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1. Rodriguez AR, Fishman MN: Growing opportunities for adjuvant therapy of renal cell carcinoma: targeted drugs and vaccines. Expert Opin Pharmacother; 2007 Dec;8(17):2979-90
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Growing opportunities for adjuvant therapy of renal cell carcinoma: targeted drugs and vaccines.
  • The management of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is undergoing a revolution, with the introduction of new agents and surgical paradigms.
  • Methods of risk stratifying kidney cancers are reviewed, as well as mechanisms of action of newer drugs approved in advanced metastatic kidney cancer.
  • These drugs present opportunities for application to patients in an earlier stage of disease, and adjuvant RCC trials designs are discussed.
  • Improvements have been made in the understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of RCC, both for causative and prognostic markers, with models addressing prediction of tumor behavior and therapeutic targets.
  • Practice patterns have shifted from cytokine therapies to targeted molecular approaches, particularly emphasizing the VEGF pathway, related intracellular kinases and the mammalian target of rapamycin.
  • In conclusion, elucidation of specific genes, proteins and aberrant molecular pathways associated with kidney cancer are ongoing.
  • These new agents may lead to opportunities to improvement of disease-free survival through therapy in the adjuvant setting.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Cancer Vaccines / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cytokines / therapeutic use. Humans. Neoplasm Staging. Signal Transduction / drug effects. Treatment Outcome


2. Cooney MM, Remick SC, Vogelzang NJ: Promising systemic therapy for renal cell carcinoma. Curr Treat Options Oncol; 2005 Sep;6(5):357-65
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Promising systemic therapy for renal cell carcinoma.
  • In the United States, advanced kidney cancer accounts for over 12,000 deaths each year.
  • Interferon is a less active agent than IL-2 but it has still been shown to be superior to therapy with either megesterol or vinblastine.
  • Interferon typically results in very few long-term responses and is given to most patients with metastatic kidney cancer.
  • Median survival after interferon therapy is dependent on risk group but is typically 12 to 15 months.
  • Thus, new therapies are urgently needed in this refractory disease.
  • Novel compounds currently being tested in clinical trials are showing promise in advanced kidney cancer.
  • The molecular targets of these drugs include interfering with the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors or the raf kinase pathway, angiogenesis inhibition, and antimicrotubule agents.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Benzenesulfonates / administration & dosage. Bevacizumab. Drug Administration Schedule. Epothilones / administration & dosage. Erlotinib Hydrochloride. Humans. Indoles / administration & dosage. Niacinamide / analogs & derivatives. Phenylurea Compounds. Pyridines / administration & dosage. Pyrroles / administration & dosage. Quinazolines / administration & dosage. Thalidomide / administration & dosage. Thalidomide / analogs & derivatives

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  • (PMID = 16107239.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-2729
  • [Journal-full-title] Current treatment options in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Treat Options Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzenesulfonates; 0 / Epothilones; 0 / Indoles; 0 / Phenylurea Compounds; 0 / Pyridines; 0 / Pyrroles; 0 / Quinazolines; 25X51I8RD4 / Niacinamide; 2S9ZZM9Q9V / Bevacizumab; 4Z8R6ORS6L / Thalidomide; 9ZOQ3TZI87 / sorafenib; DA87705X9K / Erlotinib Hydrochloride; F0P408N6V4 / lenalidomide; K27005NP0A / ixabepilone; V99T50803M / sunitinib
  • [Number-of-references] 44
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3. Chang AE, Li Q, Jiang G, Sayre DM, Braun TM, Redman BG: Phase II trial of autologous tumor vaccination, anti-CD3-activated vaccine-primed lymphocytes, and interleukin-2 in stage IV renal cell cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2003 Mar 1;21(5):884-90
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II trial of autologous tumor vaccination, anti-CD3-activated vaccine-primed lymphocytes, and interleukin-2 in stage IV renal cell cancer.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with stage IV renal cell cancer (RCC) were vaccinated with irradiated autologous tumor cells admixed with Calmette-Guérin bacillus.
  • RESULTS: Thirty-nine patients were entered onto the study, of whom 34 completed an initial course of cell therapy consisting of a mean (SEM) number of 4.3 (2.2) x 10(10) VPLN cells.
  • Among subjects who received cell therapy, there were nine responses (four complete responses [CRs] and five partial responses [PRs]), for an overall response rate of 27%.
  • CONCLUSION: The treatment protocol resulted in durable tumor responses in patients with advanced RCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD3 / immunology. Cancer Vaccines / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / therapy. Immunotherapy, Adoptive / methods. Interleukin-2 / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms / therapy. Lymphocyte Activation / drug effects. Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adoptive Transfer. Adult. Aged. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Immunity, Cellular / drug effects. In Vitro Techniques. Infusions, Intravenous. Interferon-gamma / metabolism. Interleukin-10 / metabolism. Male. Middle Aged. Mycobacterium bovis. Neoplasm Staging. Phenotype. T-Lymphocytes / immunology. Treatment Outcome. Vaccination

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  • (PMID = 12610189.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA69102; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01-RR00042
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antigens, CD3; 0 / Cancer Vaccines; 0 / Interleukin-2; 130068-27-8 / Interleukin-10; 82115-62-6 / Interferon-gamma
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4. Alexandrescu DT, Dasanu CA: Kidney cancer therapy: new perspectives and avenues. Expert Opin Pharmacother; 2006 Dec;7(18):2481-93
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  • [Title] Kidney cancer therapy: new perspectives and avenues.
  • Immunotherapy with interleukin-2 and interferon-alpha has been the only viable option in metastatic renal cell cancer for almost two decades.
  • In the last several years, significant advances in the understanding of the underlying biological and molecular mechanisms of renal cell carcinoma, particularly the role of tumour angiogenesis, have led to the identification of rational therapeutic targets and permitted the design of molecularly targeted therapeutics.
  • The use of small molecules, such as multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors, the mTOR inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, is dramatically changing the existing concepts of systemic treatment for metastatic kidney cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Drug Delivery Systems / trends. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 17150003.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-7666
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert opinion on pharmacotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Opin Pharmacother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 86
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5. Ather MH, Masood N, Siddiqui T: Current management of advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Urol J; 2010;7(1):1-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Current management of advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma.
  • INTRODUCTION: Unresectable renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a technically incurable condition.
  • Historically, RCC is resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy.
  • Cytokine therapy was until recently considered the mainstay of treatment.
  • Improvement in the understanding of the biology of RCC, particularly the hereditary types, is providing the basis for novel therapeutic targets.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Evidence was collected by review of current literature, guidelines of the American and European associations and the national comprehensive cancer network.
  • RESULTS: Treatment of advanced RCC has recently undergone a major change with the development of targeted agents and potent angiogenesis inhibitors.
  • Small-molecule multikinase inhibitors that target vascular endothelial growth factor receptors have a favorable toxicity profile and can prolong time to progression and preserve quality of life when used in newly diagnosed or previously treated patients; bevacizumab enhances the response rate and prolongs disease control when added to interferon-alpha.
  • Surgery still has a significant role in the management of stage IV RCC.
  • CONCLUSION: Supportive care and surgery remain the mainstay of treatment even in the management of advanced and metastatic RCC.
  • Systemic therapeutic agents are showing promising results.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Decision Trees. Humans. Neoplasm Staging


6. Atkins MB, Regan M, McDermott D: Update on the role of interleukin 2 and other cytokines in the treatment of patients with stage IV renal carcinoma. Clin Cancer Res; 2004 Sep 15;10(18 Pt 2):6342S-6S
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  • [Title] Update on the role of interleukin 2 and other cytokines in the treatment of patients with stage IV renal carcinoma.
  • Immunoreactive cytokines have been the mainstay of treatment of renal cancer for the past 15 years.
  • Its general tolerability, multiple proposed mechanisms of action, and familiarity have prompted IFN-alpha to be studied in combination with a variety of agents with potential activity against renal cell carcinoma.
  • These various studies may justify an increased role for IFN-alpha in the treatment of renal cancer in the foreseeable future.
  • High-dose bolus IL-2 remains the only treatment for stage IV renal cancer approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration.
  • Food and Drug Administration approval was granted in 1992 based on the ability of this agent to produce durable complete responses in a small number of patients.
  • Recent efforts have focused on trying to identify factors predictive of response to IL-2 therapy so that this treatment could be limited to those most likely to benefit.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Cytokines / therapeutic use. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Interleukin-2 / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 15448028.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA101942-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Interleukin-2
  • [Number-of-references] 35
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7. Negrier S, Douillard JY, Gomez F, Lasset C, Chevreau C, Escudier B, French Immunotherapy Group: [Interleukin-2 and interferon in metastatic kidney cancer. Experience of the French Immunotherapy Group]. Prog Urol; 2002 Apr;12(2):213-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Interleukin-2 and interferon in metastatic kidney cancer. Experience of the French Immunotherapy Group].
  • [Transliterated title] Interleukine-2 et interféron dans le cancer du rein métastatique L'expérience du Groupe Français d'Immunothérapie.
  • The authors report the experience of the investigators of the Groupe Français d'Immunotherapie in the treatment of metastatic renal cancer by cytokines based on several clinical trials conducted successively between 1991 and 1998.
  • This group initially conducted a large-scale randomized trial reported in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1999, comparing three treatment regimens: intravenous interleukin-2, interferon alone and a combination of these two treatment modalities.
  • A subgroup of patients was identified with a probability of progression during treatment greater than 70% and a median survival of 6 months.
  • These patients concomitantly presented initial metastases during the year following the diagnosis of renal cancer, involving several organs including the liver.
  • [MeSH-major] Cytokines / therapeutic use. Interferons / therapeutic use. Interleukin-2 / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans. Neoplasm Metastasis. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic

