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1. Almeida Mdo R, Bell GS, Sander JW: Epilepsy and recreational scuba diving: an absolute contraindication or can there be exceptions? A call for discussion. Epilepsia; 2007 May;48(5):851-8
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. OXYGEN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Scuba diving is not, however, without risk for anyone; apart from the risk of drowning, the main physiological problems, caused by exposure to gases at depth, are decompression illness, oxygen toxicity, and nitrogen narcosis.
  • In the United Kingdom, the Sport Diving Medical Committee advises that, to dive, someone with epilepsy must be seizure free and off medication for at least 5 years.
  • The risk of seizures recurring decreases with increasing time in remission, but the risk is never completely abolished.
  • Those who have been entirely seizure-free on stable antiepileptic drug therapy for at least 4 years, who are not taking sedative antiepileptic drugs and who are able to understand the risks, should then be able to consider diving to shallow depths, provided both they and their diving buddy have fully understood the risks.
  • [MeSH-minor] Advisory Committees. Anticonvulsants / adverse effects. Cause of Death. Dangerous Behavior. Decompression Sickness / etiology. Great Britain. Humans. Inert Gas Narcosis / etiology. Oxygen / poisoning. Risk Assessment. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 17508997.001).
  • [ISSN] 0013-9580
  • [Journal-full-title] Epilepsia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Epilepsia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticonvulsants; S88TT14065 / Oxygen
  • [Number-of-references] 46
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2. Dorhout Mees SM, van den Bergh WM, Algra A, Rinkel GJ: Achieved serum magnesium concentrations and occurrence of delayed cerebral ischaemia and poor outcome in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry; 2007 Jul;78(7):729-31
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MAGNESIUM SULFATE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Achieved serum magnesium concentrations and occurrence of delayed cerebral ischaemia and poor outcome in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.
  • BACKGROUND: Magnesium therapy probably reduces the frequency of delayed cerebral ischaemia (DCI) in subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) but uncertainty remains about the optimal serum magnesium concentration.
  • We assessed the relationship between serum magnesium concentrations achieved with magnesium sulphate therapy 64 mmol/day and the occurrence of DCI and poor outcome in patients with SAH.
  • METHODS: Differences in magnesium concentrations between patients with and without DCI and with and without poor outcome were calculated.
  • Quartiles of last serum magnesium concentrations before the onset of DCI, or before the median day of DCI in patients without DCI, were related to the occurrence of DCI and poor outcome at 3 months using logistic regression.
  • RESULTS: Compared with the lowest quartile of serum magnesium concentration (1.10-1.28 mmol/l), the risk of DCI was decreased in each of the higher three quartiles (adjusted odds ratio (OR) in each quartile 0.2; lower 95% CI 0.0 to 0.1; upper limit 0.8 to 0.9).
  • DISCUSSION: Magnesium sulphate 64 mmol/day results in a stable risk reduction of DCI over a broad range of achieved serum magnesium concentrations, and strict titration of the dosage therefore does not seem necessary.
  • However, concentrations < or = 1.28 mmol/l could decrease the effect on DCI while concentrations > or = 1.62 might have a negative effect on clinical outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Ischemia / etiology. Brain Ischemia / prevention & control. Intracranial Aneurysm / complications. Intracranial Aneurysm / drug therapy. Magnesium / blood. Magnesium Sulfate / therapeutic use. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / complications. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Odds Ratio. Prognosis. Regression Analysis. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17135457.001).
  • [ISSN] 1468-330X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 7487-88-9 / Magnesium Sulfate; I38ZP9992A / Magnesium
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2117699
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3. Vergouwen MD, de Haan RJ, Vermeulen M, Roos YB: Effect of statin treatment on vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, and functional outcome in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a systematic review and meta-analysis update. Stroke; 2010 Jan;41(1):e47-52
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  • [Title] Effect of statin treatment on vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, and functional outcome in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a systematic review and meta-analysis update.
  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: A recent meta-analysis investigating the efficacy of statin treatment in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage reported a reduced incidence of vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, and mortality in statin-treated patients.
  • We present the results of a new systematic review, which differs from the previous systematic review in its methodology, and by inclusion of the results of a fourth randomized, placebo-controlled trial.
  • Summary of Review- All randomized, placebo-controlled trials investigating the effect of statins on vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, and functional outcome in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage were included.
  • Outcomes were the number of patients with transcranial Doppler vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, poor outcome, and mortality during follow-up.
  • No statistically significant effect was observed on transcranial Doppler vasospasm (pooled risk ratio, 0.99 [95% CI, 0.66 to 1.48]), delayed cerebral ischemia (pooled risk ratio, 0.57 [95% CI, 0.29 to 1.13]), poor outcome (pooled risk ratio, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.68 to 1.24]), or mortality (pooled risk ratio, 0.37 [95% CI, 0.13 to 1.10]).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present systematic review do not lend statistically significant support to the finding of a beneficial effect of statins in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage as reported in a previous meta-analysis.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Ischemia / drug therapy. Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / drug therapy. Vasospasm, Intracranial / drug therapy


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4. Paddock SM, Edelen MO, Wenzel SL, Ebener P, Mandell W, Dahl J: Measuring changes in client-level treatment process in the therapeutic community (TC) with the Dimensions of Change Instrument (DCI). Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse; 2007;33(4):537-46
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  • [Title] Measuring changes in client-level treatment process in the therapeutic community (TC) with the Dimensions of Change Instrument (DCI).
  • The Dimensions of Change Instrument (DCI) measures treatment process in residential therapeutic community (TC) settings.
  • It summarizes eight factors of treatment process from a client perspective.
  • We present evidence of the reliability of the DCI for assessing both adult (N = 519) and adolescent (N = 474) client perceptions of treatment process.
  • The DCI factors significantly increase over time, with increases consistently seen across all DCI factors for adults.
  • We highlight areas for future DCI modifications to broaden its applicability to adolescents.
  • Our findings show that clinicians can use the DCI to evaluate adult client progress and target areas for improving quality of care.
  • [MeSH-major] Attitude to Health. Outcome Assessment (Health Care) / methods. Substance-Related Disorders / therapy. Therapeutic Community
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Factor Analysis, Statistical. Female. Health Care Surveys / instrumentation. Health Care Surveys / methods. Health Status. Humans. Male. Prognosis. Psychometrics / methods. Psychometrics / statistics & numerical data. Quality of Health Care. Reproducibility of Results. Residential Treatment. Substance Abuse Treatment Centers / statistics & numerical data. Surveys and Questionnaires. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17668339.001).
  • [ISSN] 0095-2990
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of drug and alcohol abuse
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / R01DA14969
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
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5. Pendas S, Jakub J, Giuliano R, Gardner M, Swor GB, Reintgen DS: The role of sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ or with locally advanced breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Cancer Control; 2004 Jul-Aug;11(4):231-5
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  • [Title] The role of sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ or with locally advanced breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • BACKGROUND: A significant number of patients who are initially diagnosed with pure DCIS will harbor missed or occult invasive disease at their definitive surgery.
  • To provide more accurate staging information and to avoid a second operation, some investigators believe that SLN mapping should be performed in DCIS patients.
  • The role of SLN biopsy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with advanced breast cancer is controversial.
  • METHODS: A review of the literature was performed to determine the role of SLN biopsy in patients with DCIS or advanced breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • The success rate of SLN biopsy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy was investigated as well as the percentage of positive SLNs in patients with DCIS.
  • RESULTS: Two consecutive studies revealed metastatic disease to the regional lymph nodes in up to 13% of DCIS patients.
  • In addition, 10% of DCIS patients were upstaged to infiltrating ductal carcinoma at their definitive therapy.
  • The ability of the SLN to predict the status of the remaining non-SLNs after neoadjuvant chemotherapy is unknown.
  • CONCLUSIONS: SLN biopsy is a minimally invasive technique that can be used to evaluate the regional nodal status of DCIS patients.
  • Performing a SLN biopsy during the initial surgical procedure may avoid a second operation in some DCIS patients who are diagnosed with invasive disease at their definitive operation.
  • The success rate of sentinel node identification does not seem to be altered after neoadjuvant therapy.
  • However, the ability of the SLN to predict the pathologic status of the adjacent non-SLNs remains unknown.
  • Therefore, until further prospective randomized trials are conducted, it cannot be assumed that all the regional nodes have the same biologic response to chemotherapy as the SLN.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / pathology. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / secondary. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care). Prognosis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15284714.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-2359
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer control : journal of the Moffitt Cancer Center
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Control
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 24
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6. Bennett MH, Lehm JP, Mitchell SJ, Wasiak J: Recompression and adjunctive therapy for decompression illness. Cochrane Database Syst Rev; 2007;(2):CD005277
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Recompression and adjunctive therapy for decompression illness.
  • BACKGROUND: Decompression illness (DCI) is due to bubble formation in the blood or tissues following the breathing of compressed gas.
  • Clinically, DCI may range from a trivial illness to loss of consciousness, death or paralysis.
  • Recompression is the universally accepted standard for the treatment of DCI.
  • When recompression is delayed, a number of strategies have been suggested in order to improve the outcome.
  • OBJECTIVES: To examine the effectiveness and safety of both recompression and adjunctive therapies in the treatment of DCI.
  • SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomized controlled trials that compared the effect of any recompression schedule or adjunctive therapy with a standard recompression schedule.
  • In one study there was no evidence of improved effectiveness with the addition of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (tenoxicam) to routine recompression therapy (at six weeks: relative risk (RR) 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.90 to 1.20, P = 0.58) but there was a reduction in the number of compressions required when tenoxicam was added (P = 0.01, 95% CI 0 to 1).
  • In the other study, the odds of multiple recompressions was lower with a helium and oxygen (heliox) table compared to an oxygen treatment table (RR 0.56, 95% CI 0.31 to 1.00, P = 0.05).
  • AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Recompression therapy is standard for the treatment of DCI, but there is no randomized controlled trial evidence.
  • There is a case for large randomized trials of high methodological rigour in order to define any benefit from the use of different breathing gases and pressure profiles during recompression therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Decompression Sickness / therapy. Hyperbaric Oxygenation / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Humans. Piroxicam / analogs & derivatives. Piroxicam / therapeutic use. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic

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  • [UpdateIn] Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012;5:CD005277 [22592704.001]
  • (PMID = 17443579.001).
  • [ISSN] 1469-493X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Cochrane database of systematic reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cochrane Database Syst Rev
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 13T4O6VMAM / Piroxicam; 59804-37-4 / tenoxicam
  • [Number-of-references] 44
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7. Schwartz GF, Tannebaum JE, Jernigan AM, Palazzo JP: Axillary sentinel lymph node biopsy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for carcinoma of the breast. Cancer; 2010 Mar 1;116(5):1243-51
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Axillary sentinel lymph node biopsy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for carcinoma of the breast.
  • BACKGROUND: The timing and accuracy of axillary sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in patients who are receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) for breast cancer are controversial.
  • To examine the accuracy of SLNB after NACT, the authors performed SLNB after chemotherapy on all of patients who received NACT at their institution starting in January 1997.
  • METHODS: Seventy-nine women who underwent NACT between 1997 and 2008 comprised this study and were divided as follows: 4 women had stage I disease, 60 women had stage II disease, and 15 women had stage III disease, including 10 women who had multicentric disease.
  • Thirty-nine women (49.4%) had clinical evidence of axillary metastasis (N1-N2) at the time of diagnosis.
  • The regimen, the duration of treatment, and the number of cycles of NACT depended on clinical response.
  • The choice of breast conservation therapy or mastectomy was based on the patient's response to treatment and patient preference.
  • RESULTS: Seventy-three patients underwent breast conservation therapy, and 6 patients underwent mastectomy.
  • Fourteen patients (17.7%) had no residual carcinoma (invasive or ductal carcinoma in situ) in their breast, 5 patients (6.3%) had residual ductal carcinoma in situ (only), and 60 patients (75.9%) had residual invasive carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Carcinoma / pathology. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Feasibility Studies. Female. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Lymphatic Metastasis / diagnosis. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 20087958.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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8. Hironishi M, Miwa H, Kondo T: [Benefit of L-DOPA-without-DCI (decarboxylase inhibitor) therapy on wearing-off phenomenon in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease patients]. No To Shinkei; 2002 Feb;54(2):127-32
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Benefit of L-DOPA-without-DCI (decarboxylase inhibitor) therapy on wearing-off phenomenon in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease patients].
  • Motor fluctuation is the most annoying complication experienced by patients in the advanced stages of Parkinson's disease.
  • A Combination therapy of a dopamine receptor agonist and levodopa/DCI(DOPA-decarboxylase inhibitor) is commonly used to control the complication.
  • Although administration of levodopa/DCI is useful in minimizing peripheral side effects of levodopa, it increases the incidence of motor complications due to the marked fluctuation of plasma levodopa level.
  • The use of levodopa without DCI might be an option for controlling motor fluctuation, because the extent of plasma levodopa level fluctuation is smaller when levodopa is administered without DCI than with DCI.
  • Six patients with Parkinson's disease who had troublesome motor complications under levodopa/DCI and DA agonist combination therapy were compared in terms of the extent of motor complications and their satisfaction after changing their therapy from levodopa/DCI to levodopa without DCI.
  • The change from levodopa/DCI to levodopa(without DCI) was carried out all at once, and the levodopa/DCI to levodopa dose ratio was started at 1:4.
  • The dose of levodopa(without DCI) was then increased gradually until motor complications improved or side effects were observed in patients.
  • Except two patients who voluntarily quitted levodopa and restarted DOPA/DCI before the dose of levodopa fixed, all cases showed improvement of wearing-off phenomenon.
  • Levodopa-without-DCI-therapy was effective for controlling motor fluctuation in patients of Parkinson's disease in advanced stages.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiparkinson Agents / therapeutic use. Drug Tolerance. Levodopa / therapeutic use. Parkinson Disease / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aromatic Amino Acid Decarboxylase Inhibitors. Benserazide. Carbidopa. Circadian Rhythm. Enzyme Inhibitors. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Motor Activity. Severity of Illness Index. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11889758.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-8969
  • [Journal-full-title] Nō to shinkei = Brain and nerve
  • [ISO-abbreviation] No To Shinkei
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiparkinson Agents; 0 / Aromatic Amino Acid Decarboxylase Inhibitors; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 46627O600J / Levodopa; 762OS3ZEJU / Benserazide; MNX7R8C5VO / Carbidopa
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9. Vergouwen MD, van Geloven N, de Haan RJ, Kruyt ND, Vermeulen M, Roos YB: Increased cortisol levels are associated with delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Neurocrit Care; 2010 Jun;12(3):342-5
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. SIMVASTATIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Increased cortisol levels are associated with delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.
  • In patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), hyperglycemia, hypertension, and endothelium dysfunction are associated with the occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI).
  • Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate whether increased serum cortisol levels after aneurysmal SAH are associated with DCI occurrence.
  • DCI was defined as the gradual onset of new focal neurological impairment, and/or a decreased level of consciousness of at least 2 points as recorded on the Glasgow Coma Scale.
  • Eleven patients (35%) developed DCI.
  • Signs of DCI started at a median of 6 days (range 4-10 days).
  • Patients who developed DCI had significantly higher cortisol levels than patients without DCI (P = 0.006).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Increased serum cortisol levels after SAH are associated with DCI occurrence and might be the link between the associations of hyperglycemia and endothelium dysfunction with DCI.
  • It remains to be investigated whether the association between cortisol levels and DCI is independent from known prognostic baseline factors, such as amount of blood on admission CT scan.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Ischemia / blood. Hydrocortisone / blood. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, Traumatic / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Blood Glucose / metabolism. Combined Modality Therapy. Double-Blind Method. Embolization, Therapeutic. Endothelium, Vascular / drug effects. Endothelium, Vascular / physiopathology. Female. Glasgow Coma Scale. Humans. Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Hyperglycemia / physiopathology. Hypertension / physiopathology. Male. Middle Aged. Neurologic Examination. Prognosis. Simvastatin / therapeutic use. Surgical Instruments. von Willebrand Factor / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 20069390.001).
  • [ISSN] 1556-0961
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurocritical care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurocrit Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Blood Glucose; 0 / Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors; 0 / von Willebrand Factor; AGG2FN16EV / Simvastatin; WI4X0X7BPJ / Hydrocortisone
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10. Mitchell SJ: Lidocaine in the treatment of decompression illness: a review of the literature. Undersea Hyperb Med; 2001;28(3):165-74
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. LIDOCAINE .

