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1. Veras E, Srodon M, Neijstrom ES, Ronnett BM: Metastatic HPV-related cervical adenocarcinomas presenting with thromboembolic events (Trousseau Syndrome): clinicopathologic characteristics of 2 cases. Int J Gynecol Pathol; 2009 Mar;28(2):134-9
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  • The first patient, age 36, presented with bilateral lower extremity deep vein thromboses, pulmonary embolism, and supraclavicular and cervical lymphadenopathy.
  • Acute renal and respiratory failure developed and the patient expired shortly after initiation of chemotherapy, 7 weeks after presentation.
  • Autopsy examination revealed widespread metastatic adenocarcinoma with a 2 cm cervical adenocarcinoma.
  • She developed progressive venous thrombosis despite anticoagulation.
  • Progressive thromboembolic disease with acute renal failure and multiple cerebral infarcts developed and the patient expired shortly after initiation of chemotherapy, 2 months after presentation.
  • HPV DNA was detected by in situ hybridization in the lymph node metastasis in the first case and in the cervical and ovarian tumor specimens in the second case.
  • These features more commonly suggest metastatic adenocarcinoma of upper gastrointestinal tract origin but the presence of HPV DNA within the tumors establishes them as cervical in origin.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / complications. Papillomavirus Infections / complications. Thromboembolism / etiology. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / complications

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  • (PMID = 19188822.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-7151
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of gynecological pathology : official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Pathologists
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Gynecol. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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2. Lai CH, Chi CY, Chen HP, Chen TL, Lai CJ, Fung CP, Yu KW, Wong WW, Liu CY: Clinical characteristics and prognostic factors of patients with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteremia. J Microbiol Immunol Infect; 2004 Dec;37(6):350-8
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  • Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an important nosocomial pathogen with intrinsic multi-drug resistance.
  • This retrospective study reviewed 84 episodes of S. maltophilia bacteremia over a 4-year period from July 1999 to September 2003.
  • Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteremia was hospital-acquired in 64 patients (76%), and developed after prolonged hospitalization in 48 (57%).
  • Seventy patients (83%) had a central venous catheter (CVC), 64 (76%) had prior antibiotic therapy, 55 (65%) had underlying malignancy, and 43 (51%) were receiving immunosuppressive therapy.
  • The most common sources of bacteremia were respiratory tract (33%) and CVC (31%), while the source of the bacteremia was unknown in 26% of episodes.
  • The most effective antibiotics in vitro were trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, and ceftazidime; however, a trend of increasing drug resistance in these agents was identified over the study period.
  • On univariate analysis, nosocomial bacteremia, long-lasting neutropnenia (>10 days), bacteremia originating from the respiratory tract, shock, low serum albumin level (<3 g/dL), and thrombocytopenia (platelet count <100,000/mm3) were significantly related to mortality (p<0.05).
  • In contrast, patients with CVC-related bacteremia had a lower mortality rate (odds ratio, 0.04; p<0.001).
  • Patients treated with appropriate antibiotics had a lower mortality rate, but this difference was not significant (p=0.477).
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Bacteremia / drug therapy. Bacteremia / mortality. Catheterization, Central Venous / adverse effects. Neoplasms / complications. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections / drug therapy. Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections / microbiology. Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections / mortality. Hospitalization. Humans. Male. Microbial Sensitivity Tests. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Risk Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15599467.001).
  • [ISSN] 1684-1182
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of microbiology, immunology, and infection = Wei mian yu gan ran za zhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Microbiol Immunol Infect
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China (Republic : 1949- )
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents
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3. Mitrokhin SD: [Itraconazole (Orungal) in the treatment of mycotic infections in oncologic patients]. Antibiot Khimioter; 2003;48(2):16-21
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  • [Title] [Itraconazole (Orungal) in the treatment of mycotic infections in oncologic patients].
  • Clinical and microbiological activity of itraconazole (Orungal, solution for oral use, "Janssen-Cilag") for treatment of oncological patients with inhospital infections associated with candida was evaluated.
  • The trial included 50 patients with oncological pathology of respiratory tract, as representatives of risk group for candida contamination.
  • Patients in control group were treated by fluconazole (Diflazon, "KRKA") according to standard therapy regime.
  • Treatment with amphotericin B was effective at all 4 patients treated with this antibiotic, microbiological effect was demonstrated for 3 patients of the group.
  • The course price was also significantly lower at itraconazole group.
  • All this data are important for elaboration of optimal pharmaco economic policy regarding inhospital infections at critical care units.

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  • (PMID = 12803046.001).
  • [ISSN] 0235-2990
  • [Journal-full-title] Antibiotiki i khimioterapiia = Antibiotics and chemoterapy [sic]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Antibiot. Khimioter.
  • [Language] RUS
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antifungal Agents; 0 / Pharmaceutical Solutions; 304NUG5GF4 / Itraconazole
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4. Fleischmann RM, Tesser J, Schiff MH, Schechtman J, Burmester GR, Bennett R, Modafferi D, Zhou L, Bell D, Appleton B: Safety of extended treatment with anakinra in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Ann Rheum Dis; 2006 Aug;65(8):1006-12
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  • [Title] Safety of extended treatment with anakinra in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.
  • METHODS: A six month, randomised, double blind phase comparing anakinra (100 mg/day) with placebo was followed by open label anakinra treatment for up to three years in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Concomitant non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, and other disease modifying antirheumatic drugs were permitted.
  • Patients had varying levels of disease severity, concomitant drug use, and comorbid conditions.
  • Cumulative, exposure adjusted event (EAE) rates for all adverse events (AEs), serious AEs, and deaths were similar during each year of anakinra treatment; the overall rate (0 to 3 years) was similar to that observed for controls during the blinded phase.