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  • (PMID = 12108334.001).
  • [ISSN] 1166-7087
  • [Journal-full-title] Progrès en urologie : journal de l'Association française d'urologie et de la Société française d'urologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prog. Urol.
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Interleukin-2; 9008-11-1 / Interferons
  • [Number-of-references] 15
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8. Temsirolimus: new drug. Metastatic kidney cancer: more assessment needed. Prescrire Int; 2008 Dec;17(98):223-5
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  • [Title] Temsirolimus: new drug. Metastatic kidney cancer: more assessment needed.
  • (1) Most kidney tumours are discovered at an advanced stage or after they have already metastasised.
  • Even in these cases, surgical excision, when feasible, remains the first-line treatment.
  • Chemotherapy only increases survival time by a few months, at a cost of frequent adverse effects.
  • The best-assessed drug in this setting is interferon alfa;.
  • (2) Temsirolimus is marketed for first-line treatment of advanced-stage kidney cancer in patients who have risk factors associated with a poor prognosis.
  • (3) Clinical evaluation is based on a randomised unblinded trial in 626 patients with kidney cancer.
  • The median survival time was significantly longer with temsirolimus monotherapy than with interferon alfa-2a monotherapy (10.9 versus 7.3 months), but it was not longer with interferon alfa-2a + temsirolimus than with interferon alfa-2a alone;.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasm Metastasis / drug therapy. Sirolimus / analogs & derivatives. Sirolimus / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Therapy, Combination. Europe. Humans. Interferon-alpha / administration & dosage. Interferon-alpha / adverse effects. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Recombinant Proteins. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19415885.001).
  • [ISSN] 1167-7422
  • [Journal-full-title] Prescrire international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prescrire Int
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 624KN6GM2T / temsirolimus; 76543-88-9 / interferon alfa-2a; W36ZG6FT64 / Sirolimus
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9. Geller JI, Argani P, Adeniran A, Hampton E, De Marzo A, Hicks J, Collins MH: Translocation renal cell carcinoma: lack of negative impact due to lymph node spread. Cancer; 2008 Apr 1;112(7):1607-16
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Translocation renal cell carcinoma: lack of negative impact due to lymph node spread.
  • BACKGROUND: Pediatric renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is clinically distinct from adult RCC.
  • RESULTS: Eleven cases of RCC with clinical data were identified in our institutional review as follows: 6 clear cell, 2 papillary, 2 translocation, and 1 sarcomatoid.
  • Seven of 8 TFE+ RCC patients presented with TNM Stage III/IV disease.
  • Literature analysis confirmed a significant increase in advanced stage presentation in pediatric TFE+ RCC compared with TFE- RCC.
  • Fourteen of fifteen (93.3%) patients with TFE+ stage III/IV RCC due to lymph node spread (N+ M(0)) remain disease free with a median and mean follow-up of 4.4 and 6.3 years, respectively (range, 0.3-15.5).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Translocation morphology RCC is the predominant form of pediatric RCC, associated with an advanced stage at presentation.
  • Young RCC patients should be screened for translocation morphology, and the screening information should be considered when debating adjuvant therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / genetics. Kidney Neoplasms / genetics. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Translocation, Genetic
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell / drug therapy. Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell / genetics. Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell / secondary. Adolescent. Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors / genetics. Carcinoma, Papillary / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Papillary / genetics. Carcinoma, Papillary / secondary. Child. Cohort Studies. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunoenzyme Techniques. Leucine Zippers. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Microphthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor / genetics. Neoplasm Proteins / genetics. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 18278810.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors; 0 / MITF protein, human; 0 / Microphthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / TFE3 protein, human; 0 / TFEB protein, human
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10. Cai L, Liu MZ, Gu MF, Liu H, Chen EC, Hu YH, Lin HX, Wang HY, Huang Y, Li QQ, Cui NJ, Rong TH: [Phase I study of CM-Na combined with concurrent radiochemotherapy for advanced esophageal carcinoma]. Ai Zheng; 2005 May;24(5):582-6
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  • [Title] [Phase I study of CM-Na combined with concurrent radiochemotherapy for advanced esophageal carcinoma].
  • BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: Although concurrent radiochemotherapy is recommended as the standard treatment for advanced esophageal carcinoma, the local failure still reaches up to 44%-54%.
  • METHODS: Twenty-two patients with pathologically confirmed esophageal squamous carcinoma of stage III-IV were recruited according to the inclusion criteria.
  • Conventional radiotherapy was performed with total dose of 60 Gy within 6 weeks.
  • CM-Na was given 1 h before radiotherapy at Monday, Wednesday, and Friday every week, combined with 2 circles of continuous 5-day chemotherapy of 500 mg x (m(2) x d)(-1) of 5-fluoruracil (5-FU) and 20 mg x (m(2) x d)(-1) of cisplatin (DDP) at the first and the fifth week.
  • RESULTS: Low-grade gastrointestinal adverse reactions were observed in the 4 groups during the period of chemotherapy, but no adverse reactions of nervous system, kidney, or heart were observed.
  • Severe adverse reactions occurred in 800 mg x (m(2) x d) (-1) group, included 3 cases of grade III radioactive esophagitis, 2 cases of grade IV aminopherase risen, and 1 case of grade III thrombocytopenia.
  • CONCLUSION: Liver disfunction is the main dose-limited toxicity of the treatment schemeu 700 mg x (m(2) x d) (-1) of CM-Na is recommended to phase II clinical study.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell. Esophageal Neoplasms. Organometallic Compounds / adverse effects. Radiation-Sensitizing Agents / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Alanine Transaminase / blood. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Esophagitis / etiology. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Maximum Tolerated Dose. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy, High-Energy / adverse effects. Sodium. Thrombocytopenia / chemically induced

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  • (PMID = 15890102.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Ai zheng = Aizheng = Chinese journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ai Zheng
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Organometallic Compounds; 0 / Radiation-Sensitizing Agents; 9NEZ333N27 / Sodium; EC 2.6.1.2 / Alanine Transaminase; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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11. Cornu JN, Rouprêt M, Bensalah K, Oudard S, Patard JJ: [Antiangiogenics: new therapeutic standards in metastatic kidney cancer]. Prog Urol; 2008 Jul;18 Suppl 4:S69-76
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  • [Title] [Antiangiogenics: new therapeutic standards in metastatic kidney cancer].
  • [Transliterated title] Les anti-angiogéniques: de nouveaux standards thérapeutiques dans le cancer du rein métastatique.
  • Since 2004, the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma is in deep mutation.
  • From 2004, studies of new antiangiogenic molecules, acting on the pVHL-HIF way, VEGF, PDGF or tyrosine-kinase receptors have modified the management of metastatic patients.
  • Antiangiogenic agents improve progression-free survival as shown with sunitinib, in first line treatment, or sorafenib, as second line treatment.
  • The m-TOR inhibitors (Temsirolimus), can be used with a benefit on overall survival in case of poor prognosis renal cell carcinoma or non clear cell carcinoma.
  • Nevertheless, the place of these molecules have to be defined in the sequence of the treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Benzenesulfonates / therapeutic use. Humans. Indoles / therapeutic use. Neoplasm Metastasis / drug therapy. Niacinamide / analogs & derivatives. Phenylurea Compounds. Pyridines / therapeutic use. Pyrroles / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 18706374.001).
  • [ISSN] 1166-7087
  • [Journal-full-title] Progrès en urologie : journal de l'Association française d'urologie et de la Société française d'urologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prog. Urol.
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Benzenesulfonates; 0 / Indoles; 0 / Phenylurea Compounds; 0 / Pyridines; 0 / Pyrroles; 0 / sunitinib; 25X51I8RD4 / Niacinamide; 9ZOQ3TZI87 / sorafenib
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12. Dasanu CA, Alexandrescu DT, Dutcher J: Yellow skin discoloration associated with sorafenib use for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. South Med J; 2007 Mar;100(3):328-30
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  • [Title] Yellow skin discoloration associated with sorafenib use for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma.
  • This report describes a patient with metastatic kidney cancer who developed a deep yellow skin discoloration while on therapy with the oral multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), sorafenib.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Benzenesulfonates / adverse effects. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Pigmentation Disorders / chemically induced. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / adverse effects. Pyridines / adverse effects. raf Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Acrodermatitis / chemically induced. Erythema / chemically induced. Humans. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Male. Middle Aged. Niacinamide / analogs & derivatives. Phenylurea Compounds. Spinal Neoplasms / secondary

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  • [ErratumIn] South Med J. 2007 May;100(5):485
  • (PMID = 17396743.001).
  • [ISSN] 0038-4348
  • [Journal-full-title] Southern medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] South. Med. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzenesulfonates; 0 / Phenylurea Compounds; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Pyridines; 25X51I8RD4 / Niacinamide; 9ZOQ3TZI87 / sorafenib; EC 2.7.11.1 / raf Kinases
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13. Sugano O, Muto A, Kato M, Ono K: [A case of renal cell carcinoma with lymph node metastasis keeping remission for five years by adjuvant immunotherapy with ubenimex]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2003 Oct;30(10):1519-22
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  • [Title] [A case of renal cell carcinoma with lymph node metastasis keeping remission for five years by adjuvant immunotherapy with ubenimex].
  • We report herein the long-term remission of a woman following postoperative ubenimex therapy.
  • A 46-year-old woman with a tumor in the left kidney and a swollen para-aortic lymph node was referred to our department for surgery.
  • Preoperative computed tomography revealed a stage IV renal cell carcinoma.
  • Since her right kidney naturally ruptured after hospitalization, the patient underwent bilateral kidney and partial paraaortic lymph node dissection.
  • Histopathological tests revealed that the tumor was T3, N2, M0, mixed type.
  • As the residual lymph node was swollen at 4 months after the operation, treatment with ubenimex was started.
  • Five years after the operation, no new lymph node metastases were recognized under continuous treatment with ubenimex.
  • Single administration of ubenimex appears to be effective for cases of renal cell carcinoma with lymph node metastasis to maintain good patient QOL because of its few side effects.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Immunotherapy. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Leucine / analogs & derivatives. Leucine / therapeutic use. Lymph Nodes / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Lymphatic Metastasis. Middle Aged. Nephrectomy. Remission Induction

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  • (PMID = 14584289.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; GMW67QNF9C / Leucine; I0J33N5627 / ubenimex
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14. Vogelzang NJ, Aklilu M, Stadler WM, Dumas MC, Mikulski SM: A phase II trial of weekly intravenous ranpirnase (Onconase), a novel ribonuclease in patients with metastatic kidney cancer. Invest New Drugs; 2001;19(3):255-60
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  • [Title] A phase II trial of weekly intravenous ranpirnase (Onconase), a novel ribonuclease in patients with metastatic kidney cancer.
  • Ranpirnase (Onconase) is the first ribonuclease to enter cancer clinical trials.
  • This phase II trial tested ranpirnase (480 microg/m2/w) in 14 patients with refractory advanced renal cell cancer.
  • All patients had prior immunotherapy and three had prior chemotherapy.
  • At this dose and schedule ranpirnase has minimal activity in metastatic renal cell cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Ribonucleases / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome


