Enoxaparin
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15. Attarbaschi A, Mann G, Dworzak M, Trebo M, Urban C, Fink FM, Horcher E, Reiter A, Riehm H, Gadner H, Austrian Cooperative Study Group: Malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of childhood and adolescence in Austria--therapy results between 1986 and 2000. Wien Klin Wochenschr; 2002 Dec 30;114(23-24):978-86
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  • [Title] Malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of childhood and adolescence in Austria--therapy results between 1986 and 2000.
  • Between 1986 and 2000 183 Austrian children and adolescents with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and mature B-cell acute leukemia (B-ALL) were enrolled in 3 consecutive studies of the Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (BFM) Group.
  • In the succeeding studies NHL-BFM 90 and 95, treatment stratification was additionally based on the speed of tumor response to therapy and for children with B-cell NHL/B-ALL also on the pre-therapeutic serum lactic dehydrogenase level.
  • Patients with lymphoblastic lymphoma (mainly with T-cell phenotypes) had an excellent prognosis with an ALL-type chemotherapy regimen (n = 49; relapse, n = 1), whereas an intensive, short-pulse therapy delivered within a 2- to 4-month period was found to be highly efficacious in children with B-cell NHL/B-ALL (n = 114; relapse, n = 6; progression, n = 5).
  • Patients with anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) who were treated with similar alternating short courses of multi-agent chemotherapy had a less good outcome (n = 20; relapse, n = 6, progression, n = 3).
  • Children with B-cell NHL and B-ALL who failed initial therapy also had a dismal prognosis (10/11 patients died).
  • Local radiotherapy as a part of lymphoma therapy was completely abandoned in study NHL-BFM 90 and surgical interventions were confined to specific situations such as complete resection in localized B-cell NHL and ALCL, diagnostic biopsy and second-look operation.
  • In conclusion, our results showed that the BFM treatment strategy for lymphoblastic lymphoma and B-cell NHL/B-ALL was highly successful in the majority of patients; however, optimal treatment for children with ALCL has not yet been defined.
  • As a consequence, larger trials at an international level are necessary to find new prognostic markers that might define more precisely those patients who need further intensification of first-line treatment or novel therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Burkitt Lymphoma / therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Data Interpretation, Statistical. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Infant. Lymphoma, B-Cell / diagnosis. Lymphoma, B-Cell / drug therapy. Lymphoma, B-Cell / mortality. Lymphoma, B-Cell / therapy. Male. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / diagnosis. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / mortality. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / therapy. Prognosis. Prospective Studies. Risk Factors. Survival Analysis. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12635465.001).
  • [ISSN] 0043-5325
  • [Journal-full-title] Wiener klinische Wochenschrift
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Wien. Klin. Wochenschr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] Austria
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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16. Boudova L, Kazakov DV, Jindra P, Sima R, Vanecek T, Kuntscher V, Vera V, Bouda J, Michal M: Primary cutaneous histiocyte and neutrophil-rich CD30+ and CD56+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma with prominent angioinvasion and nerve involvement in the forehead and scalp of an immunocompetent woman. J Cutan Pathol; 2006 Aug;33(8):584-9
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  • [Title] Primary cutaneous histiocyte and neutrophil-rich CD30+ and CD56+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma with prominent angioinvasion and nerve involvement in the forehead and scalp of an immunocompetent woman.
  • BACKGROUND: Cutaneous lymphomas co-expressing CD56 and CD30 are very rare.
  • They share a clinicopathological overlap with natural killer- (NK)/T-cell lymphomas and anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs), two entities with widely disparate clinical behavior.
  • METHODS: We present a case of an immunocompetent 57-year-old Caucasian woman with a rapidly growing, angiodestructive and neuroinvasive primary cutaneous ALCL (PCALCL).
  • The neoplastic population of large anaplastic CD30+ and CD56+ T cells was masked by a massive admixture of histiocytes and neutrophils.
  • RESULTS: After chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone), the patient achieved a complete remission.
  • Additionally, high-dose chemotherapy with autologous peripheral blood stem-cell transplantation was administered as a consolidation of complete remission, in which she has remained for 6 years.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This is the first CD30+ and CD56+ primary skin lymphoma to be reported on the head.
  • The presented case carries a remarkable combination of clinicopathological features of PCALCL and NK-/T-cell lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD30 / analysis. Antigens, CD56 / analysis. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Forehead. Head and Neck Neoplasms / blood supply. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / immunology. Head and Neck Neoplasms / pathology. Histiocytes / cytology. Humans. Middle Aged. Neutrophils / cytology. Scalp / blood supply. Scalp / drug effects. Scalp / innervation. Scalp / pathology. Stem Cell Transplantation

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  • (PMID = 16919035.001).
  • [ISSN] 0303-6987
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cutaneous pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cutan. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD30; 0 / Antigens, CD56
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17. Pöttgen C, Stuschke M, Stüben G, Schmitz A, Schwechheimer K, Wacker HH, Rauhut F, Kleuker S, Wilhelm H, Grehl S, Fehlings T: Long-term survival following radiotherapy and cytarabine chemotherapy for sporadic primary central nervous system lymphoma. Strahlenther Onkol; 2003 Sep;179(9):626-32
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  • [Title] Long-term survival following radiotherapy and cytarabine chemotherapy for sporadic primary central nervous system lymphoma.
  • PURPOSE: To analyze the long-term results following whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) with sequential intrathecal (i.th.) cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) +/- intravenous (i.v.
  • ) Ara-C in patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL).
  • All had sporadic PCNSL with proven histology of high-grade CNS lymphoma (twelve diffuse large-cell B-lymphomas, one lymphoblastic lymphoma, one large T-cell lymphoma).
  • Patients were treated with two to four cycles of induction chemotherapy (40 mg/m2 Ara-C i.th.
  • WBRT was administered using 1.8-Gy fractions.
  • Intrathecal chemotherapy was planned afterwards in 4-week intervals for 6 months.
  • RESULTS: Two of four patients who received i.v. and i.th. induction chemotherapy showed progressive disease, and irradiation was started immediately.
  • Six of 14 patients received 50.4 Gy WBRT, four patients had WBRT up to 39.6 Gy followed by a 10.8-Gy boost.
  • Five patients died early during therapy either due to a decline of the general medical condition or progressive disease.
  • CONCLUSION: This WBRT-based protocol with i.th. meningeal prophylaxis using Ara-C +/- i.v.
  • The value of i.v. chemotherapy is currently being investigated in prospective studies.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / mortality. Brain Neoplasms / therapy. Cytarabine / therapeutic use. Lymphoma / mortality. Lymphoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cause of Death. Combined Modality Therapy. Confidence Intervals. Dose Fractionation. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Injections, Intravenous. Injections, Spinal. Lymphoma, B-Cell / drug therapy. Lymphoma, B-Cell / mortality. Lymphoma, B-Cell / radiotherapy. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / mortality. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / radiotherapy. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / mortality. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / radiotherapy. Lymphoma, T-Cell / drug therapy. Lymphoma, T-Cell / mortality. Lymphoma, T-Cell / radiotherapy. Male. Middle Aged. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / mortality. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / radiotherapy. Radiotherapy Dosage. Survival Analysis. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 14628129.001).
  • [ISSN] 0179-7158
  • [Journal-full-title] Strahlentherapie und Onkologie : Organ der Deutschen Röntgengesellschaft ... [et al]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Strahlenther Onkol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine
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18. Sugiyama K, Omachi K, Fujiwara K, Saotome T, Mizunuma N, Takahashi S, Ito Y, Aiba K, Horikoshi N: Irinotecan hydrochloride for the treatment of recurrent and refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a single institution experience. Cancer; 2002 Feb 1;94(3):594-600
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  • [Title] Irinotecan hydrochloride for the treatment of recurrent and refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a single institution experience.
  • In the current study, the authors investigated the efficacy and adverse effects of irinotecan in the treatment of recurrent and refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma, for which current therapies appear to be unsatisfactory.
  • METHODS: Irinotecan was administered by intravenous infusion at a dose of 40 mg/m(2)/day for 3 days, and this regimen was repeated 2-3 times at weekly intervals, followed by 2 weeks off therapy.
  • The subjects were 48 patients with recurrent or refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
  • The histologic classification (Working Formulation) was low grade in 8 patients, intermediate grade in 36 patients, high grade in 1 patient, and other (angiocentric lymphoma, Ki-1 lymphoma, and unidentified) in 3 patients.
  • Therapy resulted in a complete disease remission in 2 patients and a partial remission in 15 patients.
  • The median duration of response was 64 days and the median time to disease progression was 77 days.
  • The median survival time was 422 days.
  • Treatment was withdrawn because of diarrhea in three patients.
  • Because of myelosuppression and diarrhea, approximately 67% of the patients required changes to the regimen, including dose reduction, prolongation of the interval between treatments, and reducing the number of days of consecutive treatment.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The results of the current study suggest the activity of irinotecan as salvage therapy for patients with recurrent and refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / pharmacology. Camptothecin / analogs & derivatives. Camptothecin / pharmacology. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Anemia / chemically induced. Diarrhea / chemically induced. Disease Progression. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Leukopenia / chemically induced. Male. Middle Aged. Recurrence. Survival Analysis. Thrombocytopenia / chemically induced. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002 American Cancer Society. DOI 10.1002/cncr.10266
  • (PMID = 11857289.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 7673326042 / irinotecan; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
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19. Boccalatte FE, Voena C, Riganti C, Bosia A, D'Amico L, Riera L, Cheng M, Ruggeri B, Jensen ON, Goss VL, Lee K, Nardone J, Rush J, Polakiewicz RD, Comb MJ, Chiarle R, Inghirami G: The enzymatic activity of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/IMP cyclohydrolase is enhanced by NPM-ALK: new insights in ALK-mediated pathogenesis and the treatment of ALCL. Blood; 2009 Mar 19;113(12):2776-90
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  • [Title] The enzymatic activity of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/IMP cyclohydrolase is enhanced by NPM-ALK: new insights in ALK-mediated pathogenesis and the treatment of ALCL.
  • Anaplastic large cell lymphoma represents a subset of neoplasms caused by translocations that juxtapose the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) to dimerization partners.
  • To elucidate the ALK pathways sustaining lymphomagenesis and tumor maintenance, we analyzed the tyrosine-kinase protein profiles of ALK-positive cell lines using 2 complementary proteomic-based approaches, taking advantage of a specific ALK RNA interference (RNAi) or cell-permeable inhibitors.
  • ATIC phosphorylation was documented in cell lines and primary tumors carrying ALK proteins and other tyrosine kinases, including TPR-Met and wild type c-Met.
  • Prediction of tumor responses to methotrexate may justify specific molecular-based chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 18845790.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-0020
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA090773; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01-CA90773
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / CEP 11988; 0 / CEP 14083; 0 / Carbazoles; 0 / Cell Adhesion Molecules; 0 / Indazoles; 0 / Microfilament Proteins; 0 / Multienzyme Complexes; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / Phenylurea Compounds; 0 / Phosphoproteins; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / inosine monophosphate synthase; 0 / vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein; 21820-51-9 / Phosphotyrosine; EC 2.1.2.- / Hydroxymethyl and Formyl Transferases; EC 2.7.1.- / p80(NPM-ALK) protein; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 3.5.4.- / Nucleotide Deaminases; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2661863
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20. Küpeli S, Varan A, Demir H, Aydin B, Yüce A, Büyükpamukçu M: Association of Helicobacter pylori and childhood lymphoma. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2007 May;29(5):301-4
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  • [Title] Association of Helicobacter pylori and childhood lymphoma.
  • We aimed to estimate the frequency of association between non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) with abdominal, gastric, or intestinal involvement and Helicobacter pylori in childhood.
  • Patients who were given chemotherapy previously or who received H. pylori eradication therapy were excluded from the study.
  • Pathologic diagnosis was made by examining the biopsy samples.
  • Endoscopic examination was also planned for patients with positive test results.
  • Twelve male and 3 female patients, with a median age of 7 (range: 3 to 16), were evaluated.
  • Six had stage IV characteristics, whereas another 9 patients had stage III disease.
  • Ten had high-grade B-cell lymphoma.
  • First patient had T-cell lymphoma and stage IV disease with involvement in stomach, mediastinum, peripheral lymph nodes, and bone marrow.
  • The second one had anaplastic large cell lymphoma exclusively in abdominal lymph nodes.
  • Last patient had Burkitt lymphoma and stage IV disease, with primary tumor localization in abdominal lymph nodes, liver, and kidneys.
  • The H. pylori IgG and UBT were both positive in 3 patients on admission.
  • We did not find any positive test results in the other 12 patients with intestinal, stomach, or abdominal disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / epidemiology. Helicobacter Infections / epidemiology. Helicobacter pylori / isolation & purification. Lymphoma, B-Cell / epidemiology. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Prospective Studies. Recurrence. Risk Assessment. Sampling Studies. Treatment Outcome. Turkey / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 17483706.001).
  • [ISSN] 1077-4114
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents
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21. Hughes M, Morrison A, Jackson R: Primary bladder lymphoma: management and outcome of 12 patients with a review of the literature. Leuk Lymphoma; 2005 Jun;46(6):873-7
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  • [Title] Primary bladder lymphoma: management and outcome of 12 patients with a review of the literature.
  • Primary bladder non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is rare.
  • Using the Scotland and Newcastle lymphoma group database, 12 patients with primary bladder lymphoma were identified between 1980 and 2001, the largest single group of patients available to date.
  • Six cases were low-grade extranodal marginal zone lymphoma, 4 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, one an ALK 1 positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALKoma) and one a low-grade lymphoma unspecified.
  • Two patients (low-grade NHL) were treated with oral antibiotics (n=1) or diathermy (n=1) alone with complete resolution of disease.
  • One patient with high-grade NHL gained complete remission without conventional therapy.
  • Nine patients were treated with single or combined modality surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy.
  • A review of 88 additional cases in the literature support the findings that primary bladder lymphoma is associated with a good prognosis.
  • Patients with low-grade extranodal marginal zone lymphoma may respond well to simple therapies.
  • Patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma respond well to first-line chemotherapy regimens.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, B-Cell / diagnosis. Lymphoma, B-Cell / therapy. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / therapy. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / diagnosis. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Male. Medical Oncology / methods. Prognosis. Registries. Remission Induction. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16019532.001).
  • [ISSN] 1029-2403
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia & lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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22. Perna AG, Jones DM, Duvic M: Lymphomatoid papulosis from childhood with anaplastic large-cell lymphoma of the small bowel. Clin Lymphoma; 2004 Dec;5(3):190-3
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  • [Title] Lymphomatoid papulosis from childhood with anaplastic large-cell lymphoma of the small bowel.
  • Lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP) is a lymphoproliferative disorder that exists on a spectrum of diseases with cutaneous CD30+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL).
  • Multiple treatment options are available, although none are curative.
  • Lymphomatoid papulosis is associated with primary cutaneous ALCL and other lymphoproliferative malignancies, but is rarely associated with extranodal systemic ALCL.
  • A 43-year-old man developed lymphomatoid papulosis lesions at 3 years of age, which persisted into adulthood, and he later developed ALCL of the duodenum.
  • Treatment with standard CHOP (cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin/vincristine/prednisolone) chemotherapy resulted in complete remission of his gastrointestinal lymphoma and temporary improvement of his skin lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Diphtheria Toxin / therapeutic use. Interleukin-2 / therapeutic use. Intestinal Neoplasms / pathology. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / pathology. Lymphomatoid Papulosis / pathology. Recombinant Fusion Proteins / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Child. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Humans. Male. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Treatment Outcome. Vincristine / administration & dosage


23. Deconinck E, Lamy T, Foussard C, Gaillard F, Delwail V, Colombat P, Casassus P, Lemevel A, Brion A, Milpied N: Autologous stem cell transplantation for anaplastic large-cell lymphomas: results of a prospective trial. Br J Haematol; 2000 Jun;109(4):736-42
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  • [Title] Autologous stem cell transplantation for anaplastic large-cell lymphomas: results of a prospective trial.
  • Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in the front line treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) remains controversial.
  • Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is known to have its own clinical and biological features.
  • The outcome of ALCL patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy and ASCT as part of their first-line therapy was analysed in 202 intermediate or high-grade NHL patients in a prospective randomized trial.
  • First-line chemotherapy comprised two alternating anthracycline-containing regimens.
  • Fifteen patients with ALCL were identified by morphological and immunological features (CD30 was expressed in 14 out of 15 patients, three patients expressed B-cell markers, five patients expressed T-cell markers and seven patients did not express cell markers).
  • Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) expression was confirmed in seven cases.
  • The median age was 39 years with a predominant male sex ratio (2.75).
  • All patients entered CR, no relapse occurred and EFS and survival reached 87% with a follow-up of more than 5 years.
  • These results differ significantly from those observed in the other 176 lymphoma patients: event-free survival was only 53 +/- 5% and OS reached 60 +/- 4% with a median follow-up of 56 months (P = 0.006).
  • Intensified chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support appeared effective in the treatment of ALCL, offering patients the real chance of a cure.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Carmustine / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Cytarabine / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Melphalan / administration & dosage. Middle Aged. Podophyllotoxin / administration & dosage. Prospective Studies. Survival Rate. Transplantation, Autologous

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  • (PMID = 10929023.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1048
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine; L36H50F353 / Podophyllotoxin; Q41OR9510P / Melphalan; U68WG3173Y / Carmustine; BEAM protocol
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24. Chen AI, McMillan A, Negrin RS, Horning SJ, Laport GG: Long-term results of autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation for peripheral T cell lymphoma: the Stanford experience. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant; 2008 Jul;14(7):741-7
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  • [Title] Long-term results of autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation for peripheral T cell lymphoma: the Stanford experience.
  • The peripheral T cell lymphomas (PTCL) carry a worse prognosis compared to B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
  • There is no uniform standard therapy for PTCL, and autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (AHCT) is often offered as consolidation in first remission or at relapse because of the poor outcomes with conventional therapy.
  • Fifty-three cases were identified consisting of systemic anaplastic large cell (n = 18), PTCL unspecified (n = 17), angioimmunoblastic (n = 9), nasal type extranodal NK/T (n = 7), hepatosplenic (n = 2), and adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (n = 1).
  • Fifteen patients were transplanted in first complete or partial response (CR1/PR1), 32 in second or beyond CR or PR (CR2/PR2+), and 11 with primary refractory disease (REF).
  • With a median follow-up was 5 years (range: 1.0-11.5), the 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 25% and 48%, respectively.
  • Disease status at AHCT had a significant impact on PFS and OS.
  • The pretransplant factors that impacted survival were disease status and the number of prior regimens.
  • Based on these results, AHCT as consolidation therapy in first complete or partial response may offer a durable survival benefit.
  • However, AHCT with conventional salvage chemotherapy has minimal durable benefit in patients with relapsed or refractory PTCL, and thus novel strategies and/or allogeneic HCT should be more aggressively explored in lieu of AHCT for relapsed/ refractory PTCL.


