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1. Yhim HY, Kang HJ, Choi YH, Kim SJ, Kim WS, Chae YS, Kim JS, Choi CW, Oh SY, Eom HS, Kim JA, Lee JH, Won JH, Shim H, Lee JJ, Sung HJ, Kim HJ, Lee DH, Suh C, Kwak JY: Clinical outcomes and prognostic factors in patients with breast diffuse large B cell lymphoma; Consortium for Improving Survival of Lymphoma (CISL) study. BMC Cancer; 2010;10:321
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clinical outcomes and prognostic factors in patients with breast diffuse large B cell lymphoma; Consortium for Improving Survival of Lymphoma (CISL) study.
  • BACKGROUND: The breast is a rare extranodal site of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and primary breast lymphoma (PBL) has been arbitrarily defined as disease localized to one or both breasts with or without regional lymph nodes involvement.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes in patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and breast involvement, and to find the criteria of PBL reflecting the outcome and prognosis.
  • RESULTS: Median age at diagnosis was 48 years (range, 20-83 years).
  • The patients with one extranodal disease in the breast (OED) with or without nodal disease were 49 (72.1%), and those with multiple extranodal disease (MED) were 19 (27.9%).
  • In multivariate analysis, MED (hazard ratio [HR], 3.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-12.2) and fewer than four cycles of systemic chemotherapy with or without local treatments (HR, 4.47; 95% CI, 1.54-12.96) were independent prognostic factors for worse OS.
  • Twenty-five (36.8%) patients experienced progression, and the cumulative incidence of progression in multiple extranodal sites or other than breasts and central nervous system was significantly different between the OED group and the MED group (5-year cumulative incidence, 9.7 +/- 5.4% vs. 49.0 +/- 15.1%, p = 0.001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that the patients included in OED group, reflecting different treatment outcome, prognosis and pattern of progression, should be considered as PBL in the future trial.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / therapy. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Chi-Square Distribution. Disease Progression. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Proportional Hazards Models. Republic of Korea. Retrospective Studies. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20569446.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2407
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2927999
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2. Kang JY, Park HJ, Lee KY, Lee SY, Kim SJ, Park SH, Kim YK: Extranodal marginal zone lymphoma occurring along the trachea and central airway. Yonsei Med J; 2008 Oct 31;49(5):860-3
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  • [Title] Extranodal marginal zone lymphoma occurring along the trachea and central airway.
  • Extranodal marginal zone lymphoma is a low-grade B cell lymphoma that presents with an indolent clinicopathologic nature.
  • Although this tumor can occur in various sites, including the gastrointestinal tract and lungs, it develops and spreads extremely rarely along the trachea and central airway.
  • We report a case of extranodal lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue with tracheobronchial involvement.
  • Bronchoscopic evaluation confirmed diffuse, multiple nodular lesions in both the trachea and large bronchi, and she was diagnosed with an extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of the tracheobronchial tree.
  • After systemic chemotherapy, she survived for more than 18 months.
  • [MeSH-major] Bronchial Diseases / pathology. Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / pathology. Tracheal Diseases / pathology

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  • (PMID = 18972610.001).
  • [ISSN] 0513-5796
  • [Journal-full-title] Yonsei medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Yonsei Med. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2615368
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3. Brimo F, Popradi G, Michel RP, Auger M: Primary effusion lymphoma involving three body cavities. Cytojournal; 2009;6:21
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  • [Title] Primary effusion lymphoma involving three body cavities.
  • Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a human herpes virus-8 (HHV8)-associated large-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma localized in body cavities and presenting as pleural, peritoneal, or pericardial lymphomatous effusions.
  • We describe herein a case of PEL affecting three body cavity sites in an immunocompetent patient.
  • An examination of the fluid by cytology showed large atypical lymphocytes with abundant basophilic cytoplasm, either central or eccentric nuclei having irregular outlines, and multiple prominent nucleoli.
  • A diagnosis of PEL was rendered.
  • Despite chemotherapy and valganciclovir, the disease progressed to involve the pleural and pericardial cavities and the patient died 5 months following the initial diagnosis.
  • Although PEL is a B-cell lymphoma, it is usually of null phenotype by immunohistochemistry, and can rarely aberrantly express T-cell markers, as seen in the current case.
  • The key to the diagnosis of PEL rests on identifying HHV8 in the neoplastic cells.