  • The most frequent AEs were injection site reactions (122.26 events/100 patient-years), rheumatoid arthritis progression (67.80 events/100 patient-years), and upper respiratory infections (26.09 events/100 patient-years).
  • However, if the patient was not receiving corticosteroid treatment at baseline, the serious infection rate was substantially lower (2.87 event/100 patient-years).
  • Neutralising antibodies developed in 25 patients, but appeared to be transient in 12; neutralising antibody status did not appear related to occurrence of malignancies or serious infections.
  • [MeSH-major] Antirheumatic Agents / adverse effects. Arthritis, Rheumatoid / drug therapy. Sialoglycoproteins / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antibodies / blood. Double-Blind Method. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Glucocorticoids / therapeutic use. Humans. Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasms / complications. Neoplasms / mortality. Respiratory Tract Infections / complications. Respiratory Tract Infections / mortality. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16396977.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-4967
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of the rheumatic diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Rheum. Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies; 0 / Antirheumatic Agents; 0 / Glucocorticoids; 0 / IL1RN protein, human; 0 / Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein; 0 / Sialoglycoproteins
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1798263
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5. Hohenthal U, Nikoskelainen J, Vainionpää R, Peltonen R, Routamaa M, Itälä M, Kotilainen P: Parainfluenza virus type 3 infections in a hematology unit. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2001 Feb;27(3):295-300
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  • [Title] Parainfluenza virus type 3 infections in a hematology unit.
  • Parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) is associated with a high mortality rate in BMT recipients with lower respiratory tract infections.
  • Four patients with infiltrates on chest radiograph received intravenous ribavirin therapy; all survived.
  • (1) nasopharyngeal samples for antigen detection were obtained from all patients presenting with respiratory symptoms;.
  • Our experience shows that it may be possible to avoid mortality for PIV3 lower respiratory tract infection in immunocompromised patients by early commencement of intravenous ribavirin.
  • [MeSH-major] Cross Infection / etiology. Hematologic Neoplasms / complications. Hospital Units / standards. Paramyxoviridae Infections / transmission
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antigens, Viral / analysis. Female. Finland. Follow-Up Studies. Hematology. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / adverse effects. Humans. Immunocompromised Host. Male. Middle Aged. Parainfluenza Virus 3, Human / drug effects. Parainfluenza Virus 3, Human / immunology. Ribavirin / administration & dosage. Ribavirin / standards

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  • [CommentIn] Bone Marrow Transplant. 2002 Mar;29(6):541-2 [11960279.001]
  • (PMID = 11277177.001).
  • [ISSN] 0268-3369
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, Viral; 49717AWG6K / Ribavirin
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6. Lin HW, Richmon JD, Emerick KS, de Venecia RK, Zeitels SM, Faquin WC, Lin DT: Malignant transformation of a highly aggressive human papillomavirus type 11-associated recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. Am J Otolaryngol; 2010 Jul-Aug;31(4):291-6
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  • [Title] Malignant transformation of a highly aggressive human papillomavirus type 11-associated recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.
  • OBJECTIVE: The objective is to present an uncommon case of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising from extensive recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) involving the upper and lower airway and temporal bone.
  • METHODS: We describe a case of a 24-year-old woman with a history of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 11 since childhood originating in the larynx and trachea, then progressing to involve the distal pulmonary alveoli and right middle ear through the eustachian tube.
  • Papillomatous growth was treated with multiple surgeries including laser cytoreduction of laryngotracheal papillomatosis and radical mastoidectomy, followed by a trial of chemotherapy.
  • Despite this aggressive treatment regimen, papillomatous growth progressed with recurrence in the right eustachian tube, middle ear, and mastoid eventually extending to involve the calvaria and scalp.
  • RESULTS: The patient underwent a composite resection of involved tissues, including the scalp, auricle, and lateral temporal bone, with reconstruction using a latissimus dorsi free flap.
  • A review of the literature on aggressive respiratory papillomatosis suggests that malignant transformation of juvenile-onset RRP occurs exclusively in cases positive for HPV-11.
  • Although the incidence of juvenile-onset RRP transformation to SCC is very low, the presence of HPV-11 as a risk factor for malignant transformation of RRP is becoming evident.
  • [MeSH-major] Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / pathology. Human papillomavirus 11. Papilloma / pathology. Respiratory Tract Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnosis, Differential. Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Young Adult

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20015762.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-818X
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of otolaryngology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Otolaryngol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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7. Lu Q, Huang LS, Zhang R, Xu GB, Zhao XY: [Following-up of nosocomial lower respiratory infection in patients with hematological malignancy after chemotherapy]. Zhonghua Yu Fang Yi Xue Za Zhi; 2008 Feb;42(2):123-6
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  • [Title] [Following-up of nosocomial lower respiratory infection in patients with hematological malignancy after chemotherapy].
  • OBJECTIVE: To observe and investigate the risk factors and pathogen diversification of nosocomial lower respiratory infections in patients with hematological malignancy after chemotherapy.
  • METHODS: Respiratory tract microbial population of fifty patients with different kinds of hematological malignancy and para-prepared to chemotherapy was quantitatively analyzed before and after chemotherapy at an arranged time from April, 2004 to December, 2005.
  • RESULTS: Incidence rate of lower respiratory infections in patients with the hematological malignant after chemotherapy was 16%.
  • CONCLUSION: Following-up of nosocomial lower respiratory infection in patients with hematological malignancy after chemotherapy might offer theoretical evidence for the rational use of antibiotics and the control of nosocomial infections.