15. Gobbi PG, Broglia C, Bertè R, Petrilli MP, Molica S, Angrilli F, Iannitto E, Ghirardelli ML, Di Renzo N, Cavanna L, Ascari E: Lomustine and melphalan cannot be replaced by cyclophosphamide and etoposide without reducing efficacy in MOPPEBVCAD chemotherapy for advanced Hodgkin's disease. Haematologica; 2000 Jul;85(7):722-8
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  • [Title] Lomustine and melphalan cannot be replaced by cyclophosphamide and etoposide without reducing efficacy in MOPPEBVCAD chemotherapy for advanced Hodgkin's disease.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the feasibility, toxicity and preliminary results of a potentially less toxic variant of the MOPPEBVCAD chemotherapy regimen for advanced Hodgkin's disease: MOPPEBVCyED, in which cyclophosphamide and etoposide replace lomustine and melphalan, respectively, with the remaining components being unaltered.
  • DESIGN AND METHODS: The study was multicenter, prospective and randomized, and enrolled 67 patients with newly diagnosed stage IIB, III, IV Hodgkin's disease (62 were expected on the grounds of statistical considerations).
  • Radiotherapy was restricted to sites of bulky involvement or to areas that responded incompletely to chemotherapy.
  • RESULTS: Comparing MOPPEBVCAD vs. MOPPEBVCyED, the results were as follows: complete remissions 35/35 vs. 30/32 (plus one partial remission and one disease progression); relapses 5 vs. 8; deaths 2 (one of myelodysplasia) vs. 2; delivered mean dose intensity (DI): lomustine 0.79+/-0.67 vs. cyclophosphamide 0.82+/-0.32; melphalan 0.80+/-0.13 vs. etoposide 0.86+/-0.18; average DI of the 7 drugs common to both regimens 0.73+/-0.10 vs. 0.83+/-0.11; all 9 drugs 0.75+/-0.13 vs. 0.84+/-0.09 (p=0.002); projected 5-year failure-free survival 0.79 vs 0.62; second cancers, two myelodysplasias vs. one carcinoma of the kidney.
  • INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: The higher cumulative and single drug DI recorded with MOPPEBVCyED may reflect better short-term tolerability, but it does not lead to better disease control.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Hodgkin Disease / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Bleomycin / administration & dosage. Bleomycin / standards. Bleomycin / toxicity. Epirubicin / administration & dosage. Epirubicin / standards. Epirubicin / toxicity. Female. Humans. Lomustine / administration & dosage. Lomustine / standards. Lomustine / toxicity. Male. Mechlorethamine / administration & dosage. Mechlorethamine / standards. Mechlorethamine / toxicity. Melphalan / administration & dosage. Melphalan / standards. Melphalan / toxicity. Middle Aged. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Prednisone / standards. Prednisone / toxicity. Procarbazine / administration & dosage. Procarbazine / standards. Procarbazine / toxicity. Prospective Studies. Treatment Outcome. Vinblastine / administration & dosage. Vinblastine / standards. Vinblastine / toxicity. Vincristine / administration & dosage. Vincristine / standards. Vincristine / toxicity. Vindesine / administration & dosage. Vindesine / standards. Vindesine / toxicity

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  • (PMID = 10897124.001).
  • [ISSN] 0390-6078
  • [Journal-full-title] Haematologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Haematologica
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] ITALY
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 35S93Y190K / Procarbazine; 3Z8479ZZ5X / Epirubicin; 50D9XSG0VR / Mechlorethamine; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 7BRF0Z81KG / Lomustine; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; Q41OR9510P / Melphalan; RSA8KO39WH / Vindesine; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; CAD protocol 1; EBV protocol; MOPP protocol
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16. Vozianov AF, Zak KP, Zubko VI, Romanenko AM, Klimenko IA, Babich VM, Kushneruk IuI, Shcherbak AIu, Bazalitskaia SV, Gruzov MA: [Clinical and immunological studies of the therapeutical effect of cytokines combined with 5-fluorouracil in metastatic kidney cancer]. Lik Sprava; 2002;(7):41-7
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  • [Title] [Clinical and immunological studies of the therapeutical effect of cytokines combined with 5-fluorouracil in metastatic kidney cancer].
  • The authors present the results of a six-year clinicoimmunological study of a therapeutic effect of cytkins combined with 5-fluoruracyl in metastatic renal-cell carcinoma.
  • Two therapeutic regiments have been used: rhIFN-a + 5-FU and rhIL-2 + RHifn-A + 5-FU.
  • In cytokin-sensitive patients, both therapy protocols vrs conventional therapeutic alternatives (cytostatics, hormones, irradiation) have been shown to increase the frequency of achievement of remission by objective scoring and life span of the patients.
  • There was an improvement in patients on having received the complex with IL-2 but a higher therapeutic effect appeared to be accompanied by substantial side effects.
  • Recommendatory measures well-targeted to those patients with metastatic renal-cell carcinoma who are to be placed on cytokinotherapy are presented together with immunological indices to monitor the treatments administered and prognosis.

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  • (PMID = 12587303.001).
  • [ISSN] 1019-5297
  • [Journal-full-title] Likars'ka sprava
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lik. Sprava
  • [Language] RUS
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ukraine
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Interleukin-2; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 76543-88-9 / interferon alfa-2a; 99210-65-8 / interferon alfa-2b; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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17. Doehn C: [New drugs for metastatic kidney cancer]. Aktuelle Urol; 2008 Jan;39(1):41-52
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  • [Title] [New drugs for metastatic kidney cancer].
  • [Transliterated title] Neue Medikamente beim metastasierten Nierenzellkarzinom.
  • Systemic therapy of metastatic kidney cancer has undergone dramatic changes over the past years.
  • Furthermore, signalling pathways have been identified to be relevant for tumour progression and therapeutic intervention.
  • Until some years ago, systemic therapy for kidney cancer consisted of cytokines.
  • In this review, new drugs for the treatment of metastatic kidney cancer are discussed.
  • These drugs predominantly interact the VEGF, EGFR and mTOR signalling pathways.
  • Four drugs have been studied in phase III trials and were (or will soon be) approved for treatment of metastatic kidney cancer.
  • Additionally, many drugs are currently being tested in phase I and phase II trials.
  • At present, the following scenarios have an impact on therapy decisions: different prognostic groups, first-line and second-line therapy, combination therapies and the impact of different histological subtypes.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Clinical Trials, Phase I as Topic. Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic. Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic. Cytokines / therapeutic use. Disease Progression. Humans. Immunologic Factors / administration & dosage. Immunologic Factors / therapeutic use. Karnofsky Performance Status. Kidney / pathology. Prognosis. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / administration & dosage. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Protein Kinases / drug effects. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / drug effects. Risk Factors. Signal Transduction / drug effects. TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases. Time Factors. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / drug effects


18. Sibaud V, Delord JP, Chevreau C: Sorafenib-induced hand-foot skin reaction: a Koebner phenomenon? Target Oncol; 2009 Dec;4(4):307-10
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  • Sorafenib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor prescribed primarily for the management of metastatic kidney cancer.
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Humans. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Niacinamide / analogs & derivatives. Phenylurea Compounds. Prognosis. Skin Diseases / chemically induced. Skin Tests

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  • (PMID = 19894099.001).
  • [ISSN] 1776-260X
  • [Journal-full-title] Targeted oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Target Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzenesulfonates; 0 / Phenylurea Compounds; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Pyridines; 25X51I8RD4 / Niacinamide; 9ZOQ3TZI87 / sorafenib
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19. Herrmann E, Gerss J, Bierer S, Köpke T, Bolenz C, Hertle L, Wülfing C: Pre-treatment global quality of health predicts progression free survival in metastatic kidney cancer patients treated with sorafenib or sunitinib. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol; 2009 Jan;135(1):61-7
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  • [Title] Pre-treatment global quality of health predicts progression free survival in metastatic kidney cancer patients treated with sorafenib or sunitinib.
  • PURPOSE: Our goal was to prospectively evaluate self-reported quality-of-life (QoL) during second-line therapy in 51 consecutive patients with cytokine-refractory kidney cancer treated with sorafenib or sunitinib.
  • RESULTS: Global QoL deteriorated significantly during the first 4 weeks of treatment (P < 0.0001).
  • After 16 weeks, fatigue (P < 0.0001), pain (P = 0.015), appetite loss (P = 0.002) and diarrhoea (P = 0.038) were still influenced by the therapy, while all functional scales recovered.
  • A better physical function at baseline, a better ECOG performance status, and a low risk profile according to MSKCC risk groups correlated with a longer PFS (all P < 0.0001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Second-line therapy with sorafenib or sunitinib does not adversely affect patients global QoL after 16 weeks of treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Benzenesulfonates / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / mortality. Indoles / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms / mortality. Pyridines / therapeutic use. Pyrroles / therapeutic use. Quality of Life
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Health Surveys. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Neoplasm Staging. Niacinamide / analogs & derivatives. Palliative Care. Phenylurea Compounds. Prognosis. Prospective Studies. Salvage Therapy. Surveys and Questionnaires. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 18592270.001).
  • [ISSN] 0171-5216
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cancer research and clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cancer Res. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzenesulfonates; 0 / Indoles; 0 / Phenylurea Compounds; 0 / Pyridines; 0 / Pyrroles; 25X51I8RD4 / Niacinamide; 9ZOQ3TZI87 / sorafenib; V99T50803M / sunitinib
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20. Siebels M, Staehler M, Hegele A, Varga Z, Oberneder R, Doehn C, Heinzer H, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Immun- und Targeted Therapie e.V. (DGFIT): [Impact of immunotherapy in metastatic kidney cancer in Germany after introduction of new target therapy--results of a telephone survey of the German Society of Immuno- and Targeted Therapy (DGFIT)]. Aktuelle Urol; 2010 Mar;41(2):122-30
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Impact of immunotherapy in metastatic kidney cancer in Germany after introduction of new target therapy--results of a telephone survey of the German Society of Immuno- and Targeted Therapy (DGFIT)].
  • [Transliterated title] Welche Bedeutung hat die Immuntherapie beim metastasierten Nierenzell-karzinom nach Einführung der neuen Target-Substanzen in Deutschland--Ergebnisse einer repräsentativen Umfrage der DGFIT.
  • INTRODUCTION: Until recently, the standard therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) in Germany consisted of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-alfa (IFN) as single agents or in combination, with or without chemotherapy.
  • Since 2005, new drugs (target drugs) in the therapy for mRCC are available.
  • The aim of this study was to analyse the current therapy standard in Germany.
  • Screening criteria were 1) responsibility for therapy in mRCC;.
  • 2) therapy of at least 10 patients with mRCC per year.
  • 98% of patients with mRCC were treated: A: the most frequent therapy was sunitinib (43%, 42%, 33% as first-, second-, third-line), B: the most frequent therapy was sunitinib (45% as first-line, 37% as second-line), the most frequent third-line therapy was sorafenib (35%); C: the most frequent therapy were sorafenib and sunitinib (first-line 26% vs. 27%, second-line 46% vs. 42%), in third-line therapy additionally temsirolimus 24%; D: primary sorafenib and sunitinib (first-line 33% vs. 40%, second-line 46% vs. 42%), in third-line therapy additionally temsirolimus 23%.
  • Immunotherapy (IL-2, IFN with or without chemotherapy) in mRCC plays in Germany for the second- and third-line therapy in A-D no major role (less than 10%).
  • Otherwise, for first-line therapy immunotherapy has some relevance: A: 25%, B: 37%, C: 33%, D: 16%.
  • The most important criteria for therapy decision making in A-D were: efficacy, toxicity, drug approval status.
  • Sunitinib (in first-line) and sorafenib (in second-line) are currently the most frequent prescribed drugs in mRCC.
  • Temsirolimus is used mostly for third-line therapy (followed by sunitinib/sorafenib).
  • Treatment of mRCC in Germany is increasingly being performed by oncologists.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Benzenesulfonates / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Drug Delivery Systems / methods. Immunotherapy / methods. Indoles / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pyridines / therapeutic use. Pyrroles / therapeutic use. Sirolimus / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Attitude of Health Personnel. Cooperative Behavior. Data Collection. Drug Utilization / statistics & numerical data. Germany. Humans. Interdisciplinary Communication. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Interleukin-2 / therapeutic use. Medical Oncology. Niacinamide / analogs & derivatives. Patient Care Team. Phenylurea Compounds. Urology