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  • (PMID = 19876384.001).
  • [ISSN] 1742-6413
  • [Journal-full-title] CytoJournal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cytojournal
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2762694
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Effusion / Epstein–Barr virus / human herpes virus-8 / lymphoma
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4. Lü Z, Shi YK, He XH, Qin Y, Zhou SY, Zhang CG, Liu P, Yang JL: [Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma: clinical presentation, therapy and prognosis study of 10 cases]. Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi; 2010 May 11;90(18):1247-50
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  • [Title] [Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma: clinical presentation, therapy and prognosis study of 10 cases].
  • OBJECTIVE: To explore the clinical presentation, therapy and prognosis study of primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (PCALCL).
  • METHODS: We reviewed and analyzed ten cases of PCALCL receiving treatment at our hospital from January 1999 to January 2009.
  • There were single subcutaneous nodule (n = 7) and multiple nodules (n = 3).
  • Partial lesions had a spontaneous regression and new nodules appeared at the same or different sites.
  • Two patients had lymphadenopathy and one had bone involvement with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive and high cell proliferation ratio index (ki-67 > 80%).
  • Seven cases with single lesion received surgical excision plus radiotherapy, chemotherapy or radiochemotherapy, one case recurred, six cases survived without disease.
  • Three cases with multiple lesions received systemic chemotherapy mainly in combination with radiotherapy or biotherapy, two cases recurred and one case survived without disease.
  • The patients with single lesion have a longer disease-free survival than those with multiple lesions after surgical excision in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy.
  • Multiple lesions can not be cured.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell / therapy. Skin Neoplasms / diagnosis. Skin Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20646596.001).
  • [ISSN] 0376-2491
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua yi xue za zhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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5. Yang YL, Wang J, Zhao LZ, Gao ZF, Jing HM, Ke XY: [Clinical characteristics, cell origin and prognosis of primary gastrointestinal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: a report of 40 cases]. Ai Zheng; 2008 Jun;27(6):636-41
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Clinical characteristics, cell origin and prognosis of primary gastrointestinal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: a report of 40 cases].
  • BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: Primary gastrointestinal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (PGI-DLBCL) is difficult to be distinguished from other gastrointestinal tumors because of its onset sites and clinical features, which results in frequent misdiagnoses.
  • The standard chemotherapy regimen for PGI-DLBCL is uncertain.
  • This study was to analyze the clinical characteristics, cell origin, and prognosis of PGI-DLBCL, and explore effective combined chemotherapy for PGI-DLBCL.
  • The cell origins of PGI-DLBCL in 34 patients were analyzed by immunohistochemistry.
  • The patients were treated with combined chemotherapy, surgery plus combined chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, or surgery alone.
  • The combined chemotherapy included CHOP and CHOP-like regimens.
  • The ratio of onset sites (gastric versus intestinal) was 1.05:1.
  • Of the 9 patients with multiple sites involvement, 8 (88.9%) died within 3 years after diagnosis.
  • Cox multivariable analysis showed that the death risk of the patients with high level of LDH was 2.87 times higher than that of the patients with normal level of LDH.
  • Multiple sites involvement is an important death cause of these patients.
  • Tumor cell origin, IPI score and B symptom are important prognostic factors of PGI-DLBCL.
  • The serum level of LDH at diagnosis is an independent prognostic factor.
  • [MeSH-major] Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / mortality. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / mortality

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  • (PMID = 18570740.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Ai zheng = Aizheng = Chinese journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ai Zheng
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 1.1.1.27 / L-Lactate Dehydrogenase
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6. Yanagihori H, Oyama N, Kawakami Y, Sakuma-Oyama Y, Nakamura K, Iwatsuki K, Kaneko F: A case of intravascular large B-cell lymphoma with multiple organ involvement. J Dermatol; 2003 Dec;30(12):910-4

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A case of intravascular large B-cell lymphoma with multiple organ involvement.
  • Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVL) is a rare systemic disease characterized by clonal proliferation of neoplastic lymphoid cells within the capillary lumina of small blood vessels.
  • The most common sites of involvement are cerebrovascular or sinusoid areas, resulting in a wide variety of neurologic deficits.
  • Herein we describe a case of IVL that presented with multiple internal and external organ involvements, including the skin, bilateral kidneys, and lung, and with an aggressive clinical course.
  • The confirmative diagnosis was based on the microscopic findings of the skin lesion with a B-cell immunophenotype.
  • Despite various clinical presentations, no neurological abnormality was observed until the patient died 12 months after the initial combination chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnosis, Differential. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Kidney Neoplasms / diagnosis. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / radiography. Kidney Neoplasms / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / diagnosis. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / radiography. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Middle Aged. Multiple Organ Failure. Neoplasm Metastasis. Skin Neoplasms / diagnosis. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy. Skin Neoplasms / radiography. Skin Neoplasms / secondary. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 14739519.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-2407
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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7. Michel RB, Mattes MJ: Intracellular accumulation of the anti-CD20 antibody 1F5 in B-lymphoma cells. Clin Cancer Res; 2002 Aug;8(8):2701-13
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  • [Title] Intracellular accumulation of the anti-CD20 antibody 1F5 in B-lymphoma cells.
  • In previous experiments, 125I-labeled 1F5 (anti-CD20)was found to kill B-lymphoma cells efficiently and specifically.Unexpectedly, the number of antibody (Ab) molecules taken up per cell was much larger than the number of antigen sites on the cell surface.
  • Incubation with fluorophore-conjugated 1F5, using the Raji cell line, demonstrated that the Ab accumulated in large amounts in a juxtanuclear spot.
  • Experiments with three other B-lymphoma cell lines demonstrated marked heterogeneity among them.
  • With Ramos cells, 1F5 and transferrin localized to multiple smaller intracellular spots, rather than a single large spot.
  • Such internalization may have a major impact on the therapy of this tumor type with conjugates of anti-CD20 Abs.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies / chemistry. Antigens, CD20 / immunology. Lymphoma, B-Cell / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibody Specificity. Binding, Competitive. Brefeldin A / pharmacology. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel. Epitopes. Golgi Apparatus / metabolism. Humans. Microscopy, Fluorescence. Protein Binding. Protein Synthesis Inhibitors / pharmacology. Time Factors. Transferrin / metabolism. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Ultraviolet Rays. Up-Regulation