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  • [Title] Lidocaine in the treatment of decompression illness: a review of the literature.
  • While recompression and hyperbaric oxygen administration remain the mainstays of treatment for decompression illness (DCI), drugs that might improve outcomes or prove beneficial in first aid management have been sought.
  • Lidocaine is neuro-protective in cerebral arterial gas embolism (CAGE) in vivo, and in a variety of in vivo and in vitro models of ischemic brain injury.
  • There has been limited in vivo investigation of efficacy in DCI where bubbles have formed from dissolved nitrogen.
  • In addition, lidocaine lowers neuronal metabolism, exerts advantageous effects on cerebral hemodynamics, and is a potent anti-inflammatory.
  • Clinical evidence of efficacy in DCI is limited to anecdotal reports.
  • Speculative use may be justified in severe neurologic DCI after patient counseling and consent.
  • [MeSH-major] Decompression Sickness / drug therapy. Lidocaine / therapeutic use. Neuroprotective Agents / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Hypoxia / drug effects. Energy Metabolism / drug effects. Humans. Intracranial Embolism / prevention & control. Neurons / drug effects. Neurons / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 12067153.001).
  • [ISSN] 1066-2936
  • [Journal-full-title] Undersea & hyperbaric medicine : journal of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Undersea Hyperb Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neuroprotective Agents; 98PI200987 / Lidocaine
  • [Number-of-references] 89
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11. Bennett MH, Lehm JP, Mitchell SJ, Wasiak J: Recompression and adjunctive therapy for decompression illness: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Anesth Analg; 2010 Sep;111(3):757-62
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. HELIUM .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Recompression and adjunctive therapy for decompression illness: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.
  • INTRODUCTION: Decompression illness (DCI) is caused by bubble formation in the blood or tissues after a reduction in ambient pressure.
  • Clinically, DCI may range from a trivial illness to paralysis, loss of consciousness, cardiovascular collapse, and death.
  • Recompression is the universally accepted standard for the treatment of DCI.
  • When recompression is delayed, a number of strategies have been suggested to improve the outcome.
  • We examined the effectiveness and safety of both recompression and adjunctive therapies in the treatment of DCI.
  • We included RCTs that compared the effect of any recompression schedule or adjunctive therapy with a standard recompression schedule and applied no language restrictions.
  • In one study, there was no evidence of improved effectiveness with the addition of a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug to routine recompression therapy (at 6 weeks: relative risk 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.90-1.20, P = 0.58), but there was a reduction in the number of recompression treatments required when tenoxicam was added (P = 0.01, 95% CI: 0-1).
  • In the other study, the odds of multiple recompressions were lower with a helium and oxygen (heliox) table compared with an oxygen treatment table (relative risk 0.56, 95% CI: 0.31-1.00, P = 0.05).
  • DISCUSSION: Recompression therapy is the standard for treatment of DCI, but there is no RCT evidence.
  • The addition of a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (tenoxicam) or the use of heliox may reduce the number of recompressions required, but neither improves the odds of recovery.
  • [MeSH-major] Decompression Sickness / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Air Pressure. Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Helium / therapeutic use. Humans. Oxygen Inhalation Therapy. Piroxicam / analogs & derivatives. Piroxicam / therapeutic use. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] Anesth Analg. 2010 Sep;111(3):589-90 [20733161.001]
  • (PMID = 20332190.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-7598
  • [Journal-full-title] Anesthesia and analgesia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anesth. Analg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Meta-Analysis; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 13T4O6VMAM / Piroxicam; 206GF3GB41 / Helium; 59804-37-4 / tenoxicam
  • [Number-of-references] 28
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12. Kerz T, Victor A, Beyer C, Trapp I, Heid F, Reisch R: A case control study of statin and magnesium administration in patients after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: incidence of delayed cerebral ischemia and mortality. Neurol Res; 2008 Nov;30(9):893-7
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. SIMVASTATIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A case control study of statin and magnesium administration in patients after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: incidence of delayed cerebral ischemia and mortality.
  • OBJECTIVE: To analyse the effect of the implementation of statin and magnesium treatment on delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and 14 day mortality in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH).
  • One hundred SAH patients received either simvastatin and magnesium, solely statin or no treatment.
  • RESULTS: Eighteen percent (n=5) of patients receiving statin and magnesium treatment developed a DCI whereas 24% (n=5) in the statin group and 16% (n=8) in the control group had DCI.
  • A higher incidence for DCI was found in the statin group, whereas patients without statin and magnesium tended to have less often DCI.
  • [MeSH-major] Magnesium / therapeutic use. Simvastatin / therapeutic use. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Anticholesteremic Agents / adverse effects. Anticholesteremic Agents / therapeutic use. Brain Ischemia / epidemiology. Brain Ischemia / etiology. Brain Ischemia / mortality. Case-Control Studies. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MAGNESIUM, ELEMENTAL .
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  • (PMID = 18691455.001).
  • [ISSN] 0161-6412
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurological research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurol. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticholesteremic Agents; AGG2FN16EV / Simvastatin; I38ZP9992A / Magnesium
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13. Miura D, Saitoh Y, Iwatani T, Kawabata H, Inoshita N: Chromosome enumeration probe 17 (CEP) ratio to predict chemosensitivity in HER-2 overexpressing breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e11600

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Chromosome enumeration probe 17 (CEP) ratio to predict chemosensitivity in HER-2 overexpressing breast cancer.
  • : e11600 Background: Precise assessment of HER-2 is critical in breast cancers and predicts benefit of trastuzumab (T).
  • To analyze the epidemiologic feature of C17 in Japanese patients, consecutive operable breast cancer patients during 05-07 treated in single institution were studied.
  • METHODS: HER-2 status of consecutive 307 patients excluding DCIS and whose specimens were poor quality for study, were analyzed with Pathvysion (FISH).
  • Pathological response following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) was assigned according to the Japanese Breast Cancer Society (G3; no invasive or in situ residual tumor in the breast, G2; up to two thirds of primary cancer cells having pathologically severe changes or disappearance, G1; up to one third to two thirds of primary cancer cells having pathologically severe changes or disappearance).
  • Six of 9 (67%) with C17 had G3 and 2 of 14 (14%) with non-C17 did G3.
  • CONCLUSIONS: C17 was found in 25% of Japanese operable breast cancer patients of which was similar to that of CALGB.

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  • (PMID = 27961037.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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14. Ismael G, Coradazzi AL, Beato CA, Milhomem P, Oliveira J, Manzoni C, Segalla G: Adjuvant systemic therapy in elderly patients with breast cancer: A Brazilian single center experience. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20711

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Adjuvant systemic therapy in elderly patients with breast cancer: A Brazilian single center experience.
  • : e20711 Background: Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer in women in Brazil and in the western world.
  • Despite the high incidence of breast cancer in elderly women, there is no solid information regarding the real impact of the adjuvant systemic therapy in this population, considering the underrepresentation of patients with 65 years of age or older in cancer-treatment trials.
  • Moreover, elderly patients may face some difficulties to receive adequate adjuvant systemic treatment in the routine clinical practice.
  • METHODS: Two hundred fifty eight patients with 65 years of age or older at the time of diagnosis of operable breast cancer and treated in our Institution from February 2000 to December 2005 were retrospectively studied.
  • Clinical and pathological data were recorded as well as the type of adjuvant systemic therapy: hormonal therapy (HT), chemotherapy (CT) or both.
  • We evaluated the disease free survival and overall survival and compared the results between the group of patients treated with HT only and the group of patients treated with both HT and CT.
  • RESULTS: Ninety five (37.5%) patients were stage I, 150 (58.1%) were stage II and 6 (2.3%) were stage III, while 5 (1.9%) patients were diagnosed with DCIS.
  • Ductal carcinoma was the most frequent histological type (81%) and grade II were reported in the majority of patients (47.3%).
  • There was no statistical difference between patients treated with HT when compared with the group of patients treat with HT and CT, regarding disease free survival and overall survival.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Despite the age, a considerable part of this elderly breast cancer patient's population has received adjuvant systemic treatment.

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  • (PMID = 27961971.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. Haid A, Knauer M, Köberle-Wührer R, Wenzl E: Sentinel node biopsy in breast cancer: technique and indication. Wien Klin Wochenschr; 2005 Feb;117(4):121-128

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Sentinel node biopsy in breast cancer: technique and indication.
  • : Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) has proved to be a useful and accurate procedure for lymph node staging in breast cancer and melanoma and should be standard of care in the treatment of these tumors.
  • SNB in breast cancer was accepted as a sole and reliable diagnostic method in breast cancer by the panel of distinguished experts at the 8th international conference of primary therapy of early breast cancer 2003 in St. Gallen.
  • Accepted indications are uni- and multifocal tumors smaller than 3 cm without suspicious findings in the axilla, furthermore SNB is indicated in patients with large ductal carcinoma in situ (>2 cm) and/or with assumed microinvasion.
  • Albeit SNB could be shown to be safe after preoperative chemotherapy and in multicentric breast cancer, due to lack of sufficient data it is still under discussion in these cases.
  • Expedience of this procedure in other lymph node basins, along the mammaria interna vessels or in the infra- and supraclavicular region is considered to be at an investigative stage as well.
  • Detection of additional micrometastases that are found in 10-15% leads to an upgrading from N0 to N1.
  • Broad application and refurbishment led to scientific discussion of prognostic importance of micrometastases and its relevance regarding axillary dissection and adjuvant systemic treatment.
  • Although many unicentric and multicentric observational studies validated by complete axillary dissection could demonstrate that SNB is accurate and suitable for all operable clinically node-negative breast cancers, long-term results and especially the incidence of axillary recurrence and its sequelae are outstanding.
  • Findings of ongoing large prospective randomized trials like NSABP 32, Z0010 and Z0011 of the American College of Surgeons (ACOSOG), the AMAROS-Trial of the European Organisation of Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and the ALMANAC-Trial of the British Association of Surgical Oncology (BASO) will give a conclusive answer.
  • Significant improvement in morbidity and quality of life measurements could be revealed several times in unicentric and even in multicentric studies like ALMANAC.

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  • (PMID = 28108807.001).
  • [ISSN] 1613-7671
  • [Journal-full-title] Wiener klinische Wochenschrift
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Wien. Klin. Wochenschr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Austria
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Breast cancer / Indications / Sentinel node biopsy / Technique
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16. Rodrigues MJ, Wassermann J, Albiges-Sauvin L, Stevens D, Brain E, Delaloge S, Mathieu M, Guillot E, Vincent-Salomon A, Cottu PH: Treatment of node-negative infra-centimetric HER2+ invasive breast carcinomas: A joint AERIO/REMAGUS study. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):517

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment of node-negative infra-centimetric HER2+ invasive breast carcinomas: A joint AERIO/REMAGUS study.
  • : 517 Background: Trials have shown benefit of adjuvant trastuzumab (TZM) for node-positive (N+) or supra-centrimetric HER-2+ breast carcinomas.
  • There are limited data concerning infra-centimetric HER-2+ invasive breast carcinomas (InfraHER-2).
  • METHODS: Retrospective multicenter series from 2000 to 2008 of infra-centimetric HER-2+ invasive breast carcinomas (InfraHER-2).
  • Tumors with ≥80% of ductal carcinoma in situ, multifocal and metastatic tumors were excluded.
  • 57% (n = 43) had a sentinel lymph node procedure.
  • 44% (n = 33) had chemotherapy (CT), almost all (31) were associated to TZM.
  • One patient developed myocardial infarction after A resulting in heart failure; 2 had a transient left ventricular ejection fraction decrease below 50% after TZM.
  • Decision of adjuvant CT was associated (all p < 0.05) with hormonal receptors (HR) negative status, Elston-Ellis grade (EE) 2/3 and high mitotic index (MI) while patients with HR+/low MI tumors were rarely treated (p < 0.001).
  • With a 25 months median follow-up, there was no invasive recurrence in TZM treated patients.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In our practice, decision of TZM-based therapy for InfraHER-2 N- tumors is associated with high-risk profile.
  • Patients with N- InfraHER-2 tumors should be included in HER-2-targeted adjuvant trials.

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  • (PMID = 27960805.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Blakely L, Somer B, Keaton M, Hermann R, Schnell F, Cobb P, Johns A, Walker M, Schwartzberg L: Neoadjuvant dose-dense sequential biweekly epirubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by docetaxel and trastuzumab for HER2+ operable breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):595

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Neoadjuvant dose-dense sequential biweekly epirubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by docetaxel and trastuzumab for HER2+ operable breast cancer.
  • : 595 Background: Neoadjuvant (Neo) chemotherapy (CT) with trastuzumab (H) improves pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for HER2+ breast cancer.
  • Dose-dense regimens improve outcome in the adjuvant setting but have not been fully evaluated as preoperative therapy.
  • METHODS: Patients (pts) with biopsy proven, clinical stage IIA-IIIC, noninflammatory breast cancer were eligible.
  • EF was measured prior to CT, after EC, after TH and at 6, 12 and 24 months after surgery.
  • Additional adjuvant H to complete 1 year of therapy by conventional schedule was recommended after surgery.
  • The primary endpoint was pCR for invasive cancer in breast and lymph nodes.
  • Twenty eight pts were evaluable for pathologic response- 2 withdrew before completing treatment, 1 for toxicity.
  • Dose delivery on schedule was >95% for all drugs.
  • Pathologic response: pCR 16 (57%) including 4 with residual DCIS only; 9 pPR, and 2 stable.
  • Mean EF was 63.1 (range, 51-81) before treatment, 62.4 (49-75) after EC and 58.3 (35-74) after TH.
  • Two pts had EF <50% during Neo, one with clinical CHF and 1 additional pt developed CHF during adjuvant single agent H.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Sequential Neo dose-dense Q 14 day EC followed by Q 14 day TH yields a high pCR rate in HER2+ breast cancer with acceptable toxicity profile and no new safety signals noted.

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  • (PMID = 27960705.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Mates M, Hopman W, Madarnas Y: Patterns of care and outcomes of locally advanced breast cancer at the Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e11614

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Patterns of care and outcomes of locally advanced breast cancer at the Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario.
  • : e11614 Background: Preoperative chemotherapy (PCT) is the standard of care for locally advanced breast cancer (LABC).
  • As part of a multicentre provincial initiative we undertook a review of practice patterns and outcomes for women with LABC at our institution.
  • METHODS: We reviewed electronic and paper records for M<sub>0</sub> pts receiving PCT for LABC between 1995-2007 at our institution, collecting demographic, disease and treatment-related, and outcome variables.
  • Stage distribution: 10% IIB, 11% IIIA, 77% IIIB and 2% IIIC, of which 45% had inflammatory breast cancer (IBC).
  • At biopsy 90% were invasive ductal carcinoma, 36% were ER and PR(-) and 25% were her2(+).
  • Median time from surgical consultation to PCT was 22d (6-126).
  • PCT was anthracycline-based alone in 85% of pts, 8% received a taxane, 3% also received preop endocrine therapy (ET), no pts received trastuzumab (T) preop.
  • Local therapy: mastectomy (M) in 82% of pts and partial M in 11%.
  • Axillary surgery was done in only 92% of pts (axillary node dissection 90%, sentinel node biopsy 1pt) and 7% had no definitive breast or axillary surgery due to local progression (3) or refusal (1).
  • Postop systemic therapy: CT in 5% of pts, ET in 65% and T in 10% of pts.
  • At definitive surgery 10% of pts had no residual disease in breast or axilla and 3 pts had only DCIS present, for a pathologic (p)CR rate of 15% using MDACC criteria.
  • Median 5y DFS was not reached for the entire population and those with a pCR vs. 26mo for pts with IBC; corresponding 5y DFS rates were 58%, 78%, and 41% respectively.
  • Median 5y OS was for the entire population was 52mo vs. 48mo for pts with a pCR and 47mo in the IBC group; corresponding 5y OS rates were 62%, 78% and 44% respectively.

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  • (PMID = 27961135.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Bhattacharyya M, Vinnicombe S, Ryan D, Al-Mufti R, Carpenter R, Gallagher C: Use of magnetic resonance imaging to plan breast conserving surgery following neoadjuvant chemotherapy for early breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):658

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Use of magnetic resonance imaging to plan breast conserving surgery following neoadjuvant chemotherapy for early breast cancer.
  • : 658 Background: The selection of patients (pts) for breast conserving surgery (BCS) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is dependant upon accurate assessment of the extent of residual disease within the breast such that up to 60 % patients fail primary surgery and require re-excision or mastectomy.
  • METHODS: All pts seen over a 3-year period with histologically confirmed invasive breast cancer on core biopsy, stage cT<sub>2</sub> -T<sub>3</sub>, who were not suitable for, but desired BCS, were considered for NAC.
  • Pre and post NAC mammography (MM), breast ultrasound (U/S), and MRI were independently reported and compared with clinical and pathological assessment and whether BCS achieved by segmental mastectomy and sentinel node guided axillary sampling.
  • All received 6 cycles of anthracycline based chemotherapy.
  • In 4 pts, MRI tumour size was > 1cm larger than pathological size because of associated DCIS in 3 and post treatment hyaline fibrosis in 1 patient.
  • In 2 pts, MRI size was > 1cm smaller because of delayed surgery.
  • MRI but not U/S was able to differentiate between residual invasive tumour and DCIS or fibrosis from the gadolinium enhancement curves.