  • [MeSH-major] Cross Infection / epidemiology. Hematologic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Opportunistic Infections / epidemiology. Respiratory Tract Infections / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Acinetobacter baumannii / drug effects. Acinetobacter baumannii / isolation & purification. Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Escherichia / drug effects. Escherichia / isolation & purification. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Leukocyte Count. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 18642667.001).
  • [ISSN] 0253-9624
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua yu fang yi xue za zhi [Chinese journal of preventive medicine]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Yu Fang Yi Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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8. Sharma S, White D, Imondi AR, Placke ME, Vail DM, Kris MG: Development of inhalational agents for oncologic use. J Clin Oncol; 2001 Mar 15;19(6):1839-47
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  • Because regional chemotherapy has been useful in treatment and palliation of many cancer types, the concept of delivering drugs by inhalation for the treatment of cancers in the lung is attractive.
  • Much higher local drug exposure can be achieved with total doses considerably lower than those required for systemic administration, resulting in lower exposure of nonrespiratory tract tissues to potentially toxic drugs.
  • Regional delivery of chemotherapy to the respiratory tract has been shown to have activity in preclinical and clinical studies.
  • Technical improvements in delivery methods have now made it possible to conduct trials of inhalational agents, both to treat cancers affecting the respiratory tract and to deliver other drugs used in cancer patients.
  • This review discusses the rationale of drug delivery by the inhalational route, its technical challenges, preclinical and clinical experiences, limitations, and promise.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Drug Delivery Systems. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • [ErratumIn] J Clin Oncol 2001 May 1;19(9):2583
  • (PMID = 11251016.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Cytokines
  • [Number-of-references] 71
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9. Guerrero A, Laflamme M, Agoff SN, Williams WM, Karmy-Jones R: Primary lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of the lung. Can Respir J; 2001 Nov-Dec;8(6):431-3
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  • Primary lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma (LELC) of the lung is a neoplasm seen most commonly in the nasopharynx of individuals from south China and Taiwan, and is strongly associated with the Epstein-Barr virus.
  • The case of a 62-year-old Chinese man with a rare primary lung T2N1M0 LELC of the left lower lobe is presented.
  • After it was determined that the neoplasm was of primary lung origin, adjunctive chemotherapy was initiated.
  • The role of adjunctive chemotherapy in this setting is discussed.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / pathology. Granuloma, Respiratory Tract / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 11753457.001).
  • [ISSN] 1198-2241
  • [Journal-full-title] Canadian respiratory journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Can. Respir. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
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10. Rókusz L, László L: Infections of febrile neutropenic patients in malignant hematological diseases (second study period). Mil Med; 2005 Aug;170(8):653-7
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  • The main differences in treatment were that we did not use ciprofloxacin prophylaxis routinely and we added granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor to the antimicrobial treatment regimen.
  • The clinical and microbiological spectra of diseases shifted toward Gram-positive bacteremia and lower respiratory infections.
  • [MeSH-major] Bacterial Infections / microbiology. Fever / microbiology. Hematologic Neoplasms / complications. Neutropenia / microbiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibiotic Prophylaxis. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Bacteremia / microbiology. Ciprofloxacin / therapeutic use. Female. Gram-Positive Bacteria / isolation & purification. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor / therapeutic use. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Mycoses / drug therapy. Mycoses / microbiology. Respiratory Tract Infections / drug therapy. Respiratory Tract Infections / microbiology. Retrospective Studies. Severity of Illness Index

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  • (PMID = 16173203.001).
  • [ISSN] 0026-4075
  • [Journal-full-title] Military medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mil Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 5E8K9I0O4U / Ciprofloxacin; 83869-56-1 / Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
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11. Qureshi MA, Girgis RE, Dandapantula HK, Abrams J, Soubani AO: Increased exhaled nitric oxide following autologous peripheral hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation: a potential marker of idiopathic pneumonia syndrome. Chest; 2004 Jan;125(1):281-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We hypothesize that patients who received high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous peripheral hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (APHSCT) have increased exhaled NO.
  • METHOD: We measured exhaled lower respiratory tract NO concentration with a chemiluminescent NO analyzer during a slow vital capacity maneuver against a positive pressure of 16 cm H(2)O at an expiratory flow rate of 50 mL/s in 20 female patients who received high-dose chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, carmustine, and cisplatin) followed by APHSCT for the treatment of stage III or IV breast carcinoma.
  • Lower respiratory tract exhaled NO was significantly higher after APHSCT and during the 6 months of follow-up.
  • CONCLUSION: Lower respiratory tract concentration of exhaled NO is significantly increased following APHSCT and correlates with reduction in DLCO.
  • Increase in lower respiratory tract concentration of NO is a potential marker of IPS.
  • [MeSH-major] Breath Tests. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / adverse effects. Nitric Oxide / metabolism. Pneumonia / diagnosis. Respiratory System / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Biomarkers / analysis. Breast Neoplasms / therapy. Female. Humans. Luminescent Measurements. Middle Aged. Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity

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  • [CommentIn] Chest. 2004 Jan;125(1):11-3 [14718413.001]
  • (PMID = 14718452.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-3692
  • [Journal-full-title] Chest
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chest
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 31C4KY9ESH / Nitric Oxide
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12. Wutzl A, Ploder O, Kermer C, Millesi W, Ewers R, Klug C: Mortality and causes of death after multimodality treatment for advanced oral and oropharyngeal cancer. J Oral Maxillofac Surg; 2007 Feb;65(2):255-60
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  • [Title] Mortality and causes of death after multimodality treatment for advanced oral and oropharyngeal cancer.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 222 patients who underwent multimodality treatment from 1990 to 2000 were included in the study.