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  • (PMID = 12171904.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA87059
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies; 0 / Antigens, CD20; 0 / Epitopes; 0 / Protein Synthesis Inhibitors; 0 / Transferrin; 20350-15-6 / Brefeldin A
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8. Baehring JM, Damek D, Martin EC, Betensky RA, Hochberg FH: Neurolymphomatosis. Neuro Oncol; 2003 04;5(2):104-15
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The term "neurolymphomatosis" (NL) has included infiltration of the peripheral nervous system by lymphoma and nontumor lymphocytes.
  • We describe NL as a lymphoma entity that affects cranial and peripheral nerves and roots.
  • Inclusion criteria were (A) histopathologic demonstration of lymphoma within peripheral nerve, nerve root/plexus, or cranial nerve or (B) CT/MRI or intraoperative evidence of nerve enlargement and/or enhancement beyond the dural sleeve in the setting of prior or concurrent lymphoma in systemic or CNS sites.
  • Twenty of our patients and 44 of those reported had histopathologic confirmation of lymphoma infiltrating root or nerve.
  • In the remainder, diagnosis was based upon clinical presentation, nodular nerve enlargement or enhancement, and lymphoma cells in spinal fluid or extraneural sites.
  • For antemortem diagnosis, imaging studies were of greatest utility, followed by biopsy.
  • Systemic chemotherapy was used to address the multiple potential sites of involvement.
  • When properly treated, NL carries a prognosis similar to primary CNS lymphoma in the modern era.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma / pathology. Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / pathology. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / therapy. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 12672282.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-8517
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuro-oncology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1920674
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9. Imai H, Kajimoto K, Taniwaki M, Miura I, Hatta Y, Hashizume Y, Watanabe M, Shiraishi T, Nakamura S: Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma presenting with mass lesions in the central nervous system: a report of five cases. Pathol Int; 2004 Apr;54(4):231-6
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  • [Title] Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma presenting with mass lesions in the central nervous system: a report of five cases.
  • We have encountered five cases of intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVL) presenting with central nervous system (CNS) mass lesions during their clinical course.
  • All of these cases histopathologically showed typical intravascular localization of the neoplastic cells in the initial biopsy specimens obtained from sites other than the CNS.
  • Despite multiagent chemotherapy, patients suffered from single or multiple CNS mass lesions 5-44 months after the initial diagnosis of IVL, except for one case in which IVL and the CNS mass lesion were diagnosed at the same time.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / pathology. Lymphoma, B-Cell / pathology. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / pathology

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  • (PMID = 15028023.001).
  • [ISSN] 1320-5463
  • [Journal-full-title] Pathology international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathol. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Australia
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10. Avilés A, Neri N, Cuadra I, Alvarado I, Fernández R, Calva A, Huerta-Guzmán J: Lack of prognostic factors in follicular lymphoma. Leuk Lymphoma; 2003 Jan;44(1):143-7
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  • [Title] Lack of prognostic factors in follicular lymphoma.
  • We performed a retrospective analysis of prognostic factors in patients with stage III and IV and high-tumor burden follicular lymphoma (FL) treated with uniform schedules and with a long term follow-up.
  • Eight-hundred and ten patients treated with intensive, anthracycline-based, chemotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy to sites of initial bulky nodal disease were the basis of this analysis.
  • Age >60 years, presence of B symptoms, bulky disease, >2 extranodal sites involved, high levels of LDH and the presence of serous effusions all identified as worse prognostic factors in univariate analysis were subject to multivariate analysis.
  • Three factors remained significant: age >60 years old, presence of B symptoms and >2 extranodal sites involved and these were found to influence overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS).
  • We developed a score system and only two groups (score 0 and 1 and score 2 and 3) showed statistical significance in OS.
  • Comparison of our results with multiple previous studies showed a lack of uniform prognostic factors and adequate prognostic classification could not be performed.
  • In conclusion, it is mandatory for multicentric international clinical analysis to define prognostic factors and search for a clinical classification, as in diffuse large B cell lymphoma, so as to define groups of FL for more aggressive or conservative therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Follicular / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Risk Assessment. Severity of Illness Index. Survival Analysis. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 12691155.001).
  • [ISSN] 1042-8194
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia & lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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11. Bai CM, Yang T, Xü Y, Zhang W, Liu XL, Zhu YL, Chen SC, Shen T: [Clinical analysis of 32 primary intestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma]. Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi; 2006 Feb;28(2):142-4
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  • [Title] [Clinical analysis of 32 primary intestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma].
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical and pathological features, optimal treatment and prognostic factors in primary intestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • METHODS: The clinical presentations, pathological features and therapeutic results of 32 primary intestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were retrospectively analyzed.
  • RESULTS: The most frequently site of the lesions in the 32 patients was the large intestine (n = 16, 50.0%), followed by small intestine (n = 8, 25.0%), ileocaecal region (n = 6, 18.8%) and multiple intestinal sites (n = 2, 6.2%).
  • Twenty-one patients (65.6%) were diagnosed as B-cell lymphoma, 15 (46.9%) were diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
  • Ten patients (31.2%) were diagnosed as T-cell lymphoma and one (3.1%) as histiocytic lymphoma.
  • Twenty-nine patients were treated initially by surgery with or without chemotherapy, 19 of them (59.4%) achieved complete response.
  • Based on Cox multivariate analysis, stage III - IV, B symptoms and T cell phenotype of the disease were the independent adverse prognostic factors (P < 0.05).
  • CONCLUSION: The clinical presentation of primary intestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma are not specific clinically.
  • Most of the histological types are diffuse large B-cell type lymphoma.
  • Complete resection combined with chemotherapy may be the best effective approach for treatment of this disease.
  • The prognosis of this disease are correlated with the stage, B symptoms and T cell phenotype.
  • [MeSH-major] Intestinal Neoplasms. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Lymphoma, B-Cell / drug therapy. Lymphoma, B-Cell / pathology. Lymphoma, B-Cell / surgery. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / pathology. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / surgery. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Proportional Hazards Models. Remission Induction. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 16750023.001).
  • [ISSN] 0253-3766
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua zhong liu za zhi [Chinese journal of oncology]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; CHOP protocol
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12. Wang T, Gui W, Shen Q: Primary gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: clinicopathological and prognostic analysis. Med Oncol; 2010 Sep;27(3):661-6