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  • (PMID = 28017104.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Sircar T, Chaudhri S, Francis A: Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on oestrogen, progesterone, and HER-2 receptor expression in breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e11588

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on oestrogen, progesterone, and HER-2 receptor expression in breast cancer.
  • : e11588 Background: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy(NC) is used in treating locally advanced operable breast cancer.
  • After surgery, further adjuvant treatment is offered based on the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2 status.
  • Treatment post operatively can be based on the ER/PR/HER2 status of the core biopsy taken preoperatively.
  • However a change in ER/PR or HER2 status following NC could have a profound effect on adjuvant treatment with the real possibility of appropriate therapy being unknowingly withheld.
  • The aim of our study was to determine the percentage of patients whose ER/PR, HER2 receptor expression change with NC and if these changes lead to change in their adjuvant treatment.
  • METHODS: This is a retrospective study of 32 patients with locally advanced breast cancer who had NC followed by breast conservation surgery or mastectomy.
  • RESULTS: After NC, 5 patients had complete pathological response and 2 patients had residual ductal carcinoma in situ.
  • 25(78%) patients had residual invasive malignancy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Change in 1 patient(4%) from HER2 negative to HER2 positive lead to change in adjuvant treatment who would have otherwise not received transzutumab.Q scores changed in 24% and 40% for ER and PR respectively, however, no change was observed with regards to hormonal adjuvant treatment.
  • A study with a bigger cohort might address this issue.

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  • (PMID = 27964117.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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21. Silberfein EJ, Hunt KK, Broglio K, Shen J, Sahin A, Le-Petross H, Oh J, Litton J, Hwang RF, Mittendorf EA: Clinicopathologic factors associated with involved margins following breast conserving surgery for invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e11528

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clinicopathologic factors associated with involved margins following breast conserving surgery for invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC).
  • : e11528 Background: ILC is characterized by a diffusely infiltrative growth pattern making it difficult to accurately assess disease extent prior to surgical resection.
  • This has resulted in difficulty obtaining negative margins at the time of breast conserving surgery.
  • Clinical data including radiographic appearance, biopsy method, initial surgical procedure (segmental vs. total mastectomy), and use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy were noted.
  • Pathologic data included margin status (negative (>2mm), close (0-2mm), or positive), multifocality, multicentricity, ILC subtype, grade, associated LCIS or DCIS, hormone receptor status and HER2 status.
  • RESULTS: 110 (52%) patients underwent total mastectomy and 101 (48%) underwent segmental mastectomy as their initial procedure.
  • Patients with close or positive margins were more likely to have distortion on ultrasound (vs. mass, p=.05), to have undergone an excisional biopsy (vs. core or FNA, p=.008), and to have associated DCIS (p=.02).
  • Having an excisional biopsy for diagnosis was also associated with need for multiple surgeries (p < .0001).
  • Breast conserving surgery was ultimately successful in 86 patients (85%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The majority of patients with ILC can undergo successful breast conserving surgery.
  • Patients with distortion rather than a mass on imaging and those with DCIS are more likely to have close or positive margins.
  • Diagnosis by excisional biopsy makes subsequent imaging less reliable and results in the need for multiple surgeries to ensure adequate excision.

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  • (PMID = 27964633.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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22. Hassett MJ, Weeks JC: Identifying high-priority quality measures for breast cancer quality improvement using data from a nationally representative sample. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):6507

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Identifying high-priority quality measures for breast cancer quality improvement using data from a nationally representative sample.
  • : 6507 Background: We previously developed a simple, data-based strategy for selecting high-priority quality measures, and applied it to practice performance data from eight National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) centers to identify high-priority measures for breast cancer care.
  • We now seek to evaluate the generalizability of these results by identifying which measures rank highly when practice performance data from a nationally representative sample, rather than a select group of cancer centers, are used.
  • METHODS: Using SEER-Medicare data, we assessed practice performance for 9933 women 65-70 years old diagnosed 1998-2002 with non-metastatic invasive breast cancer.
  • For each quality measure, we determined the number of eligible patients, the number who did not receive recommended therapy, and the overall and target (goal) concordance values.
  • The absence of oral hormone therapy and DCIS pathology data in SEER-Medicare precluded assessments of quality relative to the remaining measures.
  • The highest-ranking measures recommended chemotherapy for hormone-receptor positive tumors >1 cm, axillary node surgery and radiation after lumpectomy for stage I-II cancer, and no radiation after mastectomy for node-negative cancer <5 cm.
  • Excluding hormone therapy and DCIS measures, the 6 highest-ranking measures in the SEER-Medicare and NCCN analyses were identical.

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  • (PMID = 27964009.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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23. Fabian CJ, Kimler BF, Anderson J, Tawfik OW, Mayo MS, Breast Cancer Chemoprevention Consortium: Breast cancer chemoprevention Phase IB evaluation of biomarker modulation by arzoxifene, a third generation selective estrogen receptor modulator. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):1015

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Breast cancer chemoprevention Phase IB evaluation of biomarker modulation by arzoxifene, a third generation selective estrogen receptor modulator.
  • : 1015 Background: Arzoxifene (LY353381.HCl) is a new selective estrogen receptor modulator, SERM, with strong breast antiestrogen activity and absence of uterine agonist activity that is being explored as a potential breast cancer chemoprevention agent.
  • We performed a multi-institutional Phase IB evaluation of the effects of arzoxifene on serum and tissue biomarkers in women with newly diagnosed DCIS and T1/T2 invasive cancer who received study agent in the interval between core biopsy and definitive re-excision.
  • Women discontinued hormone replacement therapy (HRT) prior to entry on study.
  • Tissue from biopsy and re-excision specimens was evaluated immunohistochemically for proliferation (Ki-67 by MIB-1;.
  • PCNA) and other biomarkers potentially related to drug effect.
  • Only subjects with an ER+ and/or PR+ tumor at biopsy, with tumor tissue available from both biopsy and re-excision, were evaluated for biomarker modulation.
  • For 58 subjects evaluable for tissue biomarker analysis, a change in ER expression (median decrease of 6% positive cells) was observed for subjects receiving arzoxifene, that was statistically significant (p=0.0068) compared to the placebo group (median change = 0%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated the feasibility of accrual to a multi-institutional biomarker modulation trial utilizing women with newly-diagnosed breast cancer.
  • Given a favorable side effect profile and the modulations of tissue (ER and proliferation) biomarkers associated with risk of breast cancer development, arzoxifene remains a candidate for continued evaluation as a breast cancer chemoprevention agent.

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  • (PMID = 28014610.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. Cortazar P, Johnson J, Justice R, Pazdur R: Adjuvant breast cancer: FDA approval overview. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e11529

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Adjuvant breast cancer: FDA approval overview.
  • : e11529 Background: Improved disease-free survival (DFS) in randomized controlled trials (RCT) is the primary basis for approval of adjuvant breast cancer (ABC) treatments.
  • METHODS: Review of clinical trials leading to new drug approvals for ABC.
  • RESULTS: DFS is a composite endpoint defined as the time from randomization to the earliest occurrence of invasive loco-regional recurrence, invasive contralateral breast cancer, DCIS, distant metastases, second primary tumors or death from any cause.
  • Trastuzumab approval as part of a treatment regimen was based on 4 clinical trials that showed improved DFS.
  • Epirubicin approval was based on a longer relapse free survival (RFS) of the epirubicin-containing combination therapy (CEF-120) compared to CMF (HR=0.76; 95% CI 0.60-0.96, p=0.013).
  • Tamoxifen approval was based on an overview of tamoxifen adjuvant therapy.

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  • (PMID = 27964635.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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25. Tager FA, McKinley PS: Cognitive functioning before chemotherapy treatment in women with breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):548

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cognitive functioning before chemotherapy treatment in women with breast cancer.
  • : 548 Background: Many women with breast cancer (BC) undergoing chemotherapy report trouble with attention, concentration and memory.
  • However,most of the studies have looked at women only after treatment,with no pre-treatment assessment.
  • As part of a longitudinal study, we report here pre-chemotherapy assessments of postmenopausal BC patients.
  • METHODS: Thirty-two pre-chemo BC patients (DCIS, Stage I and Stage II) were assessed with a battery of neuro-psychological tests and self-report forms measuring: intelligence, memory, attention, language, visuo-spatial and motor functioning, and mood.
  • When we compared this group to the non-impaired patients, significant differences were seen on a number of tests assessing visual-motor function (Pegboard {P=.001 and .004}, Trailmaking A and B {P=.031, 006},Digit Symbol (P=.015) and Rey {P=.038}), visual memory (BVRT; P=.002)and visual attention(Conner's Continuous Performance Test {Commissions, P=.010; Detectability,P=.022}) independent of age, ethnicity, educational level, and stage of cancer.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study indicate that a significant number of postmenopausal women with BC exhibit objective cognitive deficits pre-treatment in many of the same areas as seen in women after chemotherapy.
  • Thus, to truly understand the cognitive effects of chemotherapy it is necessary to measure pre-treatment functioning in this population to compare with post-treatment changes.
  • In addition,these results may suggest that women with cognitive deficits before chemotherapy may be more vulnerable to the possible effects of chemotherapy and thus be more prone to notice more pronounced changes in their cognitive abilities.

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  • (PMID = 28016576.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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26. Masuda N, Ando M, Aogi K, Ino H, Iwata H, Tokuda Y, Nakamura S, Yamamoto N, Fujiwara Y: Randomized phase II study of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and trastuzumab for operable breast cancer with overexpression of HER2. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):565

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Randomized phase II study of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and trastuzumab for operable breast cancer with overexpression of HER2.
  • : 565 Background: Achievement of pathological complete response (pCR) by primary systemic therapy (PST) correlates with improved survival in operable breast cancer patients.
  • Based on data of the higher pCR rate with concomitant chemotherapy and trastuzumab (H) reported by some clinical trials, we performed a multi-center, prospective randomized phase II study to evaluate the efficacy of adding H to standard chemotherapy and to determine more effective agent which will show higher pCR by the comparison between weekly paclitaxel (P) and tri-weekly docetaxel (D) in neo-adjuvant setting for HER-2+ pts.
  • PST regimen was scheduled as the sequential chemotherapy with 4 cycles of CEF (cyclophosphamide, epirubicin 100 mg/m<sup>2</sup>, 5FU) followed by 4 cycles of q3w H with qw P 80 mg/m<sup>2</sup> (HP) or q3w D 75 mg/m<sup>2</sup> (HD).
  • The primary objective was designed to evaluate the pCR, defined as no evidence of residual invasive cancer in axilla and breast.
  • 88 pts (86%) was successful on complete treatment course.
  • Out of 30 pts with pCR, 13 pts had component of DCIS.

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  • (PMID = 27960723.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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27. Waintraub SE, Tuchman V: The role of preoperative neoadjuvant cytoreductive dose-dense bevacizumab plus docetaxel followed by bevacizumab-doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide regimen in locally advanced operable breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e11524

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The role of preoperative neoadjuvant cytoreductive dose-dense bevacizumab plus docetaxel followed by bevacizumab-doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide regimen in locally advanced operable breast cancer.
  • : e11524 Background: Neoadjuvant Rx has been shown to downstage locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) to try to achieve a pathological complete response(PCR) and to convert mastectomy to lumpectomy.
  • Bevacizumab (B) was recently approved to treat metastatic breast cancer in combination with paclitaxel (P).
  • NSABP B-27 used preoperative doxorubicin(A) with cyclophosphamide (C) +- docetaxel (Doc) every 3 wks in primary operable breast cancer, yielding a 12.9% PCR with no residual invasive cancer from AC and 26.1% with the addition of Doc.
  • Based on the success of E2100 with P+B over P, and the more recent AVADO trial showing the superiority of B and Doc over Doc, we have treated such Her2neu-neg pts using Doc/B followed by AC/B with a dose dense every (q) 2 week regimen to see if we could achieve a higher PCR rate and to assess the tolerability of this regimen.
  • METHODS: Pts with Her2neu-negative locally advanced operable M0 breast cancer were treated initially with B 10mg/kg iv q 2w with Doc 100mg/m2 q 2w four times with pegfilgrastim given 24 hours after chemotherapy, followed by A 60mg/m2 and C 600mg/m2 q 2 weeks four 4 times with pegfilgrastim given 24 hours after chemotherapy with B 10mg/kg iv for the first AC course as the B was discontinued at least 6 weeks prior to definitive breast surgery.
  • All pts were to get radiation therapy after surgery and appropriate anti-estrogen Rx if estrogen receptor was positive.
  • RESULTS: 15 Her-2 neg women aged 35-61 were treated from 9/06-present for locally advanced primary operable breast cancer.
  • Of the first 12 post-operative evaluable pts that have completed all the pre- operative therapy, the results showed 5 PCR, including one pt with residual sub-cm DCIS, 7 pathological incomplete responses, yielding a 42% PCR.
  • The addition of B to dose dense traditional neoadjuvant chemotherapy seems to increase the PCR.
  • Larger prospective trials using B with dose dense therapy are warranted.

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  • (PMID = 27964628.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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28. Gronwald J, Byrski T, Huzarski T, Dent R, Bielicka V, Zuziak D, Wisniowski R, Lubinski J, Narod S: Neoadjuvant therapy with cisplatin in BRCA1-positive breast cancer patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):502

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Neoadjuvant therapy with cisplatin in BRCA1-positive breast cancer patients.
  • : 502 Background: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is administered to control disease, make surgical resection possible and increase the possibility of breast tissue conservation.
  • A further advantage of neoadjuvant therapy is that it helps to assess chemo-sensitivity to a particular agent.
  • Induction of a pathological complete response (pCR) is one of the primary goals of neoadjuvant therapy in order to achieve a better disease-free and overall survival.
  • Experimental data suggest that BRCA1 related breast cancer may have increased sensitivity to platinum-based chemotherapy, but clinical data are limited.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of complete pathologic response after neo-adjuvant treatment with cisplatin chemotherapy in women with breast cancer and a BRCA1 mutation.
  • METHODS: Twenty five women with breast cancer and a BRCA1 mutation with stage I, II, and III breast cancer between December 2006 and December 2008 were entered into this study.
  • After chemotherapy, patients underwent surgery and were assessed for pathologic response in both the breast and axillary lymph nodes.
  • Complete pathologic response was defined as no residual invasive disease in both the breast and axilla, however ductal carcinoma in situ was allowed.
  • Thirteen patients had tumors of greater than two centimeters (52%) and seven patients had positive lymph nodes at diagnosis (28%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Platinum-based chemotherapy is effective in a high proportion of patients with BRCA1-associated breast cancers.
  • Clinical trials are warranted to determine the optimum treatment for this subgroup of breast cancer patients.

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  • (PMID = 27960785.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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29. Lee J, Min W, Kim S, Son B: Comparison of serum HER-2/neu between trastuzumab-based regimen and anthyracycline-based regimen during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced primary breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e11582

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Comparison of serum HER-2/neu between trastuzumab-based regimen and anthyracycline-based regimen during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced primary breast cancer.
  • : e11582 Background: Serum Her-2/neu has been known as molecular surrogating marker of predicting treatment response in Her-2 positive breast cancer.
  • We compare the change of serum Her-2/neu during neoadjuvant chemotherapy between trastuzumab(H) and anthyracyline(A) based treatment.
  • METHODS: All breast cancers were tested by immunohistochemical stain and FISH for Her-2/neu before treatment.
  • Serum Her-2/neu was twice measured by Chemiluminescence immunoassay(ADVIA centaurTMsystem) before neoadjuvant chemotherapy and before operation.
  • Pathologic complete response (pCR) was considered as no residual tumor or remnant ductal carcinoma in situ, partial response (PR) was less than 50% decrease in maximal diameter in pathologic tumor size.
  • CONCLUSIONS: A decrease in serum Her-2/neu levels during treatment was associated with pathologic response in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy, particularly, trastuzumab-based regimen.
  • Serum Her-2/neu levels may serve to monitoring neoadjuvant therapy in Her-2/neu positive breast cancer.

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  • (PMID = 27964116.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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30. Olson AL, Bevers T, Guzman M, Theriault RL, Hortobagyi GN, Hahn KM: Cervical and colorectal cancer screening among breast cancer (BrCa) survivors followed in either a breast center (BC) or a breast survivorship clinic (SvC) at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20506

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cervical and colorectal cancer screening among breast cancer (BrCa) survivors followed in either a breast center (BC) or a breast survivorship clinic (SvC) at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.
  • : e20506 Background: An essential component of cancer survivorship care includes the prevention and early detection of new cancers.
  • We sought to determine if documentation of appropriate cervical and/or colon cancer screening differed between BrCa survivors followed in our BC (patients < 5 yrs from diagnosis of invasive BrCa or with active BrCa issues) and those seen in our SvC (patients with history of DCIS or ≥ 5 yrs from invasive BrCa diagnosis).
  • 1) not receiving chemotherapy, radiation, or undergoing surgical evaluation;.
  • 3) ≥ 12 months from BrCa diagnosis, 4) no active GYN or GI complaints.
  • RESULTS: BrCa survivors followed our SvC were significantly more likely to have provider documentation of both cervical and colon cancer screening than those followed in our BC (72% versus 22.7%, and 68.4% versus 14.5%, respectively; both p values <0.001).
  • Although nursing documentation of cervical cancer screening is required in both centers, SvC patients were more likely to have this documented than those in the BC (95.3% versus 56.5%, respectively; p <0.001).
  • Nursing documentation of colon cancer screening is required in SvC (84.2% documented) but not in the BC (3.5% documented).
  • CONCLUSIONS: BrCa survivors receiving care in our survivorship clinic were more likely to have nursing or provider documentation of cervical and/or colon cancer screening.
  • Strategies that trigger documentation of non-BrCa screening take advantage of the "teachable moment" during a routine visit- thereby promoting the long-term health of cancer survivors.