25. Le Deley MC, Rosolen A, Williams DM, Horibe K, Wrobel G, Attarbaschi A, Zsiros J, Uyttebroeck A, Marky IM, Lamant L, Woessmann W, Pillon M, Hobson R, Mauguen A, Reiter A, Brugières L: Vinblastine in children and adolescents with high-risk anaplastic large-cell lymphoma: results of the randomized ALCL99-vinblastine trial. J Clin Oncol; 2010 Sep 1;28(25):3987-93
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  • [Title] Vinblastine in children and adolescents with high-risk anaplastic large-cell lymphoma: results of the randomized ALCL99-vinblastine trial.
  • PURPOSE: The impact of adding vinblastine to a 4-month chemotherapy regimen, based on the Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster 90 protocol, in childhood high-risk anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) was assessed.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Children and adolescents with high-risk ALCL, defined by mediastinal, lung, liver, spleen, or skin involvement, were eligible for the trial.
  • After a prephase and one chemotherapy course, patients were randomly assigned to receive either five further chemotherapy courses without vinblastine or the same regimen with one vinblastine injection (6 mg/m(2)) during each course followed by weekly vinblastine to complete a total of 1 year of treatment.
  • CONCLUSION: Adding vinblastine during induction and as maintenance for a total treatment duration of 1 year significantly delayed the occurrence of relapses but did not reduce the risk of failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Vinblastine / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Disease-Free Survival. Humans. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / drug therapy

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  • [CommentIn] J Clin Oncol. 2011 Feb 1;29(4):e90-1; author reply e92-3 [21172896.001]
  • (PMID = 20679620.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Cancer Research UK / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine
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26. Monaco S, Tsao L, Murty VV, Nandula SV, Donovan V, Oesterheld J, Bhagat G, Alobeid B: Pediatric ALK+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma with t(3;8)(q26.2;q24) translocation and c-myc rearrangement terminating in a leukemic phase. Am J Hematol; 2007 Jan;82(1):59-64
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  • [Title] Pediatric ALK+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma with t(3;8)(q26.2;q24) translocation and c-myc rearrangement terminating in a leukemic phase.
  • Pediatric ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALK+ ALCL) is usually associated with a favorable prognosis.
  • ALK+ ALCL associated with a leukemic phase is uncommon, but has been associated with an aggressive clinical course and unfavorable prognosis.
  • Overexpression of c-myc has been shown to be a consistent finding in ALK+, but not ALK-negative ALCL (ALK- ALCL), and the c-myc gene is considered a downstream target of deregulated ALK signaling.
  • We describe a pediatric ALK+ ALCL with a leukemic phase at relapse.
  • Similar to other rare cases described in the literature, it followed an aggressive clinical course despite multiple regimens of chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation.
  • Lymphoma cells showed aberrant ALK expression and c-myc overexpression.
  • In addition to the characteristic t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocation, a t(3;8)(q26.2;q24) translocation was also present, and c-myc gene rearrangement was confirmed by FISH analysis.
  • The findings in this case demonstrate the association of peripheral blood leukemic involvement and aggressive clinical course, and suggest that other factors, such as c-myc rearrangement, may be responsible for the aggressive clinical behavior in ALK+ ALCL.
  • [MeSH-major] Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3 / genetics. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8 / genetics. Gene Rearrangement. Leukemia / genetics. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / genetics. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / genetics. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc / genetics. Translocation, Genetic
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Fatal Outcome. Humans. In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence. Male. Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

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  • (PMID = 16955462.001).
  • [ISSN] 0361-8609
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / anaplastic lymphoma kinase
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27. Blystad AK, Enblad G, Kvaløy S, Berglund A, Delabie J, Holte H, Carlson K, Kvalheim G, Bengtsson M, Hagberg H: High-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation in patients with peripheral T cell lymphomas. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2001 Apr;27(7):711-6
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  • [Title] High-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation in patients with peripheral T cell lymphomas.
  • Peripheral T cell lymphomas (PTCL) have a poorer prognosis after conventional treatment than do high-grade B cell lymphomas.
  • The place for high-dose therapy (HDT) with autologous stem cell support in these patients is still not clear.
  • Forty patients, 10 women and 30 men, median age 41.5 years (range 16-61) with PTCL were treated with HDT and autologous stem cell support at The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo, Norway and The University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden, between February 1990 and September 1999.
  • The histologic subtypes were: PTCL unspecified, 20 patients; intestinal, two patients; angioimmunoblastic (AILD), two patients; angiocentric, two patients and anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), 14 patients.
  • All patients had chemosensitive disease and had received anthracycline-containing regimens prior to transplantation.
  • At the time of HDT, 17 patients were in first PR or CR and 23 were in second or third PR or CR.
  • There were three (7.5%) treatment-related deaths.
  • The estimated overall survival (OS) at 3 years was 58%, the event-free survival (EFS) 48% and the relapse-free survival (RFS) 56%, with a median follow-up of 36 months (range 7-100) for surviving patients.
  • The patients with ALCL tended to have a better prognosis compared to those with other PTCL subtypes, OS 79% vs 44%, respectively.
  • In conclusion, patients with chemosensitive PTCL who are failing to achieve CR with first-line chemotherapy or are in relapse can successfully be treated with HDT and autologous stem cell support.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Remission Induction. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Sweden. Transplantation Conditioning. Transplantation, Autologous / methods. Transplantation, Autologous / mortality

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  • (PMID = 11360110.001).
  • [ISSN] 0268-3369
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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28. Pileri SA, Zinzani PL, Gaidano G, Falini B, Gaulard P, Zucca E, Sabattini E, Ascani S, Rossi M, Cavalli F, International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group: Pathobiology of primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma. Leuk Lymphoma; 2003;44 Suppl 3:S21-6
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  • [Title] Pathobiology of primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma.
  • Controversy still exists over the response to therapy and prognosis of patients with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL).
  • Recent data from the International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group (IELSG) suggest that a MACOP-B (methotrexate, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, bleomycin) chemotherapy regimen followed by radiotherapy may be a better induction strategy than other previously used treatments.
  • To date, phenotypic analysis has revealed the following phenotype: positivity for CD45 and CD20, but negativity for CD3, CD10, CD21, Class I/II major histocompatibility antigens, and a variety of other immunohistochemical markers.
  • CD30 staining is observed in most cases, but is weaker and less homogeneous than in classic Hodgkin's lymphoma or anaplastic large cell lymphoma.
  • BCL-2 protein is usually expressed but there are few data describing the expression of MUM1/IRF4, PAX5/BSAP, BCL-6, or the B-cell transcription factors BOB.1, Oct-2, and PU.1.
  • However, two recent reports show isotype-switched Ig genes with a high frequency of somatic hypermutations as well as variants in the 5' noncoding region of the bcl-6 gene.
  • Histologically, the lymphomatous growth was predominantly diffuse with sclerosis that induced compartmentalized cell aggregation.
  • It consisted of large cells with varying degrees of nuclear polymorphism and clear to basophilic cytoplasm.
  • However, it differs from other aggressive B-cell lymphomas in that it shows defective Ig production despite the expression of Oct-2, BOB.1, and PU.1 transcription factors, and a lack of IgV(H) gene crippling mutations.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, B-Cell / pathology. Mediastinal Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnosis, Differential. Gene Rearrangement. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Neoplasm Proteins / analysis. Neoplasm Proteins / genetics

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  • (PMID = 15202521.001).
  • [ISSN] 1042-8194
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia & lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neoplasm Proteins
  • [Number-of-references] 25
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29. Luesink M, Smeets JL, Brons PP, Kapusta L: An unusual cause of atrial tachycardia in a young patient with lymphoma. Clin Pediatr (Phila); 2009 May;48(4):449-50
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  • [Title] An unusual cause of atrial tachycardia in a young patient with lymphoma.
  • An 8-year-old girl who was recently diagnosed as having anaplastic large-cell lymphoma presented with atrial tachycardia and dilated cardiomyopathy, which is a contraindication for further treatment with cardio-toxic chemotherapy.
  • After starting digoxin therapy, the dilated cardiomyopathy resolved.
  • Repeated episodes of atrial tachycardia in this case were not caused by any common disorder but were due to mechanical stimulation by a central venous catheter.
  • [MeSH-major] Cardiomyopathy, Dilated / etiology. Catheterization, Central Venous / adverse effects. Tachycardia, Ectopic Atrial / diagnosis. Tachycardia, Ectopic Atrial / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Anti-Arrhythmia Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Digoxin / therapeutic use. Echocardiography. Electrocardiography. Female. Humans. Lymphoma / therapy

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  • [CommentIn] Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2009 May;48(4):450 [19452613.001]
  • (PMID = 18772357.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-9228
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Pediatr (Phila)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Arrhythmia Agents; 73K4184T59 / Digoxin
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30. Oyarzo MP, Drakos E, Atwell C, Amin HM, Medeiros LJ, Rassidakis GZ: Intrinsic apoptotic pathway in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Hum Pathol; 2006 Jul;37(7):874-82
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  • [Title] Intrinsic apoptotic pathway in anaplastic large cell lymphoma.
  • Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) includes a subset of tumors that has abnormalities of chromosome 2p23, resulting in overexpression of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK).
  • Previous studies have reported differences in apoptotic rate and expression levels of apoptosis regulatory proteins between ALK+ and ALK- ALCL.
  • In this study, we assessed for expression of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway proteins cytochrome c, apoptosis protease-activating factor 1, and procaspase 9 in 2 ALK+ ALCL cell lines and 42 ALCL tumors (17 ALK+, 25 ALK-).
  • We used the Karpas 299 and SU-DHL-1 cell lines, and the inhibitors Z-LEHD-FMK (specific for caspase 9) and Boc-D-FMK (general caspase inhibitor) to investigate the role of caspase 9 activation in chemotherapy-induced apoptotic cell death.
  • Caspase 9 activity was significantly increased in Karpas-299 and SU-DHL-1 cells after chemotherapy treatment, but remained as low as control levels with addition of either caspase inhibitor.
  • Both caspase inhibitors rescued a substantial fraction of Karpas 299 and SU-DHL-1 cells from drug-induced cell death.
  • In ALCL tumors, expression of cytochrome c, apoptosis protease-activating factor 1, and procaspase 9 was also assessed and correlated with apoptotic rate and activated caspase 3 levels.
  • Cytochrome c was expressed in all 13 (100%) ALK+ and 18 (95%) of 19 ALK- ALCL tumors.
  • Apoptosis protease-activating factor 1 was detected in 14 (88%) of 16 ALK+ and 19 (79%) of 24 ALK- ALCL tumors.
  • Procaspase 9 was expressed in 5 (30%) of 17 ALK+ and 2 (8%) of 25 ALK- ALCL tumors (P = .09).
  • In the entire study group (ALK+ and ALK- ALCL), procaspase 9 expression levels significantly correlated with apoptotic rate (P = .02) and activated caspase 3 levels (P = .05).
  • This correlation could not be shown in the ALK+ or ALK- ALCL subgroups, presumably because of the small sample size.
  • In conclusion, chemotherapy-induced cell death in ALK+ ALCL cells involves the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, and apoptosome function may be an important determinant of apoptosis in ALCL tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Apoptosis / drug effects. Apoptosis / physiology. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / metabolism. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins / drug effects. Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins / metabolism. Blotting, Western. Caspase 3. Caspase 9. Caspases / biosynthesis. Caspases / drug effects. Caspases / metabolism. Cell Line, Tumor. Cytochromes c / biosynthesis. Disease-Free Survival. Doxorubicin / pharmacology. Enzyme Activation / drug effects. Enzyme Activation / physiology. Enzyme Inhibitors / pharmacology. Etoposide / pharmacology. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. In Situ Nick-End Labeling. Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

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  • (PMID = 16784988.001).
  • [ISSN] 0046-8177
  • [Journal-full-title] Human pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hum. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 9007-43-6 / Cytochromes c; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / anaplastic lymphoma kinase; EC 3.4.22.- / CASP3 protein, human; EC 3.4.22.- / CASP9 protein, human; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspase 3; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspase 9; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspases
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31. Yang HB, Li J, Shen T: Primary anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the lung. Report of two cases and literature review. Acta Haematol; 2007;118(3):188-91
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  • [Title] Primary anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the lung. Report of two cases and literature review.
  • To our knowledge, only eleven cases of primary anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) of the lung have previously been reported.
  • We describe here another two cases of primary pulmonary ALCL that developed in two Chinese women.
  • A comprehensive workup failed to show disease outside the chest.
  • CD30-positive ALCL was demonstrated by histopathological studies of the lung tissue.
  • Both patients were treated with 6 cycles of CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) chemotherapy and had complete remission.
  • Primary pulmonary lymphoma is a great challenge for pneumologists since the clinical presentations and radiological findings are nonspecific.
  • Appropriate invasive biopsy is necessary for early diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Antigens, CD30 / metabolism. Asian Continental Ancestry Group. Biopsy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Remission Induction. Vincristine / administration & dosage


32. Isogai R, Fukao M, Kawada A: Successful treatment for recurrence of primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma in elderly patient with etoposide, mitoxantrone, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisolone and bleomycin (VNCOP-B) therapy. J Dermatol; 2007 Aug;34(8):556-60
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  • [Title] Successful treatment for recurrence of primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma in elderly patient with etoposide, mitoxantrone, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisolone and bleomycin (VNCOP-B) therapy.
  • Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (C-ALCL) is a malignant lymphoma with a relatively good prognosis, consisting of CD30-positive, undifferentiated, large cells.
  • We report an elderly patient with C-ALCL which recurred after cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone (CHOP) therapy, but was effectively treated with the third-generation etoposide, mitoxantrone, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisolone and bleomycin (VNCOP-B) regimen.
  • It is characterized by the completion of treatment in 8 weeks, its applicability on an outpatient basis, and a low incidence of cardiotoxicity and mucosal symptoms.
  • Although our patient had no side-effects during chemotherapy, patients should be carefully monitored for side-effects, especially infection.
  • In conclusion, the VNCOP-B regimen might be an effective treatment for elderly patients with good performance status, CHOP-resistant patients or patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged, 80 and over. Bleomycin / administration & dosage. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Humans. Male. Mitoxantrone / administration & dosage. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Treatment Outcome. Vincristine / administration & dosage


33. Rodig SJ, Abramson JS, Pinkus GS, Treon SP, Dorfman DM, Dong HY, Shipp MA, Kutok JL: Heterogeneous CD52 expression among hematologic neoplasms: implications for the use of alemtuzumab (CAMPATH-1H). Clin Cancer Res; 2006 Dec 1;12(23):7174-9
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  • The humanized monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab (CAMPATH-1H) is specific for CD52 and is Food and Drug Administration - approved for the treatment of relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).
  • The utility of CAMPATH in the treatment of other hematologic neoplasms has been explored; however, a comprehensive survey of CD52 expression among a broad spectrum of WHO-defined tumor types has not been completed.
  • RESULTS: The vast majority of low-grade B cell lymphoproliferative disorders (CLL/small lymphocytic leukemia, follicular lymphoma, lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma, hairy cell leukemia, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas) express CD52.
  • In addition, we found that the majority of precursor B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphomas express this antigen.
  • In contrast, there is surprising heterogeneity in CD52 expression among more aggressive B cell lymphomas, with 25% of cases of diffuse large B cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma demonstrating no detectable CD52.
  • In addition, the majority of neoplasms of the T cell lineage are negative for the antigen, including most cases of precursor T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma, anaplastic large cell lymphoma, and peripheral T cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified.
  • Finally, the vast majority of cases of acute myeloid leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, and multiple myeloma are negative for CD52 expression.
  • CONCLUSION: In contrast with CLL, the variable expression of CD52 among other hematologic malignancies suggests that target validation on a case-by-case basis will likely be necessary to guide the rational analysis of CAMPATH therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antibodies, Neoplasm / therapeutic use. Antigens, CD / biosynthesis. Antigens, Neoplasm / biosynthesis. Glycoproteins / biosynthesis. Leukemia, Myeloid. Lymphoma, B-Cell. Lymphoma, T-Cell. Lymphoproliferative Disorders
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17145843.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antibodies, Neoplasm; 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm; 0 / CD52 antigen; 0 / Glycoproteins; 3A189DH42V / alemtuzumab
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34. Nickelsen M, Ziepert M, Zeynalova S, Glass B, Metzner B, Leithaeuser M, Mueller-Hermelink HK, Pfreundschuh M, Schmitz N: High-dose CHOP plus etoposide (MegaCHOEP) in T-cell lymphoma: a comparative analysis of patients treated within trials of the German High-Grade Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Study Group (DSHNHL). Ann Oncol; 2009 Dec;20(12):1977-84
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  • [Title] High-dose CHOP plus etoposide (MegaCHOEP) in T-cell lymphoma: a comparative analysis of patients treated within trials of the German High-Grade Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Study Group (DSHNHL).
  • BACKGROUND: T-cell lymphomas (T-NHL) generally carry a poor prognosis.
  • High-dose therapy (HDT) and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) are increasingly used to treat younger patients.
  • DESIGN AND METHODS: We treated patients <61 years with high-risk aggressive lymphoma with four to six courses of dose-escalated CHOP plus etoposide (MegaCHOEP) necessitating repeated ASCT.
  • Outcomes of patients with mature T-NHL (excluding anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma) and aggressive B-NHL were compared using multivariate Cox regression analysis.
  • RESULTS: Compared with 84.4% of B-NHL patients, 66.7% of T-NHL patients were able to receive all treatments; the rates of progressive disease were 27.3% in T-NHL and 16.3% in B-NHL patients.
  • This study sheds some doubt on expectations that HDT/ASCT will significantly improve outcomes for patients with T-NHL.