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  • [Copyright] Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart New York.
  • (PMID = 19937556.001).
  • [ISSN] 1438-8820
  • [Journal-full-title] Aktuelle Urologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Aktuelle Urol
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzenesulfonates; 0 / Indoles; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Interleukin-2; 0 / Phenylurea Compounds; 0 / Pyridines; 0 / Pyrroles; 0 / sunitinib; 25X51I8RD4 / Niacinamide; 624KN6GM2T / temsirolimus; 9ZOQ3TZI87 / sorafenib; W36ZG6FT64 / Sirolimus
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21. Pedrazzoli P, Da Prada GA, Giorgiani G, Schiavo R, Zambelli A, Giraldi E, Landonio G, Locatelli F, Siena S, Della Cuna GR: Allogeneic blood stem cell transplantation after a reduced-intensity, preparative regimen: a pilot study in patients with refractory malignancies. Cancer; 2002 May 1;94(9):2409-15
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  • [Title] Allogeneic blood stem cell transplantation after a reduced-intensity, preparative regimen: a pilot study in patients with refractory malignancies.
  • BACKGROUND: The immune-mediated graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect plays a therapeutic role in the treatment of patients with hematologic malignancies who undergo allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).
  • More recently, it was reported that a GVT effect also occurred in patients who underwent transplantation for metastatic renal carcinoma.
  • METHODS: Seventeen patients with Stage IV malignancies (7 patients with renal cell carcinoma, 3 patients with sarcoma, 2 patients with breast carcinoma, 2 patients with Hodgkin disease, 1 patient with ovarian carcinoma, 1 patient with melanoma, and 1 patient with both melanoma and renal cell carcinoma) that were not amenable to further conventional treatment were enrolled.
  • Preparative treatment consisted of reduced-intensity chemotherapy with fludarabine (30 mg/m(2) per day for 4 consecutive days) and cyclophosphamide (30 mg/Kg per day for 2 consecutive days) prior to allogeneic HSCT from a human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling.
  • RESULTS: Patients who had a PS of 2-3 prior to undergoing HSCT experienced Grade 4 hematologic toxicities and Grade > or = 3 organ toxicities and died of either treatment-related complications or disease progression within 100 days from transplantation.
  • By Day +90, 100% donor chimerism was documented in all patients with a past history of heavy chemotherapy, whereas mixed donor chimerism was observed in the 4 patients with a past history of only 1 line of chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy prior to entering the HSCT program.
  • Among patients with a follow-up > 100 days, 2 complete responses and 3 transitory partial responses were recorded.
  • CONCLUSIONS: With this conditioning regimen, full donor chimerism was achieved rapidly only in patients who had received previous intensive chemotherapy.
  • This novel therapeutic strategy may provide little benefit in patients with poor PS and rapidly progressing disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Neoplasms / therapy. Transplantation Conditioning / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / administration & dosage. Breast Neoplasms / surgery. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Child. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Female. Hodgkin Disease / surgery. Humans. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Male. Melanoma / surgery. Middle Aged. Pilot Projects. Sarcoma / surgery. Survival Rate. Transplantation Chimera. Transplantation, Homologous. Treatment Outcome. Vidarabine / administration & dosage. Vidarabine / analogs & derivatives

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002 American Cancer Society.DOI 10.1002/cncr.10491
  • (PMID = 12015766.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; FA2DM6879K / Vidarabine; P2K93U8740 / fludarabine
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22. Takemura H, Kobayashi S, Katsuno M, Asano R, Morimoto M, Tachibana S, Kubota H, Iida M, Kadokura Y, Sanbe T: [Clinical phase trial of concurrent chemoradiotherapy combined TS-1 and nedaplatin]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2005 Dec;32(13):2065-9
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  • We have treated head and neck carcinoma by concurrent chemoradiotherapy combined with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin (CDDP).
  • However,this chemoradiotherapy could not show an enormous effect in the advanced carcinoma of Stage III and IV.
  • Therefore,we changed the contents of the chemotherapy, i.e., we replaced 5-FU, one of the agents with time dependency, to continuous administration of TS-1 for 2 weeks,also replacing CDDP, one of the agents with dose dependency, to nedaplatin (CDGP) in order to reduce kidney dysfunction.
  • In this concurrent chemoradiotherapy, oral TS-1 was continued for 2 weeks and CDGP was administered on the 4 th day from the start of TS-1.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Combinations. Female. Humans. Male. Maximum Tolerated Dose. Middle Aged. Organoplatinum Compounds / administration & dosage. Oxonic Acid / administration & dosage. Pyridines / administration & dosage. Radiotherapy Dosage. Tegafur / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 16352930.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase I; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 0 / Pyridines; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid; 8UQ3W6JXAN / nedaplatin
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23. de Gramont A, Van Cutsem E: Investigating the potential of bevacizumab in other indications: metastatic renal cell, non-small cell lung, pancreatic and breast cancer. Oncology; 2005;69 Suppl 3:46-56
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  • [Title] Investigating the potential of bevacizumab in other indications: metastatic renal cell, non-small cell lung, pancreatic and breast cancer.
  • Bevacizumab (Avastin) has unprecedented survival benefit in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.
  • Trials are already in progress to investigate the potential of bevacizumab in indications including metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), pancreatic cancer, breast and ovarian cancer.
  • Bevacizumab offers the potential to increase survival without substantially altering the toxicity profile in these tumor types.
  • Bevacizumab has shown activity in patients with refractory metastatic RCC, where progression-free survival (PFS) was significantly longer in patients treated with bevacizumab (10 mg/kg every 2 weeks) than those treated with placebo (hazard ratio=2.55, p<0.001).
  • In addition, combining bevacizumab with erlotinib (Tarceva) has shown a median time to progression of more than 11 months.
  • In NSCLC, a phase II trial revealed that adding bevacizumab to chemotherapy increased therapeutic benefit compared with chemotherapy alone.
  • Adverse events were mild and easily managed, but six patients receiving bevacizumab developed severe hemoptysis.
  • Entry criteria for NSCLC trials have been adjusted to exclude patients with squamous cell histology to try to avoid this issue.
  • Adding bevacizumab (10 mg/kg) to the current standard of care, gemcitabine, in stage IV pancreatic cancer has also shown promising efficacy.
  • Partial responses were seen in 19% of patients, with a further 48% having stable disease.
  • Several ongoing clinical trials are also studying bevacizumab with various chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens.
  • Bevacizumab combined with carboplatin (Paraplatin)/paclitaxel (Taxol) was further examined in a phase III randomized trial that accrued 878 patients with advanced non-squamous cell NSCLC.
  • Patients given chemotherapy (paclitaxel and carboplatin) plus bevacizumab had a higher response rate, longer PFS and an increase in survival compared with patients on chemotherapy alone.
  • Bevacizumab has also shown activity in patients with metastatic breast cancer.
  • Bevacizumab has the potential to provide significant efficacy benefits for patients with metastatic RCC, NSCLC, pancreatic cancer, and other tumor types when used first line in combination with standard therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / pharmacology. Antibodies, Monoclonal / pharmacology. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Pancreatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / antagonists & inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Bevacizumab. Female. Humans. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy


24. Singam P, Ho C, Hong GE, Mohd A, Tamil AM, Cheok LB, Zainuddin Z: Clinical characteristics of renal cancer in Malaysia : a ten year review. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev; 2010;11(2):503-6
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  • [Title] Clinical characteristics of renal cancer in Malaysia : a ten year review.
  • Renal cancer is rare and its incidence is 1.9 per 100,000 in the Malaysian population, which consists of three major ethnic groups (Malay, Chinese and Indians).
  • The study included all renal cancer patients from a single medical institution over ten years, with a total of 75 cases.
  • Seventy-three patients underwent surgery while 2 received only radiotherapy or chemotherapy.
  • There were 26 (37.4%) patients with Stage I disease, 14 (18.7%) at Stage II, 23 (30.7%) at Stage III and 12 (16%) at Stage IV.
  • The Chinese race presented at mean older age (p= 0.02) and later stage of disease (p= 0.046).
  • Patients above 40 years old had more advanced stage disease (p= 0.023).
  • Tumour histology were clear cell (72%), urothelial cell (13.3%), sarcomatoid cell and nephroblastoma each contributed 2.7%.
  • In conclusion we observed significant influences of age and race in the clinical presentation of renal cancer in our institution based population.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Papillary / therapy. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / therapy. Wilms Tumor / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Incidence. Malaysia. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Radiotherapy Dosage. Risk Factors. Survival Rate. Time Factors. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20843141.001).
  • [ISSN] 2476-762X
  • [Journal-full-title] Asian Pacific journal of cancer prevention : APJCP
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Asian Pac. J. Cancer Prev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Thailand
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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25. Mizutani Y, Nakanishi H, Yamamoto K, Li YN, Matsubara H, Mikami K, Okihara K, Kawauchi A, Bonavida B, Miki T: Downregulation of Smac/DIABLO expression in renal cell carcinoma and its prognostic significance. J Clin Oncol; 2005 Jan 20;23(3):448-54
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  • [Title] Downregulation of Smac/DIABLO expression in renal cell carcinoma and its prognostic significance.
  • Furthermore, Smac/DIABLO plays an important regulatory role in the sensitization of cancer cells to both immune- and drug-induced apoptosis.
  • However, little is known about the clinical significance of Smac/DIABLO in various cancers, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: The level of Smac/DIABLO expression was quantified by Western blot analysis using nonfixed fresh frozen tissues.
  • RESULTS: The expression of Smac/DIABLO was lower in RCC compared with the autologous normal kidney.
  • Sixty-four (82%) of 78 of RCC expressed Smac/DIABLO, and 18% were negative, whereas 100% of normal kidney tissues were positive.
  • In stage I/II RCC, 96% expressed Smac/DIABLO, whereas only 50% expressed Smac/DIABLO in stage III/IV.
  • CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrates for the first time that Smac/DIABLO expression was downregulated in RCC and that no Smac/DIABLO expression in RCC predicted a worse prognosis.
  • These results suggest that Smac/DIABLO expression in RCC may be used as a prognostic parameter, and that enhancement of Smac/DIABLO expression in RCC may potentiate immunotherapy and chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / genetics. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Carrier Proteins / biosynthesis. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Kidney Neoplasms / genetics. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Mitochondrial Proteins / biosynthesis