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  • (PMID = 27960945.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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31. Peacock N, Saleh M, Bendell J, Rose AA, Dong Z, Siegel PM, Crowley E, Simantov R, Vahdat L: A phase I/II study of CR011-vcMMAE, an antibody-drug conjugate, in patients (pts) with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer (MBC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):1067

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase I/II study of CR011-vcMMAE, an antibody-drug conjugate, in patients (pts) with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer (MBC).
  • : 1067 Background: Glycoprotein NMB (GPNMB), also known as osteoactivin, has been shown to regulate metastasis of breast cancer in vivo.
  • This is the first study of CR011-vcMMAE in breast cancer.
  • METHODS: Eligible pts with MBC had ≥ 2 prior chemotherapy regimens, including a taxane, an anthracycline, and capecitabine; and ECOG PS ≤ 2.
  • Immunohistochemistry (IHC) with goat polyclonal antibody to GPNMB was performed on pt biopsy specimens and on tissue microarrays containing normal breast, DCIS, breast tumor and lymph node metastases.
  • RESULTS: 10 pts with MBC (median age 57, range 36 - 69) had a median of 7 prior regimens and were treated with CR011-vcMMAE for a median of 2 cycles (range 1-4).
  • Breast tumor samples were more likely to stain positive for GPNMB than normal breast tissues.

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  • (PMID = 27961164.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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32. Kot J, Sićko Z: Delayed treatment of bubble related illness in diving--review of standard protocol. Int Marit Health; 2004;55(1-4):103-20

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Delayed treatment of bubble related illness in diving--review of standard protocol.
  • The basic treatment of diver with bubble related illness consists of recompression in medical hyperbaric facility.
  • During that time the process induced by gas bubbles spread out and finally result in activation of many pathophysiological events.
  • Currently approved standard of treatment before starting of recompression consists of normobaric oxygenation, intravenous or oral fluids and general stabilization of the patient condition.
  • Usage of several pharmacological agents is promising, including corticosteroids, antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy or lidocaine.
  • Those drugs are most often used in some centres but still there is lack of randomized controlled studies concerning their efficacy in decompression illness of divers.
  • The review of available bibliography presented in this paper leads to conclusion that recommendations of the Second European Consensus Conference on Hyperbaric Medicine "The Treatment of Decompression Accidents in Recreational Diving" published in 1996 in Marseille, France for fluid replacement and drug therapy for decompression accidents are still valid.
  • This protocol includes the fluid treatment, normobaric oxygen and intensive therapy.
  • Other drugs (aspirin, lidocaine, heparin, steroids, calcium channel blockers, antioxidants) should still be treated as an option considered by clinician, but without strong evidences from clinical studies.
  • [MeSH-major] Decompression Sickness / therapy. Diving. Emergency Treatment / standards. Hyperbaric Oxygenation. Practice Guidelines as Topic

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  • (PMID = 15881547.001).
  • [ISSN] 1641-9251
  • [Journal-full-title] International maritime health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int Marit Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Number-of-references] 93
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33. Bennett M, Mitchell SJ, Lehm JP, Wasiak J: Recompression and adjunctive therapy for decompression illness: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Diving Hyperb Med; 2008 Jun;38(2):91-8

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Recompression and adjunctive therapy for decompression illness: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.
  • INTRODUCTION: Decompression illness (DCI) results from bubble formation in the blood or tissues following the breathing of compressed gas.
  • Recompression is the universally accepted standard for the treatment of DCI, but a number of strategies have been suggested in order to improve the outcome.
  • METHODS: We performed a systematic search of the literature in December 2007 for randomised controlled trials of DCI therapy, and made an analysis of pre-determined clinical outcomes.
  • There was a reduction in the number of compressions required with the addition of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) tenoxicam to routine recompression therapy (P = 0.01) but no evidence of improved effectiveness (relative risk (RR) of residual symptoms 1.04, P = 0.58).
  • The risk of multiple recompressions was lower with heliox than with an oxygen treatment table (RR 0.56, 95% CI 0.31 to 1.00, P = 0.05).
  • CONCLUSIONS: There is no randomised evidence concerning the effectiveness of recompression for DCI.
  • There is a case for large randomised trials of high methodological rigour in order to define any benefit from the use of different breathing gases during recompression therapy.

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  • (PMID = 22692691.001).
  • [ISSN] 1833-3516
  • [Journal-full-title] Diving and hyperbaric medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Diving Hyperb Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
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34. Bennett M, Mitchell S, Dominguez A: Adjunctive treatment of decompression illness with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (tenoxicam) reduces compression requirement. Undersea Hyperb Med; 2003;30(3):195-205

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Adjunctive treatment of decompression illness with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (tenoxicam) reduces compression requirement.
  • We report a randomized trial examining adjunctive administration of the NSAID, tenoxicam, to divers suffering with DCI.
  • Subjects were recompressed and treatment continued daily until symptom stabilization or complete resolution.
  • The subjects were assessed using a recovery status score at the completion of treatment and at 4-6 weeks.
  • There was a significant reduction in the number of treatments required to achieve discharge (median treatments placebo 3, tenoxicam 2, P=0.01).
  • There was no evidence of increased complications of treatment in the tenoxicam group.
  • When given this NSAID, patients with DCI require fewer hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) sessions to achieve a standard clinical end-point and there is likely to be an associated cost saving.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Decompression Sickness / drug therapy. Hyperbaric Oxygenation / methods. Piroxicam / analogs & derivatives. Piroxicam / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Algorithms. Barotrauma / etiology. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Double-Blind Method. Ear Diseases / etiology. Female. Humans. Male. Statistics as Topic. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 14620099.001).
  • [ISSN] 1066-2936
  • [Journal-full-title] Undersea & hyperbaric medicine : journal of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Undersea Hyperb Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 13T4O6VMAM / Piroxicam; 59804-37-4 / tenoxicam
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35. Zheng S, Zhang BL, Zhang RZ, Yang JL, Zou SM, Xue LY, Luo W, Yuan YL, Lü N: [Differences between clinical response and pathologic response of breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy]. Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi; 2010 Nov;39(11):734-8
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Breast Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Differences between clinical response and pathologic response of breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy].
  • OBJECTIVE: to investigate the pathologic basis of the difference between clinical response and pathologic response of breast carcinoma after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • METHODS: two hundred and nine cases of breast cancer with neoadjuvant therapy were analyzed and clinical data were collected from June, 2005 to December, 2007.
  • All patients had core needle biopsy taken before neoadjuvant chemotherapy and were operated within 4 weeks after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Clinical examination, X-ray of breast and/or B ultrasonography of primary breast focus were taken before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Clinical responses of breast primary focus were evaluated according to RECIST (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors) version 1.1.Pathologic responses of breast primary focus were evaluated according to Miller and Payne (MP) grading system.
  • (1) Clinical responses basing on clinical examination showed complete response, partial response, stable disease and progressive response, in 33, 124, 41 and 11 cases respectively. (2) Eighty-seven cases had X-ray of breast taken before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Clinical response basing on X-ray, showed complete response, partial response and stable disease in 8, 42 and 37 cases respectively. (3) Pathologic responses of breast primary focus were as MP1 (14 cases), MP2 (35 cases), MP3 (106 cases), MP4 (36 cases) and MP5 (18 cases). (4) The clinical response basing on clinical examination were related to the pathologic response (χ(2) = 33.668, P = 0.001); and the clinical response basing on X-ray of breast were also related to the pathologic response (χ(2) = 22.404, P = 0.004). (5) The pathologic basis of the difference between the pathologic response and the clinical response basing on X-ray of breast were: embolism of carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma, intraductal carcinoma with ossifying-type calcification, nodular fibrosis and others.
  • Some benign and malignant pathologic changes may contribute to the under-estimation of clinical response over pathologic response; whereas embolism of carcinoma may contribute to the over-estimation of clinical response over pathologic response.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Breast Neoplasms / radiography. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / pathology. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / radiography. Neoadjuvant Therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous / drug therapy. Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous / pathology. Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous / radiography. Adult. Aged. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / pathology. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / radiography. Carcinoma, Lobular / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Lobular / pathology. Carcinoma, Lobular / radiography. Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Remission Induction

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  • (PMID = 21215162.001).
  • [ISSN] 0529-5807
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua bing li xue za zhi = Chinese journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
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36. Kim HJ, Im YH, Han BK, Choi N, Lee J, Kim JH, Choi YL, Ahn JS, Nam SJ, Park YS, Choe YH, Ko YH, Yang JH: Accuracy of MRI for estimating residual tumor size after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer: relation to response patterns on MRI. Acta Oncol; 2007;46(7):996-1003
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  • [Title] Accuracy of MRI for estimating residual tumor size after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer: relation to response patterns on MRI.
  • BACKGROUND: This study evaluated the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for estimating residual tumor size after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer and assessed whether the tumor pattern on MRI after chemotherapy influenced the accuracy of the MRI measurement of the residual tumor size.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fifty patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy with doxorubicin and docetaxel for locally advanced breast cancer were evaluated with MRI before and after chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: MRI is an accurate method for predicting the extent of residual tumor after neoadjuvant chemotherapy; however, it may overestimate the residual disease, especially in cases showing a nest or rim tumor pattern and in those having combined lesions with ductal carcinoma in situ or multiple scattered nodules after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / diagnosis. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neoadjuvant Therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Doxorubicin / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Neoplasm, Residual. Prognosis. Reproducibility of Results. Taxoids / therapeutic use. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17851879.001).
  • [ISSN] 0284-186X
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Norway
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Taxoids; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin
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37. Kerr JR: Neonatal effects of breast cancer chemotherapy administered during pregnancy. Pharmacotherapy; 2005 Mar;25(3):438-41
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  • [Title] Neonatal effects of breast cancer chemotherapy administered during pregnancy.
  • Cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin are pregnancy category D agents; however, potential benefits may warrant treatment with these agents during pregnancy under special circumstances.
  • During her first trimester of pregnancy, a 37-year-old Caucasian woman was diagnosed with stage IIB infiltrating ductal carcinoma in situ (breast cancer) that was estrogen and progesterone receptor negative and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 positive.
  • He had neutropenia and anemia, quite possibly as a result of his mother's chemotherapy 1 week before delivery.
  • The infant grew and developed normally during his first year of life and remained in good health.
  • An objective causality assessment revealed that it was probable that the infant's adverse events (prematurity, neutropenia, and anemia) were related to his mother's doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide therapy; however, these were the only adverse events potentially linked to in utero exposure to chemotherapy during the second and third trimesters.
  • Due to the special considerations of both mother and infant, optimal treatment for patients with pregnancy-associated breast cancer requires the expert opinion of a multidisciplinary care team.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / drug therapy. Maternal-Fetal Exchange. Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic / drug therapy


38. Tozaki M, Uno S, Kobayashi T, Aiba K, Yoshida K, Takeyama H, Shioya H, Tabei I, Toriumi Y, Suzuki M, Kawakami M, Fukuda K: Histologic breast cancer extent after neoadjuvant chemotherapy: comparison with multidetector-row CT and dynamic MRI. Radiat Med; 2004 Jul-Aug;22(4):246-53
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  • [Title] Histologic breast cancer extent after neoadjuvant chemotherapy: comparison with multidetector-row CT and dynamic MRI.
  • PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy of dynamic multidetector-row CT (MDCT) in assessing residual cancer extent after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), and to compare MDCT results with those derived from dynamic three-dimensional MRI using the volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequence.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: MDCT before and after NAC was performed in 19 consecutive patients with breast cancer.
  • The distribution pattern of contrast enhancement (CE) by CT before NAC was classified into two groups: replaced lesion (diffuse CE in whole quadrants) and non-replaced lesion (localized CE).
  • In replaced lesions, accuracy for the detection of tumor extent with a deviation of less than 2 cm in length was 0% (0/7) with early-phase CT/MRI and 100% (7/7) with late-phase CT/MRI.
  • In non-replaced lesions, accuracy was 55% (6/11) with early-phase CT/MRI and 82% (9/11) with late-phase CT/MRI.
  • One case of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) could be detected only with late phase MRI.
  • CONCLUSION: Late-phase images obtained by MDCT and MRI may be accurate in the diagnosis of residual cancer extent after NAC.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Tomography, Spiral Computed
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Anthracyclines / administration & dosage. Bridged Compounds / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / pathology. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / pathology. Carcinoma, Lobular / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Lobular / pathology. Contrast Media. Female. Humans. Image Enhancement / methods. Imaging, Three-Dimensional. Middle Aged. Neoplasm, Residual. Radiographic Image Enhancement / methods. Remission Induction. Taxoids / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 15468945.001).
  • [ISSN] 0288-2043
  • [Journal-full-title] Radiation medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiat Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anthracyclines; 0 / Bridged Compounds; 0 / Contrast Media; 0 / Taxoids; 1605-68-1 / taxane
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39. Schulz-Wendtland R, Heywang-Köbrunner SH, Aichinger U, Krämer S, Wenkel E, Bautz W: [Do tissue marker clips after sonographically or stereotactically guided breast biopsy improve follow-up of small breast lesions and localisation of breast cancer after chemotherapy?]. Rofo; 2002 May;174(5):620-4
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  • [Title] [Do tissue marker clips after sonographically or stereotactically guided breast biopsy improve follow-up of small breast lesions and localisation of breast cancer after chemotherapy?].
  • [Transliterated title] Verbessert die Clipmarkierung im Rahmen der sonographischen oder stereotaktischen Brustbiopsie die Verlaufsbeurteilung kleiner Mammaläsionen und Lokalisation von Tumoren nach Chemotherapie?
  • PURPOSE: We wanted to determine if tissue marker clips after sonographically or stereotactically guided breast biopsy improve the follow-up of small breast lesions classified BI-RADS 4/5 and the localisation of breast cancer (TNM stage 2 or 3) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospective analysis was performed of 108 breast lesions 1 cm or smaller mammographically classified as BI-RADS 4/5 and 14 breast lesions larger than 2 cm mammographically classified as BI-RADS 5.
  • 33 of the 108 breast lesions 1 cm or smaller underwent sonographic core cut breast biopsy (group 1) and 75 stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (group 2).
  • All 14 lesions greater than 2 cm were stereotactically vacuum-assisted breast biopsied (group 3).
  • Mammographies were performed in all patients of group 1 and 2 with a histologically benign finding (n = 31, n = 69, respectively) and in all patients of group 3 directly after clip placement and after 6 and 12 months.
  • RESULTS: Two patients of group 1 and 6 patients of group 2 had breast conservative surgery (BET) because of the histological diagnosis of a ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive breast cancer.
  • The tissue marker clips of the remaining 31 patients of group 1 and 69 patients of group 2 diverged with a mean value of 0.4 cm (standard deviation +/- 0.23 cm; range 0.1 cm to 0.9 cm) from their placement position after 6 months.
  • After 12 months the marker clips deviated with a mean value of 0.4 cm (standard deviation +/- 0.21 cm; range 0.1 cm to 0.9 cm) in 94 patients and 0.8 cm (standard deviation +/- 0.25 cm; range 0.1 cm to 0.9 cm) in 6 patients from their original location.
  • In all patients of group 3 the tissue marker clips were the only possibility to localize the tumour after neoadjuvant chemotherapy as all other diagnostic methods showed inconsistent results.
  • CONCLUSION: Positioning a tissue marker clip in the tumour centre seems to be reasonable after interventional biopsy of breast lesions of 1.0 cm or smaller and before neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Biopsy, Needle / methods. Breast / pathology. Breast Diseases / pathology. Breast Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Reproducibility of Results. Surgical Instruments