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  • (PMID = 19570965.001).
  • [ISSN] 1569-8041
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase I; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Clinical Trial, Phase III; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone
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35. Bhagavathi S, Wilson JD: Primary central nervous system lymphoma. Arch Pathol Lab Med; 2008 Nov;132(11):1830-4
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  • [Title] Primary central nervous system lymphoma.
  • Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is an uncommon extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
  • Diffuse large B-cell lymphomas constitute most PCNSLs, whereas T-cell, low-grade, anaplastic, and Hodgkin lymphomas are rarely encountered.
  • The morphology of PCNSL shows a characteristic angiocentric pattern and is positive for B-cell markers by immunohistochemistry.
  • The differential diagnosis of PCNSL includes central nervous system gliomas, metastatic tumors, demyelinating disorders, subacute infarcts, and space-occupying lesions due to an infectious etiology.
  • The understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of PCNSL and the identification of molecular biomarkers have lagged behind that of systemic nodal lymphomas.
  • Primary central nervous system lymphomas are treated with combined radiotherapies and chemotherapies.
  • The prognosis for PCNSL is worse than for other extranodal lymphomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Central Nervous System Neoplasms / diagnosis. Lymphoma / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / pathology. Middle Aged. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 18976024.001).
  • [ISSN] 1543-2165
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of pathology & laboratory medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 24
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36. Tuinman PR, de Nes LC, Blaauwgeers JL, Koene HR, Peters SH, Hart W: [Clinical reasoning and decision-making in practice. A man with hip pain and fever]. Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd; 2008 Jul 12;152(28):1560-7
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  • [Title] [Clinical reasoning and decision-making in practice. A man with hip pain and fever].
  • [Transliterated title] Klinisch denken en beslissen in de praktijk. Een man met pijn in de heup en koorts.
  • On examination he was febrile at 38 degrees C and he walked with a limp.
  • The ANA test was positive.
  • After a short interval of improvement this treatment failed and a third biopsy was taken.
  • Subsequently, the diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) was made.
  • The patient was successfully treated with combination chemotherapy.
  • Usually, in practice, clinical reasoning and decision-making is carried out in accordance with Bayes' theorem.
  • But when the a priori probability of disease is unknown and the likelihood ratio of a diagnostic test unavailable, one has to combine the available 'evidence' with critical thinking, interdisciplinary communication, judgement, intuition and common sense.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Biopsy. Decision Making. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Male. Retroperitoneal Fibrosis / diagnosis. Retroperitoneal Fibrosis / pathology. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2008 Sep 6;152(36):1993-4; author reply 1994 [18810811.001]
  • (PMID = 18712223.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-2162
  • [Journal-full-title] Nederlands tijdschrift voor geneeskunde
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd
  • [Language] dut
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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37. Damas C, Fernandes G, Magalhães A, Hespanhol VP: [Unusual diagnosis of tracheal obstruction]. Rev Port Pneumol; 2006 May-Jun;12(3):303-8
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  • [Title] [Unusual diagnosis of tracheal obstruction].
  • [Transliterated title] Diagnóstico pouco usual de obstrução da traqueia.
  • The histological specimen was compatible with anaplastic Lymphoma, CD 30+.
  • He is clinically stable and under monitoring, having now completed a chemotherapy treatment with CHOP (Ciclophosphamide, Adriamycin or Hydroxydorubicin, Vincristine or Oncovin and Prednisone).
  • The primary mediastinal Large Cells Lymphoma represents 11.5% of the Large Cells Lymphomas (2% of the non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas).
  • This neoplasm is in many studies considered incurable, but there are some positive results with the combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / diagnosis. Tracheal Neoplasms / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 16967180.001).
  • [ISSN] 0873-2159
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista portuguesa de pneumologia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Port Pneumol
  • [Language] por
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Portugal
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38. Wróbel G, Kazanowska B, Chybicka A, Jeleń M, Małdyk J, Sowińska E, Balcerska A, Balwierz W, Bubała H, Kołakowska-Mrozowska B, Kołtan A, Korzon M, Kowalczyk J, Krawczuk-Rybak M, Maciejka-Kapuścińska L, Matysiak M, Płoszyńska A, Popadiuk S, Solarz E, Sońta-Jakimczyk D, Sopyło B, Stańczak E, Stefaniak J, Stefańska K, Wachowiak J, Wieczorek M, Wysocki M: [Progress in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in children. The report of Polish Pediatric Leukaemia/lymphoma Study Group (PPLLSG)]. Przegl Lek; 2004;61 Suppl 2:45-8
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  • [Title] [Progress in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in children. The report of Polish Pediatric Leukaemia/lymphoma Study Group (PPLLSG)].
  • Treatment results of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in children has been shown in this study.
  • From 1979 to 2003 children were registered with the diagnosis of NHL in oncology centers of Polish Pediatric Leukaemia/Lymphoma Study Group, a group of 397 patients with NHL B, 222 pts with NHL T and 54 pts with anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL).
  • The predominant primary site of disease was mediastinum (59.3%).
  • The majority were Burkitts type and presented abdominal location (50%).
  • 80% with disseminated disease.
  • CR was achieved by 89% patients, but 94% with LDH < 500 IU/L and 73% with LDH > 500 IU.
  • The median time of follow up was 53 months.
  • The patients with ALCL were treated according to several protocols.
  • Despite great progress in the therapy of NHL in children during 20 years of observation, the results are not satisfactory in disseminated stages.
  • Major surgery in advanced stages is not recommended since it delays chemotherapy and fails to improve overall survival.
  • Early detection of neoplasm is one of the most important efforts to improve therapy success.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Abdominal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Abdominal Neoplasms / epidemiology. Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease-Free Survival. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / epidemiology. Male. Mediastinal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Mediastinal Neoplasms / epidemiology. Poland / epidemiology. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Secondary Prevention. Survival Analysis. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 15686045.001).
  • [ISSN] 0033-2240
  • [Journal-full-title] Przegla̧d lekarski
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prz. Lek.
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
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39. Cerveny CG, Law CL, McCormick RS, Lenox JS, Hamblett KJ, Westendorf LE, Yamane AK, Petroziello JM, Francisco JA, Wahl AF: Signaling via the anti-CD30 mAb SGN-30 sensitizes Hodgkin's disease cells to conventional chemotherapeutics. Leukemia; 2005 Sep;19(9):1648-55
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  • [Title] Signaling via the anti-CD30 mAb SGN-30 sensitizes Hodgkin's disease cells to conventional chemotherapeutics.
  • SGN-30, a monoclonal antibody with activity against CD30+ malignancies, is currently in phase II clinical evaluation for treatment of Hodgkin's disease (HD) and anaplastic large cell lymphoma.
  • SGN-30 treatment activated NF-kappaB and modulation of several messages including the growth regulator p21WAF1/CIP1 (p21) and cellular adhesion marker ICAM-1. p21 protein levels increased coincident with growth arrest and Annexin V/PI staining in treated HD cells.
  • To determine if SGN-30-induced growth arrest would sensitize tumor cells to chemotherapeutics used against HD, L540cy and L428 cells were exposed to SGN-30 in combination with a panel of cytotoxic agents and resultant interactions quantified by the Combination Effects Method.
  • In addition to direct cell killing, SGN-30 affects growth arrest and drug sensitization through growth regulating and proapoptotic machinery.
  • Importantly, these data suggest that SGN-30 can enhance the efficacy of standard chemotherapies used to treat patients with CD30+ malignancies.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antigens, CD30 / immunology. Hodgkin Disease / drug therapy. Hodgkin Disease / immunology. Signal Transduction / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Apoptosis / drug effects. Bleomycin / therapeutic use. Cell Cycle / drug effects. Cell Cycle / immunology. Cell Line, Tumor. Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans. Mice. Mice, SCID. NF-kappa B / drug effects. NF-kappa B / immunology. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis / methods. Sensitivity and Specificity. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays / methods


40. Kaliyadan F, Ray S, Mathew MK, Pai S, Sasikala L, Pai R: A rapidly progressing, fatal case of primary systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma presenting as erythroderma--association with carbamazepine. Dermatol Online J; 2008;14(12):5
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  • [Title] A rapidly progressing, fatal case of primary systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma presenting as erythroderma--association with carbamazepine.
  • A 73-year-old male patient admitted with erythroderma was diagnosed to have primary systemic Analpastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) positive, CD 30 positive, anaplastic large cell lymphoma.
  • The patient's condition deteriorated rapidly during the period after the diagnosis was confirmed, with subsequent death before chemotherapy could be started.
  • Here we highlight the possibility of carbamazepine inducing anaplastic large cell lymphomas and the need for a high level of suspicion to make an early diagnosis allowing rapid appropriate treatment in such cases.
  • [MeSH-major] Carbamazepine / adverse effects. Dermatitis, Exfoliative / complications. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Diabetic Neuropathies / drug therapy. Disease Progression. Fatal Outcome. Humans. Male. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 19265618.001).
  • [ISSN] 1087-2108
  • [Journal-full-title] Dermatology online journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dermatol. Online J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 33CM23913M / Carbamazepine
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41. Kim JH, Lee SH, Park J, Kim HY, Lee SI, Park JO, Kim K, Kim WS, Jung CW, Park YS, Im YH, Kang WK, Lee MH, Park K, Han JH, Ko YH: Primary pulmonary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Jpn J Clin Oncol; 2004 Sep;34(9):510-4
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  • [Title] Primary pulmonary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • BACKGROUND: Primary pulmonary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is a very rare neoplasm.
  • It is represented most commonly by marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type.
  • Although there have been a few reviews of this lymphoma, clinical features, diagnostic procedure, optimal management and prognostic factors have not been well defined.
  • METHODS: We reviewed the medical records of 24 patients who were pathologically and clinically diagnosed as primary pulmonary lymphoma between September 1995 and June 2003.
  • RESULTS: There were 13 patients with MALT lymphoma and two with MALT lymphoma accompanied by large B-cell lymphoma, seven with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and two with anaplastic large cell lymphoma.
  • The majority of patients (66.7%) needed surgical approaches (open thoracotomy or video-assisted thoracoscopy) for definite diagnosis.
  • The 13 patients with MALT lymphoma were treated with a variety of modalities such as observation, surgery and single or combination chemotherapy, and combination chemotherapy was administered to 11 patients with non-MALT lymphoma regardless of surgery.
  • The overall survival rate at 3 years for all 24 patients was 86% with a median follow-up of 32 months.
  • CONCLUSION: Although this entity of lymphoma appears to have a good prognosis, further clinical experience and long-term follow-up are needed to identify prognostic factors.
  • [MeSH-major] Lung Neoplasms / diagnosis. Lymphoma, B-Cell / diagnosis. Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Bronchoscopy. Female. Humans. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / mortality. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Survival Rate. Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted

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  • (PMID = 15466823.001).
  • [ISSN] 0368-2811
  • [Journal-full-title] Japanese journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Jpn. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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42. Smith SD, Bolwell BJ, Rybicki LA, Brown S, Dean R, Kalaycio M, Sobecks R, Andresen S, Hsi ED, Pohlman B, Sweetenham JW: Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in peripheral T-cell lymphoma using a uniform high-dose regimen. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2007 Aug;40(3):239-43
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  • [Title] Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in peripheral T-cell lymphoma using a uniform high-dose regimen.
  • The role of high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) is poorly defined.
  • Comparisons of outcomes between PTCL and B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) have yielded conflicting results, in part due to the rarity and heterogeneity of PTCL.
  • Some retrospective studies have found comparable survival rates for patients with T- and B-cell NHL.
  • In this study, we report our single-center experience of ASCT over one decade using a uniform chemotherapy-only high-dose regimen.
  • Thirty-two patients with PTCL-unspecified (PTCL-u; 11 patients) and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (21 patients) underwent autologous stem cell transplant, mostly for relapsed or refractory disease.
  • These results suggest a poor outcome for patients with PTCL after ASCT, and new therapies for T-cell lymphoma are needed.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Lymphoma, T-Cell / mortality. Lymphoma, T-Cell / therapy. Transplantation Conditioning
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Busulfan / administration & dosage. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Lymphoma, B-Cell / mortality. Lymphoma, B-Cell / therapy. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Transplantation, Autologous

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  • (PMID = 17530000.001).
  • [ISSN] 0268-3369
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; G1LN9045DK / Busulfan
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43. Kisacik B, Akdogan A, Maras Y, Kalyoncu U, Karadag O, Kilickap S, Calguneri M: Anaplastic large cell lymphoma presenting with symmetric polyarthritis in pregnancy. Rheumatol Int; 2008 Jul;28(9):909-11
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  • [Title] Anaplastic large cell lymphoma presenting with symmetric polyarthritis in pregnancy.
  • Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare T-cell lymphoma and typically is seen in children and young adults.
  • Primary bone infiltration of ALCL is exceedingly rare.
  • Herein we report ALCL of bone in a pregnant admitted with symmetric polyarthritis.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis revealed soft tissue component of that destructive mass lesion on the right iliac crest after delivery.
  • Excisional biopsy from the destructive mass showed anaplastic large cell lymphoma (CD 30 was positive and ALK negative).
  • The patient was treated with combination chemotherapy consisting of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone (CHOP) every 4 weeks.
  • After the third cycle of chemotherapy, a marked improvement of her arthritis and right iliac pain was noted.
  • [MeSH-major] Arthritis / etiology. Bone Neoplasms / complications. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / complications. Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols. Cyclophosphamide. Doxorubicin. Female. Humans. Prednisolone. Pregnancy. Vincristine. Young Adult


44. Janik JE, Morris JC, Pittaluga S, McDonald K, Raffeld M, Jaffe ES, Grant N, Gutierrez M, Waldmann TA, Wilson WH: Elevated serum-soluble interleukin-2 receptor levels in patients with anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Blood; 2004 Nov 15;104(10):3355-7
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  • [Title] Elevated serum-soluble interleukin-2 receptor levels in patients with anaplastic large cell lymphoma.
  • Levels of serum soluble interleukin 2 receptor (sIL-2R) provide a reliable marker of disease activity in patients with hairy cell leukemia and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.
  • The malignant cells in patients with anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) express CD30 and are usually positive for expression of CD25.
  • We measured serum sIL-2R and soluble CD30 (sCD30) levels in patients with ALCL treated with EPOCH (etoposide, prednisone, Oncovin, Cytoxan, hydroxydaunorubicin) infusional chemotherapy.
  • Serum sCD30 levels were elevated and decreased in response to therapy as previously reported.
  • Serum sIL-2R levels were elevated in 7 of 9 patients with ALCL and decreased in response to treatment.
  • Patients positive for the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene showed elevated sIL-2R levels, whereas those negative for ALK had normal serum sIL-2R levels and their tumors lacked CD25 expression.
  • Serum sIL-2R levels were elevated in both patients with recurrent disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / blood. Receptors, Interleukin-2 / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antigens, CD30 / blood. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cyclophosphamide / therapeutic use. Doxorubicin / therapeutic use. Etoposide / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prednisone / therapeutic use. Recurrence. Solubility. Vincristine / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 15205267.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-4971
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD30; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Receptors, Interleukin-2; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; EPOCH protocol
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45. Fätkenheuer G, Hell K, Roers A, Diehl V, Salzberger B: Spontaneous regression of HIV associated T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with highly active antiretroviral therapy. Eur J Med Res; 2000 Jun 20;5(6):236-40
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  • [Title] Spontaneous regression of HIV associated T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with highly active antiretroviral therapy.
  • A subcutaneous, T-phenotypic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (CD30/Ki1-positive, EBV positive) was diagnosed in a HIV-infected bisexual man.
  • Without chemotherapy the patient had a sustained long-term remission of this tumor (more than three years) after the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy.
  • By PCR analysis of T-cell receptor beta gene rearrangements the tumor was found to be oligoclonal.
  • Improvement of cellular immune function by antiretroviral therapy is the only recognizable factor which may have led to tumor remission.
  • This hypothesis is supported by parallels to EBV associated polyclonal lymphoproliferation in allogeneic transplantat recipients where regression of lymphoma can be induced by reducing immunosuppressive therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / pathology. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / pathology. Neoplasm Regression, Spontaneous
  • [MeSH-minor] Anti-HIV Agents / therapeutic use. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 10882638.001).
  • [ISSN] 0949-2321
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of medical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Med. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-HIV Agents
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46. Jacobsen E: Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, T-/null-cell type. Oncologist; 2006 Jul-Aug;11(7):831-40
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  • [Title] Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, T-/null-cell type.
  • Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, T-/null-cell type (ALCL), is a rare disease that has only been well characterized for two decades.
  • Despite this, the biology of ALCL is better understood than that of many other more common variants of lymphoma.
  • This review focuses on the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and therapy of ALCL, including stem cell transplantation.
  • In particular, the text emphasizes how novel prognostic features and the evolving understanding of the biology of this disease will influence treatment selection and drug development.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / pathology


47. Snyder RL: Resumption of high-dose methotrexate after methotrexate-induced nephrotoxicity and carboxypeptidase G2 use. Am J Health Syst Pharm; 2007 Jun 1;64(11):1163-9
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  • PURPOSE: The successful resumption of high-dose methotrexate in a 13-year-old boy with recurrent anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) who suffered renal dysfunction after a 24-hour infusion of high-dose methotrexate and required treatment with carboxypeptidase G(2) (CPDG(2) ) is described.
  • SUMMARY: A 13-year-old boy who had been diagnosed in 2001 with stage I ALCL was admitted to the hospital in February 2005 after he developed a smaller left axillary mass in the area of his original mass.
  • Recurrent ALCL was diagnosed, and treatments were initiated based on branch K3 of the protocol published in the non-Hodgkin's lymphoma-Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (NHL-BFM) trial 90.
  • In the NHL-BFM 90 protocol, all AA and BB courses include high-dose methotrexate therapy, which consists of aggressive alkalinized hydration, methotrexate 5 g/m(2) given as an i.v. infusion over 24 hours, and leucovorin rescue.
  • Because the patient's elimination of methotrexate remained slow and his serum creatinine level remained above normal limits, CPDG(2) was obtained for the treatment of methotrexate toxicity.
  • He is currently in remission on maintenance therapy.
  • CONCLUSION: A 13-year-old boy with recurrent ALCL had methotrexate-induced nephrotoxicity following high-dose methotrexate.
  • The resultant delayed methotrexate clearance required the standard therapies as well as use of investigational CPDG(2).
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / adverse effects. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Methotrexate / adverse effects. Renal Insufficiency / drug therapy. gamma-Glutamyl Hydrolase / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Humans. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Retreatment