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  • [CommentIn] J Clin Oncol. 2005 Jan 20;23(3):410-2 [15572728.001]
  • (PMID = 15572731.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Carrier Proteins; 0 / DIABLO protein, human; 0 / Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; 0 / Mitochondrial Proteins
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26. Jayasinghe C, Siegler N, Leuschner I, Fleischhack G, Born M, Müller AM: Renal cell carcinoma with Xp11.2 translocation in a 7-year-old boy. Klin Padiatr; 2010 May;222(3):187-9
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  • [Title] Renal cell carcinoma with Xp11.2 translocation in a 7-year-old boy.
  • BACKGROUND: More than 90% of pediatric renal tumors are nephroblastomas while renal cell carcinomas (RCC) are rare in children (< 5%).
  • PATIENT: According to the clinical diagnoses of a nephroblastoma stage IV a 7-year-old boy with a kidney tumor and peripheral pulmonary lesion was preoperatively treated for 8 weeks with Vincristine, Actinomycin D and Adriamycin.
  • The resected kidney displayed a RCC with Xp11.2 translocation.
  • Hence chemotherapy was put to a halt.
  • Prognosis of pediatric RCC with translocation seems more favourable than without translocation though definitive evidence will only be possible by documentation in a clinical diagnose-related register.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / genetics. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Chromosomes, Human, X / genetics. Kidney Neoplasms / genetics. Lung Neoplasms / genetics. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Sex Chromosome Aberrations. Translocation, Genetic / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Humans. Kidney / pathology. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Nephrectomy. Prognosis. Tomography, X-Ray Computed


27. Ettinger LJ, Goodell LA, Javidian P, Hsieh Y, Amenta P: Long-term survival in an adolescent with widely metastatic renal cell carcinoma with rhabdoid features. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2000 Mar-Apr;22(2):173-5
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  • [Title] Long-term survival in an adolescent with widely metastatic renal cell carcinoma with rhabdoid features.
  • Renal cell carcinoma is rarely seen in children and adolescents.
  • Currently, all known chemotherapy has been ineffective in improving the median survival in patients with advanced disease.
  • A 13-year-old black boy with stage IV renal cell carcinoma with rhabdoid features is a long-term disease-free survivor after aggressive multiagent chemotherapy.
  • After the initial evaluation and histologic diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma, the patient received three courses of an aggressive chemotherapy regimen consisting of vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide with mesna uroprotection, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and erythropoietin (Epogen).
  • The dramatic response to treatment and long-term disease-free survival of this patient suggest this chemotherapeutic approach warrants additional investigation.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Biopsy, Needle. Humans. Male. Rhabdoid Tumor / etiology. Survivors

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  • (PMID = 10779035.001).
  • [ISSN] 1077-4114
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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28. Westermann J, Reich G, Kopp J, Haus U, Dörken B, Pezzutto A: Granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating-factor plus interleukin-2 plus interferon alpha in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a pilot study. Cancer Immunol Immunother; 2001 Jan;49(11):613-20
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  • [Title] Granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating-factor plus interleukin-2 plus interferon alpha in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a pilot study.
  • Granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) plays a central role in the differentiation and function of dendritic cells, which are crucial for the elicitation of MHC-restricted T cell responses.
  • Preclinical and the first clinical data provide a rationale for the application of GM-CSF in immunotherapy of cancer.
  • Ten patients with renal cell carcinoma stage IV (Holland/ Robson) were treated in this pilot study.
  • Therapy was started with GM-CSF alone (2 weeks).
  • Therapy was performed on an outpatient basis.
  • The cytokine regimen was evaluated for toxicity, clinical response and immunomodulatory effects [fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), mixed-lymphocyte reaction and cytotoxicity of PBMC].
  • GM-CSF treatment caused a significant increase in the number of PBMC expressing costimulatory molecules.
  • In an autologous mixed-lymphocyte reaction a 2.1-fold increase in T cell proliferation was observed after 2 weeks of GM-CSF treatment, and cytotoxicity assays showed changes in natural-killer-(NK)- and non-NK-mediated cytotoxicity in some patients.
  • We conclude that GM-CSF might be useful for immunotherapy of renal cell carcinoma, especially in combination with T-cell-active cytokines.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor / therapeutic use. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Interleukin-2 / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Cytotoxicity Tests, Immunologic. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Leukocyte Count. Leukocytes, Mononuclear / immunology. Lymphocyte Activation. Lymphocyte Culture Test, Mixed. Lymphocyte Subsets / classification. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Pilot Projects. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 11225992.001).
  • [ISSN] 0340-7004
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer immunology, immunotherapy : CII
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Immunol. Immunother.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Interleukin-2; 83869-56-1 / Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
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29. Park TK, Kim SN, Kim SW, Kim GE, Suh CO: Concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy in invasive cervical cancer patients with high risk factors. J Korean Med Sci; 2000 Aug;15(4):436-41
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  • [Title] Concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy in invasive cervical cancer patients with high risk factors.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival of 395 previously untreated cervical cancer patients with at least one high risk factor following concurrent chemoradiation and to assess the toxicities.
  • Two different chemotherapy regimens were used for concurrent chemoradiation.
  • In the patients with squamous cell carcinoma, 100 mg/m2 of cisplatin was infused intravenously, followed immediately by five consecutive daily administrations of 5-fluorouracil, 1,000 mg/m2/day, each infused intravenously over 24 hr.
  • The 5-year survival rate was 54.4% with stage III and IV, 62.6% with lymph node metastasis on computed tomogram or MRI, 77.9% with stage I-II disease with lesion size > or =4 cm, and 50.3% with small cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma.
  • This study suggests that cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiation in treating cervical cancer patients with high risk factors is effective and relatively well tolerated, with acceptable toxicity.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Radiotherapy, High-Energy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Adenocarcinoma / mortality. Adenocarcinoma / radiotherapy. Adult. Aged. Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / adverse effects. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Drug-Induced Liver Injury / epidemiology. Drug-Induced Liver Injury / etiology. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Gastrointestinal Diseases / epidemiology. Gastrointestinal Diseases / etiology. Hematologic Diseases / epidemiology. Hematologic Diseases / etiology. Humans. Kidney Diseases / chemically induced. Kidney Diseases / epidemiology. Korea / epidemiology. Life Tables. Lymphatic Metastasis. Middle Aged. Particle Accelerators. Retrospective Studies. Risk. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 10983693.001).
  • [ISSN] 1011-8934
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of Korean medical science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Korean Med. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] KOREA (SOUTH)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3054665
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30. Mancuso A, Sternberg CN: New treatments for metastatic kidney cancer. Can J Urol; 2005 Feb;12 Suppl 1:66-70; discussion 105
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  • [Title] New treatments for metastatic kidney cancer.
  • Renal cell carcinoma accounts for approximately 3% of adult malignancies and 90%-95% of neoplasms arising from the kidney.
  • It is characterized by a lack of early warning signs, diverse clinical manifestations, resistance to radiation and chemotherapy, and infrequent but reproducible responses to immunotherapy with agents such as interferon alpha (IFNa) and interleukin 2 (IL-2).
  • International studies have shown objective response rates of < 15% in patients with advanced and metastatic disease, with 5-year disease-specific survival ranging between 0-20%.
  • Considering these poor outcomes, renal cancers' very vascular nature and overexpression of receptors for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), various biologic and angio-suppressive therapies are being evaluated in clinical trials.
  • Promising results in terms of overall response rate and median time to progression have been reported especially as second-line therapy following cytokine failure, a setting where no effective systemic therapy has been recognized (SU011248, Bay 43-9006, Bevacizumab and Erlotinib).
  • While confirmatory studies are ongoing, other novel treatments in first line trials (CCI-779, Infliximab, PTK-787, and Thalidomide) have drawn international attention.
  • This review, analyzing basic translational research principles, will summarize the available data on the use of these new therapeutic approaches in RCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / therapy. Immunotherapy / methods. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Risk Assessment. Sensitivity and Specificity. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome


31. Ko YJ, Atkins MB: Chemotherapies and immunotherapies for metastatic kidney cancer. Curr Urol Rep; 2005 Feb;6(1):35-42
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  • [Title] Chemotherapies and immunotherapies for metastatic kidney cancer.
  • Most patients who develop kidney cancer are effectively treated with a radical nephrectomy; however, for those patients who present with or develop metastatic disease, the therapeutic options are limited.
  • Interferon and interleukin-2 remain the standard therapies.
  • Although cytotoxic chemotherapy continues to have a minor role in patients with clear cell renal carcinoma, it may become the treatment of choice for some patients with variant renal cancers.
  • Novel agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor, its receptor, and other hypoxia-induced proteins are showing great promise and soon may expand the therapeutic options for patients with advanced kidney cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic. Female. Humans. Immunotherapy / methods. Interferons / therapeutic use. Interleukins / therapeutic use. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Risk Assessment. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15610695.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-2737
  • [Journal-full-title] Current urology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Urol Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Interleukins; 9008-11-1 / Interferons
  • [Number-of-references] 51
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32. Singer EA, Bratslavsky G, Linehan WM, Srinivasan R: Targeted therapies for non-clear renal cell carcinoma. Target Oncol; 2010 Jun;5(2):119-29
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  • [Title] Targeted therapies for non-clear renal cell carcinoma.
  • The treatment of advanced and metastatic kidney cancer has been revolutionized by the development of targeted systemic therapies.
  • Despite the growing number of available agents approved for use against clear cell renal cell carcinoma, patients with non-clear histologies, constituting approximately 1 in 4 cases of kidney cancer, have not received the same attention.
  • The majority of clinical trials testing novel targeted therapies have excluded non-clear subtypes, providing limited therapeutic options for patients with these diagnoses and their oncologists.
  • This review will focus on the use of targeted therapies against the non-clear histologic subtypes of renal cell carcinoma: papillary I and II, chromophobe, and collecting duct.
  • The unique genetic and molecular profiles of each distinct non-clear kidney cancer subtype will be described, as these differences are integral to the development and effectiveness of the novel agents used to treat them.
  • Trials focusing on non-clear kidney cancer, or those that treated clear cell tumors along with significant numbers of non-clear subtypes, will be discussed.
  • The role of cytoreductive nephrectomy and the use of neoadjuvant and adjuvant targeted therapy will be reviewed.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Papillary / therapy. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / therapy. Clinical Trials as Topic. Kidney Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Design. Gene Expression Profiling. Humans. Nephrectomy