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  • (PMID = 11997863.001).
  • [ISSN] 1438-9029
  • [Journal-full-title] RöFo : Fortschritte auf dem Gebiete der Röntgenstrahlen und der Nuklearmedizin
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rofo
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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40. Antonelli C, Franchi F, Della Marta ME, Carinci A, Sbrana G, Tanasi P, De Fina L, Brauzzi M: Guiding principles in choosing a therapeutic table for DCI hyperbaric therapy. Minerva Anestesiol; 2009 Mar;75(3):151-61
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  • [Title] Guiding principles in choosing a therapeutic table for DCI hyperbaric therapy.
  • Hyperbaric therapy is the basis of treatment for pervasive development disorders.
  • For this reason, the choice of the right therapeutic table for each case is critical.
  • Above all, the delay in recompression time with respect to the first symptoms and to the severity of the case must be considered.
  • In our experience, the use of low-pressure oxygen tables resolves almost all cases if recompression takes place within a short time.
  • These tables can also be used in severe spinal-cord decompression sickness.
  • Saturation treatment should be avoided or at least used only in special cases.
  • In cases of arterial gas embolism cerebral injury, it is recommended to start with an initial 6 ATA recompression only if the time between symptom onset and the beginning of recompression is less than a few hours.
  • [MeSH-major] Decompression Sickness / therapy. Hyperbaric Oxygenation / standards. Oxygen / administration & dosage. Practice Guidelines as Topic
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Algorithms. Anoxia / etiology. Anoxia / prevention & control. Cell Adhesion / drug effects. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Embolism, Air / therapy. Endothelium, Vascular / drug effects. Endothelium, Vascular / physiopathology. Female. Helium / administration & dosage. Helium / pharmacology. Helium / therapeutic use. Humans. Inert Gas Narcosis / etiology. Inert Gas Narcosis / prevention & control. Leukocytes / drug effects. Leukocytes / physiology. Male. Middle Aged. Nitrogen / administration & dosage. Nitrogen / adverse effects. Nitrogen / pharmacology. Nitrogen / therapeutic use. Reperfusion Injury / etiology. Reperfusion Injury / prevention & control. Spinal Cord / blood supply. Spinal Cord Compression / complications. Spinal Cord Compression / therapy. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19221544.001).
  • [ISSN] 1827-1596
  • [Journal-full-title] Minerva anestesiologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Minerva Anestesiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 206GF3GB41 / Helium; 37291-87-5 / nitrox; 58933-55-4 / heliox; N762921K75 / Nitrogen; S88TT14065 / Oxygen
  • [Number-of-references] 31
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41. Sharma JB, Pushparaj M, Kumar S, Roy KK, Raina V, Malhotra N: Successful pregnancy outcome with 5-flurouracil, epirubicin, cyclophosphamide chemotherapy, and hemostatic radiotherapy with abdominal shielding for metastatic invasive intraductal breast carcinoma. Arch Gynecol Obstet; 2009 Mar;279(3):415-7
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  • [Title] Successful pregnancy outcome with 5-flurouracil, epirubicin, cyclophosphamide chemotherapy, and hemostatic radiotherapy with abdominal shielding for metastatic invasive intraductal breast carcinoma.
  • A case of metastatic infiltrating breast cancer in a young multiparous lady with 33 weeks pregnancy is presented who was treated with combination chemotherapy and hemostatic radiotherapy and had successful pregnancy outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / therapy. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / therapy. Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic / therapy

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  • (PMID = 18642013.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-0711
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of gynecology and obstetrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Gynecol. Obstet.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 3Z8479ZZ5X / Epirubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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42. Smith IE, A'Hern RP, Coombes GA, Howell A, Ebbs SR, Hickish TF, O'Brien ME, Mansi JL, Wilson CB, Robinson AC, Murray PA, Price CG, Perren TJ, Laing RW, Bliss JM, TOPIC Trial Group: A novel continuous infusional 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy regimen compared with conventional chemotherapy in the neo-adjuvant treatment of early breast cancer: 5 year results of the TOPIC trial. Ann Oncol; 2004 May;15(5):751-8
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  • [Title] A novel continuous infusional 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy regimen compared with conventional chemotherapy in the neo-adjuvant treatment of early breast cancer: 5 year results of the TOPIC trial.
  • BACKGROUND: To compare the efficacy of continuous infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy against conventional bolus chemotherapy in the preoperative treatment of patients with large operable early breast cancer.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Four hundred and twenty-six women with histologically proven 3 cm invasive early breast cancer were randomised to receive pre-operative infusional 5-FU 200 mg/m(2) by daily 24 h continuous infusion via a Hickman line for 18 weeks with epirubicin 60 mg/m(2) intravenous (i.v.) bolus on day 1 and cisplatin 60 mg/m(2) i.v. bolus on day 1, both repeating 3-weekly (infusional ECisF), or conventional bolus doxorubicin 60 mg/m(2) i.v. on day 1 and cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m(2) i.v. on day 1, both repeating 3-weekly (AC), both schedules for six courses.
  • Patients subsequently had local therapy (surgery or radiotherapy or both) and tamoxifen 20 mg orally daily as appropriate.
  • RESULTS: The 5 year results for AC and infusional ECisF, respectively, were as follows: overall response, 75% and 77%; complete clinical remission, 31% and 34%; pathological complete remission (pathCR), 16% for both; and pathCR with residual ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), 25% and 24%.
  • Both treatments were well tolerated.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative continuous infusional 5-FU-based chemotherapy is no more active than conventional AC for early breast cancer; with a median 5 year follow-up, the infusion-based schedule shows a non-significant trend towards improved survival.

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  • (PMID = 15111342.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-7534
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase III; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide
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43. Zheng S, Zhang BL, Zou SM, Lin DM, Xue LY, Luo W, Lu N: [Diagnostic value of core needle biopsy before neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer]. Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi; 2008 Feb;37(2):99-102
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  • [Title] [Diagnostic value of core needle biopsy before neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer].
  • OBJECTIVE: To assess the diagnostic value of core needle biopsy (CNB) before neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer.
  • METHODS: One hundred and nineteen breast cancer cases underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy in our hospital during the period from June, 2005 to January, 2007 were analyzed.
  • CNB was carried out before starting chemotherapy.
  • The hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides of CNB taken before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy were reviewed independently by two pathologists, and the rate of consistency was verified.
  • RESULTS: Amongst the 119 cases studied, 110 cases were confirmed to be carcinoma, including 105 cases of invasive carcinoma and 5 cases of ductal carcinoma-in-situ.
  • CONCLUSION: CNB has important value in distinguishing benign from malignant lesions, as well as in confirming the diagnosis of invasive carcinoma before starting neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Biopsy, Needle / methods. Breast Neoplasms / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / diagnosis. Neoadjuvant Therapy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Breast / pathology. Female. Humans

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  • (PMID = 18681320.001).
  • [ISSN] 0529-5807
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua bing li xue za zhi = Chinese journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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44. Jones RL, Lakhani SR, Ring AE, Ashley S, Walsh G, Smith IE: Pathological complete response and residual DCIS following neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast carcinoma. Br J Cancer; 2006 Feb 13;94(3):358-62
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  • [Title] Pathological complete response and residual DCIS following neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast carcinoma.
  • Patients who have no residual invasive cancer following neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast carcinoma have a better overall survival than those with residual disease.
  • Many classification systems assessing pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy include residual ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) only in the definition of pathological complete response.
  • The purpose of this study was to investigate whether patients with residual DCIS only have the same prognosis as those with no residual invasive or in situ disease.
  • A retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database identified 435 patients, who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy for operable breast cancer between February 1985 and February 2003.
  • Of these, 30 (7%; 95% CI 5-9%) had no residual invasive disease or DCIS and 20 (5%; CI 3-7%) had residual DCIS only.
  • With a median follow-up of 61 months, there was no statistical difference in disease-free survival, 80% (95% CI 60-90%) in those with no residual invasive or in situ disease and 61% (95% CI 35-80%) in those with DCIS only (P=0.4).
  • No significant difference in 5-year overall survival was observed, 93% (95% CI 75-98%) in those with no residual invasive or in situ disease and 82% (95% CI 52-94%) in those with DCIS only (P=0.3).
  • Due to the small number of patients and limited number of events in each group, it is not possible to draw definitive conclusions from this study.
  • Further analyses of other databases are required to confirm our finding of no difference in disease-free and overall survival between patients with residual DCIS and those with no invasive or in situ disease following neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / therapy. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / mortality. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / therapy. Neoadjuvant Therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm, Residual. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16421590.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0920
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
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45. Londero V, Bazzocchi M, Del Frate C, Puglisi F, Di Loreto C, Francescutti G, Zuiani C: Locally advanced breast cancer: comparison of mammography, sonography and MR imaging in evaluation of residual disease in women receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Eur Radiol; 2004 Aug;14(8):1371-9
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  • [Title] Locally advanced breast cancer: comparison of mammography, sonography and MR imaging in evaluation of residual disease in women receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • The accuracy of mammography, sonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in identifying residual disease after neoadjuvant chemotherapy is evaluated and imaging findings are correlated with pathologic findings.
  • Fifteen patients enrolled in an experimental protocol of preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy underwent clinical examination, mammography, sonography and dynamic MRI, performed in this order, before and respectively after 2 and 4 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • %) clinically complete response (CR), 9/15 (60%) partial response (PR), 3/15 (20%) stable disease (SD) and 1/15 (6.7%) progressive disease.
  • Mammography identified 1/15 (6.7%) clinically CR, 8/15 (53.3%) PR and 4/15 (27%) SD, and was not able to evaluate the disease in 2/15 (13%) cases.
  • Therefore, MRI and sonography compared to mammography correctly identified residual disease in 100 vs. 86%.
  • MRI resulted in two false-negative results because of the presence of microfoci of in situ ductal carcinoma (DCIS) and invasive lobular carcinoma (LCI).
  • MRI was superior to mammography in cases of multifocal or multicentric disease (83 vs. 33%).
  • Sonography performed after MRI improves the accuracy in evaluation of uncertain foci of multifocal disease seen on MR images with an increase of diagnostic accuracy from 73 to 84.5%.
  • MRI assesses response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy better than traditional methods of physical examination and mammography.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Lobular / diagnosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Neoplasm, Residual / diagnosis. Ultrasonography, Mammary / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. False Negative Reactions. Female. Humans. Imaging, Three-Dimensional / methods. Mammography / methods. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Predictive Value of Tests. Preoperative Care. Reproducibility of Results. Sensitivity and Specificity

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  • (PMID = 14986052.001).
  • [ISSN] 0938-7994
  • [Journal-full-title] European radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Radiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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46. Chen JH, Feig B, Agrawal G, Yu H, Carpenter PM, Mehta RS, Nalcioglu O, Su MY: MRI evaluation of pathologically complete response and residual tumors in breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Cancer; 2008 Jan 1;112(1):17-26
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  • [Title] MRI evaluation of pathologically complete response and residual tumors in breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • BACKGROUND: This study investigated the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluation of pathologically complete response and residual tumors in patients who were receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) for both positive and negative HER-2 breast cancer.
  • On the basis of the final MRI, response was determined to be a clinically complete response ([CCR], no enhancement), probable CCR (residual enhancement equal to or less than that of glandular tissue), or residual tumor.
  • Pathological outcomes were categorized as 1) no residual cancer, 2) no residual invasive cancer but ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) present, or 3) residual invasive cancer.
  • The pathologically complete response (pCR) was defined as no invasive cancer.
  • The accuracy of MRI in identifying pCR varied according to the chemotherapy agent that was administered.
  • The high false-negative rate found in HER-2 negative patients was associated with residual disease that presented as scattered cells or small foci.
  • Results indicate that the chemotherapy agent should be taken into consideration when using MRI to interpret therapeutic outcomes.

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  • [Copyright] 2007 American Cancer Society
  • [ErratumIn] Cancer. 2008 Apr 1;112(7):1642. Feig, Byon [corrected to Feig, Byron]
  • (PMID = 18000804.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA062203; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA90437
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 2S9ZZM9Q9V / Bevacizumab; EC 2.7.10.1 / ERBB2 protein, human; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, ErbB-2
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47. O'Brien C, True LD, Higano CS, Rademacher BL, Garzotto M, Beer TM: Histologic changes associated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy are predictive of nodal metastases in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Am J Clin Pathol; 2010 Apr;133(4):654-61
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  • [Title] Histologic changes associated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy are predictive of nodal metastases in patients with high-risk prostate cancer.
  • Clinical trials are evaluating the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on men with high-risk prostate cancer.
  • We assessed the prognostic and predictive value of histologic features (intraductal carcinoma, vacuolated cell morphologic features, inconspicuous glands, cribriform architecture, and inconspicuous cancer cells) observed in 50 high-risk prostate cancers treated with preprostatectomy docetaxel and mitoxantrone.
  • In univariate analyses (using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank tests), intraductal (P = .001) and cribriform (P = .014) histologic features were associated with shorter RFS.
  • In multivariable logistic regression analysis, only intraductal pattern (P = .007) predicted lymph node metastases.
  • Intraductal and cribriform histologic features apparently predict postchemotherapy outcome.

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  • (PMID = 20231619.001).
  • [ISSN] 1943-7722
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of clinical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Clin. Pathol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000334-33S2; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA119125; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA119125-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA119125-01; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / 3M01RR00334-33S2; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / RR000334-33S2; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000334; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 1 R01CA119125-01
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Taxoids; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; BZ114NVM5P / Mitoxantrone
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS270412; NLM/ PMC3047497
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48. Baillargeon JP, Iuorno MJ, Jakubowicz DJ, Apridonidze T, He N, Nestler JE: Metformin therapy increases insulin-stimulated release of D-chiro-inositol-containing inositolphosphoglycan mediator in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. J Clin Endocrinol Metab; 2004 Jan;89(1):242-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. TESTOSTERONE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Metformin therapy increases insulin-stimulated release of D-chiro-inositol-containing inositolphosphoglycan mediator in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.
  • Some actions of insulin are mediated by putative inositolphosphoglycan mediators, and a deficiency in D-chiro-inositol-containing inositolphosphoglycan (DCI-IPG) may contribute to insulin resistance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).
  • Furthermore, similar effects of DCI and metformin, an insulin-sensitizing drug, have been demonstrated in PCOS women.
  • To determine whether metformin improves insulin actions by increasing biologically active DCI-IPG in women with PCOS, we analyzed DCI-IPG during an oral glucose tolerance test in 19 obese women with PCOS before and after 4-8 wk of metformin or placebo.
  • After treatment, the mean (+/-SE) area under the curve (AUC) during the oral glucose tolerance test of insulin (AUC(insulin)) decreased significantly more in the metformin group, compared with the placebo group [-3574 +/- 962 vs. +1367 +/- 1021 micro IU/min.ml (-26 +/- 7 vs. +10 +/- 7 nmol/min.liter), P = 0.003], but the AUC of DCI-IPG (AUC(DCI-IPG)) decreased similarly in both groups (-1452 +/- 968 vs. -2207 +/- 1021%/min, P = 0.60).
  • However, the ratio of AUC(DCI-IPG)/AUC(insulin) increased by 160% after metformin and decreased by 29% after placebo (P = 0.002 between groups).
  • Moreover, metformin seemed to improve the positive correlation between AUC(DCI-IPG) and AUC(insulin) but not placebo (r = 0.32, P = 0.68 at baseline; r = 0.52, P = 0.12 after metformin; and r = -0.39, P = 0.30 after placebo).
  • We conclude that in obese women with PCOS, metformin may improve the action of insulin in part by improving insulin-mediated release of DCI-IPG mediators, as evidenced by increased bioactive DCI-IPG released per unit of insulin.
  • [MeSH-major] Hypoglycemic Agents / therapeutic use. Inositol Phosphates / secretion. Insulin / pharmacology. Metformin / therapeutic use. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome / drug therapy. Polysaccharides / secretion

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  • (PMID = 14715857.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-972X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / K24HD40237; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / R01HD35629
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hypoglycemic Agents; 0 / Inositol Phosphates; 0 / Insulin; 0 / Placebos; 0 / Polysaccharides; 0 / inositol phosphate glycan; 3XMK78S47O / Testosterone; 9100L32L2N / Metformin
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49. Müller T, Kuhn W: Cysteine elevation in levodopa-treated patients with Parkinson's disease. Mov Disord; 2009 Apr 30;24(6):929-32
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  • [Title] Cysteine elevation in levodopa-treated patients with Parkinson's disease.
  • Levodopa/decarboxylase inhibitor (LD/DCI) administration increases total homocysteine (tHcy) plasma levels.
  • Objectives were to investigate associations between LD/DCI intake, concentrations of tHcy, cysteine, and cysteinyl-glycine in PD patients and healthy controls.
  • Significant associations appeared between tHcys and cysteine in PD patients. tHcy and cysteine concentrations correlated to LD/DCI intake and severity of PD.
  • The cysteine increase may be due to the significant higher dosing of daily LD/DCI and the significant higher morning LD/DCI dose 1 hour before blood sampling in PD patients with tHcy above 15 when compared with the remaining PD patients and the controls.
  • The correlation outcomes support the view that LD/DCI intake may also increase cysteine.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiparkinson Agents / therapeutic use. Cysteine / blood. Levodopa / therapeutic use. Parkinson Disease / blood. Parkinson Disease / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Analysis of Variance. Cohort Studies. Female. Glycine / blood. Humans. Linear Models. Male. Middle Aged. Severity of Illness Index

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2009 Movement Disorder Society.
  • (PMID = 19243072.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-8257
  • [Journal-full-title] Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mov. Disord.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiparkinson Agents; 46627O600J / Levodopa; K848JZ4886 / Cysteine; TE7660XO1C / Glycine
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50. Gonzalez RJ, Buzdar AU, Fraser Symmans W, Yen TW, Broglio KR, Lucci A, Esteva FJ, Yin G, Kuerer HM: Novel clinical trial designs for treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast with trastuzumab (herceptin). Breast J; 2007 Jan-Feb;13(1):72-5
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  • [Title] Novel clinical trial designs for treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast with trastuzumab (herceptin).
  • Because ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) avidly expresses Her2/neu, the target of the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab, and because trastuzumab has been shown to be effective against invasive breast cancer, trastuzumab may be effective for reducing the tumor burden and abrogating or reversing the hypothesized transition from in situ to invasive disease in patients with DCIS.
  • To test this hypothesis, a trial of neoadjuvant trastuzumab for DCIS has been opened at our institution.
  • Because trastuzumab has been shown to act as a radiosensitizing agent for Her2/neu-overexpressing cancer and because there are currently no systemic treatments for estrogen-receptor-negative DCIS, it makes sense to investigate whether use of trastuzumab concurrently with postoperative radiation therapy improves local control of DCIS.
  • The National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) is planning a trial to test this hypothesis.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / drug therapy. Receptor, ErbB-2
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Female. Humans. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Research Design. Trastuzumab