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Primary gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: clinicopathological and prognostic analysis.
  • The objective is to investigate the association between pathological type and clinical features, response to treatment and prognosis of primary gastrointestinal Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (PGINHL).
  • The clinicopathologic features, response to treatment and survival of 124 patients with PGINHL, were investigated retrospectively.
  • Ninety-one patients were treated with surgery, most of which included combined therapy, while 32 patients received chemotherapy alone.
  • The most common immunophenotype was B-cell subtype.
  • In 115 (92.7%) patients of B-cell lymphoma, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma (MALToma) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) were 55 and 50 patients, respectively.
  • The patients of two pathological types had different clinical features including stage, B symptoms, sites of tumor, distant involvement, International Prognosis Index Score, size of tumor, and response to treatment.
  • Both overall survival curve and multiple Cox regression analysis indicated that pathological type was statistically significant.
  • [MeSH-major] Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / pathology. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Child. Female. Humans. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / diagnosis. Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / mortality. Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / pathology. Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / therapy. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / mortality. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / pathology. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / therapy. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models. Risk. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19565363.001).
  • [ISSN] 1559-131X
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical oncology (Northwood, London, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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13. Sakai R, Kanamori H, Ishigatsubo Y: [Long-term remission after CHOP therapy in a case of multifocal extranodal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with t(1 ; 14) (p22 ; q32) and rearrangement of bcl-10]. Rinsho Ketsueki; 2005 Oct;46(10):1105-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Long-term remission after CHOP therapy in a case of multifocal extranodal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with t(1 ; 14) (p22 ; q32) and rearrangement of bcl-10].
  • q32) has been reported only in cases of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas.
  • In this report, we describe the first case of multiple extranodal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) with t(1 ; 14)(p22 ; q32).
  • A 70-year-old woman was diagnosed as having DLBCL of multiple extranodal sites (lung, duodenum, colon and kidney).
  • She achieved complete remission after six cycles of chemotherapy and has been free of disease for more than five years.
  • This is the first case of bcl-10 gene rearrangement in DLBCL with t(1 ; 14)(p22 ;.
  • [MeSH-major] Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing / genetics. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Gene Rearrangement. Lymphoma, B-Cell / drug therapy. Lymphoma, B-Cell / genetics. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / genetics. Translocation, Genetic
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1 / genetics. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 14 / genetics. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / genetics. Prednisolone / administration & dosage. Remission Induction. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 16440771.001).
  • [ISSN] 0485-1439
  • [Journal-full-title] [Rinshō ketsueki] The Japanese journal of clinical hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rinsho Ketsueki
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing; 0 / BCL10 protein, human; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone; VAP-cyclo protocol
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14. Al-Tourah AJ, Connors JM, Gascoyne RD, Hoskins PJ, O'Reilly SE, Shenkier TN, Voss NJ, Klasa RJ: Long-term follow up of limited stage primary testicular lymphoma: Outcome and patterns of relapse after combined-modality treatment. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6588

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Long-term follow up of limited stage primary testicular lymphoma: Outcome and patterns of relapse after combined-modality treatment.
  • : 6588 Background: To assess the outcome and patterns of relapse in patients (pts) with limited stage primary testicular lymphoma treated with chemotherapy and irradiation.
  • METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated the outcome and patterns of relapse in pts treated at the BC Cancer Agency for limited stage (IAE or II AE) primary testicular lymphoma.
  • Patients who were consecutively treated from 1980-1995 were selected to reflect a change in treatment policy to combined-modality therapy, consisting of brief CHOP type chemotherapy for 3 cycles followed by total scrotal irradiation.
  • Prophylactic intrathecal chemotherapy was not given.
  • All pts had diffuse large B cell lymphoma; 15(38%) pts had Ann Arbor stage IAE and 24(62%) pts had stage IIAE.
  • 5 pts were not treated, 4 were elderly and frail and 1 pt refused recommended treatment.
  • 34 pts received combined-modality therapy.
  • There were 13(38%) relapses, 10 occurring more than 2 yrs past diagnosis(range 2-10yrs).
  • 5 pts relapsed with brain parenchymal lesions, 2 with distant cutaneous sites, 3 in retroperitoneal lymph nodes (RPLN), 1 with paraspinal mass, 1 with contralateral testis and RPLN and 1 with multiple nodal sites.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Patients with limited stage primary testicular lymphoma who undergo combined-modality treatment are at risk for late relapses at extranodal sites, with particular predilection for skin and brain parenchyma but not leptomeninges.

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  • (PMID = 28016176.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. Rabii R, Mezzour MH, Guessous H, Essaki H, Joual A, Rachid M, Quessar A, Benchekroun S, El Mrini M: [Urogenital lymphoma presenting with obstructive anuria]. Prog Urol; 2004 Feb;14(1):73-7

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Urogenital lymphoma presenting with obstructive anuria].
  • The authors report a case of urogenital lymphoma with multiple sites in a patient presenting with oligo-anuria.
  • After a haemodialysis session and ultrasound-guided right percutaneous nephrostomy, pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a very large pelvic mass between the bladder and the rectum and transrectal biopsy of the mass confirmed the diagnosis of high-grade malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) with a type B lymphoblastic phenotype.
  • Treatment consisted of chemotherapy according to the LMB 93 protocol.
  • In the light of this case and a review of the literature, the authors discuss the diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic aspects of this rare site of lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Anuria / etiology. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / complications. Urogenital Neoplasms / complications