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  • (PMID = 17519458.001).
  • [ISSN] 1079-2082
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of health-system pharmacy : AJHP : official journal of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Health Syst Pharm
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; EC 3.4.19.9 / gamma-Glutamyl Hydrolase; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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48. Halkos ME, Miller JI, Mann KP, Miller DL, Gal AA: Thoracic presentations of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders. Chest; 2004 Dec;126(6):2013-20
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  • METHODS: Eleven cases of PTLD with a primary thoracic presentation were identified among 3,085 solid-organ transplant patients and 1,662 bone marrow transplant patients from 1990 to 2001.
  • RESULTS: There were eight men and three women with a mean age of 49 years.
  • The time to presentation ranged from 1 to 97 months (median time, 8 months).
  • Six patients developed PTLD within 1 year of undergoing transplantation.
  • Diagnosis was achieved by CT-guided transthoracic needle biopsy in eight patients, and by open biopsy in three patients.
  • Pathologic analysis revealed monomorphic PTLD (ie, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) in seven patients, polymorphic PTLD in two patients, anaplastic large cell lymphoma in one patient, and Hodgkin lymphoma in one patient.
  • Eighty-four percent of the specimens evaluated for EBV were determined to be positive by in situ hybridization and/or immunohistochemistry.
  • All patients were initially treated with a reduction in immunosuppression therapy, and six patients (55%) received adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • The median interval from diagnosis to death was 13 months (range, 1 to 42 months).
  • Heart and lung allograft recipients have the worst prognosis because of the mortality that accompanies rejection with subtherapeutic immunosuppression therapy.
  • Earlier diagnosis and improvements in immunosuppression and chemotherapy may improve survival for these inherently high-risk patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoproliferative Disorders / diagnosis. Thoracic Diseases / diagnosis. Transplantation / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antibodies, Viral / analysis. Cytomegalovirus / isolation & purification. Female. Herpesvirus 4, Human / isolation & purification. Humans. Lymphoma / diagnosis. Lymphoma / etiology. Lymphoma / therapy. Lymphoma / virology. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 15596707.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-3692
  • [Journal-full-title] Chest
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chest
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Viral
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49. Krieger G, Kreysing E, Kneba M: [Long-term results with MACOP-B and radiation therapy for aggressive lymphomas]. Onkologie; 2001 Feb;24 Suppl 1:49-58
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  • [Title] [Long-term results with MACOP-B and radiation therapy for aggressive lymphomas].
  • [Transliterated title] Langzeitergebnisse mit MACOP-B und Strahlentherapie bei aggressiven Non-Hodgkin-Lymphomen.
  • BACKGROUND: Long-term results are needed to evaluate chemotherapy regimens and prognostic factors in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL).
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between 1985 and 1991, 71 patients with aggressive NHL were treated in a single institution with MACOP-B and adjuvant radiotherapy as first-line therapy.
  • The Kiel classification combined with the International Prognostic Index (IPI) identified diffuse large B-cell and anaplastic large T-cell lymphomas with IPI 0-2 as subgroups with very favorable prognosis after MACOP-B (OS 84% and 80% at 10 years).
  • Late relapses (>2 years after therapy) did occur in these patients but had a good prognosis after second remission.
  • Risk factors for therapy-related death were age and pulmonary toxicity.
  • Most patients suffered from chemotherapy-associated mucositis.
  • CONCLUSIONS: MACOP-B in combination with adjuvant radiotherapy is highly effective in diffuse large B-cell or anaplastic large T-cell-lymphomas with IPI 0-2.
  • Patients with IPI >2 or with centrocytic or secondary centroblastic B-cell or non-anaplastic T-cell lymphomas need more intensive therapy or novel approaches.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, B-Cell / drug therapy. Lymphoma, T-Cell / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Bleomycin / administration & dosage. Bleomycin / adverse effects. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Cyclophosphamide / adverse effects. Disease-Free Survival. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / adverse effects. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Leucovorin / administration & dosage. Leucovorin / adverse effects. Male. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Methotrexate / adverse effects. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Prednisone / adverse effects. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Vincristine / administration & dosage. Vincristine / adverse effects

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2001 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg
  • (PMID = 11441311.001).
  • [ISSN] 0378-584X
  • [Journal-full-title] Onkologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Onkologie
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; Q573I9DVLP / Leucovorin; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate; MACOP-B protocol
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50. Yao C, Rahmanzadeh R, Endl E, Zhang Z, Gerdes J, Hüttmann G: Elevation of plasma membrane permeability by laser irradiation of selectively bound nanoparticles. J Biomed Opt; 2005 Nov-Dec;10(6):064012
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  • Irradiation of nanoabsorbers with pico- and nanosecond laser pulses could result in thermal effects with a spatial confinement of less than 50 nm.
  • We demonstrate that the system enables molecules to penetrate impermeable cell membranes.
  • Laser light at 532 nm is used to irradiate conjugates of colloidal gold, which are delivered by antibodies to the plasma membrane of the Hodgkin's disease cell line L428 and/or the human large-cell anaplastic lymphoma cell line Karpas 299.
  • The fraction of transiently permeabilized and then resealed cells is affected by the laser parameter, the gold concentration, and the membrane protein of the different cell lines to which the nanoparticles are bound.
  • Furthermore, a dependence on particle size is found for these interactions in the different cell lines.
  • The results suggest that after optimization, this method could be used for gene transfection and gene therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Cell Membrane Permeability / physiology. Cell Membrane Permeability / radiation effects. Drug Delivery Systems / methods. Fluoresceins / pharmacokinetics. Lasers. Lymphoma / metabolism. Nanostructures
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopolymers / pharmacokinetics. Cell Line, Tumor. Humans


51. Piccaluga PP, Ascani S, Fraternali Orcioni G, Piccioli M, Pileri Jr A, Falini B, Pileri S: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase expression as a marker of malignancy. Application to a case of anaplastic large cell lymphoma with huge granulomatous reaction. Haematologica; 2000 Sep;85(9):978-81
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  • [Title] Anaplastic lymphoma kinase expression as a marker of malignancy. Application to a case of anaplastic large cell lymphoma with huge granulomatous reaction.
  • Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) shows a wide morphologic spectrum, including the occurrence of reactive components obscuring the neoplastic population.
  • The authors describe an ALCL in a girl wha had a tick bite 20 days prior to clinical presentation.
  • She developed a huge epithelioid reaction (an unprecedented finding for this tumor).
  • The diagnostic controversies were solved by applying the ALKc antibody against anaplastic large cell lymphoma kinase (ALK), in conjunction with reagents anti-nucleophosmin (NPM), which showed the typical staining pattern observed in ALCL carrying t(2;5).
  • Comprised within the epithelioid component there were large anaplastic cells and small-medium sized atypical elements displaying strong nuclear and cytoplasmic positivity for ALK and NPM (N-terminal region).
  • Following the diagnosis, the patient - whose general conditions were critical - underwent aggressive chemotherapy, achieving complete remission.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / diagnosis. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Child. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Granuloma / etiology. Humans. Insect Bites and Stings / pathology. Neoplasm Proteins / metabolism. Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases. Ticks

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  • (PMID = 10980638.001).
  • [ISSN] 0390-6078
  • [Journal-full-title] Haematologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Haematologica
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] ITALY
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / anaplastic lymphoma kinase
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52. Dunleavy K, Piekarz RL, Zain J, Janik JE, Wilson WH, O'Connor OA, Bates SE: New strategies in peripheral T-cell lymphoma: understanding tumor biology and developing novel therapies. Clin Cancer Res; 2010 Dec 1;16(23):5608-17
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  • [Title] New strategies in peripheral T-cell lymphoma: understanding tumor biology and developing novel therapies.
  • Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) constitute a group of heterogeneous diseases that are uncommon, representing, in Western countries, only approximately 10% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas.
  • They are typically associated with a poor prognosis compared with their B-cell counterparts and are much less well understood with respect to tumor biology, owing to their rarity and biologic heterogeneity, and to the fact that characteristic cytogenetic abnormalities are few compared with B-cell lymphomas.
  • Although the outcome for patients with anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), particularly anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive ALCL, is good, other types of PTCLs are associated with a poor prognosis, even with aggressive anthracycline-based chemotherapy.
  • In this respect, there is a need for new approaches in these diseases, and this review focuses on and explores recent experience with novel therapies in PTCL.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral / diagnosis. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral / etiology. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral / therapy. Therapies, Investigational / trends
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antineoplastic Agents / chemical synthesis. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Cell Biology. Comprehension. Drug Discovery / methods. Drug Discovery / trends. Gene Expression Profiling. Humans. Molecular Targeted Therapy / methods

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  • [Copyright] ©2010 AACR.
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  • (PMID = 21138864.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / Z99 CA999999
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS236831; NLM/ PMC3058794
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53. Pagliai F, Rigacci L, Briganti V, Dini C, Castagnoli A, Vaggelli L, Bosi A: PET scan evaluation of thymic mass after autologous peripheral blood stem-cell transplantation in an adult with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Leuk Lymphoma; 2003 Nov;44(11):2015-8
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  • [Title] PET scan evaluation of thymic mass after autologous peripheral blood stem-cell transplantation in an adult with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • We report the case of a 31-year-old man with anaplastic large-cell lymphoma successfully treated with chemotherapy who showed mediastinal widening 5 months after autologous stem-cell transplantation.
  • CT scan and PET evaluations were consistent with the diagnosis of benign thymic hyperplasia.
  • Because of the rapid and aggressive course of this type of lymphoma, and the progressive widening of the mass at CT scan, we performed a mediastinal biopsy that confirmed these findings, showing normal thymic tissue.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / therapy. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation / adverse effects. Thymus Hyperplasia / etiology. Tomography, Emission-Computed / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Fluorine Radioisotopes. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Humans. Male. Radiopharmaceuticals. Transplantation, Autologous

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  • (PMID = 14738158.001).
  • [ISSN] 1042-8194
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia & lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fluorine Radioisotopes; 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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54. Pinter-Brown LC: SGN-30: a basis for the effective treatment of CD30 positive hematopoietic malignancies. Expert Opin Investig Drugs; 2008 Dec;17(12):1883-7
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  • [Title] SGN-30: a basis for the effective treatment of CD30 positive hematopoietic malignancies.
  • BACKGROUND: Patients with high-risk, relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma, those with systemic anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, and those with primary cutaneous CD30-positive disorders are in need of novel therapies.
  • CD30, a common marker in these malignancies, is a reasonable immunologic target given its restricted expression in normal states.
  • SGN-30 is a chimeric antibody targeting CD30.
  • Given the long drug half-life, short infusions may be administered every 2 - 3 weeks.
  • The highest response rate was seen in patients with primary cutaneous CD30-positive lymphoproliferative disease and encouraging results were seen in patients with relapsed or refractory systemic anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.
  • Most responses in Hodgkin lymphoma were stable disease.
  • Despite a majority of patients having had stem cell transplantation, the drug was well tolerated.
  • There are in vivo and in vitro data that SGN-30 may be synergistic with chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / immunology. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antigens, CD30 / immunology. Hematologic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Hematologic Neoplasms / immunology. Immunotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Drug Tolerance. Humans. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19012503.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-7658
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert opinion on investigational drugs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Opin Investig Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antigens, CD30; 0 / SGN-30 monoclonal antibody
  • [Number-of-references] 21
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55. Madero L, Benito AI, Quintero V, Gonzalez-Vicent M, Díaz MA: Ki-1+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma in a child with unpredictable clinical course. Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2001 Mar;18(2):143-6
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  • [Title] Ki-1+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma in a child with unpredictable clinical course.
  • Ki-1+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma (Ki-1+ ALCL) is a subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) with defined histopathological characteristics but with highly variable clinical presentation and outcome.
  • Although in most of the patients the disease behaves as an intermediate- or high-grade lymphoma, some patients present with an indolent clinical course.
  • Factors that determine the clinical behavior of this lymphoma have not yet been identified.
  • A case is reported of a 13-year-old girl who initially presented with Ki-1+ ALCL but later developed recurrent localized cutaneous disease and followed a clinical course similar to that of a low-grade lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Diagnosis, Differential. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Lymphoma, Follicular / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Follicular / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Follicular / pathology. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasms, Second Primary / chemistry. Neoplasms, Second Primary / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Second Primary / pathology. Recurrence. Skin Neoplasms / chemistry. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 11255733.001).
  • [ISSN] 0888-0018
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric hematology and oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Hematol Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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56. Barrionuevo C, Anderson VM, Zevallos-Giampietri E, Zaharia M, Misad O, Bravo F, Cáceres H, Taxa L, Martínez MT, Wachtel A, Piris MA: Hydroa-like cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: a clinicopathologic and molecular genetic study of 16 pediatric cases from Peru. Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol; 2002 Mar;10(1):7-14
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  • [Title] Hydroa-like cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: a clinicopathologic and molecular genetic study of 16 pediatric cases from Peru.
  • Hydroa-like cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (hydroa-like CTCL) is an unusual pediatric malignancy with a poor prognosis.
  • The lesion consists of lymphomatous T-cell infiltration of the skin and subcutis with variable exocytosis and angiocentricity.
  • It has been also called edematous, scarring vasculitic panniculitis and hydroa-like lymphoma.
  • The differential diagnosis includes other cutaneous lymphomas, particularly the cutaneous nasal type T/natural killer-cell lymphoma, mycosis fungoides, precursor T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma, nonspecific peripheral T-cell lymphoma, cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma, and subcutaneous panniculitic T-cell lymphoma.
  • Chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy had little or no benefit.
  • The lymphoma extended from the epidermis to the subcutis, with frequent angiocentric and periadnexal array.
  • Lymphoma cells were mostly of intermediate size with dense hyperchromatic nuclei, inconspicuous nucleoli, and infrequent mitosis.
  • The lymphoma cells displayed T-cell cytotoxic phenotype.
  • In addition, they were negative for the natural killer cell antigens CD56 and CD57.
  • Epstein-Barr virus in situ hybridization was positive in the six cases in which it was assayed.
  • T-cell receptor gamma (TCRgamma) displayed monoclonal-type rearrangement in four cases studied.
  • Consequently, it should be considered an independent subset of CTCLs and be included as such in the classification of neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissues.

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  • (PMID = 11893040.001).
  • [ISSN] 1541-2016
  • [Journal-full-title] Applied immunohistochemistry & molecular morphology : AIMM
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Appl. Immunohistochem. Mol. Morphol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 34
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57. Senderowicz AM: Novel direct and indirect cyclin-dependent kinase modulators for the prevention and treatment of human neoplasms. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol; 2003 Jul;52 Suppl 1:S61-73
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  • [Title] Novel direct and indirect cyclin-dependent kinase modulators for the prevention and treatment of human neoplasms.
  • Abnormalities in the cell cycle are responsible for the majority of human neoplasias.
  • Most abnormalities occur due to hyperphosphorylation of the tumor suppressor gene Rb by the key regulators of the cell cycle, the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs).
  • Thus, a pharmacological CDK inhibitor may be useful in the prevention and/or treatment of human neoplasms.
  • (3) it inhibits positive elongation factor B, leading to transcription "halt"; and (4) it induces apoptosis in several preclinical models.
  • Antitumor activity was observed in some patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and renal, colon, and prostate cancers.
  • Concentrations between 300 and 500 n M-necessary to inhibit CDK-were achieved safely.
  • Phase II trials with infusional flavopiridol and phase I infusional trials in combination with standard chemotherapy are being completed with encouraging results.
  • The maximum tolerated doses using flavopiridol daily for 5, 3, and 1 consecutive days are 37.5, 50, and 62.5 mg/m(2) per day.
  • Phase II/III trials using this 1-h schedule in several tumor types including non-small-cell lung cancer, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, mantle cell lymphoma, and head and neck cancer are being conducted worldwide.
  • UCN-01, the second CDK modulator that has entered clinical trials, has unique preclinical properties:.
  • (2) it promotes cell-cycle arrest by accumulation in p21/p27;.
  • The last of these represents a novel strategy to combine UCN-01 with DNA-damaging agents.
  • In the initial UCN-01 clinical trial (continuous infusion for 72 h), a prolonged half-life of about 600 h (100 times longer than in preclinical models) was observed.
  • Another patient with refractory anaplastic large-cell lymphoma had no evidence of disease at >4 years.
  • " Moreover, it is still unclear which pharmacodynamic endpoint reflects loss of CDK activity in tissue samples from patients in these trials.
  • Despite these caveats, we feel that CDKs are sensible targets for cancer therapy and that there are several small-molecule CDK modulators in clinical trials with encouraging results.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cyclin-Dependent Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors. Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Alkaloids / administration & dosage. Animals. Cell Cycle / drug effects. Clinical Trials as Topic. Flavonoids / administration & dosage. Humans. Piperidines / administration & dosage. Staurosporine / analogs & derivatives. Tumor Cells, Cultured