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  • (PMID = 17214797.001).
  • [ISSN] 1075-122X
  • [Journal-full-title] The breast journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Breast J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, ErbB-2; P188ANX8CK / Trastuzumab
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51. Planas J, Morote J, Orsola A, Salvador C, Trilla E, Cecchini L, Raventós CX: The relationship between daily calcium intake and bone mineral density in men with prostate cancer. BJU Int; 2007 Apr;99(4):812-5; discussion 815-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The relationship between daily calcium intake and bone mineral density in men with prostate cancer.
  • OBJECTIVE: To analyse the relationship between daily calcium intake (DCI) and bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with prostate cancer, and to assess if DCI is a risk factor for osteoporosis in this group of patients.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: DCI was assessed by a standard questionnaire answered by men with prostate cancer who had had bone densitometry.
  • BMD was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in the lumbar spine and different hip sites, in a cross-sectional study including 372 men with prostate cancer free of bone metastases, 71.5% (266) under androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) and 28.5% (106) after radical prostatectomy (RP).
  • Osteoporosis was defined according to the International Society for Clinical Densitometry official position (2005).
  • RESULTS: A DCI of <1000 mg, the National Institute of Health recommendation, was detected in 93% of the men, (93.5% under ADT and 91.5% after RP).
  • The mean DCI was 609.7 mg in men with osteoporosis and 682.8 mg in those without (P < 0.001); in men under ADT the mean DCI remained significantly lower in those with osteoporosis (615.5 vs 700.4 mg, P < 0.001).
  • A multivariate analysis showed that DCI was an independent risk factor for osteoporosis, together with patient age, ADT and its duration.
  • CONCLUSIONS: DCI seems to be related to BMD; a low DCI was an independent risk factor for osteoporosis in men with prostate cancer.
  • In the study population overall the DCI was inadequate.
  • Urologists should recommend a DCI of >1000 mg in patients with prostate cancer, especially in those under ADT.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Density / drug effects. Calcium, Dietary / administration & dosage. Osteoporosis / etiology. Prostatic Neoplasms / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Absorptiometry, Photon. Age Factors. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Androgen Antagonists / therapeutic use. Cross-Sectional Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Prostatectomy. Risk Factors


52. Mazouni C, Peintinger F, Wan-Kau S, Andre F, Gonzalez-Angulo AM, Symmans WF, Meric-Bernstam F, Valero V, Hortobagyi GN, Pusztai L: Residual ductal carcinoma in situ in patients with complete eradication of invasive breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy does not adversely affect patient outcome. J Clin Oncol; 2007 Jul 1;25(19):2650-5
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  • [Title] Residual ductal carcinoma in situ in patients with complete eradication of invasive breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy does not adversely affect patient outcome.
  • PURPOSE: To determine whether residual ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) after completion of preoperative chemotherapy affects the outcome of patients with histologically defined complete eradication of invasive cancer.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrospective analysis of a database including 2,302 breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy at The University of Texas M.D.
  • Anderson Cancer Center between 1980 and 2004 was performed.
  • The overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and local recurrence-free survival were compared for patients with no residual invasive or in situ cancer (pathologic complete response [pCR]) and patients with no residual invasive cancer but persistent in situ disease (pCR+DCIS).
  • RESULTS: The mean follow-up time was 250 months.
  • Of the 2,302 treated patients, 78 (3.4%) had pCR, 199 (8.6%) had pCR+DCIS, and 2,025 (88%) had residual invasive cancer.
  • For patients with pCR and pCR+DCIS, the 5-year DFS rates (87.1% in both groups) and 10-year DFS rates (81.3% v 81.7%, respectively) were similar; the 5-year OS rates (91.9% v 92.5%, respectively) and 10-year OS rates (91.8% v 92.5%, respectively) were also similar and significantly better than the rate of patients with residual invasive cancer (74.4%; P < .001).
  • The 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival rates were also not different between patients with pCR (92.8%; 95% CI, 86.1% to 96.4%) and patients with pCR+DCIS (90.9%; 95% CI, 77.3% to 96.5%; P = .63).
  • CONCLUSION: Residual DCIS in patients who experience complete eradication of the invasive cancer in the breast and lymph nodes does not adversely affect survival or local recurrence rate.
  • Inclusion of patients with residual DCIS in the definition of pCR is justified when this outcome is used as an early surrogate for long-term survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Breast Neoplasms / therapy. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / pathology. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / therapy. Neoadjuvant Therapy / methods. Neoplasm, Residual / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Recurrence. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17602071.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01-CA106290
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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53. Yoshida K, Yamaguchi M, Morinaga T, Ikeuchi M, Kinehara M, Ashida H: Genetic modification of Bacillus subtilis for production of D-chiro-inositol, an investigational drug candidate for treatment of type 2 diabetes and polycystic ovary syndrome. Appl Environ Microbiol; 2006 Feb;72(2):1310-5
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Genetic modification of Bacillus subtilis for production of D-chiro-inositol, an investigational drug candidate for treatment of type 2 diabetes and polycystic ovary syndrome.
  • D-chiro-inositol (DCI) is a drug candidate for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and polycystic ovary syndrome, since it improves the efficiency with which the body uses insulin and also promotes ovulation.
  • Here, we report genetic modification of Bacillus subtilis for production of DCI from myo-inositol (MI).
  • In this study, we identified iolI encoding inosose isomerase, which converts 2KMI to 1-keto-D-chiro-inositol (1KDCI), and found that IolG reduces 1KDCI to DCI.
  • Inactivation of iolE in a mutant constitutively expressing the iol operon blocked the MI catabolic pathway to accumulate 2KMI, which was converted to DCI via the activity of IolI and IolG.
  • The mutant was able to convert at least 6% of input MI in the culture medium to DCI.
  • [MeSH-minor] Base Sequence. Biotransformation. Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid. DNA, Bacterial / genetics. Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / drug therapy. Drugs, Investigational. Female. Genes, Bacterial. Humans. Mutation. Operon. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome / drug therapy. Stereoisomerism. Therapies, Investigational

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  • (PMID = 16461681.001).
  • [ISSN] 0099-2240
  • [Journal-full-title] Applied and environmental microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Bacterial; 0 / Drugs, Investigational; 4L6452S749 / Inositol
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1392952
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54. Nascimento NR, Lessa LM, Kerntopf MR, Sousa CM, Alves RS, Queiroz MG, Price J, Heimark DB, Larner J, Du X, Brownlee M, Gow A, Davis C, Fonteles MC: Inositols prevent and reverse endothelial dysfunction in diabetic rat and rabbit vasculature metabolically and by scavenging superoxide. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A; 2006 Jan 3;103(1):218-23
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. NITRIC OXIDE .

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  • Inositol components of an insulin inositol glycan mediator, d-chiro-inositol (DCI) and 3-O-methyl DCI (pinitol), decrease hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia.
  • We tested whether these, myoinositol and dibutyryl DCI (db-DCI), would prevent or reverse ED in diabetic rats and rabbits.
  • Inositols added in vitro to five diabetic tissues reversed ED.
  • DCI and db-DCI decreased elevated ROS in endothelial cells in high glucose and db-DCI reduced PKC activation, hexosamine pathway activity, and advanced glycation end products to basal levels.
  • Xanthine/xanthine oxidase generated superoxide was reduced by superoxide dismutase or inositols, with db-DCI efficacious in a mechanism requiring chelated Fe(3+).
  • These effects are related to their metabolic actions, direct superoxide scavenging, and enhancing and protecting NO signaling.
  • Of the inositols tested, db-DCI was most effective.
  • [MeSH-major] Endothelium, Vascular / drug effects. Endothelium, Vascular / physiopathology. Hyperglycemia / drug therapy. Hypertriglyceridemia / drug therapy. Inositol Phosphates / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Aorta / anatomy & histology. Aorta / metabolism. Enzyme Activation / drug effects. Muscle Contraction / drug effects. Nitric Oxide / metabolism. Protein Kinase C / metabolism. Rabbits. Rats. Reactive Oxygen Species / metabolism. Signal Transduction / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 16373499.001).
  • [ISSN] 0027-8424
  • [Journal-full-title] Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Inositol Phosphates; 0 / Reactive Oxygen Species; 31C4KY9ESH / Nitric Oxide; EC 2.7.11.13 / Protein Kinase C
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1325005
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55. Dorhout Mees SM, Rinkel GJ, Hop JW, Algra A, van Gijn J: Antiplatelet therapy in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a systematic review. Stroke; 2003 Sep;34(9):2285-9
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  • [Title] Antiplatelet therapy in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a systematic review.
  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Observational studies suggest that platelet inhibitors reduce the risk of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and thereby have a beneficial effect on clinical outcome.
  • We performed a systematic meta-analysis to determine whether antiplatelet therapy has a beneficial effect after SAH.
  • METHODS: We searched Medline and the Cochrane Library to identify all randomized controlled trials of antiplatelet drugs versus control and calculated relative risks with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for poor outcome (dependence or death), the occurrence of DCI, and the occurrence of any intracranial hemorrhage.
  • The overall relative risk for poor outcome was 0.87 (95% CI, 0.65 to 1.17); for the occurrence of DCI (reported in 3 of the 5 studies), 0.65 (95% CI, 0.47 to 0.89); and for the occurrence of intracranial hemorrhage, 1.19 (reported in 4 of the 5 studies) (95% CI, 0.76 to 1.85).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that antiplatelet drugs reduce the risk of DCI in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Ischemia / prevention & control. Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic / statistics & numerical data. Risk. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12881605.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4628
  • [Journal-full-title] Stroke; a journal of cerebral circulation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Stroke
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Meta-Analysis; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors
  • [Number-of-references] 35
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56. Yao Y, Shan F, Bian J, Chen F, Wang M, Ren G: D-chiro-inositol-enriched tartary buckwheat bran extract lowers the blood glucose level in KK-Ay mice. J Agric Food Chem; 2008 Nov 12;56(21):10027-31
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  • D-chiro-inositol (DCI) is an active compound in tartary buckwheat [Fagopyrum tataricum (L.
  • The present study was performed to (i) prepare DCI-enriched tartary buckwheat bran extract (TBBE), (ii) evaluate its acute toxicity in mice, and (iii) examine its blood glucose lowering activity in diabetic mice.
  • It was found that steaming buckwheat bran in an autoclave at 1.6 MPa and 120 degrees C for 60 min could significantly enrich the DCI level in TBBE from 0.03 to 0.22% and further to 22% after passage of the TBBE through activated carbon and ion exchange resins.
  • Male KK-A(y) mice (type 2 diabetic) and C57BL/6 mice (the control) were used to investigate the antidiabetic activity of TBBE.
  • The present study clearly demonstrated that oral administration of DCI-enriched TBBE could lower plasma glucose, C-peptide, glucagon, triglyceride, and BUN, improve glucose tolerance, and enhance insulin immunoreactivity in KK-A(y) mice.
  • [MeSH-major] Blood Glucose / drug effects. Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / drug therapy. Dietary Fiber / administration & dosage. Fagopyrum / chemistry. Hypoglycemic Agents / administration & dosage. Inositol / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Disease Models, Animal. Humans. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Mice, Inbred ICR. Mice, Obese

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  • (PMID = 18921966.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-5118
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of agricultural and food chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Agric. Food Chem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Blood Glucose; 0 / Hypoglycemic Agents; 4L6452S749 / Inositol
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57. Spiess BD, Zhu J, Pierce B, Weis R, Berger BE, Reses J, Smith CR, Ewbank B, Ward KR: Effects of perfluorocarbon infusion in an anesthetized swine decompression model. J Surg Res; 2009 May 1;153(1):83-94
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  • [Title] Effects of perfluorocarbon infusion in an anesthetized swine decompression model.
  • INTRODUCTION: Decompression illness (DCI) results from sudden changes in ambient pressure leading to super-saturation and bubble formation in tissues and the blood stream.
  • This study hypothesized that PFC would increase N(2) removal as well as O(2) delivery to tissues.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Juvenile swine (20 kg) were anesthetized and highly instrumented with arterial monitoring, pulmonary artery catheterization, EDAC ultrasound bubble detection, and end tidal N(2) by mass spectrometry.
  • Animals were dry compressed to 6.8 ATA for 30 minutes of time on the bottom and then rapidly decompressed.
  • RESULTS: DCI was created by the dive profile but the severity was variable.
  • Sham animals had no significant changes except that those who received PFC developed significant pulmonary hypertension and decreased cardiac output.
  • This held true for those that also underwent DCI.
  • However, O(2) delivery to tissues was improved with PFC and EDAC bubble count was dramatically less with PFC.
  • Even with this as a problem O(2) delivery to tissues was enhanced by PFC.
  • Future work with PFC in different species will help to further understand the contribution of these two mechanisms to treatment efficacy by PFC in DCI.
  • [MeSH-major] Blood Substitutes / administration & dosage. Decompression Sickness / drug therapy. Fluorocarbons / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Disease Models, Animal. Emulsions. Female. Male. Nitrogen / blood. Oxygen / blood. Swine

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  • (PMID = 18541265.001).
  • [ISSN] 1095-8673
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of surgical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Surg. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Blood Substitutes; 0 / Emulsions; 0 / Fluorocarbons; N762921K75 / Nitrogen; S88TT14065 / Oxygen
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58. Uchiyama T, Sakakibara R, Hattori T, Yamanishi T: Short-term effect of a single levodopa dose on micturition disturbance in Parkinson's disease patients with the wearing-off phenomenon. Mov Disord; 2003 May;18(5):573-8
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  • [Title] Short-term effect of a single levodopa dose on micturition disturbance in Parkinson's disease patients with the wearing-off phenomenon.
  • We investigated the short-term effects of a single dose of levodopa (L-dopa) on micturition function in PD patients with wearing-off phenomenon.
  • We carried out urodynamic studies before and about 1 hour after the patients had taken 100 mg of L-dopa with dopa-decarboxylase inhibitor (DCI).
  • After taking the L-dopa/DCI, urinary urgency and urge incontinence aggravated, whereas voiding difficulty was alleviated in all 12 patients.
  • When compared to the baseline assessment, urodynamic study results after taking 100 mg of L-dopa/DCI showed aggravated detrusor hyperreflexia; decreased maximum bladder capacity (P = 0.006); an increased maximum Watts Factor value (P = 0.001), reflecting the detrusor power on voiding; an increased Abrams-Griffiths number (P = 0.042), reflecting urethral obstruction on voiding; decreased residual urine volume (P = 0.025); and increased static urethral closure pressure (P = 0.012).
  • One hundred milligrams of L-dopa/DCI worsened detrusor hyperreflexia, producing worsened urinary urgency and urge incontinence during the storage (bladder-filling) phase.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiparkinson Agents / pharmacology. Antiparkinson Agents / therapeutic use. Levodopa / pharmacology. Levodopa / therapeutic use. Parkinson Disease / complications. Parkinson Disease / drug therapy. Urination Disorders / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Muscle, Smooth / drug effects. Severity of Illness Index. Time Factors. Urethra / drug effects. Urethra / physiopathology. Urinary Bladder / drug effects. Urinary Incontinence / diagnosis. Urinary Incontinence / epidemiology. Urinary Incontinence / etiology. Urodynamics / drug effects