  • Patients received preoperative radiotherapy 50 Gy and concomitant chemotherapy with mitomycin and 5-fluorouracil.
  • Of these, a second cancer in the head and neck region or the lower respiratory tract or the upper digestive tract was found in 7.3%.
  • CONCLUSION: Favorable survival data were registered for patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity who underwent combined treatment protocols.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Mouth Neoplasms / mortality. Mouth Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Cause of Death. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / mortality. Neoplasms, Second Primary / mortality. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / mortality. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / therapy. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 17236930.001).
  • [ISSN] 0278-2391
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery : official journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Oral Maxillofac. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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13. Baskaran ND, Gan GG, Adeeba K: Applying the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer risk scoring in predicting outcome of febrile neutropenia patients in a cohort of patients. Ann Hematol; 2008 Jul;87(7):563-9
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  • A retrospective study of 116 episodes of febrile neutropenia in patients who were admitted to the hematology ward of a local medical center in Malaysia between January 1st 2004 and January 31st 2005.
  • The MASCC score predicted the outcome of febrile neutropenic episodes with a positive predictive value of 82.9%, a sensitivity of 93%, and specificity of 67%.
  • Other predictors of a favorable outcome were those patients who had lymphomas versus leukemias, duration of neutropenia of less than 7 days, low burden of illness characterized by the absence of an infective focus and absence of lower respiratory tract infection, a serum albumin of >25 g/l, and the absence of gram-negative bacteremia on univariate analysis but only serum albumin level, low burden of illness, and presence of respiratory infection were significantly associated with unfavorable outcome after multivariate analysis.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematologic Neoplasms / complications. Neutropenia / mortality. Severity of Illness Index
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Antibiotic Prophylaxis. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bacterial Infections / complications. Bacterial Infections / drug therapy. Bacterial Infections / prevention & control. Cohort Studies. Comorbidity. Female. Fever / etiology. Hospitals, University / statistics & numerical data. Humans. Immunocompromised Host. Inpatients / classification. Inpatients / statistics & numerical data. Malaysia / epidemiology. Male. Middle Aged. Predictive Value of Tests. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Risk. Sensitivity and Specificity. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18437382.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-0584
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents
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14. El-Mahallawy HA, Ibrahim MH, Shalaby L, Kandil A: Community respiratory viruses as a cause of lower respiratory tract infections following suppressive chemotherapy in cancer patients. J Egypt Natl Canc Inst; 2005 Jun;17(2):121-6
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  • [Title] Community respiratory viruses as a cause of lower respiratory tract infections following suppressive chemotherapy in cancer patients.
  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Community respiratory viruses are an important cause of respiratory disease in the immunocompromised patients with cancer.
  • To evaluate the occurrence and clinical significance of respiratory virus infections in hospitalized cancer patients at National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, during anticancer treatment, we studied cases that developed episodes of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI).
  • Sputum cultures were done and an immunofluorescence search for IgM antibodies of influenza A and B, parainfluenza serotypes 1, 2 and 3, adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, Legionella pneumophila, Coxiella burnettii, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae were performed on serum samples of patients.
  • Influenza virus was the commonest virus detected, being of type B in 4 cases, type A in one case and mixed A and B in another 5 cases; followed by RSV in 5 patients.
  • Taken together, bacteria were identified as a single cause of LRTI in 10 cases, viruses in 6, fungi in 3 and mixed causes in 7.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that respiratory viruses are common in LRTI, either as a single cause or mixed with bacterial pathogens, in hospitalized cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.
  • Diagnostic tests for respiratory viruses should be incorporated in the routine diagnostic study of patients with hematologic malignancies.
  • Also, it must be emphasized that early CT chest is crucial as a base-line prior to initiation of anti-fungal or anti-viral therapy.
  • In cancer patients with a febrile episode and LRTI, tailored therapy is recommended according to the clinical findings of the patient.
  • [MeSH-major] Immunocompromised Host. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Respiratory Tract Infections / virology. Virus Diseases / virology


15. Zhu S, Li Y, Liu G, Han X, Gong L, Yao L, Lan M, Zhang W: Primary lung seminoma in a 76-year-old man: a case report. Int J Clin Exp Pathol; 2010;3(7):730-5
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  • In this report, we present a rare case of primary seminoma in the lung of a 76-years-old man.
  • CASE PRESENTATION: The patient was a 76-year-old man admitted with respiratory tract symptom and hemoptysis.
  • The Chest Routine Scan and CT showed there was a consolidation area in the basal segments at the lower lobe of left lung.
  • Bronchoscope also exhibited a neoplasm in left lung.
  • During left lower lobectomy, we found that adherence occurred widely in left thoracic wall, and the pleural membrane was shrinkage.
  • No chemotherapy or radiotherapy was given.
  • CONCLUSION: Although primary seminoma of the lung is rare in old male population, the diagnosis should be taken into serious consideration in order to improve the treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Seminoma / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male

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  • [Cites] Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand. 1969;75(1):18-26 [5796079.001]
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  • (PMID = 20830245.001).
  • [ISSN] 1936-2625
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of clinical and experimental pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Clin Exp Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2933394
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Seminoma / immunohistochemistry / lung
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16. Kieback DG, Einzmann T, Labinsky E, Fischer DC, Niebergall H, Hasenburg A: Aggressive management of recurrent ovarian cancer--the challenge of individualizing cancer therapy illustrated by a case report. Onkologie; 2004 Aug;27(4):393-7
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  • [Title] Aggressive management of recurrent ovarian cancer--the challenge of individualizing cancer therapy illustrated by a case report.
  • BACKGROUND: In clinical practice, treatment recommendations and the patient's wishes often diverge, facing the physician with difficult choices.