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  • (PMID = 15098759.001).
  • [ISSN] 1166-7087
  • [Journal-full-title] Progrès en urologie : journal de l'Association française d'urologie et de la Société française d'urologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prog. Urol.
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Number-of-references] 15
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16. Adams H, Tzankov A, d'Hondt S, Jundt G, Dirnhofer S, Went P: Primary diffuse large B-cell lymphomas of the bone: prognostic relevance of protein expression and clinical factors. Hum Pathol; 2008 Sep;39(9):1323-30
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  • [Title] Primary diffuse large B-cell lymphomas of the bone: prognostic relevance of protein expression and clinical factors.
  • Diffuse large B-cell lymphomas can be considered primary bone tumors if they are monostotic or polyostotic, affecting multiple skeletal sites without visceral or lymph node involvement.
  • To elucidate the prognostic relevance of clinicopathologic characteristics in such disease, we collected a cohort of primary diffuse large B-cell lymphomas of the bone and retrospectively investigated 33 patients.
  • Protein expression patterns were identified by immunohistochemistry applied to a tissue microarray.
  • Clinical factors favoring a good prognosis were age younger than 53 and administration of chemotherapy.
  • In summary, poor survival in PB-DLBCL was clearly predicted in patients older than 53, who had not received chemotherapy, and who demonstrated MUM1 expression and nongerminal center phenotype.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / pathology

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  • (PMID = 18614198.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-8392
  • [Journal-full-title] Human pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hum. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interferon Regulatory Factors; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2; 0 / interferon regulatory factor-4
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17. Gorsane I, Bourkhis L, Laatiri MA, Aloui S, Letaif A, Haouala F, Ben Dhia N, Frih A, Zakhama A, Elmay M, Skhiri H: [Acute renal failure caused by renal lymphoma. A case report]. Nephrol Ther; 2010 Apr;6(2):132-6
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  • [Title] [Acute renal failure caused by renal lymphoma. A case report].
  • Acute renal failure, as the initial manifestation of lymphoma, has been reported only in a few cases.
  • A 24-hour urine collection analysis allowed the detection of 1g of protein.
  • A diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell type non-Hodgkin lymphoma was made.
  • However, investigations revealed the presence of two others sites of lymphoma: gastric and ophthalmic.
  • The patient's renal function and kidney size as well as the other lymphoma locations were normalized after the initiation of chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Acute Kidney Injury / etiology. Eye Neoplasms / diagnosis. Kidney Neoplasms / diagnosis. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / diagnosis. Stomach Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antigens, CD20 / blood. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20299297.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-9177
  • [Journal-full-title] Néphrologie & thérapeutique
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nephrol. Ther.
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD20; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
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18. Plosker GL, Figgitt DP: Rituximab: a review of its use in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Drugs; 2003;63(8):803-43
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  • [Title] Rituximab: a review of its use in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.
  • Rituximab is an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that has demonstrated efficacy in patients with various lymphoid malignancies, including indolent and aggressive forms of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL).
  • While the optimal use of the drug in many clinical settings has yet to be clarified, two pivotal trials have established rituximab as a viable treatment option in patients with relapsed or refractory indolent NHL, and as a standard first-line treatment option when combined with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy in elderly patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (the most common type of aggressive NHL).
  • The latter was a randomised comparison of eight cycles of CHOP plus rituximab 375 mg/m(2) intravenously (one dose per cycle) versus CHOP alone in previously untreated elderly patients (60 to 80 years of age) with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
  • Treatment with rituximab is generally well tolerated, particularly in terms of adverse haematological effects and serious or opportunistic infections relative to standard chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Clinical trials with rituximab indicate that the drug has broad application to B-cell malignancies, although further clarification is needed to determine its optimal use in many of these clinical settings.
  • Importantly, rituximab in combination with CHOP chemotherapy has emerged as a new treatment standard for previously untreated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, at least in elderly patients.
  • Compared with conventional chemotherapy, rituximab is associated with markedly reduced haematological events such as severe neutropenia, as well as associated infections.
  • Rituximab may be particularly suitable for elderly patients or those with poor performance status, and its tolerability profile facilitates its use in combination with cytotoxic drugs.
  • Although treatment with rituximab induces lymphopenia in most patients, typically lasting about 6 months, a full recovery of B lymphocytes in the peripheral blood is usually seen 9-12 months after therapy, as CD20 is not expressed on haematopoietic stem cells.
  • CD20 is, however, expressed on >90% of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) and to a lesser degree on B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cells.
  • In addition, in vitro data indicate that rituximab sensitises tumour cells to the effects of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs.
  • PHARMACOKINETIC PROPERTIES: Serum rituximab concentrations increased in proportion to dose across a wide range of single- and multiple-dose intravenous regimens in patients with B-cell NHL.
  • When administered at a dose of 375 mg/m(2) once weekly for 4 weeks in a pivotal trial in patients with relapsed or refractory indolent B-cell NHL (follicular or small lymphocytic subtypes), peak serum concentrations essentially doubled from the first (239.1 mg/L) to the fourth (460.7 mg/L) infusion, while elimination half-life (t(1/2)) increased from 76.3 to 205.8 hours (3.2 to 8.6 days).
  • The concomitant increase in serum rituximab concentrations and t(1/2) with each successive infusion may be due, at least in part, to the elimination of circulating CD20-positive B cells and reduction or saturation of CD20-binding sites after the initial infusions of rituximab.
  • The pharmacokinetic properties of rituximab are also characterised by wide inter-individual variability, and serum drug concentrations that are correlated with clinical response.
  • Although pharmacokinetic data are limited in patients with aggressive forms of NHL, such as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, rituximab appears to have a similar pharmacokinetic profile in these patients to that in patients with indolent B-cell NHL.
  • The pharmacokinetics of rituximab are also reported to be similar whether the drug is administered with or without cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy.
  • THERAPEUTIC USE: A number of studies have demonstrated efficacy of intravenous rituximab in patients with various lymphoid malignancies of B-cell origin, including indolent (e.g. follicular lymphoma) and aggressive (e.g. diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) forms of NHL, and CLL, but the drug has not yet been approved for use in CLL, and approved indications in NHL vary between countries.
  • In the US, for example, rituximab is available for the treatment of patients with low-grade or follicular, relapsed or refractory, CD20-positive B-cell NHL.
  • In Europe, the drug has similar approval for relapsed or refractory follicular NHL as in the US, but has also been approved for use in combination with CHOP chemotherapy for the most common aggressive form of NHL (CD20-positive, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma).
  • In Japan, rituximab has been approved for indolent B-cell NHL and mantle cell lymphoma (an aggressive form of B-cell NHL), primarily on the basis of results of a Japanese phase II trial.
  • Indolent NHL: Results of several studies evaluating rituximab 375 mg/m(2) once weekly for 4 weeks in patients with indolent forms of B-cell NHL (primarily follicular and small lymphocytic lymphomas) showed objective response (OR) rates ranging from approximately 40-60% in those receiving the drug for relapsed or refractory indolent B-cell NHL, and slightly higher (50-70%) for those receiving rituximab as first-line therapy.
  • In a pivotal trial in 166 patients with relapsed or refractory low-grade or follicular B-cell NHL, intent-to-treat (ITT) analysis showed an OR rate of 48%, and a projected median time to progression of 13 months.
  • CHOP, fludarabine-containing regimens) or other drugs (e.g. interferon-alpha2a) in previously untreated patients with indolent forms of B-cell NHL (primarily follicular and small lymphocytic subtypes).
  • Follow-up data from a study in 40 patients with low-grade or follicular B-cell NHL treated with rituximab plus CHOP as first-line therapy showed that responses were durable with a progression-free survival and median duration of response >5 years.Bcl-2 gene rearrangement (t14;18) occurs in malignant cells in up to 85% of patients with follicular lymphoma, and minimal residual disease in peripheral blood and bone marrow can be monitored using polymerase chain reaction (PCR).
  • Aggressive NHL: Studies with rituximab as monotherapy in aggressive B-cell NHL, a potentially curable disorder, have generally been restricted to patients with relapsed or recurrent disease, since CHOP has traditionally been the standard first-line treatment regimen.
  • However, promising results from phase II monotherapy studies prompted further clinical investigation of rituximab in conjunction with chemotherapy.
  • Thus, most studies with rituximab in patients with aggressive forms of B-cell NHL have involved combination therapy, including a pivotal randomised trial comparing eight cycles of standard CHOP therapy plus rituximab 375 mg/m(2) (one dose per cycle) versus CHOP alone in 399 previously untreated elderly patients (60-80 years of age) with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
  • Other, smaller trials with rituximab in combination with CHOP or other chemotherapeutic regimens, either as first-line therapy or for patients with relapsed or refractory aggressive B-cell NHL, have also shown promising results in terms of clinical response rates.CLL: In relatively small trials (n < 40) conducted primarily in patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell CLL, rituximab monotherapy (various regimens) achieved OR rates of 23-45%, with median duration of response ranging from approximately 3-10 months. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / pharmacology. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Administration Schedule. Humans. Rituximab