58. Ardini E, Magnaghi P, Orsini P, Galvani A, Menichincheri M: Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase: role in specific tumours, and development of small molecule inhibitors for cancer therapy. Cancer Lett; 2010 Dec 28;299(2):81-94
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  • [Title] Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase: role in specific tumours, and development of small molecule inhibitors for cancer therapy.
  • The Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase first identified as the product of a gene rearrangement in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma.
  • ALK has subsequently been found to be rearranged, mutated, or amplified in a further series of tumours including neuroblastoma, and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.
  • In this review, we describe the various oncogenic forms of ALK, relevant clinical settings, and give a detailed overview of current drug discovery efforts in the field.
  • [MeSH-major] Genetic Predisposition to Disease / genetics. Mutation. Neoplasms / genetics. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Humans. Molecular Structure. Piperidines / chemistry. Piperidines / therapeutic use. Pyridines / chemistry. Pyridines / therapeutic use. Pyrimidines / chemistry. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use. Pyrroles / chemistry. Pyrroles / therapeutic use. Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20934803.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-7980
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / GSK 1838705A; 0 / NVP-TAE684; 0 / PF-2341066; 0 / Piperidines; 0 / Pyridines; 0 / Pyrimidines; 0 / Pyrroles; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / anaplastic lymphoma kinase
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59. Oertel J, Oertel B, Dörken B: Detection of small numbers of cells characteristic for haematological disorders in peripheral blood (the deep diff). Clin Lab Haematol; 2002 Apr;24(2):73-80
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  • [Title] Detection of small numbers of cells characteristic for haematological disorders in peripheral blood (the deep diff).
  • We studied cytocentrifuge preparations of peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes in haematological patients with nondiagnostic white cell differential counts.
  • This approach (the 'deep diff') enabled the detection of small numbers of diagnostically significant cells in a majority of patients.
  • We observed centrocytes in seven patients with follicular lymphoma, mantle cells in five patients with mantle cell lymphoma and marginal zone cells in five patients with nodal marginal zone lymphoma.
  • We detected small percentages of lymphoma cells in cytospins of mononuclear leucocytes in 12 patients with large B-cell lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.
  • The deep diff was nondiagnostic in 5/6 patients with hairy cell leukaemia and in 9/10 patients with Waldenström's macroglobulinaemia and small lymphocytic lymphoma.
  • Increased counts of leukaemic cells were found in 12/13 patients with acute leukaemia with < 3% blasts in the conventional white cell differential.
  • Decreased blasts were found in five patients with aplastic anaemia and in nine patients with bone marrow aplasia after intensive chemotherapy.
  • Increased plasma cell counts were observed in 13/14 patients with advanced plasma cell myeloma.
  • We conclude that the 'deep diff', augmented by immunocytochemistry, may be useful in the diagnosis of haematological disorders.
  • [MeSH-major] Blood Cell Count. Hematologic Diseases / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Anemia / blood. Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts / blood. Centrifugation. Coloring Agents. Eosine Yellowish-(YS). Humans. Leukemia / blood. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / blood. Methylene Blue. Neoplastic Cells, Circulating. Retrospective Studies. Staining and Labeling / methods. Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia / blood

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  • (PMID = 11985551.001).
  • [ISSN] 0141-9854
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical and laboratory haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Lab Haematol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Coloring Agents; 0 / May-Grunwald Giemsa; T42P99266K / Methylene Blue; TDQ283MPCW / Eosine Yellowish-(YS)
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60. Lee HK, Wilder RB, Jones D, Ha CS, Pro B, Rodriguez MA, Romaguera JE, Cabanillas F, Rodriguez J, Cox JD: Outcomes using doxorubicin-based chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy for early-stage peripheral T-cell lymphomas. Leuk Lymphoma; 2002 Sep;43(9):1769-75
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  • [Title] Outcomes using doxorubicin-based chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy for early-stage peripheral T-cell lymphomas.
  • There is little information in the literature on outcomes using doxorubicin-based chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy for early-stage peripheral T-cell lymphomas.
  • From 1985 to 1998, 39 patients with Stage I or II World Health Organization classification anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL; n = 20), peripheral T-cell lymphoma, unspecified (PTCLu; n = 11), or nasal-type NK/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL; n = 8) were treated using doxorubicin-based chemotherapy (median, 6 cycles) with (n = 24) or without (n = 15) radiotherapy (median dose, 40 Gy).
  • Even though patients who presented with bulky disease or who achieved less than a complete response to chemotherapy were the ones typically treated with combined modality therapy rather than chemotherapy alone, there was no significant difference in local control (5-year rates: 60 vs. 70%, p = 0.49), progression-free survival (5-year rates: 65 vs. 60%, p = 0.62), or overall survival (5-year rates: 74 vs. 67%, p = 0.47) between the groups treated with combined modality therapy and chemotherapy alone.
  • Twelve relapses were limited to the initial site of disease; two involved the initial site and new sites, and one involved only new sites.
  • Based on the significant risk of relapse at the initial site of disease, different approaches, including chemotherapy with concomitant radiotherapy to doses > or = 45 Gy, warrant investigation.
  • [MeSH-major] Doxorubicin / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, T-Cell / drug therapy. Lymphoma, T-Cell / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12685830.001).
  • [ISSN] 1042-8194
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia & lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 16672; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 6294
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin
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61. Wang FH, Li YH, Zeng J, Rao HL, Xia ZJ, Sun XF, Huang HQ, Lin TY, Jiang WQ, Guan ZZ: Clinical analysis of primary systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma: a report of 57 cases. Ai Zheng; 2009 Jan;28(1):49-53
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  • [Title] Clinical analysis of primary systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma: a report of 57 cases.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The clinical characteristics and prognosis of primary systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) are various according to different reports.
  • Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), a specific marker of primary systemic ALCL, is related with its clinical characteristics and prognosis.
  • This study was to investigate the clinical characteristics and prognosis of primary systemic ALCL, and to explore the expression and clinical significance of ALK.
  • METHODS: Clinical data of 57 primary systemic ALCL patients, treated in Cancer Center of Sun Yat-sen University from January 1997 to January 2006, were reviewed.
  • Of the 57 patients, 33 (57.9%) had B symptoms, 23 (40.4%) had Ann Arbor stage III-IV tumors, and 23 (40.4%) had extranodal disease at diagnosis.
  • All patients received chemotherapy.
  • With a median follow-up of 49.1 months, the median time to progression was 35.2 months and the expected 5-year survival rate was 65.2%.
  • The positive rate of ALK was 63.0% in the 46 cases detected.
  • Compared with ALK-negative patients, ALK-positive patients were younger (p = 0.001) and had higher expected 5-year survival rate (p < 0.01).
  • Multivariate analysis confirmed the independent prognostic values of ALK expression, primary disease site and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Primary systemic ALCL usually occurs in young patients, with good response to chemotherapy and good prognosis.
  • No ALK expression, high-intermediate/high IPI, extranodal disease and elevated LDH level are correlated to unfavorable prognosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / drug therapy. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / analysis

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  • (PMID = 19448428.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Ai zheng = Aizheng = Chinese journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ai Zheng
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / anaplastic lymphoma kinase
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62. Yurtsever H, Kempf W, Laeng RH: Posttransplant CD30+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma with skin and lymph node involvement. Dermatology; 2003;207(1):107-10
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  • [Title] Posttransplant CD30+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma with skin and lymph node involvement.
  • Most examples are of B cell origin, and CD30+ T cell PTLD are very rare.
  • We report a CD30+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) in the skin of the right lower leg and in draining lymph nodes of the right inguinal region in an immunosuppressed 59-year-old male who had received a renal graft 9 years previously.
  • Unlike the vast majority of PTLD, an incomplete T cell immunophenotype was observed, and there was evidence of T cell lineage at the genetic level reflected by a rearranged T cell receptor gamma gene.
  • The neoplastic cells were non-reactive to the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) 1 protein.
  • Arguments against a primary cutaneous ALCL, which is also ALK-1 negative, include systemic presentation at the time of initial diagnosis and immunoreactivity of the neoplastic cells to epithelial membrane antigen.
  • Typically, our rare example of a posttransplantation systemic ALCL showed an aggressive behaviour and a poor response to both chemotherapy and local irradiation.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Failure, Chronic / surgery. Kidney Transplantation / adverse effects. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / pathology. Lymphomatoid Papulosis / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy, Needle. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease Progression. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Risk Assessment


63. Vinogradova IuE, Lutsenko IN, Kaplanskaia IB, Vorob'ev IA, Samoĭlova RS, Gorgidze LA, Ryzhikova NA, Valiev TT, Giliazitdinova EA, Dzhulakian UL, Egorova EK, Zvonkov EE, Krasil'nikova BB, Magomedova AU, Margolin OV, Mar'in DS, Kremenetskaia AM, Kravchenko SK, Vorob'ev AI: [Efficacy of therapy of different variants of anaplastic large T-cell lymphomas]. Ter Arkh; 2008;80(7):33-7
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  • [Title] [Efficacy of therapy of different variants of anaplastic large T-cell lymphomas].
  • AIM: To compare efficacy of NHL-BFM-90 and CHOP-like courses in the treatment of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL).
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-two patients with ALCL participated in the study.
  • The diagnosis was made basing on the findings of clinical, device, morphological, immunohistochemical and molecular-genetic examinations with application of a panel of monoclonal antibodies to CD30, ALK, CD3, CD4, CDS, CD7, CD34, CD15, CD68, CD20, CD45RO, CD45RA, Ki-67.
  • 14 cases of 22 were negative by kinase of anaplastic lymphocytes (ALK-) and 8 were positive (ALK+).
  • Mean age of ALK-ALCL patients was 39.6 +/- 4.1 years, of ALK+ALCL patients - 23.4 +/- 2.6 years.
  • All 14 patients treated according to NHL-BFM-90 had ALCL stages III-IV with B-symptoms.
  • 12 patients who completed treatment by the above protocol achieved complete remission after the forth course, 2 patients failed the treatment.
  • Of 8 ALCL patients treated initially according to other schemes, a complete remission was achieved in 4 patients (2 had stage II).
  • Four patients who had failed to achieve complete remission died of the disease progression.
  • CONCLUSION: ALCL occurs more frequently in young and middle-aged patients.
  • The disease has an aggressive course with rapid generalization.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Asparaginase / therapeutic use. Bleomycin / therapeutic use. Cyclophosphamide / therapeutic use. Daunorubicin / therapeutic use. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Doxorubicin / therapeutic use. Etoposide / therapeutic use. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Leucovorin / therapeutic use. Male. Methotrexate / therapeutic use. Middle Aged. Prednisone / therapeutic use. Procarbazine / therapeutic use. Remission Induction / methods. Treatment Outcome. Vincristine / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 18763592.001).
  • [ISSN] 0040-3660
  • [Journal-full-title] Terapevticheskiĭ arkhiv
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ter. Arkh.
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 35S93Y190K / Procarbazine; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; EC 3.5.1.1 / Asparaginase; Q573I9DVLP / Leucovorin; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate; ZS7284E0ZP / Daunorubicin; BEACOPP protocol; CHOP protocol; MACOP-B protocol; PVDA protocol
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64. Foss HD, Marafioti T, Stein H: [The many faces of anaplastic large cell lymphoma]. Pathologe; 2000 Mar;21(2):124-36
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  • [Title] [The many faces of anaplastic large cell lymphoma].
  • [Transliterated title] Die vielen Gesichter des anaplastischen grosszelligen Lymphoms.
  • Fifteen years after their first description by one of the authors (HS) anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALC-lymphoma, ALCL) now represents a generally accepted group of large cell lymphomas.
  • Essential defining features comprise of a proliferation of large lymphoid cells with strong expression of the cytokine receptor CD30 and a characteristic growth pattern.
  • Using molecular and clinical criteria three entities of ALC-lymphoma have been identified: primary systemic anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive ALC-lymphoma, primary systemic ALK-negative ALC-lymphoma and primary cutaneous ALC-lymphoma.
  • The ALK expression in the primary systemic ALC-lymphoma entity is caused by chromosomal translocations, most commonly t(2;5), and can nowadays be reliably detected by immuno-histology.
  • ALK-positive ALC-lymphoma predominantly affects young male patients and if treated with chemotherapy has a favourable prognosis.
  • They show a broad morphological spectrum, with the "common type", the small cell variant and the lymphohistiocytic variant being most commonly observed.
  • The knowledge of the existence of these variants is essential in establishing the correct diagnosis.
  • ALK-negative ALC-lymphomas occur in older patients, equally affecting both genders and have an unfavorable prognosis.
  • The morphology and the immuno-phenotype of primary cutaneous ALC-lymphoma shows an overlap with that of lymphomatoid papulosis.
  • Both diseases have an excellent prognosis and secondary systemic dissemination is only rarely observed.
  • The ALC-lymphomas described above derive from T cells and are generally accepted as biological entities.
  • In contrast, large B-cell-lymphomas with anaplastic morphology are now believed not to represent an own entity but a morphologic variant of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
  • Malignant lymphomas with morphological features of both Hodgkin- and ALC-lymphoma have formerly been classified as ALCL Hodgkin-like.
  • Recent immuno-histological analysis of these cases however suggests that ALCL Hodgkin-like does not represent an own lymphoma entity.
  • Most of these cases are likely to be examples of tumor cell rich classical Hodgkin lymphoma, while a minority of these cases appear to fall either into the category of ALK-positive or ALK-negative ALC-lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / classification. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / pathology

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  • (PMID = 10840818.001).
  • [ISSN] 0172-8113
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Pathologe
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathologe
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
  • [Number-of-references] 32
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65. Jagasia M, Morgan D, Goodman S, Hamilton K, Kinney M, Shyr Y, Stein R, Zic J, Greer J: Histology impacts the outcome of peripheral T-cell lymphomas after high dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplant. Leuk Lymphoma; 2004 Nov;45(11):2261-7
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  • [Title] Histology impacts the outcome of peripheral T-cell lymphomas after high dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplant.
  • The role of high dose chemotherapy (HDC) and stem cell transplant (SCT) in peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) was studied in 28 patients, from 1988 to 2002.
  • Outcome was compared to 86 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) transplanted during 1986-2000.
  • Patients with anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) had a better 3-year OS compared to those with non-ALCL histology (86% vs. 47%, P=0.0122).
  • Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)- positive ALCL patients had a superior EFS compared to ALK-negative ALCL (100% vs. 0; P=0.0228).
  • Patients with cutaneous ALCL (ALK-negative) relapsed, but had an indolent course after SCT.
  • When compared to DLBCL, patients with ALCL had a superior OS (86% vs. 36%, P=0.0034) and patients with non-ALCL had a comparable OS.
  • ALCL histology confers better survival compared to non-ALCL and DLBCL histologies.
  • ALK-positive ALCL is associated with the best EFS after relapse with HDC and SCT.
  • The timing of SCT for non-ALCL histology remains to be determined.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, B-Cell / therapy. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral / pathology. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral / therapy. Stem Cell Transplantation / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / therapy. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / biosynthesis. Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases. Recurrence. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15512815.001).
  • [ISSN] 1042-8194
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia & lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / anaplastic lymphoma kinase
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66. Auw-Haedrich C, Coupland SE, Kapp A, Schmitt-Gräff A, Buchen R, Witschel H: Long term outcome of ocular adnexal lymphoma subtyped according to the REAL classification. Revised European and American Lymphoma. Br J Ophthalmol; 2001 Jan;85(1):63-9
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  • [Title] Long term outcome of ocular adnexal lymphoma subtyped according to the REAL classification. Revised European and American Lymphoma.
  • AIM: To classify ocular adnexal lymphomas according to the Revised European and American Lymphoma (REAL) classification and to determine any correlation between clinical features or histomorphological variables with the patients' outcome.
  • METHODS: Conventional and immunohistology were performed on representative sections of 53 specimens of 46 patients with ocular adnexal lymphoma.
  • The growth fraction of the tumours was determined using the MIB-1 antibody directed against the Ki-67 antigen.
  • The Student's t test and log rank test were used for statistical analysis.
  • Almost all specimens represented B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas: extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (EMZL) (n=38), diffuse large cell B cell lymphoma (n=8), lymphoplasmocytic lymphoma/immunocytoma (n=2), mantle cell lymphoma (n=2), follicle centre lymphoma (n=1), and plasmacytoma (n=1).
  • One case of a secondary anaplastic large cell lymphoma of T cell type (T-ALCL) was diagnosed.
  • The majority of the patients had stage I disease.
  • A variety of therapeutic regimens was administered, the main form of treatment being radiotherapy.
  • The average follow up time was 85 months.
  • Complete remission was achieved in 24 patients (10 after excision alone, eight after radiotherapy alone, three after combined excision and radiotherapy, one after chemotherapy alone, and two after combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy).
  • 12 patients died of causes related to lymphoma; in one patient the cause of death was unknown.
  • The stage at presentation, as well as the lymphoma malignancy category, had a significant correlation with the final course of the disease (p=0.0001 and p=0.03, respectively).
  • A significant correlation was also noted between the final outcome (p<0.05) and tumour cell expression for Ki-67 antigen and p53 protein.
  • CONCLUSION: 67% of patients with ocular adnexal lymphoma had EMZL.
  • MIB-1 and p53 expression by the tumour cells proved to be important immunohistochemical markers concerning the prognosis.
  • Primary diffuse large cell B cell lymphoma of the ocular adnexa requires at least similar therapeutic measures and regular intensive follow up.
  • [MeSH-major] Eye Neoplasms / pathology. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / pathology. Plasmacytoma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Ki-67 Antigen / metabolism. Lymphoma, B-Cell / pathology. Lymphoma, B-Cell / therapy. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Proteins / metabolism. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 11133714.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1161
  • [Journal-full-title] The British journal of ophthalmology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br J Ophthalmol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Ki-67 Antigen; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1723704
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67. Ferenczi K, Summers P, Aubert P, Cooper B, Meyerson H, Cooper KD, Honda K: A case of CD30+ nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma. Am J Dermatopathol; 2008 Dec;30(6):567-71
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  • [Title] A case of CD30+ nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma.
  • Extranodal nasal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma is a very rare lymphoma characterized by strong association with Epstein-Barr virus infection, very aggressive clinical behavior, and poor prognosis.
  • The typical phenotype of neoplastic natural killer cells in this entity is as follows: CD2+, CD56+, surface CD3-, cytoplasmic CD3epsilon+, and cytotoxic granule-associated protein positive.
  • CD30 expression, a phenotype characteristic of anaplastic large-cell lymphomas, is not a typical feature of nasal NK/T-cell lymphomas.
  • A skin biopsy revealed an atypical angiocentric mononuclear cell infiltrate.
  • Strong CD30 and CD3e immunoreactivities were noted in large atypical mononuclear cells within the infiltrate initially suggestive of a CD30+ T-cell lymphoma.
  • However, flow cytometry of the skin lesion indicated that the cells were CD2+, CD4-, CD8-, and lacked surface CD3 more typical of a neoplasm of natural killer cells.
  • Further studies revealed that the cells were CD56+, T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1+, and contained Epstein-Barr virus sequences consistent with a nasal-type NK/T-cell lymphoma.
  • High titers of Epstein-Barr virus in the blood, evidence of sinonasal disease, and absence of a T-cell receptor gene rearrangement were additional features consistent with the diagnosis.
  • The patient had a very aggressive clinical course and, despite combination chemotherapy, died 8 months after the onset of skin lesions.
  • This case represents an example of nasal-type NK/T-cell lymphoma with expression of CD30.
  • When presenting in the skin, the phenotypic and morphologic features of this lymphoma may lead to an erroneous diagnosis of a CD30+ large-T-cell lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD30 / metabolism. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / diagnosis. Natural Killer T-Cells / immunology. Natural Killer T-Cells / pathology. Nose Neoplasms / diagnosis. Skin Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / immunology. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / pathology