  • CASE REPORT: The clinical course of a 36-year-old patient with 'platinum-refractory' ovarian cancer is reported.
  • The patient experienced a symptomatic relapse 7 months after debulking surgery and completion of platinum-based first-line chemotherapy.
  • Her husband supported her, and both asked for maximal therapy, including intensive care treatment for recurrent respiratory tract infections and total parenteral nutrition (TPN).
  • Problems related to TPN and progression of disease affected her individual perception of quality of life to a much lower extent than expected and perceived by her caretakers.
  • All professional health care providers were more than once very reluctant to continue treatment and only after extensive counseling gave in to the demand of the patient for further treatment, considering the effort futile - only to be surprised by treatment response and recovery.
  • After 3 years of palliation, the tumor was resistant to all cytotoxic regimens and the patient died 2 months after withdrawal of chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSION: This case report illustrates that also in the age of evidence-based medicine individualized treatment beyond proven strategies can offer patient benefit.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Papillary / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Ovarian Neoplasms / drug therapy. Palliative Care / methods. Patient Participation. Puerperal Disorders / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Critical Care / psychology. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Humans. Medical Futility. Motivation. Parenteral Nutrition, Total / psychology. Quality of Life / psychology


17. Anderson K, Lawson KA, Simmons-Menchaca M, Sun L, Sanders BG, Kline K: Alpha-TEA plus cisplatin reduces human cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell tumor burden and metastasis. Exp Biol Med (Maywood); 2004 Dec;229(11):1169-76
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  • [Title] Alpha-TEA plus cisplatin reduces human cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell tumor burden and metastasis.
  • A novel nonhydrolyzable ether-linked acetic acid analog of vitamin E, 2,5,7,8-tetramethyl-2R-(4R,8R,12-trimethyltridecyl)-chroman-6-yloxyacetic acid (alpha-TEA) in combination with cisplatin, reduces tumor burden of A2780/cp70 (cp70) cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cells xenografted into immune compromised nude mice.
  • For studies 1 and 2, alpha-TEA was formulated in liposomes and delivered by aerosol such that approximately 36 microg and 72 microg of alpha-TEA were deposited in the respiratory tract of each mouse each day, respectively.
  • Cisplatin at 5 mg/kg was administered by intraperitoneal injections once weekly for the first 3 weeks in Study 1 and on the third and 10th days following treatment initiation in Study 2.
  • The combination alpha-TEA + cisplatin treatment reduced tumor burden and metastasis of cp70-GFP cells in comparison to control mice or mice treated with alpha-TEA or cisplatin singly.
  • Analyses of tumor sections showed the alpha-TEA + cisplatin treatment group, in comparison to control, to have a significantly lower level of cell proliferation (Ki-67 staining; P < 0.0001) and a significantly higher level of apoptosis (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling [TUNEL]; P < 0.0001).
  • In summary, combinations of alpha-TEA + cisplatin significantly reduced tumor burden and metastases in a xenograft model of cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cells.
  • These data show promise for combination alpha-TEA + cisplatin chemotherapy for ovarian cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Drug Resistance / physiology. Neoplasm Metastasis / drug therapy. Ovarian Neoplasms / drug therapy. Tumor Burden / drug effects. Vitamin E / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Inhalation. Animals. Apoptosis / drug effects. Apoptosis / physiology. Cell Line, Tumor. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Disease Models, Animal. Female. Humans. In Situ Nick-End Labeling. Liposomes. Mice. Mice, Nude. Neoplasm Transplantation. Tocopherols

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  • [CommentIn] Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2005 May;230(5):291 [15855295.001]
  • (PMID = 15564444.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-3702
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental biology and medicine (Maywood, N.J.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp. Biol. Med. (Maywood)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA59739; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA75253; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / ES07784; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / T32 ES07247
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 2,5,7,8-tetramethyl-2R-(4R,8R,12-trimethyltridecyl)chroman-6-yloxy acetic acid; 0 / Liposomes; 1406-18-4 / Vitamin E; 1406-66-2 / Tocopherols; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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18. Clayton J, Fardell B, Hutton-Potts J, Webb D, Chye R: Parenteral antibiotics in a palliative care unit: prospective analysis of current practice. Palliat Med; 2003 Jan;17(1):44-8
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  • The sites of infection for which parenteral antibiotics were prescribed included urinary tract infections (37%), lower respiratory tract infections (26%), soft tissue/skin or wound infections (16%), purulent terminal respiratory secretions (5%) and other (16%).
  • In this sample, urinary tract infections were more commonly associated with a positive outcome than other indications combined (88% versus 48%, respectively).
  • However, outcomes appeared to vary in this sample according to the palliative care phase of the patient at the time parenteral antibiotics were administered.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Bacterial Agents / administration & dosage. Bacterial Infections / drug therapy. Palliative Care / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome / complications. Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome / therapy. Adult. Age Factors. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Infusions, Parenteral. Injections, Intramuscular. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasms / complications. Neoplasms / therapy. Prospective Studies. Treatment Outcome. Urinary Tract Infections / complications. Urinary Tract Infections / drug therapy


19. Hitzman CJ, Wattenberg LW, Wiedmann TS: Pharmacokinetics of 5-fluorouracil in the hamster following inhalation delivery of lipid-coated nanoparticles. J Pharm Sci; 2006 Jun;95(6):1196-211
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  • The inhalation delivery of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in lipid-coated nanoparticles (LNPs) to hamsters was evaluated to determine the feasibility for use in lung cancer chemotherapy.
  • The concentration of FITC-dextran and total 5-FU (released and LNP-associated) was determined as a function of time in the lung, trachea, larynx, esophagus, and serum.