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  • (PMID = 12662126.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-6667
  • [Journal-full-title] Drugs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Review
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab
  • [Number-of-references] 177
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19. Sukpanichnant S, Udomsakdi-Auewarakul C, Ruchutrakool T, Leelakusolvong S, Boonpongmanee S, Chinswangwatanakul V: Gastrointestinal lymphoma in Thailand: a clinicopathologic analysis of 120 cases at Siriraj Hospital according to WHO classification. Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health; 2004 Dec;35(4):966-76
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Gastrointestinal lymphoma in Thailand: a clinicopathologic analysis of 120 cases at Siriraj Hospital according to WHO classification.
  • Clinicopathologic information of gastrointestinal (GI) lymphoma in Southeast Asia is lacking.
  • A retrospective analysis of 120 cases of GI lymphoma in Thailand diagnosed at Siriraj Hospital based on WHO classification was performed.
  • All were non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).
  • Sites of involvement included stomach (49.2%), intestine (46.7%), and multiple sites (4.2%).
  • There were 104 cases of primary GI lymphoma (86.7%) and 16 cases of secondary GI lymphoma (13.3%).
  • The most common type of lymphoma in both groups was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
  • Lymphoepithelial lesions (LEL) were not significantly different between the two groups (58.2% vs 42.9%), but Helicobacterpylori infection was significantly associated with primary gastric lymphoma (p < 0.0001).
  • The treatment of choice for localized primary GI lymphoma is controversial.
  • Complete surgical resection may increase the chance of complete remission, but mortality and relapse rates might be higher than those observed with combination chemotherapy alone.
  • GI lymphomas in Thailand are mostly primary B-cell NHL.
  • LEL is not indicative of primary GI lymphoma, but H. pylori infection is closely associated with primary gastric lymphoma.
  • A prospective study to determine the treatment of choice for localized GI lymphoma is needed.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / pathology. Stomach Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Thailand