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  • (PMID = 19033930.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-0311
  • [Journal-full-title] The American Journal of dermatopathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Dermatopathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD30
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68. Chott A, Raderer M: New developments in extracutaneous lymphomas. Semin Cutan Med Surg; 2000 Jun;19(2):149-56
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  • [Title] New developments in extracutaneous lymphomas.
  • The recently proposed World Health Organization classification of neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissues is based on the principles of the Revised European-American Classification of Lymphoid Neoplasms introduced in 1994.
  • Use of these classifications implies a new approach to lymphoma diagnosis, especially because of the inclusion of clinical data among which the site of involvement (nodal v extranodal) is very important.
  • Recent technical advances allowing molecular biological investigations on the single cell level helped gain new insights into the cellular origin of B-cell lymphomas.
  • Tumor cells of the majority of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) harbor somatically mutated immunoglobulin variable region genes, and are therefore derived from germinal center B cells or their descendants.
  • The same is true for Hodgkin's disease, which (at least in the majority of cases) is a germinal center derived B-cell lymphoma.
  • Significant news on the molecular pathogenesis of NHL include the prognostically relevant dichotomy of B-CLL, the involvement of translocations affecting 3q27 in 20% to 40% of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL), the prognostical implication of the t(2;5) in anaplastic large cell lymphoma, and detection of the t(11;18) in gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT)-type lymphoma.
  • A major step forward with regard to gastric MALT-type lymphoma therapy was the discovery of a causal relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and lymphomagenesis.
  • Cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy remains the golden standard for DLBCL treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. B-Lymphocytes / metabolism. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic. Lymphoma, B-Cell / genetics. Mutation. Translocation, Genetic
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Hodgkin Disease / genetics. Humans. Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell / genetics. Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / genetics. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / genetics. Prognosis. Rituximab. Stomach Neoplasms / genetics

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  • (PMID = 10892718.001).
  • [ISSN] 1085-5629
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in cutaneous medicine and surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin Cutan Med Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab
  • [Number-of-references] 38
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69. Cohen Y, Libster D, Amir G, Hiller N, Da'as N, Ben Yehuda D, Polliack A: Primary ALK positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the pancreas. Leuk Lymphoma; 2003 Jan;44(1):205-7
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  • [Title] Primary ALK positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the pancreas.
  • Here we present an unusual case of anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), appearing as a primary tumor of the pancreas which invaded into the adjacent duodenal wall, causing upper gastrointestinal bleeding.
  • After complete resection of the tumor (Whipple's operation), the patient received 4 cycles of CHOP chemotherapy.
  • Currently, 2 years after diagnosis the patient still remains lymphoma free.
  • Primary ALCL of the pancreas is very rare and has only been reported on one previous occasion.
  • Nevertheless, lymphoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic tumors and an attempt to obtain tissue diagnosis is always necessary before continuing with radical surgery, especially in young patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / pathology. Pancreatic Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Duodenal Neoplasms / etiology. Duodenal Neoplasms / therapy. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Male. Necrosis. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology. Remission Induction / methods


70. Rassidakis GZ, Georgakis GV, Oyarzo M, Younes A, Medeiros LJ: Lack of c-kit (CD117) expression in CD30+ lymphomas and lymphomatoid papulosis. Mod Pathol; 2004 Aug;17(8):946-53
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  • [Title] Lack of c-kit (CD117) expression in CD30+ lymphomas and lymphomatoid papulosis.
  • c-Kit receptor (CD117) is expressed by erythroid, megakaryocytic, and myeloid precursors and mature mast cells and has been reported to be expressed in CD30+ lymphomas such as Hodgkin's disease and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.
  • Imatinib mesylate, a well-established inhibitor of bcr-abl tyrosine kinase, and currently used for the treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, also inhibits c-kit receptor kinase activity.
  • In view of the possible use of imatinib as experimental therapy for patients with c-kit-positive tumors, we assessed c-kit expression in CD30+ cell lines and lymphomas.
  • The cell lines were assessed using multiple methods (RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and Western blot).
  • c-Kit expression was also immunohistochemically assessed in 168 CD30+ lymphomas including 87 classical Hodgkin's disease, 63 anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, and 15 cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.
  • We also studied 18 cases of lymphomatoid papulosis, a CD30+ lesion closely related to cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.
  • Neither c-kit mRNA nor protein was detected in any of the cell lines assessed.
  • Furthermore, treatment with imatinib did not inhibit proliferation of cell lines in vitro.
  • Using immunohistochemistry, only one of 183 (0.5%) lesions was positive for c-kit, the positive case being an ALK-negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.
  • Our data demonstrate that expression of c-kit receptor is exceedingly rare among CD30+ lymphomas and lymphomatoid papulosis, suggesting that c-kit receptor is unlikely to be an appropriate target for therapeutic options such as imatinib in patients with these tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / pathology. Lymphomatoid Papulosis / pathology. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Antigens, CD30 / analysis. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Benzamides. Cell Division / drug effects. Cell Line, Tumor. Flow Cytometry. Hodgkin Disease / genetics. Hodgkin Disease / metabolism. Hodgkin Disease / pathology. Humans. Imatinib Mesylate. Immunohistochemistry. Piperazines / pharmacology. Pyrimidines / pharmacology. RNA, Messenger / genetics. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. RNA, Neoplasm / genetics. RNA, Neoplasm / metabolism. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 15105813.001).
  • [ISSN] 0893-3952
  • [Journal-full-title] Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mod. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD30; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Pyrimidines; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / RNA, Neoplasm; 8A1O1M485B / Imatinib Mesylate; EC 2.7.10.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit
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71. Brugières L, Quartier P, Le Deley MC, Pacquement H, Perel Y, Bergeron C, Schmitt C, Landmann J, Patte C, Terrier-Lacombe MJ, Delsol G, Hartmann O: Relapses of childhood anaplastic large-cell lymphoma: treatment results in a series of 41 children--a report from the French Society of Pediatric Oncology. Ann Oncol; 2000 Jan;11(1):53-8
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  • [Title] Relapses of childhood anaplastic large-cell lymphoma: treatment results in a series of 41 children--a report from the French Society of Pediatric Oncology.
  • PURPOSE: To study response to chemotherapy and the outcome of children treated for a relapsed anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) and to evaluate the role of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in these patients.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Clinical data concerning the 41 relapses that occurred in 119 patients with ALCL enrolled in 3 consecutive studies since 1975 were analysed.
  • First-line treatment consisted of intensive chemotherapy according to the COPAD protocol for the first series of 12 patients treated between 1975 and 1989 and to the SFOP (French Society of Pediatric Oncology) HM protocols for the 30 patients treated between 1989 and 1997.
  • Twenty-eight patients were treated with CV(B)A (CCNU, vinblastine, ara-C with or without bleomycin), and the others with miscellaneous protocols for recurrent disease.
  • Fifteen patients underwent autologous BMT and 1 allogeneic BMT while in CR2.
  • With a median follow-up of 5 years, 12 patients died, 9 of their disease and 29 patients are alive in CR2 (20 patients), CR3 (5 patients), CR4 (2 patients), CR5 (1 patient) or CR6 (1 patient).
  • Overall and disease-free survival are respectively 69% (53%-82%) and 44% (29%-61%) at three years.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Relapsed ALCL are highly chemosensitive but over 40% of the patients experience several relapses.
  • Prolonged conventional chemotherapy based on vinblastine might, in some cases, be as efficient as short intensive treatment with ABMT.

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  • (PMID = 10690387.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-7534
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine; 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 7BRF0Z81KG / Lomustine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; EC 3.5.1.1 / Asparaginase; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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72. Cerimagić Z, Guska S, Banjanović B: A case of T/null anaplastic large cell lymphoma arising in lung. Bosn J Basic Med Sci; 2006 Aug;6(3):34-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A case of T/null anaplastic large cell lymphoma arising in lung.
  • Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare non-Hodgkin, T-cell lymphoma, representing only 2-3% of all lymphoid neoplasm's in adults according to World Health Organization (WHO).
  • CD30 antigen-positive, large neoplastic cells characterize ALCL.
  • We present here a 46-year-old male with pulmonary ALCL previously diagnosed with Hodgkin disease.
  • The neoplastic cells were large and had clear cytoplasm, large vesicular nuclei, and prominent nucleoli.
  • Immunophenotypic analysis revealed LCA, vimentin and CD30 positivity.
  • Immunohistochemical profile was consistent with ALK negative ALCL.
  • The progression of Hodgkin lymphoma to aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (ALCL in this case) is well known entity.
  • After the diagnosis was established, our patient immediately had been referred to the Department of Hematology in order to get appropriate chemotherapy, necessary in such cases.


73. Hirsch B, Brauer J, Fischdick M, Loddenkemper C, Bulfone-Paus S, Stein H, Dürkop H: Anti-CD30 human IL-2 fusion proteins display strong and specific cytotoxicity in vivo. Curr Drug Targets; 2009 Feb;10(2):110-7
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  • [Title] Anti-CD30 human IL-2 fusion proteins display strong and specific cytotoxicity in vivo.
  • Although therapy of CD30-positive lymphomas such as classical Hodgkin lymphoma and anaplastic large cell lymphoma has been improved considerably during the last decades, patients suffer from high toxicity of current therapeutic regimens.
  • Since CD30 expression is very restricted, CD30-positive tumors are well suited for immunotherapeutic approaches.
  • In this report, we give a short overview of CD30-targeting approaches in humans.
  • Furthermore, we introduce two novel anti-CD30 fusion proteins consisting of the single chain variable fragment of the CD30 monoclonal antibody Ber-H2 and human interleukin-2, evaluate their biological activity in a human CD30-positive syngeneic murine model, and demonstrate the immunological mechanisms leading to tumor rejection by these reagents.
  • The data indicate that there are several promising approaches in CD30-targeted immunotherapy.
  • The findings of the anti-CD30 IL-2 constructs suggest that these fusion proteins are particularly useful to remove small, residual tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / immunology. Cell Survival / drug effects. Interleukin-2 / pharmacology. Recombinant Fusion Proteins / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antigens, CD30 / immunology. Drug Delivery Systems. Humans

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  • (PMID = 19199906.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-5592
  • [Journal-full-title] Current drug targets
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Drug Targets
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antigens, CD30; 0 / Interleukin-2; 0 / Recombinant Fusion Proteins
  • [Number-of-references] 40
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74. Prochazka V, Faber E, Raida L, Vondrakova J, Kucerova L, Jarosova M, Indrak K, Papajik T: Prolonged survival of patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma after first-line intensive sequential chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation. Biomed Pap Med Fac Univ Palacky Olomouc Czech Repub; 2009 Mar;153(1):63-6
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  • [Title] Prolonged survival of patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma after first-line intensive sequential chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation.
  • BACKGROUND: Nodal peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are infrequent subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.
  • The WHO classification recognizes three subgroups of nodal PTCL: peripheral T-cell lymphoma not otherwise specified (PTCL, NOS), anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and angioimmunoblastic lymphoma (AIL).
  • The clinical course is aggressive and despite multiagent chemotherapy, the median survival is about 2 years.
  • Optimal first-line chemotherapy is not established and the role of high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell support is still controversial.
  • AIM: To analyze the long-term outcome of PTCL patients treated with intensive first-line chemotherapy with highdose therapy and autologous transplant consolidation.
  • METHOD: Sequential chemotherapy protocol consisting of 3 cycles of CHOEP-21-like regimen (PACEBO), 1 cycle of an ifosfamide and methotrexate-based regimen (IVAM) and a priming regimen with high-dose cytosine arabinoside (HAM).
  • Consolidation was provided with myeloablative conditioning (BEAM 200) and autologous stem cell support.
  • Eighty-four patients with aggressive high-risk lymphoma were treated with the sequential protocol from 2000 to 2007 in our institution.
  • Here we report our experience with 18 patients with nodal PTCL (10 PTCL, NOS; 3 ALCL, ALKnegative; 2 ALCL, ALK-positive; 2 ALCL, unknown ALK status; 1 AIL).
  • RESULTS: Eleven (61 %) patients achieved complete remission, 3 (17 %) partial remission and 4 (22 %) patients failed the procedure.
  • After a median follow-up of 25.7 months, nine patients relapsed or progressed (6 PTCL, NOS; 2 ALCL ALK-positive; 1 ALCL ALK-negative; median 14.1 months) and four patients died (lymphoma progression).
  • CONCLUSION: Our results show that intensive first-line chemotherapy with high-dose therapy and autologous transplant consolidation offers a chance for long-term survival in patients with chemosensitive PTCL.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral / mortality. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Survival Rate. Transplantation, Homologous

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  • (PMID = 19365529.001).
  • [ISSN] 1213-8118
  • [Journal-full-title] Biomedical papers of the Medical Faculty of the University Palacký, Olomouc, Czechoslovakia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biomed Pap Med Fac Univ Palacky Olomouc Czech Repub
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Czech Republic
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75. Nagajothi N, Dham SK, Gelfand Y, Sanmugarajah J: Treatment of AIDS-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma with dose-adjusted EPOCH chemotherapy. J Natl Med Assoc; 2007 Jul;99(7):799-801
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  • [Title] Treatment of AIDS-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma with dose-adjusted EPOCH chemotherapy.
  • Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) has rarely been described in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).
  • Reports of treatment of ALCL in the setting of AIDS are rare as well.
  • Dose-adjusted EPOCH (DA-EPOCH; etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin) has been shown to be well tolerated and effective in the treatment of AIDS-related aggressive B-cell lymphomas.
  • Treatment of AIDS-associated ALCL with DA-EPOCH has not been reported.
  • This report describes two patients with AIDS-associated ALCL treated with DA-EPOCH chemotherapy.
  • Both patients presented with advanced disease.
  • The first patient completed six cycles of chemotherapy and remains in complete remission at 12 months of follow up.
  • The second patient has received 2 cycles of chemotherapy thus far.
  • She had an excellent response with rapid improvement of cutaneous disease and lymphadenopathy starting three days after the first cycle.
  • Repeat imaging after two cycles of chemotherapy showed marked radiologic improvement as well.
  • Chemotherapy was well tolerated by both patients.
  • Our experience suggests that DA-EPOCH is an effective treatment for AIDS-associated ALCL.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 17668647.001).
  • [ISSN] 1943-4693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the National Medical Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Natl Med Assoc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; EPOCH protocol
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2574342
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76. Daar G, Küpeli S, Yalçin B, Kesik V, Orhan D, Büyükpamukçu M: Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2010 Oct;27(7):558-63
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  • [Title] Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma.
  • Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is characterized by proliferation of anaplastic large CD 30+ T-cell lymphoid cells with abundant cytoplasm.
  • Primary cutaneous ALCL is a rare form of ALCL, usually seen in elderly patients.
  • In this report, the authors present an unusual case of 15-year-old boy with a solitary left ear lobe mass, previously reported as keratoacanthoma which was later histopathologically and immunohistochemically diagnosed as T-cell phenotype, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-negative primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma.
  • The patient's response to chemotherapy was good and he is receiving the continuation phases of his chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Humans. Male. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20624005.001).
  • [ISSN] 1521-0669
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric hematology and oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Hematol Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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77. Aboulafia DM: HHV-8- and EBV-associated nonepidermotrophic large B-cell lymphoma presenting as a foot rash in a man with AIDS. AIDS Patient Care STDS; 2002 Apr;16(4):139-45
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] HHV-8- and EBV-associated nonepidermotrophic large B-cell lymphoma presenting as a foot rash in a man with AIDS.
  • Human herpesvirus type 8 (HHV-8; Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus) is frequently identified in tumor tissue obtained from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), or multicentric Castleman's disease.
  • The association between HHV-8 and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated solid lymphomas is less clear.
  • Herein, I describe the case of a man with a CD4+ count of 30 cells/microL, and HIV viral load of 90,000 copies/mL, multi-drug resistant HIV infection, and limited stage KS.
  • Microscopy showed a homogeneous population of anaplastic large B cells that stained positive for CD20 (L26), CD30, and lambda light chain.
  • In situ hybridization of tumor tissue identified Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded RNA, and polymerase chain reaction amplification yielded HHV-8-specific gene products.
  • Staging studies did not reveal lymphoma elsewhere, and the patient began chemotherapy, but died from septic complications.
  • Although extranodal presentations are common in the setting of immunodeficiency, reports of AIDS-associated lymphoma presenting as a nonepidermotrophic foot lesion are rare.
  • More importantly, this case provides further support that HHV-8 can be associated with solid lymphomas that have an anaplastic large cell morphology.
  • [MeSH-major] AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections / pathology. Epstein-Barr Virus Infections / pathology. Exanthema / pathology. Herpesvirus 4, Human / isolation & purification. Herpesvirus 8, Human / isolation & purification. Homosexuality, Male. Lymphoma, B-Cell / pathology