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2003 Movement Disorder Society
  • (PMID = 12722172.001).
  • [ISSN] 0885-3185
  • [Journal-full-title] Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mov. Disord.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiparkinson Agents; 46627O600J / Levodopa
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59. Breuer W, Ermers MJ, Pootrakul P, Abramov A, Hershko C, Cabantchik ZI: Desferrioxamine-chelatable iron, a component of serum non-transferrin-bound iron, used for assessing chelation therapy. Blood; 2001 Feb 1;97(3):792-8
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  • [Title] Desferrioxamine-chelatable iron, a component of serum non-transferrin-bound iron, used for assessing chelation therapy.
  • This study introduces a method for monitoring a component of serum non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI), termed "desferrioxamine-chelatable iron" (DCI).
  • DCI was found in the serum of most patients with thalassemia major (21 of 27 tested, range 1.5-8.6 microM), but only in a minority of patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (8 of 95 samples from 39 patients, range 0.4-1.1 microM) and in none of 48 controls.
  • The method was applied to monitoring the appearance of iron in the serum of patients under chelation therapy.
  • Short-term (2 hours) follow-up of patients immediately after oral administration of deferriprone (L1) showed substantial mobilization of DCI into the serum (up to 10 microM within 30-60 minutes).
  • The transfer of DCI from L1 to Fl-DFO was observed in vitro with preformed L1-iron complexes, and occurred even at L1/iron ratios exceeding 3:1.
  • Simultaneous administration of oral L1 and intravenous DFO to patients abrogated the L1-mediated rise in DCI, consistent with the shuttling of iron from L1 to DFO in vivo.
  • Potential applications of the DCI assay may be for studying chelator action and as an index of patient chelation status.
  • [MeSH-major] Chelation Therapy. Deferoxamine / metabolism. Iron / blood. Iron Chelating Agents / metabolism. Iron Overload / therapy. Microscopy, Fluorescence / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Apoproteins / metabolism. Calibration. Child. Drug Therapy, Combination. Fluorescein / chemistry. Humans. Kinetics. Pyridones / therapeutic use. Transferrin / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 11157499.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-4971
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Apoproteins; 0 / Iron Chelating Agents; 0 / Pyridones; 0 / Transferrin; 2BTY8KH53L / deferiprone; E1UOL152H7 / Iron; J06Y7MXW4D / Deferoxamine; TPY09G7XIR / Fluorescein
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60. Yokochi F: [Pharmacological treatment of parkinsonian tremor]. Nihon Rinsho; 2000 Oct;58(10):2091-5
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  • [Title] [Pharmacological treatment of parkinsonian tremor].
  • Tremor is the most common initial symptom and one of the cardinal features of Parkinson's disease.
  • Anticholinergic agents, levodopa/DCI and dopamine agonists are most common and beneficial in parkinsonian tremor, but efficacies of these medications are variable among patients.
  • Rigidity and bradykinesia are more responsive to levodopa/DCI therapy than tremor.
  • Clozapine is an atypical neuroleptic agent, not on the market in Japan, and has been reported to decrease or ameliorate parkinsonian tremor through the studies of open label and double blind crossover as a new drug for parkinsonian tremor.
  • [MeSH-major] Parkinson Disease / drug therapy. Tremor / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenergic beta-Antagonists / therapeutic use. Antiparkinson Agents / therapeutic use. Cholinergic Antagonists / therapeutic use. Dopamine Agonists / therapeutic use. Histamine H1 Antagonists / therapeutic use. Humans. Levodopa / therapeutic use. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 11068452.001).
  • [ISSN] 0047-1852
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nippon Rinsho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic beta-Antagonists; 0 / Antiparkinson Agents; 0 / Cholinergic Antagonists; 0 / Dopamine Agonists; 0 / Histamine H1 Antagonists; 0 / Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors; 46627O600J / Levodopa
  • [Number-of-references] 10
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61. Nakamura R, Nagashima T, Sakakibara M, Sangai T, Fujimoto H, Arai M, Shida T, Kaneoya K, Ueda T, Nakatani Y, Hashimoto H, Miyazaki M: Breast-conserving surgery using supine magnetic resonance imaging in breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Breast; 2008 Jun;17(3):245-51
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Breast-conserving surgery using supine magnetic resonance imaging in breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • BACKGROUND: Success of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) depends on accurate assessment of the initial lesion.
  • We developed a new procedure (NIPR) in which initial naked magnetic resonance images are projected onto the skin before BCS.
  • METHODS: Thirty-five breast cancer patients underwent supine oblique MRI of the operative area.
  • In 20 DCIS patients, the metallic clips were reproduced by projection on the skin using NIPR, and discrepancies between the projection site and clip were measured on X-rays.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / diagnosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Mastectomy, Segmental
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Supine Position

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  • (PMID = 18024036.001).
  • [ISSN] 0960-9776
  • [Journal-full-title] Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Breast
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
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62. van den Bergh WM, Algra A, van Kooten F, Dirven CM, van Gijn J, Vermeulen M, Rinkel GJ, MASH Study Group: Magnesium sulfate in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a randomized controlled trial. Stroke; 2005 May;36(5):1011-5
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MAGNESIUM SULFATE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Magnesium reverses cerebral vasospasm and reduces infarct volume after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in rats.
  • We aimed to assess whether magnesium reduces the frequency of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) in patients with aneurysmal SAH.
  • Magnesium sulfate therapy consisted of a continuous intravenous dose of 64 mmol/L per day, to be started within 4 days after SAH and continued until 14 days after occlusion of the aneurysm.
  • The primary outcome DCI (defined as the occurrence of a new hypodense lesion on computed tomography compatible with clinical features of DCI) was analyzed according to the "on-treatment" principle.
  • Magnesium treatment reduced the risk of DCI by 34% (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.38 to 1.14).
  • At that time, 18 patients in the treatment group and 6 in the placebo group had an excellent outcome (risk ratio, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.3 to 8.9).
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that magnesium reduces DCI and subsequent poor outcome, but the results are not yet definitive.
  • A next step should be a phase III trial to confirm the beneficial effect of magnesium therapy, with poor outcome as primary outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Ischemia / prevention & control. Magnesium Sulfate / therapeutic use. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / drug therapy

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  • [CommentIn] Stroke. 2007 May;38(5):e14; author reply e15 [17363719.001]
  • [CommentIn] Stroke. 2005 Dec;36(12):2530-1; author reply 2531-2 [16282545.001]
  • (PMID = 15790946.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4628
  • [Journal-full-title] Stroke; a journal of cerebral circulation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Stroke
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 7487-88-9 / Magnesium Sulfate
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63. Suh WW, Hillner BE, Pierce LJ, Hayman JA: Cost-effectiveness of radiation therapy following conservative surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2005 Mar 15;61(4):1054-61
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cost-effectiveness of radiation therapy following conservative surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast.
  • PURPOSE: To assess the cost-effectiveness of radiation therapy (RT) in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS).
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: A Markov model was constructed for a theoretical cohort of 55-year-old women with DCIS over a life-time horizon.
  • Probability estimates for local noninvasive (N-INV), local invasive (INV), and distant recurrences were obtained from National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) B-17.
  • Utilities for eight nonmetastatic health states were collected from both healthy women and DCIS patients.
  • Direct medical (2002 Medicare fee schedule) and nonmedical costs (time and transportation) of RT were ascertained.
  • Sensitivity analyses revealed the ICER to be affected by baseline probability of a local recurrence, relative efficacy of RT in preventing INV, negative impact of an INV on quality of life, and cost of initial RT.
  • Cost of salvage BCS + RT and source of utilities (healthy women vs. DCIS patients) influenced the ICER albeit to a lesser degree.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Addition of RT following BCS for patients with DCIS should not be withheld because of concerns regarding its cost-effectiveness.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Breast Neoplasms / surgery. Carcinoma in Situ / radiotherapy. Carcinoma in Situ / surgery. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Cost-Benefit Analysis. Decision Trees. Female. Humans. Markov Chains. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / economics. Quality-Adjusted Life Years. Radiotherapy / economics. Sensitivity and Specificity

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  • (PMID = 15752884.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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64. Manley HJ, Garvin CG, Drayer DK, Reid GM, Bender WL, Neufeld TK, Hebbar S, Muther RS: Medication prescribing patterns in ambulatory haemodialysis patients: comparisons of USRDS to a large not-for-profit dialysis provider. Nephrol Dial Transplant; 2004 Jul;19(7):1842-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Medication prescribing patterns in ambulatory haemodialysis patients: comparisons of USRDS to a large not-for-profit dialysis provider.
  • BACKGROUND: End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients are prescribed numerous medications.
  • The United States Renal Data System (USRDS) reported on medication prescribing patterns in 1998.
  • Since then, several new medications, treatment guidelines and recommendations have been introduced.
  • The objective was to analyse and compare haemodialysis (HD) patient medication prescribing patterns between the Dialysis Clinic, Inc. (DCI) database and the USRDS report.
  • METHODS: Point-prevalent (01/01/03) medication use data from the DCI national database was obtained.
  • Data collected included patient demographics, reason for and duration of ESRD, and medication listed on profile.
  • All medications were classified similar to the USRDS and by where taken (clinic vs home).
  • Medication prescribing patterns were compared between DCI and USRDS databases.
  • Comparisons between age groups (<65 and >or=65 years) and diabetic status [diabetes mellitus (DM) vs non-DM] were made.
  • RESULTS: There were 128 477 medication orders categorized in 10 474 patients.
  • DCI patient demographics were similar to present USRDS patients except for fewer Hispanics (P<0.001).
  • Patients were prescribed 12.3+/-5.0 (median 12) different medications (2.6+/-1.4 clinic medications and 10.0+/-4.5 home medications).
  • This is higher than reported by USRDS (median 9 medications).
  • Patient age did not influence number of medications used (P = 0.54).
  • DM patients are prescribed more medications than non-DM (13.3+/-5.0 DM vs 11.6+/-4.8 non-DM; P<0.00001).
  • All medication class prescribing patterns were markedly different.
  • CONCLUSION: The data suggest that medication prescribing patterns in HD patients have changed.
  • Various prescribing patterns identified areas for improvement in care (e.g. increased use of aspirin, beta-blockers and hyperlipidaemia medications) and areas requiring further investigation (e.g. high use of anti-acid, benzodiazepine and non-aluminum/non-calcium phosphate-binding medications).
  • [MeSH-major] Ambulatory Care. Drug Prescriptions / statistics & numerical data. Kidney Failure, Chronic / therapy. Renal Dialysis

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  • (PMID = 15128886.001).
  • [ISSN] 0931-0509
  • [Journal-full-title] Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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65. Ma L, Liu WG, Zhang JM, Chen G, Fan J, Sheng HS: Magnesium sulphate in the management of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: a meta-analysis of prospective controlled trials. Brain Inj; 2010;24(5):730-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effectiveness and safety of intravenous magnesium therapy in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH).
  • Magnesium infusion reduced the risk of poor outcome and delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI): the relative risk was 0.62 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.46-0.83) and 0.73 (95% CI 0.53-1.00), respectively.
  • The withdrawal rate for adverse effects was higher in the magnesium-treatment arm compared to the placebo arm, RR 9.98 (95% CI 3.04-32.74).
  • CONCLUSION: The meta-analysis suggests that intravenous magnesium therapy reduces the risk of DCI and poor outcome after aneurysmal SAH.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Ischemia / drug therapy. Magnesium Sulfate / therapeutic use. Neuroprotective Agents / therapeutic use. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Controlled Clinical Trials as Topic. Humans. Injections, Intravenous. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20334471.001).
  • [ISSN] 1362-301X
  • [Journal-full-title] Brain injury
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Brain Inj
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Meta-Analysis; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neuroprotective Agents; 7487-88-9 / Magnesium Sulfate
  • [Number-of-references] 25
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66. van den Bergh WM: Magnesium in subarachnoid haemorrhage: proven beneficial? Magnes Res; 2009 Sep;22(3):121-6
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MAGNESIUM, ELEMENTAL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Delayed cerebral ischaemia (DCI) is an important cause of death and dependence after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.
  • The current mainstay of preventing DCI is nimodipine and maintenance of normovolemia, but even with this strategy DCI occurs in a considerable proportion of patients.
  • Magnesium is an inexpensive, easily available neuroprotective agent and has been shown to reduce cerebral vasospasm and infarct volume after experimental SAH.
  • In a subgroup analysis in the Cochrane review of all randomized clinical trials of calcium antagonists in SAH, magnesium reduced the occurrence of DCI and that of poor outcome.
  • Magnesium is a promising agent to prevent the occurrence of secondary ischemia and to improve outcome in patients with SAH.
  • Currently two large phase Il trials are being conducted that will hopefully provide definite evidence whether magnesium treatment is beneficial in SAH patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Magnesium / therapeutic use. Neuroprotective Agents / therapeutic use. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 19780398.001).
  • [ISSN] 0953-1424
  • [Journal-full-title] Magnesium research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Magnes Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neuroprotective Agents; I38ZP9992A / Magnesium
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67. Verkooijen HM, Fioretta G, De Wolf C, Vlastos G, Kurtz J, Borisch B, Schäfer P, Spiliopoulos A, Sappino AP, Renella R, Pittet B, Schmid De Gruneck J, Wespi Y, Neyroud-Caspar I, Bouchardy C: Management of women with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: a population-based study. Ann Oncol; 2002 Aug;13(8):1236-45
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Management of women with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: a population-based study.
  • BACKGROUND: Increasing incidence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) confronts patients and clinicians with optimal treatment decisions.
  • This multidisciplinary study investigates therapeutic modalities of DCIS in daily practice and provides recommendations on how to increase quality of care.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: All women (n = 116) with unilateral DCIS recorded in the Geneva Cancer Registry from 1995 to 1999 were considered.
  • Information concerned patient and tumor characteristics, treatment and outcome.
  • Factors linked to therapy were determined using a case-control approach.
  • Cases were women with treatment of interest and controls other women on the study.
  • RESULTS: Most DCIS cases (62%) were discovered by mammography screening.
  • Ninety (78%) women had breast-conserving surgery (BCS), 18 (16%) mastectomy and seven (6%) bilateral mastectomy.
  • Eight (7%) patients had tumor-positive margins, 18 (16%) lymph node dissection and two (1.7%) chemotherapy.
  • Less than 50% underwent breast reconstruction after mastectomy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Because of important disparities in DCIS management, recommendations are made to increase quality of care, in particular to prevent axillary dissection or bilateral mastectomy and to increase the use of radiotherapy after BCS.

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  • (PMID = 12181247.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-7534
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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68. Vinnikov VA, Maznyk NA, Lloyd D: Delayed chromosomal instability in lymphocytes of cancer patients after radiotherapy. Int J Radiat Biol; 2010 Apr;86(4):271-82
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Delayed chromosomal instability in lymphocytes of cancer patients after radiotherapy.
  • PURPOSE: To assess possible delayed chromosomal instability (DCI) expressed as elevated chromatid breakage in cells containing previously formed chromosome type aberrations in cultured blood lymphocytes of cancer patients after radiotherapy (RT).
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty patients treated for uterine cancer with external Co(60) RT, without chemotherapy, were selected.
  • RESULTS: RT caused a significant increase of radiation-specific chromosome aberrations in patients' lymphocytes together with DCI, which was observed as an excessive yield of cells containing both chromosome and chromatid aberrations (defined as C(acs&act)).
  • This DCI passed successfully through mitoses in vitro, and at the end of RT a mean yield of 'extra' C(acs&act) was 3 x 10(-3) x cell(-1) amongst either M1 or M3+ cells.
  • At the end of RT and one year later DCI in M1 lymphocytes appeared at random amongst patients, but some inter-individual variation was found for DCI presence in M3+ cells at both post-irradiation samplings.
  • As time passed, the mean yield of lymphocytes exhibiting DCI decreased in vivo and one year after RT reached the pre-treatment level of 1 x 10(-3) x cell(-1).
  • CONCLUSIONS: DCI was demonstrated in descendants of human lymphocytes after therapeutic irradiation.
  • The effect diminished one year later, suggesting that the progeny of patients' irradiated stem cells did not produce new daughter lymphocytes exhibiting DCI during the studied post-irradiation period.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Mitosis / radiation effects. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 20353337.001).
  • [ISSN] 1362-3095
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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69. Dorhout Mees SM, MASH-II study group: Magnesium in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (MASH II) phase III clinical trial MASH-II study group. Int J Stroke; 2008 Feb;3(1):63-5
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MAGNESIUM SULFATE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • RATIONALE: Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is an important cause of poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH).
  • In a phase II randomized clinical trial of 283 patients, magnesium treatment reduced the risk of DCI by 34% and of poor outcome by 23%.
  • DESIGN: The MASH-II study is a phase III randomized, clinical international multicenter trial.
  • [MeSH-major] Intracranial Aneurysm / drug therapy. Magnesium Sulfate / therapeutic use. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aneurysm, Ruptured / complications. Anti-Arrhythmia Agents / therapeutic use. Humans

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  • (PMID = 18705917.001).
  • [ISSN] 1747-4949
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of stroke : official journal of the International Stroke Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Stroke
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ISRCTN/ ISRCTN68742385
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase III; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Arrhythmia Agents; 7487-88-9 / Magnesium Sulfate
  • [Investigator] van den Bergh WM; Rinkel GJ; Algra MD; van Buuren M; Al-Shahi Salman R; Brekelmans GJ; Dirven CM; van Gijn J; van Kooten F; Lavados PM; van Oostenbrugge RJ; Vandertop WP; van der Bom JG; Mali WP; Rothwell PM; Kerr RS
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70. van den Bergh WM, van de Water JM, Hoff RG, Algra A, Rinkel GJ: Calcium homeostasis during magnesium treatment in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Neurocrit Care; 2008;8(3):413-7
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CALCIUM, ELEMENTAL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Calcium homeostasis during magnesium treatment in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.
  • OBJECTIVE: Magnesium treatment in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) can result in hypocalcemia; this hypocalcemia increases the risk of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and poor outcome.
  • We assessed whether low serum levels of total calcium in patients with SAH treated with magnesium is mediated by parathyroid hormone (PTH) or calcitriol, and whether increased PTH or low serum levels of ionized calcium are associated with an increased risk of DCI and poor outcome.
  • Mean serum magnesium during treatment was related to mean serum levels of ionized calcium, PTH and calcitriol with linear regression.
  • Hypocalcemia (Ca(2+)) and high serum PTH were related to the occurrence of DCI by means of the Cox proportional hazards model and to poor outcome by logistic regression.
  • Neither hypocalcemia nor high serum PTH was related to DCI.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Magnesium treatment in patients with SAH leads to hypocalcemia without effect on outcome.
  • PTH is related to poor outcome, but this is independent of magnesium therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Calcium / blood. Homeostasis / drug effects. Magnesium / administration & dosage. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / drug therapy. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Calcitriol / blood. Female. Humans. Hypocalcemia / epidemiology. Hypocalcemia / metabolism. Male. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Parathyroid Hormone / blood. Proportional Hazards Models. Risk Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18317951.001).
  • [ISSN] 1541-6933
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurocritical care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurocrit Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Parathyroid Hormone; FXC9231JVH / Calcitriol; I38ZP9992A / Magnesium; SY7Q814VUP / Calcium
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71. Orlando M, Wenzel SL, Ebener P, Edwards MC, Mandell W, Becker K: The dimensions of change in therapeutic community treatment instrument. Psychol Assess; 2006 Mar;18(1):118-22
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  • [Title] The dimensions of change in therapeutic community treatment instrument.
  • In this article, the authors describe the refinement and preliminary evaluation of the Dimensions of Change in Therapeutic Community Treatment Instrument (DCI), a measure of treatment process.
  • In Study 1, a 99-item DCI, administered to a cross-sectional sample of substance abuse clients (N = 990), was shortened to 54 items on the basis of results from confirmatory factor analyses and item response theory invariance tests.
  • In Study 2, confirmatory factor analyses of the 54-item DCI, completed by a longitudinal cohort of 993 clients, established and validated an 8-factor solution across 2 subpopulations (adults and adolescents) and 2 time points (treatment entry and 30-days postentry).
  • The results of the 2 studies are encouraging and support use of the 54-item DCI as a tool to measure treatment process.
  • [MeSH-major] Community Mental Health Services. Mental Disorders / therapy. Surveys and Questionnaires