  • Concentrations of 5-FU and FITC-dextran were initially high in the trachea, larynx, and esophagus, and lower in the lung.
  • Within 24 h, greater than 99% of the LNPs were cleared from the respiratory tract and total 5-FU concentrations mirrored the LNP concentration.
  • An eight-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used to describe the observed trends in concentrations of LNPs and total 5-FU and to estimate the released 5-FU concentration in the above tissues.
  • From this analysis, effective local targeting as well as sustained efficacious concentrations of 5-FU in the expected tumor sites were demonstrated.
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Inhalation. Aerosols. Animals. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Cricetinae. Delayed-Action Preparations. Dextrans / chemistry. Feasibility Studies. Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate. Fluorescent Dyes. Lipids / chemistry. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Male. Mesocricetus. Particle Size. Tissue Distribution

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association
  • (PMID = 16639722.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3549
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pharmaceutical sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Pharm Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Aerosols; 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Delayed-Action Preparations; 0 / Fluorescent Dyes; 0 / Lipids; I223NX31W9 / Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate; K3R6ZDH4DU / Dextrans; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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20. El-Mahallawy H, Sidhom I, El-Din NH, Zamzam M, El-Lamie MM: Clinical and microbiologic determinants of serious bloodstream infections in Egyptian pediatric cancer patients: a one-year study. Int J Infect Dis; 2005 Jan;9(1):43-51
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  • OBJECTIVES: Bloodstream infections (BSI) remain a major cause of morbidity and death in patients undergoing treatment for cancer.
  • However, all recent epidemiological and therapeutic studies underline the absolute need for knowledge of the factors governing the infections in each center.
  • More tailored policies for the treatment of patients with febrile neutropenia following chemotherapy can then be created.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Over a 12-month period, all children with cancer and fever, with or without neutropenia, who were admitted to the NCI for empirical therapy of febrile episodes and who had a microbiologically confirmed bloodstream infection were studied retrospectively.
  • A more serious BSI in terms of a prolonged episode was encountered in 30.2% of the episodes and was significantly associated with patients being hospitalized, having intensified chemotherapy, polymicrobial and fungal infection, lower respiratory tract infections and persistent neutropenia at day seven.
  • These results encourage the possibility of a more selective management strategy for these children.
  • [MeSH-major] Bacteremia / microbiology. Fungemia / microbiology. Neoplasms / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Egypt / epidemiology. Female. Fever / complications. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Male. Neutropenia / complications. Opportunistic Infections / drug therapy. Opportunistic Infections / epidemiology. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 15603994.001).
  • [ISSN] 1201-9712
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of infectious diseases : IJID : official publication of the International Society for Infectious Diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Infect. Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents
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21. Paganini HR, Rodríguez Brieshcke T, Zubizarreta P, Latella A, Firpo V, Fernandez C, Armada A, Casimir L, Debbag R: [Criteria of low risk of mortality in children with neutropenia and fever during cancer chemotherapy]. Medicina (B Aires); 2001;61(1):63-6
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  • [Title] [Criteria of low risk of mortality in children with neutropenia and fever during cancer chemotherapy].
  • [Transliterated title] Criterios de bajo riesgo de mortalidad en niños con neutropenia y fiebre durante la quimioterapia por cáncer.
  • To validate the use of a lower-risk mortality profile in pediatric febrile neutropenia during anticancer therapy and to evaluate the efficacy of a sequential parenteral-oral antibiotic treatment for these children, a prospective study was conducted between May 1997 and December 1999.
  • Children with neutropenia (ANC < 500/mm3) and fever (> 38 degrees C) due to anticancer therapy were eligible for the study if they presented the following lower-risk conditions: absence of severe co-morbidity factors, good clinical condition, no risk clinical foci, no bacteremia, and responsible parents.
  • Clinical evidence of infection was found in 47% (122) of children and the most common site was the upper respiratory tract (81%).
  • Mean time of hospitalization was 1.5 days.
  • They all were satisfactorily treated with a secondary treatment and none underwent any major complications or died.
  • The lower-risk profile used was safe and the sequential antibiotic therapy was adequate to manage febrile neutropenia in this subset of children.
  • [MeSH-major] Fever / mortality. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neutropenia / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Prospective Studies. Risk Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11265626.001).
  • [ISSN] 0025-7680
  • [Journal-full-title] Medicina
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Medicina (B Aires)
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] Argentina
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents
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22. Aksoylar S, Cetingül N, Kantar M, Karapinar D, Kavakli K, Kansoy S: Meropenem plus amikacin versus piperacillin-tazobactam plus netilmicin as empiric therapy for high-risk febrile neutropenia in children. Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2004 Mar;21(2):115-23
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  • [Title] Meropenem plus amikacin versus piperacillin-tazobactam plus netilmicin as empiric therapy for high-risk febrile neutropenia in children.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of meropenem plus amikacin compared with piperacillin-tazobactam plus netilmicin for initial empirical antibiotic treatment of high-risk febrile neutropenia in children with cancer.
  • Clinical response was determined at 72 h and at completion of the therapy.
  • Most of the clinically documented infections were of lower respiratory tract, gastrointestinal mucosa, or urinary tract origin.
  • The success rate with initial empiric therapy was 52% in the meropenem plus amikacin and 42% in the piperacillin/tazobactam plus netilmicin group, respectively (p = .5).