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  • (PMID = 20680492.001).
  • [ISSN] 1776-260X
  • [Journal-full-title] Targeted oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Target Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / BC / Z01 BC011023-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / BC / Z01 BC011028-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / BC / Z01 BC011038-01; United States / Intramural NIH HHS / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS254814; NLM/ PMC3003336
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33. Clark JI, Kancharla K, Qamar R, Fisher S, Hantel A, Panganiban J, Millbrandt L, Albain KS: Pilot study of sequential vinorelbine and cisplatin followed by docetaxel for selected IIIB and stage IV non-small cell lung cancer. Lung Cancer; 2001 Nov;34(2):271-7
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  • [Title] Pilot study of sequential vinorelbine and cisplatin followed by docetaxel for selected IIIB and stage IV non-small cell lung cancer.
  • Vinorelbine, cisplatin and docetaxel are known to be efficacious in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
  • Patients with selected stage IIIB and IV NSCLC, Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) performance status (PS) of 1 or less and measurable or evaluable disease were eligible.
  • Treatment was cisplatin 100 mg/m(2) day 1 and 29, vinorelbine 25 mg/m(2) weekly for 8 weeks, followed by docetaxel 100 mg/m(2) every 21 days for four cycles if no progression.
  • If grade IV neutropenia developed, G-CSF 5 mcg/kg/day was used in subsequent cycles.
  • Of 18 eligible patients, 17 patients had stage IV disease with a median age of 66 years (range 48-80).
  • Six of eighteen patients received all 8 weeks of vinorelbine/cisplatin and six of eight patients who went on to receive docetaxel received all four planned cycles; only two patients overall received all planned therapy.
  • One grade III/IV event each of cardiotoxicity (myocardial infarction), renal toxicity (acute renal failure), anemia and thrombocytopenia occurred with vinorelbine and cisplatin, and 2 Grade IV hypersensitivity reactions, manifested by severe back pain with docetaxel occurred.
  • Three deaths occurred during the study, all during treatment with vinorelbine and cisplatin: one due to neutropenic sepsis; one from a pulmonary embolism; and one secondary to severe hypoglycemia in a diabetic patient.
  • Based on response rates and tolerability that were somewhat comparable to other regimens in this disease setting, a modified version of this program, adjusted to decrease the incidence of grade III and IV toxicity, was selected as one arm of a recent randomized phase II trial in the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG), S9806, evaluating sequential therapy in advanced NSCLC.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Paclitaxel / analogs & derivatives. Taxoids. Vinblastine / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Kidney Injury / chemically induced. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Agranulocytosis / chemically induced. Anemia / chemically induced. Back Pain / chemically induced. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Cisplatin / adverse effects. Disease Progression. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Myocardial Infarction / chemically induced. Survival Analysis. Thrombocytopenia / chemically induced. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11679186.001).
  • [ISSN] 0169-5002
  • [Journal-full-title] Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lung Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Taxoids; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; Q6C979R91Y / vinorelbine
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34. Cao Y, Li P, Tan KJ: [Clinical observation on shenmai injection in preventing and treating adverse reaction of chemotherapy on advanced non-small cell lung cancer]. Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi; 2006 Jun;26(6):550-2
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  • [Title] [Clinical observation on shenmai injection in preventing and treating adverse reaction of chemotherapy on advanced non-small cell lung cancer].
  • OBJECTIVE: To observe the efficacy of Shenmai Injection (SI) in preventing and treating adverse reation of chemotherapy on advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
  • METHODS: Forty-five patients with NSCLC in III b-IV stage were randomly divided into two groups, the control group treated with chemotherapy alone and the treated group with chemotherapy and SI.
  • The therapeutic efficacy were evaluated after 3 treatment cycles.
  • The treated group showed a better effect than the control group in reducing adverse reaction, such as decrease of leucocyte and hemoglobin (P < 0.05), while in the aspects of improving thrombocytopenia and the reducing occurrence of nausea/vomitting and alleviating injury of liver and kidney function, it only showed the lower value in the treated group, but with no significant difference as compared with the control group (P >0.05).
  • CONCLUSION: SI could not raise the efficacy of chemotherapy on NSCLC, but improve the quality of life, raise the body weight of patients and alleviate adverse reaction of chemotherapy as myelosuppression so as to improve the tolerance of organism to chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 16841676.001).
  • [ISSN] 1003-5370
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhongguo Zhong xi yi jie he za zhi Zhongguo Zhongxiyi jiehe zazhi = Chinese journal of integrated traditional and Western medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi
  • [Language] CHI
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Drugs, Chinese Herbal; 0 / fructus schizandrae, radix ginseng, radix ophiopogonis drug combination
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35. Temsirolimus and mantle cell lymphoma. Highly toxic, limited efficacy. Prescrire Int; 2010 Dec;19(111):276-8
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  • [Title] Temsirolimus and mantle cell lymphoma. Highly toxic, limited efficacy.
  • Mantle cell lymphoma is a highly malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • There is no consensus on chemotherapy regimens for patients who do not qualify for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
  • Temsirolimus, a metabolic precursor of sirolimus, already marketed in the European Union for metastatic kidney cancer, recently received an extension of indications to include relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma.
  • In this setting, one trial involving 162 patients in whom 2 or 3 chemotherapy regimens had failed compared two doses of temsirolimus (175 mg per week for 3 weeks, followed by 75 mg or 25 mg per week) versus a control group receiving various other treatments.
  • The median overall survival time was about 11 months, regardless of the treatment.The median survival time before radiological or clinical progression was slightly longer with the higher dose of temsirolimus than in the control group (4.8 versus 1.9 months).
  • In practice, temsirolimus shows only limited efficacy but is highly toxic in patients with relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma after several prior chemotherapy regimens.
  • It is better to avoid using this drug.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell / drug therapy. Sirolimus / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Drug Packaging. Humans

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  • (PMID = 21355378.001).
  • [ISSN] 1167-7422
  • [Journal-full-title] Prescrire international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prescrire Int
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 624KN6GM2T / temsirolimus; W36ZG6FT64 / Sirolimus
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36. Varan A, Akyuz C, Sari N, Buyukpamukçu N, Cağlar M, Buyukpamukçu M: Renal cell carcinoma in children: experience of a single center. Nephron Clin Pract; 2007;105(2):c58-61
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  • [Title] Renal cell carcinoma in children: experience of a single center.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical features and outcome of children with renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • Clinical features, histopathology, treatment regimens and outcomes of the patients were evaluated.
  • RESULTS: The male/female ratio was 3:8, with a median age of 10 years.
  • The stage distribution was as follows: 3 patients in stage I, 1 patient in stage II, 3 patients in stage IIIb, and 4 patients in stage IV.
  • Five of 7 patients with stage II-IV received an actinomycin D-based regimen, one received a cisplatin-based regimen, and the other was given 5-fluorouracil (5-FU).
  • All of the stage I patients are alive without disease.
  • Three patients with stage IIIb, stage IV and stage II disease are alive without disease 8, 14 and 26 years after their diagnosis, respectively.
  • The other stage IV and stage IIIb patients died of the disease.
  • CONCLUSION: Nephroureterectomy is the main treatment modality, and it is sufficient for stage I patients.
  • For patients with stage II-IV RCC, interferon-alpha and/or actinomycin D-based chemotherapy is the treatment of choice.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Cisplatin / therapeutic use. Dactinomycin / therapeutic use. Female. Fluorouracil / therapeutic use. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Nephrectomy. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome. Ureter / surgery

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 17135769.001).
  • [ISSN] 1660-2110
  • [Journal-full-title] Nephron. Clinical practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nephron Clin Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 1CC1JFE158 / Dactinomycin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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37. Quan WD Jr, Walker PR, Quan FM, Ramirez M, Elsamaloty HM, Ghai V, Vinogradov M, Liles DK: Activity of continuous infusion plus pulse interleukin-2 with famotidine in patients with metastatic kidney cancer or melanoma previously treated with interleukin-2. Cancer Biother Radiopharm; 2006 Oct;21(5):437-42
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  • [Title] Activity of continuous infusion plus pulse interleukin-2 with famotidine in patients with metastatic kidney cancer or melanoma previously treated with interleukin-2.
  • Lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells generated by high-dose continuous infusion interleukin-2 (IL-2) are able to nonspecifically lyse melanoma and kidney cancer cells.
  • Second-line therapy is, therefore, needed.
  • We treated 11 patients (6 with metastatic melanoma; 5 having metastatic kidney cancer) who had previously experienced progressive disease on prior IL-2 regimens, with a combination of famotidine 20 mg intravenously (i.v.) twice per day and continuous-infusion IL-2 18 MIU/M2/24 hours x 72 hours, followed 24 hours later by a pulse IL-2 dose (18 MIU/M2 over 15 minutes).
  • Patient characteristics were: 9 males, median age 63 years (range, 57-75), median Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status: 1; most common metastatic sites: lungs, lymph nodes, and soft tissue/subcutaneous (s.c.
  • Five (5) patients (3 with melanoma, 2 with kidney cancer) have had partial responses.
  • Two (2) patients with kidney cancer have been converted to complete responders with resection of residual disease, remaining without relapse at 5+ and 20+ months.
  • This combination has activity in patients with metastatic kidney cancer or melanoma who have received prior IL-2.
  • [MeSH-major] Famotidine / administration & dosage. Immunotherapy / methods. Interleukin-2 / administration & dosage. Kidney Neoplasms / therapy. Melanoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Synergism. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Killer Cells, Lymphokine-Activated / drug effects. Killer Cells, Lymphokine-Activated / immunology. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis


38. Mizutani Y, Wada H, Yoshida O, Fukushima M, Nakanishi H, Nakao M, Miki T: Significance of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase activity in renal cell carcinoma. Eur J Cancer; 2003 Mar;39(4):541-7
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  • [Title] Significance of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase activity in renal cell carcinoma.
  • DPD is also the principal enzyme involved in the degradation of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), an anticancer chemotherapeutic agent that is used clinically to treat renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • The levels of DPD activity in RCC and normal kidney samples were determined by the 5-FU degradation assay.
  • The activity of DPD was approximately 2-fold higher in normal kidney compared with RCC.
  • DPD activity in Stage I/II RCC was approximately 2-fold higher than that in Stage III/IV RCC.
  • In addition, it may be possible to overcome 5-FU resistance by using DPD inhibitors in the treatment protocols of 5-FU-based chemotherapy for RCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / enzymology. Fluorouracil / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms / enzymology. Oxidoreductases / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Dihydrouracil Dehydrogenase (NADP). Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 12751387.001).
  • [ISSN] 0959-8049
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; EC 1.- / Oxidoreductases; EC 1.3.1.2 / Dihydrouracil Dehydrogenase (NADP); U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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39. Grønberg BH, Sundstrøm S, Kaasa S, Bremnes RM, Fløtten O, Amundsen T, Hjelde HH, Plessen Cv, Jordhøy M: Influence of comorbidity on survival, toxicity and health-related quality of life in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer receiving platinum-doublet chemotherapy. Eur J Cancer; 2010 Aug;46(12):2225-34
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  • [Title] Influence of comorbidity on survival, toxicity and health-related quality of life in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer receiving platinum-doublet chemotherapy.
  • AIM OF THE STUDY: To investigate whether patients with severe comorbidity receiving platinum-based chemotherapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have a shorter overall survival, experience more toxicity or more deterioration of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) than other patients during treatment.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients enrolled onto a phase III trial comparing pemetrexed/carboplatin with gemcitabine/carboplatin as first-line therapy of stage IIIB/IV NSCLC were analysed.
  • Eligible patients had performance status 0-2 and adequate kidney/liver/bone-marrow function.
  • Toxicity was graded using the CTCAE v3.0 and the patients reported HRQoL on the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ)-C30/LC13.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The results from our study suggest that patients with advanced NSCLC who have severe co-existing disorders benefit from and tolerate platinum-doublet chemotherapy as well as other patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20471248.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-0852
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase III; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin
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40. Potti A, George DJ: Tyrosine kinase inhibitors in renal cell carcinoma. Clin Cancer Res; 2004 Sep 15;10(18 Pt 2):6371S-6S
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  • [Title] Tyrosine kinase inhibitors in renal cell carcinoma.
  • Current standard treatments for patients with metastatic (stage IV) renal cell carcinoma involve both surgical removal of tumors and treatment with biological agents such as interleukin 2 and/or IFN-alpha.
  • Unfortunately, such approaches are inadequate for most patients with stage IV disease; the result is a median time to progression of 2 to 4 months and an overall survival of 6 to 17 months.
  • Standard chemotherapy has been uniformly disappointing in this disorder.
  • It is clear that new therapies are needed to approach these patients.
  • Recently, a greater understanding of cancer genetics has led to the successful development of novel therapeutics directed against targets linked to specific types of cancer.
  • During the past decade, researchers have identified the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene as an important tumor suppressor in clear cell carcinoma of the kidney.
  • This review will focus on the potential growth factor targets in clear cell carcinoma, their relation to VHL and hypoxia-inducible factor, and the clinical challenges that face their development.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors

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  • (PMID = 15448033.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 6.3.2.19 / Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases; EC 6.3.2.19 / VHL protein, human; EC 6.3.2.19 / Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein
  • [Number-of-references] 32
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41. Chao D, Zisman A, Pantuck AJ, Gitlitz BJ, Freedland SJ, Said JW, Figlin RA, Belldegrun AS: Collecting duct renal cell carcinoma: clinical study of a rare tumor. J Urol; 2002 Jan;167(1):71-4
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  • [Title] Collecting duct renal cell carcinoma: clinical study of a rare tumor.
  • PURPOSE: Collecting duct carcinoma is a rare type of renal cell carcinoma that affects younger patients, and is associated with aggressive regional and distant spread.
  • The clinical and pathological features of 6 patients with collecting duct carcinoma treated at a single institution are described.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: There were 6 patients with collecting duct carcinoma included in the University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, Kidney Cancer Database.
  • RESULTS: Average patient age plus or minus standard deviation was 56 +/- 11 years, and 5 of 6 had TNM stage IV disease.
  • There was 1 patient who had TNM stage I disease and survived without evidence of disease at 5 years.
  • Transient response to chemotherapy was seen in 1 patient.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Collecting duct carcinoma is associated with poor prognosis.
  • For the majority of patients surgical treatment will not result in a cure.
  • Previously recommended chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy appears to have a limited role in treatment of this disease, and early detection may be the best method for prolonging patient survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Kidney Tubules, Collecting


42. Davis NB, Taber DA, Ansari RH, Ryan CW, George C, Vokes EE, Vogelzang NJ, Stadler WM: Phase II trial of PS-341 in patients with renal cell cancer: a University of Chicago phase II consortium study. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jan 1;22(1):115-9
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  • [Title] Phase II trial of PS-341 in patients with renal cell cancer: a University of Chicago phase II consortium study.
  • PURPOSE: Determine response rate, time to disease progression, and toxicity of the proteasome inhibitor PS-341 in patients with stage IV renal cell cancer.
  • Additionally, whole blood was collected at the same time intervals.
  • Two patients were never treated (one patient refused treatment and one had insufficient tumor for biopsy).
  • Eighteen patients completed at least three cycles of therapy; three patients experienced disease progression after two cycles.
  • CONCLUSION: Evidence is lacking for clinically significant activity of PS-341 in metastatic renal cell cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Boronic Acids / adverse effects. Boronic Acids / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Protease Inhibitors / adverse effects. Protease Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Pyrazines / adverse effects. Pyrazines / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Bortezomib. Cysteine Endopeptidases / pharmacology. Disease Progression. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Middle Aged. Multienzyme Complexes / antagonists & inhibitors. Multienzyme Complexes / pharmacology. Neoplasm Metastasis. Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 14701773.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CM / N01 CM 17102
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Boronic Acids; 0 / Multienzyme Complexes; 0 / Protease Inhibitors; 0 / Pyrazines; 69G8BD63PP / Bortezomib; EC 3.4.22.- / Cysteine Endopeptidases; EC 3.4.25.1 / Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex
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43. Jung L, Holle L, Dalton WS: Discovery, Development, and clinical applications of bortezomib. Oncology (Williston Park); 2004 Dec;18(14 Suppl 11):4-13
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  • Proteasome inhibition is a novel, targeted approach in cancer therapy.
  • Both natural and synthetic proteasome inhibitors selectively penetrate cancer cells, disrupting the orderly destruction of key regulatory proteins involved in tumorigenesis and metastasis.
  • Disrupting the orderly destruction of regulatory proteins causes an imbalance of these proteins within the cell, which interferes with the systematic activation of signaling pathways required to maintain tumor cell growth and survival; therefore, cellular replication is inhibited and apoptosis ensues.
  • Bortezomib (PS-341, Velcade), the first proteasome inhibitor evaluated in human clinical trials, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in patients with refractory or relapsed multiple myeloma.
  • Preclinical study results show that bortezomib suppresses tumor cell growth, induces apoptosis, overcomes resistance to standard chemotherapy agents and radiation therapy, and inhibits angiogenesis.
  • Phase I study results established the antitumor activity of bortezomib, administered alone or in combination with standard chemotherapy agents, in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies or solid tumors, usually without additive toxicities.
  • The results of phase II studies further supported the antitumor activity of bortezomib in patients with refractory or relapsed multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; less impressive results were observed in patients with stage IV renal cell cancer.
  • Studies evaluating bortezomib in earlier stages of multiple myeloma, including first-line therapy, are under way.
  • Evidence suggests that certain prognostic factors, such as older age and bone marrow containing more than 50% plasma cells, may be useful in predicting response and survival time in multiple myeloma patients receiving bortezomib.
  • Further studies of bortezomib are needed to establish its full spectrum of activity, the ideal regimens for various tumor types, and clinically useful prognostic indicators that predict successful outcomes.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Boronic Acids / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy. Multiple Myeloma / drug therapy. Protease Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Proteasome Inhibitors. Pyrazines / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bortezomib. Cell Cycle / drug effects. Clinical Trials, Phase I as Topic. Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic. Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Humans. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 15688597.001).
  • [ISSN] 0890-9091
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Boronic Acids; 0 / Protease Inhibitors; 0 / Proteasome Inhibitors; 0 / Pyrazines; 69G8BD63PP / Bortezomib
  • [Number-of-references] 61
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44. Thomas SE, Hutchinson RJ, DebRoy M, Magee JC: Successful renal transplantation following prior bone marrow transplantation in pediatric patients. Pediatr Transplant; 2004 Oct;8(5):507-12
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  • [Title] Successful renal transplantation following prior bone marrow transplantation in pediatric patients.
  • Improving survival rates following pediatric bone marrow transplantation (BMT) will likely result in greater numbers of children progressing to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) because of prior chemotherapy, irradiation, sepsis, and exposure to nephrotoxic agents.
  • Renal transplantation remains the treatment of choice for ESRD; however, the safety of renal transplantation in this unique population is not well established.
  • We report our experience with living related renal transplantation in three pediatric patients with ESRD following prior BMT.
  • Age at time of BMT ranged from 2 to 7 yr.
  • All patients had stable bone marrow function prior to renal transplantation.
  • Age at renal transplant ranged from 8 to 14 yr.
  • All three patients have been managed with conventional immunosuppression, as no patient received a kidney and BMT from the same donor source.
  • All have functioning bone marrow and kidney transplants, with serum creatinine levels ranging 0.6-1.2 mg/dL.
  • One patient with a history of grade III skin and grade IV gastrointestinal-graft-vs.-host disease (GI-GVHD) prior to transplantation, had a mild flare of GI-GVHD (grade I) post-renal transplant and is currently asymptomatic.
  • The incidence of opportunistic infection has been comparable with our pediatric renal transplant population without prior BMT.
  • One patient was treated for basal cell carcinoma via wide local excision.
  • Renal transplantation is an excellent option for the treatment of pediatric patients with ESRD following BMT.
  • Pre-existing immune system impairment and bone marrow function should be taken into consideration when weighing different immunosuppressive agents for renal transplantation.
  • Patients who have undergone renal transplantation following BMT are at high risk for opportunistic infections and malignancy, and need life-long medical surveillance.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Marrow Transplantation / adverse effects. Kidney Failure, Chronic / therapy. Kidney Transplantation
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Graft vs Host Disease / etiology. Humans. Immunosuppression. Infant. Opportunistic Infections / etiology. Postoperative Care. Treatment Outcome


45. Motzer RJ, Bacik J, Mazumdar M: Prognostic factors for survival of patients with stage IV renal cell carcinoma: memorial sloan-kettering cancer center experience. Clin Cancer Res; 2004 Sep 15;10(18 Pt 2):6302S-3S
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  • [Title] Prognostic factors for survival of patients with stage IV renal cell carcinoma: memorial sloan-kettering cancer center experience.
  • Prospective identification of patients with stage IV renal cell carcinoma more likely to benefit from cytokine therapy could be used as a stratification factor in Phase III trials and in risk-directed therapy.
  • The relationship between pretreatment clinical features and survival was evaluated in patients treated in Phase II and III clinical trials for metastatic renal cell carcinoma at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.
  • The first analysis was performed in 670 patients treated with cytokines or chemotherapy, and a multivariate model was created to predict survival.
  • (1) the survival of patients given interferon alpha as first-line therapy, (2) a comparison of survival for patients treated with chemotherapy versus cytokine therapy, (3) survival of patients with nonclear cell histologic features, and (4) survival of patients treated with a second-line therapy.
  • Prognostic models based on pretreatment clinical and laboratory variables can help identify patients more likely to benefit from standard therapies, as well as assist in the interpretation of drug effectiveness in Phase II clinical trials.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology


46. Maruoka Y, Ando T, Hoshino M, Ogiuchi Y, Nishihara N, Okamoto T, Fukada K, Kuwazawa T, Ogiuchi H: [Combination chemotherapy with nedaplatin (CDGP) and 5-FU for oral cancer]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2002 Mar;29(3):421-5
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  • [Title] [Combination chemotherapy with nedaplatin (CDGP) and 5-FU for oral cancer].
  • Chemotherapy using CDGP plus 5-FU was evaluated in patients with oral cancer.
  • The subjects were patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity who had not received any therapy, comprising 7 patients with carcinoma of the tongue, 2 with buccal carcinoma, 2 with maxillary gingival carcinoma, and 1 with carcinoma of the oral floor.
  • There were 4 patients in Stage II, 3 patients in Stage III and 5 patients in Stage IV.
  • Patients with a PS < or = 1, WBC > or = 4,000/mm3, Hb > or = 10 g/dl, platelet count > or = 10 x 10/mm3, and normal liver, kidney, and heart function at baseline were selected for this study.
  • This treatment was one course of therapy, and patients received 1 or 2 courses.
  • Toxicities experienced by patients were mild (grade 2 or lower) gastrointestinal disorders (including nausea/vomiting) and renal impairment, while grade 3 leukopenia and thrombocytopenia developed in 1 patient each and grade 4 thrombocytopenia occurred in another patient.
  • Thus, patients receiving CDGP + 5-FU therapy should be closely monitored for hematologic toxicity.
  • Since CDGP + 5-FU therapy achieved a good response rate (75%) in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, we plan to use this therapy in the future and assess its benefit in a larger number of patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Mouth Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Fluorouracil / adverse effects. Humans. Leukopenia / chemically induced. Male. Middle Aged. Nausea / chemically induced. Organoplatinum Compounds / administration & dosage. Organoplatinum Compounds / adverse effects. Vomiting, Anticipatory / etiology