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  • (PMID = 15916100.001).
  • [ISSN] 0125-1562
  • [Journal-full-title] The Southeast Asian journal of tropical medicine and public health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Southeast Asian J. Trop. Med. Public Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Thailand
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20. Koch P, del Valle F, Berdel WE, Willich NA, Reers B, Hiddemann W, Grothaus-Pinke B, Reinartz G, Brockmann J, Temmesfeld A, Schmitz R, Rübe C, Probst A, Jaenke G, Bodenstein H, Junker A, Pott C, Schultze J, Heinecke A, Parwaresch R, Tiemann M, German Multicenter Study Group: Primary gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: I. Anatomic and histologic distribution, clinical features, and survival data of 371 patients registered in the German Multicenter Study GIT NHL 01/92. J Clin Oncol; 2001 Sep 15;19(18):3861-73
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Primary gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: I. Anatomic and histologic distribution, clinical features, and survival data of 371 patients registered in the German Multicenter Study GIT NHL 01/92.
  • PURPOSE: The study was initiated to obtain epidemiologic data and information on anatomic and histologic distribution, clinical features, and treatment results in patients with primary gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (PGI NHL).
  • Radiotherapy and chemotherapy were stratified according to histologic grading, stage, and whether surgery had been carried out or not.
  • Multiple GI involvement (MGI) was 6.5%.
  • Aggressive NHL accounted for the majority, with a distinguishable pattern in several sites.
  • Forty percent of PGL were of low-grade mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue type.
  • One third of large-cell lymphomas had low-grade components.
  • In gastric and ileocecal lymphoma, event-free (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were significantly higher as compared with the small intestine or MGI (median time of observation, 51 months).
  • A uniform reporting system for PGI NHL, in terms of definitions and histologic and staging classifications, is needed to facilitate comparison of treatment results.
  • [MeSH-major] Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / therapy

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  • (PMID = 11559724.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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21. Chandra P, Wen YH, Tuli S, Raphael BG, Amorosi EL, Medeiros LJ, Ibrahim S: Postchemotherapy histiocyte-rich pseudotumor involving the spleen. Am J Clin Pathol; 2009 Sep;132(3):342-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Each patient had a history of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, treated with multiagent chemotherapy.
  • Computed tomography scans performed on both patients showed splenic masses.
  • A positron emission tomography scan performed on 1 patient showed increased metabolic activity.
  • The preoperative diagnosis in both patients was recurrent lymphoma, prompting splenectomy.
  • The splenectomy specimens showed multiple, tan-white, firm nodules, up to 3.5 cm in diameter, that were histologically composed of central necrotic B cells (CD20+/CD3-), consistent with necrotic lymphoma, surrounded by numerous lipid-laden (xanthomatous) histiocytes.
  • Clinical staging studies at the time of splenectomy showed no other sites of disease.
  • We conclude that these histologic and immunophenotypic findings represent chemotherapy-induced tumor necrosis with a florid histiocytic reaction mimicking residual viable lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Histiocytosis / etiology. Histiocytosis / pathology. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / drug therapy. Spleen / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 19687310.001).
  • [ISSN] 1943-7722
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of clinical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Clin. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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22. Wong MT, Eu KW: Primary colorectal lymphomas. Colorectal Dis; 2006 Sep;8(7):586-91
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Lymphoma.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVE: The incidence of primary colorectal lymphomas is rare, comprising 10-20% of gastrointestinal lymphomas and only 0.2-0.6% of large bowel malignancies.
  • Patients often present delayed with nonspecific symptoms and consequently have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis.
  • Treatment often involves a multimodality approach, combining surgery and chemotherapy, with the use of radiotherapy in selected cases.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: We reviewed all cases of primary colorectal lymphoma seen at our institution from 1989 to 1999.
  • Patients were included based on standard diagnostic criteria for primary intestinal lymphoma established by Dawson in 1961.
  • The following clinical information was obtained: age, sex, presentation, site of tumour, operation performed, histology, length of stay, intraoperative complications, adjuvant therapy and duration of follow-up.
  • The type of lymphoma was classified according to the WHO classification system.
  • For staging, a modification of the Ann Arbor system for gastrointestinal lymphoma, proposed by Musshoff, was used.
  • The two most common sites of involvement were the caecum (57.1%) and the rectum/sigmoid colon (21.4%).
  • The lesions manifested in a variety of ways, ranging from solitary fungating masses to multiple colonic polyps.
  • All cases were non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphomas, with a majority being diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (57.1%).
  • Eleven patients (78.6%) received postoperative chemotherapy, with a regimen that included cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin and prednisone.
  • CONCLUSION: Primary colorectal lymphoma is a rare condition.
  • The histology is usually B cell and of intermediate grade.
  • Therapy usually involves resection of the affected colon and regional lymphovascular structures, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, with a reported 5-year survival of 27-55%.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms. Lymphoma