  • Empirical therapy with meropenem plus amikacin or piperacillin/tazobactam plus netilmicin for high-risk febrile neutropenia is equally effective and safe in pediatric cancer patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Drug Therapy, Combination / therapeutic use. Neutropenia / drug therapy. Penicillanic Acid / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Amikacin / administration & dosage. Fever / drug therapy. Fever / etiology. Fungi / isolation & purification. Gram-Negative Bacteria / isolation & purification. Gram-Positive Bacteria / isolation & purification. Hematologic Neoplasms / complications. Hematologic Neoplasms / etiology. Humans. Infection / microbiology. Neoplasms / complications. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Netilmicin / administration & dosage. Piperacillin / administration & dosage. Thienamycins / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 15160510.001).
  • [ISSN] 0888-0018
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric hematology and oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Hematol Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Thienamycins; 4O5J85GJJB / Netilmicin; 84319SGC3C / Amikacin; 87-53-6 / Penicillanic Acid; FV9J3JU8B1 / meropenem; SE10G96M8W / tazobactam; X00B0D5O0E / Piperacillin
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23. Matsusaka K, Kinoshita Y, Udagawa H, Fukayama M, Ohashi K: Squamous cell carcinoma arising in a communicating bronchopulmonary-foregut malformation. Hum Pathol; 2010 Nov;41(11):1650-4
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  • Communicating bronchopulmonary-foregut malformation, a variant of bronchopulmonary sequestration, is a rare anomaly characterized by communication between an isolated portion of the respiratory tree and the gastrointestinal tract.
  • This patient had a workup for a chief complaint of exacerbation of constitutional dysphagia, resulting in detection of squamous cell carcinoma involving the lower esophagus.
  • Pathologic findings showed that squamous cell carcinoma had arisen in malformed bronchopulmonary tissue constituting part of the distal esophagus segmentally.
  • This case was unique in that squamous cell carcinoma developed in an extremely rare type of congenital abnormality that had functioned as a passageway for food from birth, as a result of chronic irritation for more than 4 decades.
  • [MeSH-major] Bronchopulmonary Sequestration / pathology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Esophageal Neoplasms / pathology. Esophagus / abnormalities
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Drug Therapy, Combination. Esophagectomy. Humans. Male. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20537686.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-8392
  • [Journal-full-title] Human pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hum. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. Gerein V, Rastorguev E, Gerein J, Lodemann E, Pfister H, Draf W, Desloovere C: 2',5'-Oligoadenylate synthetase activity analysis and human papilloma virus typing as prognostic factors in patients with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. J Laryngol Otol; 2004 Oct;118(10):750-6
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  • [Title] 2',5'-Oligoadenylate synthetase activity analysis and human papilloma virus typing as prognostic factors in patients with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.
  • OBJECTIVE: Determination of early prognostic factors in patients with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis is extremely important, so the major goal of our prospective, multicentre study was to evaluate (1) the feasibility of various factors to determine prognosis of the clinical course, as well as (2) the response to interferon-alpha therapy in recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.
  • METHODS: Forty-two patients with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis were treated with interferon-alpha (3 MU/m(2) three times per week; mean therapy duration was 2.7 +/- 1.8 years) in 1983-1994 and followed-up until 2003.
  • Human papilloma virus (HPV) type, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis severity and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activity were determined by standard methods and analysed for correlation with the results of long-term clinical outcome.
  • RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Patients with HPV type 11, a severity score >4, a high number of surgical procedures prior to interferon-alpha therapy and a high basal 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activity should be considered at high risk of an aggressive clinical course, often with spread to lower airway passages, malignant transformation and death.
  • Human papilloma virus type, score for recurrent respiratory papillomatosis severity, number of surgical procedures and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activity showed significant association with response to interferon-alpha therapy and the long-term clinical course, so these factors have value in predicting prognosis in recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.
  • [MeSH-major] 2',5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase / analysis. Papilloma / enzymology. Papillomaviridae / enzymology. Respiratory Tract Neoplasms / enzymology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. DNA, Viral / analysis. Female. Humans. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Leukocytes, Mononuclear / enzymology. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / enzymology. Prognosis. Prospective Studies. Severity of Illness Index. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15550179.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-2151
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of laryngology and otology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Laryngol Otol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / DNA, Viral; 0 / Interferon-alpha; EC 2.7.7.- / 2',5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase
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25. Liu C, Schwartz BS, Vallabhaneni S, Nixon M, Chin-Hong PV, Miller SA, Chiu C, Damon L, Drew WL: Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 infection in patients with hematologic malignancy. Emerg Infect Dis; 2010 Dec;16(12):1910-7
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  • Seventeen (63%) and 10 (37%) patients had upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) and lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), respectively.
  • Sixty-five percent of URTI patients were outpatients; 35% recovered without antiviral therapy.
  • Complications included acute respiratory distress syndrome, pneumomediastinum, myocarditis, and development of oseltamivir-resistant virus; 3 patients died.
  • Rigorous infection control, improved techniques for diagnosing respiratory disease, and early antiviral therapy can prevent nosocomial transmission and optimize patient care.
  • [MeSH-major] Cross Infection / epidemiology. Hematologic Neoplasms / epidemiology. Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype. Influenza, Human / epidemiology. Pandemics
  • [MeSH-minor] Academic Medical Centers. Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Respiratory Tract Infections / epidemiology. Respiratory Tract Infections / etiology. San Francisco / epidemiology. Seasons

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  • (PMID = 21122221.001).
  • [ISSN] 1080-6059
  • [Journal-full-title] Emerging infectious diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Emerging Infect. Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3294592
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26. Leung RK, Whittaker PA: RNA interference: from gene silencing to gene-specific therapeutics. Pharmacol Ther; 2005 Aug;107(2):222-39
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  • [Title] RNA interference: from gene silencing to gene-specific therapeutics.