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  • (PMID = 12015867.001).
  • [ISSN] 1087-2914
  • [Journal-full-title] AIDS patient care and STDs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AIDS Patient Care STDS
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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78. Turturro F: Recombinant adenovirus-mediated cytotoxic gene therapy and lymphoproliferative disorders: analysis based on pharmacodynamics. Curr Drug Targets Immune Endocr Metabol Disord; 2002 Jul;2(2):109-18
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  • [Title] Recombinant adenovirus-mediated cytotoxic gene therapy and lymphoproliferative disorders: analysis based on pharmacodynamics.
  • The literature has seen an incredible booming of publications related to the use of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy in cancer over the past decade.
  • The use of recombinant adenoviruses as a therapeutic tool for lymphoproliferative disorders has also been evaluated in this context.
  • Several approaches of adenovirus-mediated gene expression have been used to transfect cell lines that are derived from lymphoid tumors and would have otherwise been refractory to other transfection methods.
  • The identification of high affinity receptor for human adenoviruses serotype 2 and 5, the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR), has raised the question about its relevance for the efficacy of recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene therapy.
  • We have reviewed the published studies that have examined the use of recombinant adenovirus vectors expressing cytotoxic genes for gene therapy in lymphomas, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and multiple myeloma.
  • Based on the concept that a recombinant adenovirus particle behaves like a drug, we address the issue of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy in terms of classic pharmacodynamics.
  • We have analyzed the use of recombinant adenovirus-mediated cytotoxicity by assessing the importance of the biochemical and physiological signaling pathways interacting with these particular drugs and their mechanisms of action.
  • The case of anaplastic large cell lymphoma is discussed as an example that better illustrates the concept of pharmacodynamics of recombinant adenoviral-mediated expression of cytotoxic genes.
  • Ultimately, the issues derived from the use of such a modality of therapy that require further evaluation, are discussed in this review.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoviruses, Human / genetics. Genetic Therapy / methods. Lymphoproliferative Disorders / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor-Like Membrane Protein. Flow Cytometry. Gene Targeting. Genetic Vectors. Humans. Integrin alphaVbeta3 / metabolism. Integrins / metabolism. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / pathology. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / therapy. Membrane Proteins / metabolism. Receptors, Virus / genetics. Receptors, Vitronectin / metabolism. Virion / genetics

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  • (PMID = 12476785.001).
  • [ISSN] 1568-0088
  • [Journal-full-title] Current drug targets. Immune, endocrine and metabolic disorders
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Drug Targets Immune Endocr. Metabol. Disord.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CLMP protein, human; 0 / Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor-Like Membrane Protein; 0 / Integrin alphaVbeta3; 0 / Integrins; 0 / Membrane Proteins; 0 / Receptors, Virus; 0 / Receptors, Vitronectin; 0 / integrin alphaVbeta5
  • [Number-of-references] 57
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79. Miettinen M: From morphological to molecular diagnosis of soft tissue tumors. Adv Exp Med Biol; 2006;587:99-113
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  • [Title] From morphological to molecular diagnosis of soft tissue tumors.
  • Cytogenetic discoveries of balanced translocations in soft tissue tumors have opened the way to molecular genetic definition of these translocations as gene fusions from the late 1980s.
  • Many sarcomas are known to have such fusions, and the demonstration of the fusion transcripts in tumor tissue is of great value in specific diagnosis of synovial sarcoma (SYT-SSX), Ewing sarcoma (EWS-Fli1), clear cell sarcoma (EWS-ATF1), myxoid liposarcoma (FUS-CHOP), and other sarcomas.
  • These translocations are believed to be disease-specific and pathogenetic forces, despite occasional observations to the contrary.
  • Demonstration of SYT-SSX and EWS-ATF1 fusion assists in the diagnosis of synovial and clear cell sarcomas in unusual locations, such as the gastrointestinal tract, where these tumors occur with low frequency.
  • In two exceptional instances, the same translocation and gene fusion occurs in two unrelated diseases: ETV6-NTRK fusion in infantile fibrosarcoma and secretory carcinoma of the breast, and ALK-TPM3 fusion in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor and large cell anaplastic lymphoma.
  • Thus, the target cell of the genetic change is an important factor to define the resulting disease.
  • Activating mutations in two related receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), KIT, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) is central to the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), and countering the mutational activation by specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as Imatinib mesylate, is now standard treatment for metastatic GISTs.
  • Mutation type influences therapy responsiveness, but fortunately very few GISTs carry primarily Imatinib-resistant mutations.
  • Secondary drug resistance acquired during Imatinib treatment based on new, Imatinib-resistant mutations is a major problem limiting treatment success.
  • Schwannoma types may differ in their pathogenesis: gastrointestinal schwannomas lack NF2 changes suggesting a different pathogenesis.
  • [MeSH-major] Genetic Testing. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / genetics. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17163160.001).
  • [ISSN] 0065-2598
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in experimental medicine and biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv. Exp. Med. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 70
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80. Ishii K, Yamamoto Y, Nomura S: [CD30-negative diffuse large B-cell lymphoma expressing ALK]. Rinsho Ketsueki; 2005 Jul;46(7):501-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [CD30-negative diffuse large B-cell lymphoma expressing ALK].
  • He obtained complete remission (CR) following chemotherapy, radiation and lymphadenectomy on the right neck.
  • An open-abdominal lymph node biopsy was performed from which a diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma was made.
  • He underwent allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) from his HLA-matched sister while in non-CR in November 2002.
  • Engraftment was achieved on day 14, and at the same time, complete chimerism was confirmed.
  • Acute grade III graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developed and was controlled with cyclosporine A and prednisolone.
  • Extensive chronic GVHD was subsequently observed and required systemic immunosuppression.
  • The tumor cells were ALK-positive, CD30-negative and JH rearrangement was detected, and were therefore classified as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with expression of ALK according to the WHO classification, though they differed from this subtype in some points.
  • Although this case was refractory for chemotherapy with a complex karyotype, the graft-versus-lymphoma effect might have contributed to the sustained CR following the PBSCT.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, B-Cell. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antigens, CD30. Combined Modality Therapy. Fatal Outcome. Humans. Male. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation. Peripheral Vascular Diseases / etiology. Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases. Transplantation, Homologous

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  • (PMID = 16440742.001).
  • [ISSN] 0485-1439
  • [Journal-full-title] [Rinshō ketsueki] The Japanese journal of clinical hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rinsho Ketsueki
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD30; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / anaplastic lymphoma kinase
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81. Sandlund JT: Should adolescents with NHL be treated as old children or young adults? Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program; 2007;:297-303
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results) data for the years 1975-1998 show that children with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) have a better treatment outcome than do adults.
  • Some factors are related to the patient (e.g., drug distribution and clearance, performance status, compliance, sex) whereas others pertain to tumor histology and biology.
  • From ages 5 through 14 years, Burkitt lymphoma is the predominant histologic subtype, whereas diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is most common in the 15- to 29-year age range.
  • Because different treatment strategies are often used in children and adults with NHL, the choice of therapy for adolescents and young adults (ages 15 through 29 years) is challenging and somewhat controversial.
  • It is reasonable to consider pediatric strategies for some adolescents and very young adults with NHL, and pediatric strategies are currently used to treat adults with certain subtypes of NHL (Burkitt lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma).
  • However, the use of pediatric strategies in adults does not guarantee a comparable outcome, as illustrated by trials for adult lymphoblastic lymphoma.
  • Age-related differences in tumor biology have been demonstrated in anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL).
  • Additional biologic data will not only improve prognosis and treatment stratification but, more important, will lead to the identification of specific molecular targets for therapy.

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  • (PMID = 18024643.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-4391
  • [Journal-full-title] Hematology. American Society of Hematology. Education Program
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 21765
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 62
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82. Nguyen JT, Condron MR, Nguyen ND, De J, Medeiros LJ, Padula A: Anaplastic large cell lymphoma in leukemic phase: extraordinarily high white blood cell count. Pathol Int; 2009 May;59(5):345-53
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Anaplastic large cell lymphoma in leukemic phase: extraordinarily high white blood cell count.
  • Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a distinct type of T/null-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that commonly involves nodal and extranodal sites.
  • The World Health Organization of lymphoid neoplasms recognizes two types: anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive or ALK negative, the former as a result of abnormalities involving the ALK gene at chromosome 2p23.
  • Patients with ALCL rarely develop a leukemic phase of disease, either at the time of initial presentation or during the clinical course.
  • Described herein is a patient with ALK+ ALCL, small cell variant, associated with the t(2;5)(p23;q35), who initially presented with leukemic involvement and an extraordinarily high leukocyte count of 529 x 10(9)/L, which subsequently peaked at 587 x 10(9)/L.
  • Despite chemotherapy the patient died 2(1/2) months after diagnosis.
  • In the literature review 20 well-documented cases are identified of ALCL in leukemic phase reported previously, with a WBC ranging from 15 to 151 x 10(9)/L.
  • Leukemic phase of ALCL occurs almost exclusively in patients with ALK+ ALCL, most often associated with the small cell variant and the t(2;5)(p23;q35), similar to the present case.
  • Patients with leukemic phase ALK+ ALCL appear to have a poorer prognosis than most patients with ALK+ ALCL.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / blood. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Chromosome Aberrations. Flow Cytometry. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence. Leukocyte Count. Male. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / metabolism. Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

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  • (PMID = 19432678.001).
  • [ISSN] 1440-1827
  • [Journal-full-title] Pathology international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathol. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / anaplastic lymphoma kinase
  • [Number-of-references] 19
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83. Au WY, Yeung CK, Chan HH, Wong RW, Shek TW: CD30-positive cutaneous T-cell lymphoma with concurrent solid tumour. Br J Dermatol; 2002 Jun;146(6):1091-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] CD30-positive cutaneous T-cell lymphoma with concurrent solid tumour.
  • Extranodal CD30+ T-cell lymphomas seldom carry classical t(2;5) translocation and are usually anaplastic large cell lymphoma kinase protein negative.
  • The prognosis of CD30+ cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is good in the absence of nodal primary or disseminated disease.
  • Although an increased incidence of solid tumours has been reported in patients with CD30+ non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the skin, reports of concurrent malignancies are rare in CD30+ CTCL.
  • We report two patients with CD30+ CTCL who, respectively, had concurrent disseminated gastric carcinoma and bilateral ovarian teratoma.
  • The CTCL responded completely to chemotherapy in one patient, who eventually succumbed to gastric cancer.
  • A possible relationship between the lymphoma and the solid tumours is discussed.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD30 / analysis. Antigens, Neoplasm / analysis. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / immunology. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / immunology. Skin Neoplasms / immunology. Stomach Neoplasms / immunology. Uterine Neoplasms / immunology


84. Iwamizu-Watanabe S, Yamashita Y, Yatabe Y, Nakamura S, Mori N: Frequent expression of CD30 antigen in the primary gastric non-B, non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Pathol Int; 2004 Jul;54(7):503-9
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  • [Title] Frequent expression of CD30 antigen in the primary gastric non-B, non-Hodgkin lymphomas.
  • Most primary gastric lymphomas are of B-cell origin.
  • Fourteen cases of primary gastric non-B, non-Hodgkin lymphomas were studied to evaluate their clinicopathological and immunophenotypic findings.
  • The cases were comprised of 11 men and three women, with a median age of 56.5 years.
  • Most patients underwent surgery either with or without chemotherapy, exhibiting a 5 year survival rate of 57.5%.
  • Morphologically, the neoplastic cells showed various histological features, such as anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) (n = 3), peripheral T-cell lymphoma, unspecified, large (n = 4), medium-sized (n = 2) and mixed cell (n = 5).
  • Two cases displayed a non-B, non-T cell phenotype, whereas the remaining cases displayed a T-cell phenotype.
  • The neoplastic cells were CD30+ in 10 cases.
  • TIA-1 was positive in six cases.
  • In one case, anaplastic large cell lymphoma kinase (ALK) was identified with immunostaining and chromosomal rearrangement of ALK was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).
  • In conclusion, although the mechanism of CD30 expression is unknown, primary gastric non-B, non-Hodgkin lymphomas tend to express CD30.
  • We consider that some of the cases in the present study may be derived from cytotoxic T cells, similar to systemic and cutaneous ALCL, the majority of which exhibit TIA-1.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD30 / metabolism. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / metabolism. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / metabolism. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral / metabolism. Stomach Neoplasms / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 15189504.001).
  • [ISSN] 1320-5463
  • [Journal-full-title] Pathology international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathol. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD30
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85. Garner R, Li Y, Gray B, Zori R, Braylan R, Wall J, Hunger SP: Long-term disease control of refractory anaplastic large cell lymphoma with vinblastine. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2009 Feb;31(2):145-7
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  • [Title] Long-term disease control of refractory anaplastic large cell lymphoma with vinblastine.
  • Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a unique clinical and pathologic subtype of lymphoma characterized by the proliferation of large, highly pleomorphic CD30-positive cells.
  • Overall 70% to 80% of children with ALCL are cured with modern chemotherapy regimens, but the disease is often resistant to multiple therapies after relapse.
  • Single agent vinblastine therapy has been effective in some cases of refractory ALCL.
  • We report a case of ALCL originally diagnosed in an 8-year-old girl.
  • After relapse, the disease was refractory to multiagent chemotherapy, but has showed remarkable response to, and dependence on, single agent vinblastine treatment for almost 7 years.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / drug therapy. Vinblastine / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Child. Female. Humans. Recurrence. Remission Induction / methods. Salvage Therapy

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  • (PMID = 19194204.001).
  • [ISSN] 1536-3678
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine
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86. Bang SM, Kim YK, Park YH, Sohn SK, Lee JJ, Cho EK, Ryoo BY, Chung IJ, Yoon SS, Kim HJ, Lee JH, Yoon HJ, Park S: High-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation in Korean patients with aggressive T/NK-cell lymphoma. Leuk Lymphoma; 2005 Nov;46(11):1599-1604
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  • [Title] High-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation in Korean patients with aggressive T/NK-cell lymphoma.
  • The proportion of aggressive T/NK-cell lymphoma in Korea is larger than in the West, and it shows a lower response to conventional chemotherapy and poorer survival than diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
  • This study was undertaken to evaluate the response rate and survival and to document the prognostic factors in patients with T/NK-cell lymphoma who have undergone high-dose therapy (HDT).
  • Eligibility for the study was a mature T/NK-cell lymphoma with initially poor risk (as high or high intermediate risk on age-adjusted International Prognostic Index) or relapsed cases.
  • Twelve patients had unspecified peripheral T-cell lymphomas, 7 anaplastic large-cell lymphomas, 6 nasal T/NK-cell lymphomas, and 3 angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas.
  • Disease status at transplant were initially poor risk in 15, chemosensitive relapse in 8 and chemo-resistant relapse in 5 patients, respectively.
  • Absolute neutrophil count ( > 500/microl) recovered at a median 11 days after autologous stem cell transplantation in 26 patients.
  • Two therapy-related mortalities occurred.
  • Estimated 3-year event-free survival and overall survival (OS) (+/- SE) were 24+/- 9 and 42+/- 10 months, respectively.
  • Therefore, an initial approach with effective induction and HDT may result in a better outcome in T/NK-cell lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. Killer Cells, Natural / pathology. Lymphoma, T-Cell / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Female. Graft Survival. Humans. Korea. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Recurrence. Remission Induction. Retrospective Studies. Salvage Therapy / methods. Survival Analysis. Transplantation, Autologous

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  • (PMID = 16334486.001).
  • [ISSN] 1042-8194
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia & lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] England
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87. Perez K, Castillo J, Dezube BJ, Pantanowitz L: Human Immunodeficiency Virus-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Leuk Lymphoma; 2010 Mar;51(3):430-8
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  • [Title] Human Immunodeficiency Virus-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma.
  • Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a distinct subtype of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) characterized by the expression of CD30 in lymphoma cells.
  • Like aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, the risk of developing PTCL is also increased in the setting of HIV infection.
  • To date, the occurrence of ALCL in HIV-positive individuals is limited to a few case reports and small case series.
  • A total of 37 cases of HIV-associated ALCL were identified after reviewing the available published literature.
  • Analysis of these cases showed that this group of HIV-infected patients was on average 38 years of age with a male-to-female ratio of 4:1, and a reported median CD4 cell count of 83 cells/mm(3).
  • HIV-associated ALCL cells rarely expressed anaplastic lymphoma kinase.
  • These lymphomas manifested almost exclusively with extranodal involvement and exhibited a very aggressive clinical course.
  • The administration of chemotherapy and early stages at presentation were identified as good prognostic factors, while the use of HAART showed a statistical trend toward improved survival in HIV-associated ALCL.
  • [MeSH-major] HIV Infections / complications. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / pathology. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / virology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Antigens, CD30 / biosynthesis. CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes / metabolism. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis


88. Kelten C, Kabukcu S, Sen N, Teke Z, Yaren A, Erdem E, Duzcan E: Secondary involvement of the breast in T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, an unusual example mimicking inflammatory breast carcinoma. Arch Gynecol Obstet; 2009 Jul;280(1):149-52
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  • [Title] Secondary involvement of the breast in T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, an unusual example mimicking inflammatory breast carcinoma.
  • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the breast is a rare malignancy and present with almost equal frequency either as a primary or a secondary disease.
  • Survival is poor in most cases of secondary breast lymphoma because of their advanced stage.
  • The histologic and immunohistochemical features were diagnosed as an ALK (-) anaplastic large cell lymphoma.
  • A Computed Tomography examination was performed for staging the lymphoma and then chemotherapy was started.
  • Thirty months after the diagnosis, the patient is still alive with disease.
  • Because of the presence of systemic symptoms such as skin involvement and generalized lymphadenopathies (mediastinal, axillary or cervical), T cell lymphoma cases with breast involvement could mimic the clinical presentation of inflammatory breast carcinoma.
  • Pathologic examination is needed for the correct diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / secondary. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Mammography. Neoplasm Staging. Tomography, X-Ray Computed