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  • (PMID = 16919111.001).
  • [ISSN] 1462-8910
  • [Journal-full-title] Colorectal disease : the official journal of the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Colorectal Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 29
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23. Thieblemont C, de la Fouchardière A, Coiffier B: Nongastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas. Clin Lymphoma; 2003 Mar;3(4):212-24
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  • [Title] Nongastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas.
  • Nongastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT)-derived lymphomas arise from various extranodal locations and are usually related to a particular pathogenesis with a possible external (environmental or autoimmune) event inducing the disease.
  • We reviewed 165 patients with nongastric MALT lymphoma among the 243 patients with MALT lymphoma in our database and reviewed reports in the literature to analyze the clinical features of nongastric MALT lymphomas.
  • The site of clinical presentation was related to the lymphoma location and was usually indolent.
  • Dissemination of the disease at diagnosis was noticed in 48% of cases because of the involvement of multiple mucosal sites (48%) or because of a nonmucosal site involvement such as bone marrow, spleen, or liver (52%).
  • Treatment recommendations for localized disease are based on surgery, local therapy, or chlorambucil.
  • For disseminated disease, treatment recommendations include chemotherapy with fludarabine or chlorambucil or chemotherapy with CHOP (cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin/vincristine/prednisone) in cases of large tumor mass
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / pathology. Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Disease-Free Survival. Humans. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 12672270.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-9655
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 102
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24. Das DK: Serous effusions in malignant lymphomas: a review. Diagn Cytopathol; 2006 May;34(5):335-47
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Lymphoma.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Although the frequency of pleural effusion is 20-30% in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin's disease (HD), the involvement of peritoneal and pericardial cavities is uncommon.
  • Among lymphoma subtypes, T-cell neoplasms, especially the lymphoblastic lymphomas, more frequently involve the serous fluids.
  • Cytologic features of specific lymphoma subtypes such as lymphoblastic lymphoma, follicular center cell lymphoma, including Burkitt-type lymphoma, marginal zone lymphoma, MALT lymphoma, and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, etc., have been described in the literature.
  • The differential diagnostic problems of lymphomas in serous effusions include reactive lymphocytoses, early involvement by lymphomatous process, small round-cell tumors (SRCT), and presence of look-alike of Reed-Sternberg cells.
  • ICC not only distinguishes lymphomas from reactive lymphocytoses and SRCTs, it significantly modifies the morphologic diagnosis to achieve a better classification of lymphomas.
  • Morphometry also distinguishes reactive lymphocytoses from malignant lymphoma with a high degree of sensitivity (>85%) and specificity (>95%).
  • Limitations of individual ancillary techniques can be overcome by using multiple parameters.
  • Although lymphomas rarely present as serous effusions without the involvement of other thoracic and extrathoracic sites, a small group of lymphomas called primary effusion lymphomas (PEL) exhibit exclusive or dominant involvement of serous cavities, without a detectable solid tumor mass.
  • This body cavity based lymphoma (BCBL) is a distinct clinicopathologic entity and is found predominantly in AIDS patients with preexisting Kaposi sarcoma.
  • Cytomorphologically, PEL is usually a large-cell lymphoma, which appears to bridge features of large-cell immunoblastic and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL).
  • Most of these cases comprise a unique subgroup of B-cell lymphoma, with features of both high-grade anaplastic and B-immunoblastic lymphoma, but T-cell and/or natural killer cell immunophenotypes are described.
  • The presence of pleural effusion at the time of presentation is not only associated with extremely poor outcome of lymphomas, it is also a predictor of disease relapse after chemotherapy and decreased survival.
  • When the patients of lymphomatous pleural effusions with and without mediastinal mass present in respiratory distress, thoracocentesis is the initial diagnostic and therapeutic choice in these patients.
  • In such situations, cytology along with ancillary studies not only gives a quick diagnosis of lymphoma, but also offers prognostically significant information such as classification of lymphomas, its grade and immunophenotype, and presence/absence of viral DNAs and tumor lysis syndrome.
  • [MeSH-major] Cytodiagnosis / methods. Lymphoma / complications. Pleural Effusion, Malignant / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Ascitic Fluid / pathology. Carcinoma, Small Cell / pathology. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Hodgkin Disease / pathology. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Lymphocytosis / pathology. Male. Pericardial Effusion / etiology. Pericardial Effusion / pathology. Reed-Sternberg Cells / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16604559.001).
  • [ISSN] 8755-1039
  • [Journal-full-title] Diagnostic cytopathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Diagn. Cytopathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 136
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25. Ejaz A, Wenig BM: Sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma: clinical and pathologic features and a discussion on classification, cellular differentiation, and differential diagnosis. Adv Anat Pathol; 2005 May;12(3):134-43
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma: clinical and pathologic features and a discussion on classification, cellular differentiation, and differential diagnosis.
  • SNUC typically presents as a rapidly enlarging tumor mass involving multiple (sinonasal tract) sites, often with evidence of extension beyond the anatomic confines of the sinonasal tract.
  • The tumor cells are medium to large sized and round to oval and have pleomorphic and hyperchromatic nuclei, inconspicuous to prominent nucleoli, varying amount of eosinophilic cytoplasm, high nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio, marked increase in mitotic activity frequently with atypical mitoses, tumor necrosis, and apoptosis.
  • Adjunct analyses (eg, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and molecular biologic studies) are often required in the diagnosis of SNUC and in differentiating it from other undifferentiated malignant neoplasms.
  • The treatment of SNUC includes aggressive multimodality therapy, including surgical resection and adjuvant therapy (ie, radiotherapy, chemotherapy).
  • The prognosis associated with SNUC is poor, and death due to disease often occurs within short periods following the diagnosis.
  • We believe that the histologic definition of SNUC can be expanded to include tumors with limited differentiated foci (ie, squamous cell differentiation) predicated on the caveats that the clinical parameters (ie, rapidly enlarging and destructive sinonasal lesions) and the majority of the histologic findings (ie, undifferentiated pleomorphic cell population) match those features that have heretofore defined SNUC.
  • The presence of squamous cell differentiation would correlate to origin in the Schneiderian epithelium, thereby conferring an ectodermal derivation to these tumors.
  • Irrespective of its cell of origin and perhaps even in the face of differentiated foci in limited parts of the tumor, given its rather unique clinicopathologic characteristics, this tumor should be identified and classified as SNUC, thereby differentiating it from the other specific types of sinonasal carcinomas and nonepithelial malignant tumors.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Carcinoma, Neuroendocrine / pathology. Diagnosis, Differential. Esthesioneuroblastoma, Olfactory / pathology. Humans. Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous / pathology. Male. Melanoma / pathology. Middle Aged. Nasal Cavity / pathology. Nose Neoplasms / pathology. Prognosis. Rhabdomyosarcoma / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 15900114.001).
  • [ISSN] 1072-4109
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in anatomic pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv Anat Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 29
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