  • By harnessing an evolutionary conserved endogenous biological pathway, first identified in plants and lower organisms, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) reagents are used to bind to and promote the degradation of target RNAs, resulting in knockdown of the expression of specific genes.
  • In addition, siRNA and shRNA libraries have been developed to allow the systematic analysis of genes required for disease processes such as cancer using high throughput RNAi screens.
  • RNAi has been used for the knockdown of gene expression in experimental animals, with the development of shRNA systems that allow tissue-specific and inducible knockdown of genes promising to provide a quicker and cheaper way to generate transgenic animals than conventional approaches.
  • Finally, because of the ability of RNAi to silence disease-associated genes in tissue culture and animal models, the development of RNAi-based reagents for clinical applications is gathering pace, as technological enhancements that improve siRNA stability and delivery in vivo, while minimising off-target and nonspecific effects, are developed.
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Design. RNA Interference / drug effects. RNA, Small Interfering
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Communicable Diseases / drug therapy. Gene Silencing / drug effects. Gene Silencing / physiology. Humans. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms / genetics. Respiratory Tract Diseases / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 15908010.001).
  • [ISSN] 0163-7258
  • [Journal-full-title] Pharmacology & therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pharmacol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Small Interfering
  • [Number-of-references] 230
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27. Tezcan G, Kupesiz A, Ozturk F, Ogunc D, Gultekin M, Yesilipek A, Hazar V: Episodes of fever and neutropenia in children with cancer in a tertiary care medical center in Turkey. Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2006 Apr-May;23(3):217-29
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  • Demographics, clinical information, treatment approaches, and outcomes of the patients admitted to Akdeniz University Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology from October 1996 to June 2004 were evaluated retrospectively.
  • A total of 425 infections were diagnosed in 345 episodes, in which lower respiratory tract infections were the most common (32.7%).
  • [MeSH-major] Bacterial Infections / epidemiology. Fever / epidemiology. Neoplasms / complications. Neutropenia / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Candidiasis / complications. Candidiasis / epidemiology. Catheterization, Central Venous / adverse effects. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease Progression. Female. Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections / complications. Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections / drug therapy. Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections / epidemiology. Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections / complications. Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections / drug therapy. Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections / epidemiology. Humans. Hypotension / epidemiology. Infant. Male. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Treatment Outcome. Turkey / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 16517538.001).
  • [ISSN] 1521-0669
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric hematology and oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Hematol Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents
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28. Yano M, Shiozaki H, Tsujinaka T, Inoue M, Doki Y, Fujiwara Y, Monden M: Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus infiltrating the respiratory tract is less sensitive to preoperative concurrent radiation and chemotherapy. J Am Coll Surg; 2000 Dec;191(6):626-34
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  • [Title] Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus infiltrating the respiratory tract is less sensitive to preoperative concurrent radiation and chemotherapy.
  • BACKGROUND: The prognosis of upper thoracic esophageal cancer is poor when compared with middle and lower thoracic esophageal cancer because the tumor easily infiltrates the respiratory tract and surgical en-bloc resection is difficult.
  • Recently, preoperative chemoradiation therapy has been shown to lead to down-staging of the disease and improve prognosis.
  • But the benefit of this therapy for tumors infiltrating the respiratory tract remains unknown.
  • STUDY DESIGN: Fifty-six patients with thoracic esophageal cancer infiltrating neighboring organs, but with no hematogeneous metastasis, were given preoperative concurrent chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil and cisplatin) and radiation (40 Gy) therapy.
  • RESULTS: The prognosis was significantly poorer for patients with tumors infiltrating the respiratory tract (T) or aorta plus respiratory tract (A + T) than for patients with tumors infiltrating the aorta alone (A) or other organs (Oth) (p < 0.05 for Oth versus T; p < 0.05 for Oth versus A + T; p < 0.0001 for A versus T; p < 0.0001 for A versus A + T by log-rank test).
  • Patients positive for respiratory tract invasion (T, T + A), compared with those negative for respiratory tract invasion (A, Oth), showed a poorer clinical response to chemoradiation (3.0%, 45.5%, 39.4%, and 9.1% versus 4.3%, 82.6%, 4.3%, and 8.7% in complete response (CR), partial response (PR), nonresponse (NC) and progressive disease (PD), respectively, p = 0.0156) and surgical resectability (36.4% vs. 87.0%, p = 0.0003).
  • Histologic effectiveness (8.3%, 50.0%, and 41.7% versus 25.0%, 70.0%, and 5.0% in grade 3, grade 2, and grade 1, respectively, for patients with respiratory tract invasion versus those without it, p = 0.0189) and histologic stages (8.3%, 8.3%, 8.3%, 8.3%, 25.0%, and 41.7% versus 20.0%, 0%, 15.0%, 25.0%, 40.0%, and 0% in pathologic CR, stage I, stage IIA, stage IIB, stage III, and stage IV, respectively, for patients with respiratory tract invasion versus those without it, p = 0.0496) were significantly better in patients negative for respiratory tract invasion; the percentages of patients with lymph node metastasis did not differ significantly between the two groups.
  • Comparison of the recurrence patterns showed that local failure was most common in patients with respiratory tract invasion, and distant failure was the leading cause of recurrence in patients without it.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Because the prognosis of patients with thoracic esophageal cancer infiltrating the respiratory tract is extremely poor, partially because of the low local effectiveness of preoperative concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy, caution is needed when deciding on salvage surgery.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Drug Tolerance. Esophageal Neoplasms / pathology. Esophagectomy. Preoperative Care / methods. Radiation Tolerance. Respiratory Tract Neoplasms / secondary. Respiratory Tract Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11129811.001).
  • [ISSN] 1072-7515
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American College of Surgeons
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Coll. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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