89. Rodig SJ, Shapiro GI: Crizotinib, a small-molecule dual inhibitor of the c-Met and ALK receptor tyrosine kinases. Curr Opin Investig Drugs; 2010 Dec;11(12):1477-90
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  • Crizotinib (PF-02341066), under development by Pfizer, is an orally bioavailable, ATP-competitive, small-molecule inhibitor of the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) c-Met (also known as hepatocyte growth factor receptor) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), for the potential treatment of cancers dependent on these oncogenic kinases for growth and survival.
  • Since the first published characterizations of crizotinib only a few years ago, the drug has been extensively validated as a highly specific inhibitor of c-Met and ALK among > 120 different RTKs surveyed.
  • In preclinical tumor xenograft studies, crizotinib inhibited the growth and survival of cell lines dependent upon c-Met or ALK enzymatic activity.
  • Crizotinib has been particularly effective against anaplastic large cell lymphoma and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines that harbor ALK translocations resulting in expression of oncogenic ALK fusion proteins.
  • At the time of publication, an ongoing phase III clinical trial is comparing crizotinib with standard second-line chemotherapy in previously treated patients with NSCLC harboring ALK rearrangement, and a phase III trial comparing crizotinib with standard chemotherapy in the first-line setting in non-squamous lung cancer is planned.
  • Thus, in the future, crizotinib is expected to become a highly used therapeutic for the treatment of ALK-rearranged tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-met / antagonists & inhibitors. Pyrazoles / therapeutic use. Pyridines / therapeutic use. Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line, Tumor. Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Approval. Drug Evaluation, Preclinical. Humans

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  • (PMID = 21154129.001).
  • [ISSN] 2040-3429
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in investigational drugs (London, England : 2000)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Investig Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Pyrazoles; 0 / Pyridines; 53AH36668S / crizotinib; EC 2.7.10.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-met; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / anaplastic lymphoma kinase
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90. Thuilliez C, Watrelot-Virieux D, Chanut F, Fournel-Fleury C, Ponce F, Marchal T: Presumed primary muscular lymphoma in a dog. J Vet Diagn Invest; 2008 Nov;20(6):824-6
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  • [Title] Presumed primary muscular lymphoma in a dog.
  • A case of presumed primary muscular lymphoma in an 8-year-old, intact, male Newfoundland dog is reported.
  • Fine-needle aspiration of the mass revealed anaplastic large cell lymphoma.
  • Despite chemotherapy, health status declined and the animal was euthanized a few weeks later.
  • Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma, which showed a strong muscular tropism.
  • Immunohistochemical staining revealed neoplastic cell reactivity for cluster of differentiation 3 (CD3) and Ki-67 antigens (70% and 90%, respectively).
  • The presumed histological diagnosis in this dog was primary muscular anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Dog Diseases / pathology. Lymphoma / veterinary. Muscle Neoplasms / veterinary

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  • (PMID = 18987239.001).
  • [ISSN] 1040-6387
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of veterinary diagnostic investigation : official publication of the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Vet. Diagn. Invest.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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91. Tirelli U, Spina M, Jaeger U, Nigra E, Blanc PL, Liberati AM, Benci A, Sparano JA: Infusional CDE with rituximab for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: preliminary results of a phase I/II study. Recent Results Cancer Res; 2002;159:149-53
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  • [Title] Infusional CDE with rituximab for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: preliminary results of a phase I/II study.
  • iCDE) is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic regimen for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), with a complete remission rate of 46% and a median overall survival of 8.2 months (Sparano JA, Blood 1993; 81:2810).
  • Since the majority of HIV-associated NHL are CD20-positive we reasoned that the addition of rituximab to iCDE (R-iCDE) could also improve the poor outcome of these patients.
  • Characteristics of 29 evaluable patients were: median age: 38 years (range 29-65 years); male sex 24/29; histology: DLCL 16 (55%), Burkitt 10 (35%), ALCL 2 (7%), unclassified 1 (3%); stage: I (35%), II (10%), III (10%), IV (45%); International Prognostic Index: 0, 1 (59%), 2 (24%), 3 (17%), 4, 5 (0); CD4 count: median 132/ mm3 (range 3-470/mm3).
  • All patients were treated with G-CSF and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).
  • Twenty-six of 29 patients received treatment as planned, while chemotherapy had to be discontinued in three patients (2 persistent thrombocytopenias, 1 cerebral hemorrhage).
  • Ten percent had progressive disease.
  • The high complete remission rate also indicates a potential therapeutic benefit and warrants further randomized trials.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cyclophosphamide / therapeutic use. Doxorubicin / therapeutic use. Etoposide / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Disease-Free Survival. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Middle Aged. Rituximab. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11785839.001).
  • [ISSN] 0080-0015
  • [Journal-full-title] Recent results in cancer research. Fortschritte der Krebsforschung. Progrès dans les recherches sur le cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Recent Results Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase I; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; ACE protocol 1
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92. zur Nieden NI, Baumgartner L: Assessing developmental osteotoxicity of chlorides in the embryonic stem cell test. Reprod Toxicol; 2010 Sep;30(2):277-83
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  • [Title] Assessing developmental osteotoxicity of chlorides in the embryonic stem cell test.
  • This study employs the embryonic stem cell test to unambiguously characterize the effect of four chlorides with increasing valence, NaCl, LiCl, MgCl(2) and AlCl(3), utilizing the capacity of murine embryonic stem cells to differentiate into bone forming cells in vitro.
  • Contrasting cytotoxicity of these chlorides to the inhibition of osteogenic differentiation assayed with a quantitative calcium assay and morphometric image analysis, we suggest here a potential negative effect on fetal bone development for all four chlorides.
  • Although this effect was clearer for AlCl(3) than for the other tested chlorides, we suggest extreme caution should still be given when administering any chloride during pregnancy.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone and Bones / drug effects. Chlorides / toxicity. Embryonic Stem Cells / drug effects. Osteoblasts / drug effects. Teratogens / toxicity
  • [MeSH-minor] Animal Testing Alternatives / methods. Animals. Cell Differentiation / drug effects. Cell Line. Cell Survival / drug effects. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Mice. Osteogenesis / drug effects. Osteogenesis / physiology

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  • [Copyright] Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • (PMID = 20447454.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-1708
  • [Journal-full-title] Reproductive toxicology (Elmsford, N.Y.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Reprod. Toxicol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Chlorides; 0 / Teratogens
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93. Braschoss S, Hirsch B, Dübel S, Stein H, Dürkop H: New anti-CD30 human pancreatic ribonuclease-based immunotoxin reveals strong and specific cytotoxicity in vivo. Leuk Lymphoma; 2007 Jun;48(6):1179-86
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  • [Title] New anti-CD30 human pancreatic ribonuclease-based immunotoxin reveals strong and specific cytotoxicity in vivo.
  • Although the therapy of Hodgkin lymphoma and anaplastic large cell lymphoma has been considerably improved during the last decades, high therapeutic toxicity, relapses, secondary tumors, and primary treatment failure(s) occur.
  • Both malignancies are well suited for CD30-targeted immunotherapy because of their strong CD30 expression.
  • We constructed an immunotoxin composed of a single chain variable fragment of a CD30 antibody fused to the human pancreatic ribonuclease, showing CD30-specific binding and ribonucleolytic activity resistant to the inhibitor RNasin.
  • This immunotoxin revealed CD30-specific anti-tumor activity in BALB/c mice that were challenged with CD30-positive or CD30-negative syngeneic tumor cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD30 / immunology. Cytotoxins / pharmacology. Immunotoxins / pharmacology. Ribonuclease, Pancreatic / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antibody Specificity. Cell Line. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Drosophila melanogaster. Female. Humans. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Neoplasm Transplantation / pathology. Protein Binding. Recombinant Fusion Proteins / immunology. Recombinant Fusion Proteins / isolation & purification. Recombinant Fusion Proteins / metabolism. Transplantation, Isogeneic / pathology. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • [CommentIn] Leuk Lymphoma. 2007 Jun;48(6):1067-9 [17577767.001]
  • (PMID = 17577782.001).
  • [ISSN] 1042-8194
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia & lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD30; 0 / Cytotoxins; 0 / Immunotoxins; 0 / Recombinant Fusion Proteins; EC 3.1.27.5 / Ribonuclease, Pancreatic
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94. Szomor A, Al Saati T, Delsol G, Kereskai L, Szijártó Z, Losonczy H: Primary bone marrow T-cell anaplastic large cell lymphoma with triple M gradient. Pathol Oncol Res; 2007;13(3):260-2
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  • [Title] Primary bone marrow T-cell anaplastic large cell lymphoma with triple M gradient.
  • We present a case of a 60-year-old male patient with primary bone marrow anaplastic large cell lymphoma.
  • Bone marrow biopsy showed massive CD30-positive, ALK-negative large lymphoid cell infiltration of T-cell origin with anaplastic morphology.
  • PCR analysis of lymphoid cells separated from the bone marrow demonstrated the presence of a B/T hybrid genotype disorder with no evidence of the t(2;5), nor t(1;2) translocations.
  • The patient entered a period of remission following CHOP chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Marrow Neoplasms / diagnosis. Bone Marrow Neoplasms / immunology. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / immunology. T-Lymphocytes / immunology


95. Lin XB, Jiang WQ, Zhong XY, Luo RZ: [Expression and clinical significance of Mcl-1 in T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma]. Ai Zheng; 2007 Apr;26(4):435-9
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  • [Title] [Expression and clinical significance of Mcl-1 in T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma].
  • BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: The prognosis of T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (T-NHL) is poor.
  • Overexpression of myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) gene could inhibit irradiation-and drug-induced apoptosis in several lymphoma cell lines.
  • The clinical features, treatments, and outcomes of the T-NHL patients were analyzed retrospectively.
  • RESULTS: The weak positive rates of Mcl-1 were 44.4% in precursor T lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL), 0% in anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma (ALCL), and 18.9% in other peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTL); the positive rates were 0%, 100%, and 49.1%, respectively (P<0.001).
  • Weak diffuse cytoplasmic staining of Mcl-1 was detected in T-LBL, and strong cytoplasmic staining with perinuclear accentuation was detected in ALCL.
  • The overall survival time was significantly longer in the PTL patients with high Mcl-1 expression than in the PTL patients with weak/negative Mcl-1 expression (>32 months vs. 15 months, P=0.007), and longer in the T-LBL patients without Mcl-1 expression than in the T-LBL patients with weak Mcl-1 expression (21 months vs. 7 months, P=0.58).
  • It is specifically highly expressed in ALCL.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / metabolism. Lymphoma, T-Cell / metabolism. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Child. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Humans. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral / drug therapy. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral / metabolism. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Myeloid Cell Leukemia Sequence 1 Protein. Neoplasm Staging. Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / drug therapy. Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / metabolism. Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / pathology. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 17430669.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Ai zheng = Aizheng = Chinese journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ai Zheng
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Myeloid Cell Leukemia Sequence 1 Protein; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2
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96. Leong MY, English M, McMullan D, Ramani P: Aberrant expression of beta-HCG in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Pediatr Dev Pathol; 2008 May-Jun;11(3):230-4
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  • [Title] Aberrant expression of beta-HCG in anaplastic large cell lymphoma.
  • We report a case of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) showing aberrant expression of beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotrophin (beta-HCG).
  • The patient was a 14-year-old boy who presented with a right inguinal mass and a raised serum beta-HCG level.
  • Biopsy of the mass revealed a malignant neoplasm composed of large, pleomorphic cells with prominent nucleoli.
  • These malignant cells showed positive staining with CD30, ALK, epithelial membrane antigen, and beta-HCG.
  • Chromosomal analysis showed t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocation, and polymerase chain reaction demonstrated T-cell receptor gene rearrangement.
  • The patient did not respond well to chemotherapy, and he died 8 months after the diagnosis.
  • To the best of our knowledge, this is the 1st case of ALCL showing aberrant expression of beta-HCG and associated with a raised serum level of beta-HCG.
  • [MeSH-major] Chorionic Gonadotropin, beta Subunit, Human / biosynthesis. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / metabolism. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic. Diagnosis, Differential. Fatal Outcome. Gene Rearrangement, T-Lymphocyte. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence. Male. Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal / pathology. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Translocation, Genetic

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  • (PMID = 17990918.001).
  • [ISSN] 1093-5266
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric and developmental pathology : the official journal of the Society for Pediatric Pathology and the Paediatric Pathology Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr. Dev. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Chorionic Gonadotropin, beta Subunit, Human
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97. Mora J, Filippa DA, Thaler HT, Polyak T, Cranor ML, Wollner N: Large cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma of childhood: Analysis of 78 consecutive patients enrolled in 2 consecutive protocols at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Cancer; 2000 Jan 1;88(1):186-97
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  • [Title] Large cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma of childhood: Analysis of 78 consecutive patients enrolled in 2 consecutive protocols at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.
  • BACKGROUND: The authors report a study of pediatric patients with advanced diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL) who were treated with 2 consecutive regimens, LSA2-L2 and LSA4, over a 25-year-period at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.
  • They also describe a comparative analysis of two subgroups retrospectively identified as having CD30 positive (+) anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and CD30 negative (-) DLCL.
  • Immunophenotypic data were obtained retrospectively for 52 patients using a panel of monoclonal antibodies against CD30, CD15, CD45, CD45Ro, CD43, epithelial membrane antigen, CD5, BCL-2, cyclin-D, and p53.
  • RESULTS: A disease free survival rate of 72% in patients with advanced stage DLCL using the LSA2-L2 and LSA4 regimens.
  • Of the 78 treated patients, 56 are alive and without evidence of disease with a median follow-up of 120 months (range, 24-312 months).
  • The recurrence rate was significantly higher in the CD30+ ALCL subgroup (33%) than in the CD30- DLCL group (0.04%).
  • Of 52 patients for whom immunophenotypic data were available, 28 had disease of B-cell lineage, 24 had disease of T-cell/null phenotype, 19 were CD30+ (36.
  • 5%), 18 had disease of T-cell phenotype, and 1 had disease of B-cell lineage.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The CD30- DLCL cases mostly were of B-cell lineage, had a small risk of treatment failure, and did not develop a recurrence off therapy.
  • A distinct clinical pattern was identified for the CD30+ ALCL group; although these tumors were of T-cell lineage and had a significantly higher rate of late recurrences (median follow-up of 24 months) they all were salvageable.
  • Based on the findings of the current study, the authors propose that T-cell CD30+ ALCL be addressed in the future according to equal dose intensity regimens in induction therapy, as is done for B-cell lymphomas; prolonged periods of maintenance chemotherapy, as is done for T-cell lymphoblastic lymphomas; and no central nervous system prophylaxis beyond the induction period unless other recognized risk factors are present.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Biomarkers, Tumor. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease-Free Survival. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Incidence. Infant. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Neoplasms, Second Primary / complications. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome


98. Dearden CE, Foss FM: Peripheral T-cell lymphomas: diagnosis and management. Hematol Oncol Clin North Am; 2003 Dec;17(6):1351-66
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  • [Title] Peripheral T-cell lymphomas: diagnosis and management.
  • Peripheral T-cell lymphomas are a diverse group of diseases with varying clinical manifestations.
  • Response to conventional chemotherapy generally is poor.
  • Treatment using purine analogs has achieved response rates between 25% and 60% in relapsed/refractory patients, with minimal toxicity.
  • Using purine analogs in combination therapy may improve response rates, albeit with an increased risk of toxicity.
  • The role of purine analogs as first line therapy in patients who have otherwise favorable prognostic factors has not been defined.
  • Monoclonal antibody therapy has emerged in the last decade as a promising approach in treating T-cell malignancies.
  • Campath-1H is an effective and well-tolerated therapy in these diseases.
  • Durable remissions have been seen in heavily pretreated patients and in up to two thirds of patients who had T-PLL, which is the largest disease group studied.
  • These results in T-PLL are significantly better than those reported with other therapies; this suggests that Campath-1H should be moved to first line therapy in this aggressive disease.
  • The way in which monoclonal antibodies work indicate that they may be particularly useful in treating patients who have minimal residual disease, and, in this setting, facilitate stem cell transplantation.
  • These approaches may be worth further investigation in patients who have T-cell lymphomas.
  • None of the therapies that are available to treat the mature T-cell neoplasms seems to be curative, other than in selected patients who have favorable ALCL.
  • There is a need for larger, prospective, randomized trials to examine these novel therapies and to further explore combination regimens, which may exploit potential synergism.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Chromosome Aberrations. Chromosomes, Human / genetics. Chromosomes, Human / ultrastructure. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Neoplastic Stem Cells / pathology. Prognosis. T-Lymphocyte Subsets / pathology

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  • (PMID = 14710889.001).
  • [ISSN] 0889-8588
  • [Journal-full-title] Hematology/oncology clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hematol. Oncol. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 58
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99. Gotoh M, Kitahara T, Iguchi T, Izumi M, Mukai K, Ohyashiki K: [HIV-related multiple non-Hodgkin lymphomas]. Rinsho Ketsueki; 2008 Nov;49(11):1552-5
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  • [Title] [HIV-related multiple non-Hodgkin lymphomas].
  • He was HIV-positive, and had gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and renal T-cell anaplastic large cell lymphoma (T-ALCL).
  • We diagnosed double lymphomas related to AIDS.
  • The patient received anti-retroviral therapy, and started the CHOP regimen for the double lymphomas, resulting in transient improvement.
  • However, fever again appeared during HAART and CHOP treatment, and a right inguinal subcutaneous lesion appeared.
  • Biopsy specimen demonstrated null cell ALCL, and this patient demonstrated multiple lymphomas.
  • This case suggested that cancer generation was promoted by low immunity, although it is known that ambivalent tumors such as non-Hodgkin lymphomas can occur frequently.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / diagnosis. Lymphoma, B-Cell / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic / diagnosis. Lymphoma, T-Cell / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary. Stomach Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Humans. Kidney Neoplasms / diagnosis. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lymphocytes, Null. Male. Prednisolone / administration & dosage. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 19047787.001).
  • [ISSN] 0485-1439
  • [Journal-full-title] [Rinshō ketsueki] The Japanese journal of clinical hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rinsho Ketsueki
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone; VAP-cyclo protocol
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100. Wahl AF, Klussman K, Thompson JD, Chen JH, Francisco LV, Risdon G, Chace DF, Siegall CB, Francisco JA: The anti-CD30 monoclonal antibody SGN-30 promotes growth arrest and DNA fragmentation in vitro and affects antitumor activity in models of Hodgkin's disease. Cancer Res; 2002 Jul 1;62(13):3736-42
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  • [Title] The anti-CD30