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  • (PMID = 11915732.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 8UQ3W6JXAN / nedaplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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47. Tsujita A, Oono S, Kobayashi A, Yamasawa H, Bando M, Sugiyama Y: [Lung cancer in patients with chronic renal failure]. Nihon Kokyuki Gakkai Zasshi; 2007 Jan;45(1):8-12
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  • [Title] [Lung cancer in patients with chronic renal failure].
  • We evaluated the clinical characteristics of 18 patients with lung cancer complicated by chronic renal failure at our department between November 1983 and September 2004.
  • Fifteen patients had non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and 3 had small cell lung cancer (SCLC).
  • The stage of NSCLC was I in 7 patients, II in 2, and IV in 6.
  • The stage of SCLC was localized disease (LD) in 2 patients and extensive disease (ED) in 1.
  • The lung cancer was often detected due to symptoms such as cough and bloody sputum.
  • Concerning treatment, surgery was mainly selected in patients with stage I NSCLC, but radiotherapy alone was often performed due to the wishes of patients in those with stage III or IV NSCLC.
  • The outcome of patients who underwent chemotherapy with stage III or IV NSCLC was similar to patients with lung cancer not complicated by renal failure.
  • In lung cancer patients with chronic renal failure, new hepatic excretion type anti-cancer drugs can be also used, but further evaluation is necessary.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / etiology. Kidney Failure, Chronic / complications. Lung Neoplasms / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols. Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Small Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Small Cell / etiology. Carcinoma, Small Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Small Cell / radiotherapy. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Paclitaxel / administration & dosage. Pneumonectomy. Renal Dialysis

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  • (PMID = 17313020.001).
  • [ISSN] 1343-3490
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon Kokyūki Gakkai zasshi = the journal of the Japanese Respiratory Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nihon Kokyuki Gakkai Zasshi
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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48. Lin J, Zhang W, Xie B, Li L, Zhang L, Zheng J, Wang X: [Clinical investigation of IRESSA in the treatment of patients with advanced refractory non-small cell lung cancer]. Zhongguo Fei Ai Za Zhi; 2006 Oct 20;9(5):455-7
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  • [Title] [Clinical investigation of IRESSA in the treatment of patients with advanced refractory non-small cell lung cancer].
  • BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy is a main method for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
  • NSCLC is usually a drug-resistant neoplasm.
  • Innate or acquired drug-resis-tance contributes to the chief cause for bad effect in the treatment of patients with NSCLC.
  • To search for a new anti-cancer drug becomes a goal of clinical oncologists.
  • The aim of the present study is to evaluate the curative effect and side reactions of IRESSA in the treatment of patients with advanced refractory NSCLC.
  • The patients had ever experienced at least one regimen of chemotherapy.
  • RESULTS: Totally 33 patients enrolled in this study and all were stage IV.
  • All enrolled patients except one patient who died of severe adverse side reaction completed treatment by IRESSA.
  • Time to progression was 5.7 months.
  • Overall survival time was 3.3 to 25.9 months (median survival time was 9.6 months).
  • The curative effect was correlated with the pathological type, in sequence of alveolar cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.
  • No patients showed abnormal in liver or kidney function.
  • CONCLUSIONS: IRESSA takes better effect on the advanced drug-resistant patients with NSCLC.
  • So IRESSA may be accepted as third line in the treatment of advanced NSCLC and as first line in the treatment of patients with bad constitution who have no opportinities for operation, irradiation therapy or chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 21176471.001).
  • [ISSN] 1009-3419
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhongguo fei ai za zhi = Chinese journal of lung cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhongguo Fei Ai Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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49. Kamiński B, Kobiorska-Nowak J, Bień S: [Distant metastases to nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses, from the organs outside the head and neck]. Otolaryngol Pol; 2008;62(4):422-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • At that time, the correct diagnosis requires only to compare the pathology report from the primary biopsy, with the biopsy from the lump in the head and neck.
  • MATERIAL: 4 cases, out of 46 all distant metastases to the head and neck region, localized in the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses, diagnosed and treated in Dept. of ORL H&N surgery, Holy Cross Cancer Centre, from 2001 to 2007.
  • Case I. F. 71 years; the metastasis of colonic carcinoma to the sphenoid sinus as a first symptom of the disease).
  • The palliative Rtg-therapy was applied, and patient died in 2 months after diagnosis was established.
  • Case II. M. 69 y with metastasis of kidney cancer (Ca clarocellulare) to the nasal cavity, during a palliative stage of the disease due to multiple lung metastases.
  • Patient was treated with multiple courses of chemotherapy due to generalization of the disease.
  • Cases III. F. 50 years in palliative stage of the breast cancer, with metastases to the bones and hepar and with metastasis to the maxillary sinus.
  • Received palliative Rtg. therapy on the region of metastasis.
  • Case IV. F. 54 years in palliative stage of the colonic cancer, with multiple metastases to the lungs and hepar; with metastasis to the maxillary sinus.
  • The palliative Rtg-therapy on the region of metastasis.
  • In the majority of distant metastases to the nose and paranasal sinuses, the palliative therapy is the only possible option of treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Colonic Neoplasms / pathology. Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms / secondary. Skull Base Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Poland. Prognosis. Survival Analysis. Treatment Failure

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  • (PMID = 18837216.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6657
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngologia polska = The Polish otolaryngology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol Pol
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
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50. Monge AH, Pineda RP, del Rocio Estrada Hernandez M, Juárez EG, García JC: [Fallopian tube primary invasive adenocarcinoma associated with acute inflammatory pelvic disease. Case report and literature review]. Ginecol Obstet Mex; 2008 Feb;76(2):118-24
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Transliterated title] Adenocarcinoma invasor primario de trompa de falopio concomitante con enfermedad pélvica inflamatoria aguda. Comunicación de un caso y revisión de la bibliografía.
  • The treatment is predominantly surgical, as that of epithelial ovarian carcinoma, and consists of an intraperitoneal washing, total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and a proper staging.
  • In the more advanced stages III and IV that required a radical debulking, we have to be very emphatic in citoreduction.
  • In some cases, as the persistence or recurrence of illness, it can be necessary adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • In some patients in early stage I or II with low risk, the complete staging could not be necessary.
  • There is controversy about administration criteria of adjuvant treatment, since there is not evidence of survival increase related to its use.
  • The five years survival rate was 64% for stage I, 42% for stage II, 32% for stage III, and 17% for stage IV.
  • [MeSH-minor] Abdomen, Acute / etiology. Acute Kidney Injury / etiology. Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Anuria / etiology. Ceftriaxone / therapeutic use. Clindamycin / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Hysterectomy. Middle Aged. Ovariectomy. Peritonitis / drug therapy. Peritonitis / etiology

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  • (PMID = 18798405.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-9041
  • [Journal-full-title] Ginecología y obstetricia de México
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ginecol Obstet Mex
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Mexico
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 3U02EL437C / Clindamycin; 75J73V1629 / Ceftriaxone
  • [Number-of-references] 10
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51. Génébès C, Brouchet L, Kamar N, Lepage B, Prévot G, Rostaing L, Didier A, Mazières J: Characteristics of thoracic malignancies that occur after solid-organ transplantation. J Thorac Oncol; 2010 Nov;5(11):1789-95
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  • METHODS: Among a cohort of 2831 patients who received a transplant at our institution and were followed between 1984 and 2009, 24 patients (0.85%) developed thoracic malignancies.
  • Risk factors for lung cancer, as well as demographic, cancer, and transplantation characteristics, were analyzed.
  • The most frequent histologic types were squamous cell carcinoma (n = 11, 46%) and adenocarcinoma (n = 9, 37%).
  • The median time period between transplantation and diagnosis of lung cancer was 6.6 years.
  • Ten lung malignancies occurred after kidney transplantation (0.5%), eight after liver transplantation (1.3%), and six after heart transplantation (2.8%).
  • Seven patients underwent surgery, three had radiotherapy, four had chemotherapy, and six had multimodal treatment.
  • The median survival time was 1.5 years, ranging from 6 months for stage IV to 3.7 years for stage I.
  • CONCLUSION: Solid-organ transplantation is associated with a high risk of lung cancer and may have an important synergetic part with other risk factors for lung cancer (tobacco).
  • However, survival rates from lung cancer in our study population are similar to those of nontransplanted patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / etiology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / etiology. Lung Neoplasms / etiology. Mesothelioma / etiology. Organ Transplantation / adverse effects. Small Cell Lung Carcinoma / etiology


52. Whitson BA, Groth SS, Andrade RS, Garrett L, Dudek AZ, Jessurun J, Maddaus MA: Extension of survival by resection of asynchronous renal cell carcinoma metastases to mediastinal lymph nodes. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg; 2008 May;135(5):1022-8
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  • [Title] Extension of survival by resection of asynchronous renal cell carcinoma metastases to mediastinal lymph nodes.
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether or not resection of isolated mediastinal lymph node renal cell carcinoma metastases confers a survival advantage, as compared with patients with stage IV disease.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of all patients with renal cell carcinoma whose histologic specimens were evaluated at our institution from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2006.
  • Using Kaplan-Meier estimates, we compared the survival of patients who underwent resection of asynchronous mediastinal lymph node metastases with that of patients with stage IV disease.
  • RESULTS: During the 7-year study period, of the 386 patients with renal cell carcinoma who were evaluated at our institution, 9 underwent resection of asynchronous mediastinal lymph node metastases.
  • After primary tumor resection and before diagnosis of asynchronous mediastinal lymph node metastases, all patients completed chemotherapy, cytokine therapy, or tumor vaccination; 3 underwent radiotherapy.
  • The median time from primary tumor resection to mediastinal lymph node resection was 2.8 years (range, 0.5-23.3).
  • The median survival after resection of metastases (3.2 years) was significantly longer (P = .021) than for other patients with stage IV disease at our institution (1.1 years).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Resection of renal cell carcinoma mediastinal lymph node metastases is safe, appears to extend survival, and should be considered an important component of treating patients with renal cell carcinoma who have asynchronous mediastinal lymph node metastases.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Lymph Nodes / pathology

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  • (PMID = 18455579.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-685X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Thorac. Cardiovasc. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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