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  • (PMID = 16594821.001).
  • [ISSN] 1040-3590
  • [Journal-full-title] Psychological assessment
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Psychol Assess
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / R01 DA 14969
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
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72. Kruyt ND, Biessels GJ, DeVries JH, Luitse MJ, Vermeulen M, Rinkel GJ, Vandertop WP, Roos YB: Hyperglycemia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a potentially modifiable risk factor for poor outcome. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab; 2010 Sep;30(9):1577-87
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  • Hyperglycemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) occurs frequently and is associated with delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and poor clinical outcome.
  • As hyperglycemia is potentially modifiable with intensive insulin therapy (IIT), we systematically reviewed the literature on IIT in aSAH patients.
  • Therefore, before initiating a large-scale randomized trial to investigate the clinical benefit of IIT, phase II studies, possibly with the help of cerebral blood glucose monitoring by microdialysis, will first have to improve this therapy in terms of both safety and adequacy.
  • [MeSH-major] Hyperglycemia / complications. Hyperglycemia / drug therapy. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / complications. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blood Glucose / metabolism. Humans. Hypoglycemic Agents / adverse effects. Hypoglycemic Agents / therapeutic use. Insulin / adverse effects. Insulin / therapeutic use. Risk Factors. Treatment Failure

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  • (PMID = 20628402.001).
  • [ISSN] 1559-7016
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cerebral blood flow and metabolism : official journal of the International Society of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Blood Glucose; 0 / Hypoglycemic Agents; 0 / Insulin
  • [Number-of-references] 123
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2949259
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73. Vergouwen MD, Meijers JC, Geskus RB, Coert BA, Horn J, Stroes ES, van der Poll T, Vermeulen M, Roos YB: Biologic effects of simvastatin in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab; 2009 Aug;29(8):1444-53
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. SIMVASTATIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Recently, two randomized controlled phase II studies showed that acute initiation of statin treatment directly after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) decreases the incidence of radiologic vasospasm and clinical signs of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), and even reduces mortality.
  • The purpose of this study was to investigate the biologic effects of acute statin treatment in patients with SAH.
  • With regard to primary outcomes, there were significant differences by treatment group for total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (P<0.0001), but not for parameters of coagulation, fibrinolysis, endothelium function, and inflammation.
  • With regard to secondary outcomes, no differences were observed in the incidence of transcranial Doppler vasospasm, clinical signs of DCI, and poor outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Ischemia / prevention & control. Hypolipidemic Agents / therapeutic use. Intracranial Aneurysm / drug therapy. Simvastatin / therapeutic use. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Blood Coagulation / drug effects. Cerebral Angiography. Cerebrovascular Circulation / drug effects. Cholesterol, LDL / blood. Double-Blind Method. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Angiography. Male. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19458605.001).
  • [ISSN] 1559-7016
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cerebral blood flow and metabolism : official journal of the International Society of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ISRCTN/ ISRCTN45662651
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cholesterol, LDL; 0 / Hypolipidemic Agents; AGG2FN16EV / Simvastatin
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74. Hop JW, Rinkel GJ, Algra A, Berkelbach van der Sprenkel JW, van Gijn J: Randomized pilot trial of postoperative aspirin in subarachnoid hemorrhage. Neurology; 2000 Feb 22;54(4):872-8
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVE: To assess the safety and feasibility of a clinical trial on the effectiveness of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH).
  • BACKGROUND: Several studies have indicated that increased platelet activity might be involved in the pathogenesis of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after SAH.
  • METHOD: Fifty patients who had early surgery (< or =4 days) for a ruptured aneurysm were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.
  • Trial medication, consisting of suppositories with 100 mg ASA versus placebo, was started immediately after surgical clipping of the aneurysm and continued for 21 days.
  • End points were functional outcome and quality of life at 4 months, clinical deterioration after operation, development of DCI, hypodense lesion on postoperative CT, and hemorrhagic complications.
  • Fifteen of 26 patients receiving placebo deteriorated clinically versus 10 of 24 patients receiving ASA; 4 patients in each group deteriorated from DCI.
  • The effectiveness of ASA on functional outcome and delayed cerebral ischemia has to be studied in a larger trial.
  • [MeSH-major] Aspirin / therapeutic use. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Brain / pathology. Brain / radiography. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Pilot Projects. Postoperative Period. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 10690979.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-3878
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] R16CO5Y76E / Aspirin
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75. Laskowitz DT, Kolls BJ: Neuroprotection in subarachnoid hemorrhage. Stroke; 2010 Oct;41(10 Suppl):S79-84
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Despite advances in aneurysm ablation and the initial management of patients presenting with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, delayed cerebral ischemia remains a significant source of morbidity.
  • Traditionally, delayed cerebral ischemia was thought to be a result of vasospasm of the proximal intracranial vessels, and clinical trials have relied largely on radiographic evidence of vasospasm as a surrogate for functional outcome.
  • However, a number of trials have demonstrated a dissociation between angiographic vasospasm and outcome, and more recent data suggest that other mechanisms of injury, such as microvascular dysfunction and complex neuronal-glial interactions, may influence the development of delayed ischemic deficit after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.
  • Our evolving understanding of the pathophysiology of delayed cerebral ischemia may offer the opportunity to test new therapeutic strategies in this area and improve clinical trial design.

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  • (PMID = 20876512.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4628
  • [Journal-full-title] Stroke; a journal of cerebral circulation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Stroke
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / NS056856-01A2; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / R41 NS056856; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / R41 NS056856-01A2
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neuroprotective Agents
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS237397; NLM/ PMC3376008
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76. van den Bergh WM, Algra A, Rinkel GJ, MASH Study Group: Magnesium and aspirin treatment in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage. Comparison of effects after endovascular and neurosurgical aneurysm occlusion. J Neurol; 2009 Feb;256(2):213-6
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MAGNESIUM, ELEMENTAL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Magnesium and aspirin treatment in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage. Comparison of effects after endovascular and neurosurgical aneurysm occlusion.
  • OBJECTIVE: Aneurysm treatment with endovascular coiling is associated with a better outcome than neurosurgical clipping in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH).
  • The better outcome after coiling may decrease the risk reduction from other treatments in these patients, and thus may increase sample sizes for current or future neuroprotective trials.
  • The influence of the method of aneurysm treatment was studied in our randomised MASH trial, which assessed in a factorial design the efficacy of magnesium and aspirin in preventing delayed cerebral ischaemia (DCI) and poor outcome.
  • METHODS: Between November 2000 and January 2004 315 patients were enrolled in the trial; 55 of them had no aneurysm treatment and were excluded for the current analysis, 176 underwent neurosurgical and 84 endovascular treatment.
  • The effect of treatment on the risk of DCI was assessed by means of Cox proportional hazards modelling and that of poor outcome by means of logistic regression analysis.
  • RESULTS: The hazard ratio of DCI with aspirin was 1.4 (95 % CI 0.3 - 1.7) after coiling and 1.9 (0.8 - 4.4) after clipping, and with magnesium 0.4 (0.1 - 1.2) after coiling and 0.8 (0.4 - 1.7) after clipping.
  • CONCLUSION: This post hoc analysis does not suggest that medical treatments are less effective after endovascular than after neurosurgical treatment in patients with SAH, and thus do not support a need for adjusting sample size calculations in future trials.
  • [MeSH-major] Aspirin / administration & dosage. Brain Ischemia / drug therapy. Intracranial Aneurysm / therapy. Magnesium / administration & dosage. Postoperative Complications / drug therapy. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Embolization, Therapeutic / statistics & numerical data. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Odds Ratio. Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors / administration & dosage. Prostheses and Implants / statistics & numerical data. Sample Size. Surgical Instruments / statistics & numerical data. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19169852.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-1459
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors; I38ZP9992A / Magnesium; R16CO5Y76E / Aspirin
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77. Van de Water JM, Van den Bergh WM, Hoff RG, Algra A, Rinkel GJ: Hypocalcaemia may reduce the beneficial effect of magnesium treatment in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. Magnes Res; 2007 Jun;20(2):130-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Hypocalcaemia may reduce the beneficial effect of magnesium treatment in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.
  • To assess whether magnesium treatment in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is associated with hypocalcaemia and whether hypocalcaemia in these patients is associated with an increased risk of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and poor outcome.
  • The relationship between mean serum magnesium and mean serum calcium during treatment was assessed with linear regression.
  • The relationship between hypocalcaemia (serum calcium < 2.0 mmol/L) during treatment and the occurrence of DCI and poor outcome was studied with the Cox proportional hazards method and logistic regression, respectively.
  • Patients with hypocalcaemia during study treatment had an increased frequency of DCI (HR 2.1; 95% CI, 1.0 to 4.3), and an increased risk for poor outcome (OR 2.9; 95% CI, 1.4 to 6.4), but this effect attenuated in the multivariable analysis (OR 1.9; 95% CI, 0.8 to 4.7).
  • Hypocalcaemia is associated with an increased risk of DCI and poor outcome and may therefore reduce the potential beneficial effect of magnesium treatment in SAH.
  • [MeSH-major] Hypocalcemia / physiopathology. Magnesium / therapeutic use. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Brain Ischemia / blood. Brain Ischemia / etiology. Calcium / blood. Female. Humans. Linear Models. Male. Middle Aged. Odds Ratio. Risk Factors. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18062586.001).
  • [ISSN] 0953-1424
  • [Journal-full-title] Magnesium research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Magnes Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] I38ZP9992A / Magnesium; SY7Q814VUP / Calcium
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78. Taguchi Y, Takashima S, Asaoka E, Dohgu N, Inoue H: [Increase in regional cerebral blood flow of striatum induced by low dose levodopa in a patient with hemiparkinsonism]. Rinsho Shinkeigaku; 2004 Jul;44(7):443-5

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Increase in regional cerebral blood flow of striatum induced by low dose levodopa in a patient with hemiparkinsonism].
  • Neurological examination revealed cogwheel-type rigidity in the left upper and lower limbs without tremor.
  • A 99mTc-ECD SPECT detected a decrease in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the right corpus striatum.
  • Administration of levodopa/DCI (100 mg/day) improved not only her left-sided rigidity but also the rCBF in the right corpus striatum.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiparkinson Agents / administration & dosage. Cerebrovascular Circulation. Corpus Striatum / blood supply. Levodopa / administration & dosage. Parkinsonian Disorders / drug therapy. Parkinsonian Disorders / physiopathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Stimulation, Chemical

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  • (PMID = 15384706.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-918X
  • [Journal-full-title] Rinshō shinkeigaku = Clinical neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rinsho Shinkeigaku
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiparkinson Agents; 46627O600J / Levodopa
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79. van den Bergh WM, Albrecht KW, Berkelbach van der Sprenkel JW, Rinkel GJ: Magnesium therapy after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage a dose-finding study for long term treatment. Acta Neurochir (Wien); 2003 Mar;145(3):195-9; discussion 199
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  • [Title] Magnesium therapy after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage a dose-finding study for long term treatment.
  • BACKGROUND: Magnesium is a neuroprotective agent which might prevent or reverse delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH).
  • Although the dosage for short-term magnesium therapy is well established, there is lack of knowledge on the dosage for extended use of magnesium.
  • Our aim was to find a dosage schedule of magnesium sulphate to maintain a serum magnesium level of 1.0-2.0 mmol/L for 14 days to cover the period of DCI.
  • Serum magnesium was measured at least every two days and all patients were under continuous observation during magnesium treatment.
  • FINDINGS: In treatment group A the mean serum magnesium level during treatment was 1.03+/-0.14 (range 0.82-1.34) mmol/L, in group B 1.10+/-0.15 (range 0.87-1.43) mmol/L, and in group C 1.38+/-0.18 (range 1.11-1.98) mmol/L.
  • The renal magnesium excretion in group C was equal to the administrated doses within 48 hours after treatment had started.
  • INTERPRETATION: With a continuous intravenous dosage of 64 mmol/L per day, serum magnesium levels maintained within the range of 1.0-2.0 mmol/L for 14 days.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Ischemia / drug therapy. Brain Ischemia / etiology. Magnesium / administration & dosage. Magnesium / therapeutic use. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / complications. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Injections, Intravenous. Male. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 12632115.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6268
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta neurochirurgica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Neurochir (Wien)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Austria
  • [Chemical-registry-number] I38ZP9992A / Magnesium
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80. Wasserberg N, Morgenstern S, Schachter J, Fenig E, Lelcuk S, Gutman H: Risk factors for lymph node metastases in breast ductal carcinoma in situ with minimal invasive component. Arch Surg; 2002 Nov;137(11):1249-52
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  • [Title] Risk factors for lymph node metastases in breast ductal carcinoma in situ with minimal invasive component.
  • HYPOTHESIS: Clinical and pathological variables may be predictors of axillary dissemination in T1mic and T1a breast carcinoma.
  • PATIENTS: All patients diagnosed as having ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) with microinvasion between January 1, 1988, and December 30, 1998.
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pathology slides were reviewed according to the 1997 Cancer Staging Manual put forth by the American Joint Committee on Cancer.
  • Patients with no invasive component or invasive components larger than 5 mm were excluded.
  • RESULTS: The study group included 57 women aged 37 to 71 years (median, 60 years), 37 with T1mic disease and 20 with T1a.
  • Modified radical mastectomy was performed in 29 patients (18 with T1mic and 11 with T1a) and breast-preserving surgery in 28 (19 with T1mic and 9 with T1a).
  • Forty-seven patients received adjuvant therapy (radiotherapy alone, or with hormones or chemotherapy).
  • One patient was unavailable for follow-up, another died of disseminated disease, and a third developed contralateral primary carcinoma.
  • Comedo DCIS (P<.03) and the number of DCIS-involved ducts (P<.002) in the T1mic group, and nuclear grade 3 (P<.001) in both groups, were independent significant predictors of axillary metastases.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The significant rate of axillary metastases in T1a and T1mic breast tumors makes axillary staging a must.
  • High nuclear grade, comedo DCIS, and high number of DCIS-involved ducts may predict axillary metastasis and should be considered when axillary dissection is done selectively.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / pathology. Lymph Node Excision. Lymphatic Metastasis / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Axilla. Female. Humans. Mastectomy. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 12413311.001).
  • [ISSN] 0004-0010
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of surgery (Chicago, Ill. : 1960)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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81. Nomoto M, Iwata S, Kaseda S: [Pharmacological treatments of Parkinson's disease]. Nihon Yakurigaku Zasshi; 2001 Feb;117(2):111-22
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Pharmacological treatments of Parkinson's disease].
  • Antiparkinsonian agents applied or under the investigation for the treatment of patients with Parkinson's disease were reviewed.
  • Tremor, akinesia, rigidity and postual instability are key signs of Parkinson's disease.
  • The main pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease is neurodegeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons.
  • Antioxidant or neuroprotective agents will be the future drugs for Parkinson's disease.
  • At present, supplement of dopamine by levodopa administration, retarding the metabolism of levodopa or dopamine by a dopa decarboxylase inhibitor (DCI), MAO-B (monoamine oxidase inhibitor type B) inhibitor or catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitor, dopamine receptor agonists, anticholinergic agents, dopamine release enhancer/uptake inhibitor, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists are applied for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.
  • Agents to facilitate the growth of nerves or to inhibit degeneration of nerves are also studied and will be developed for the treatment of Parkinson's disease in the future.
  • In the case of familial Parkinson's disease, abnormal genes were identified.
  • Gene therapy might be another future treatment for these cases.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiparkinson Agents. Parkinson Disease
  • [MeSH-minor] Amantadine. Animals. Aromatic Amino Acid Decarboxylase Inhibitors. Benzophenones. Carbidopa. Catechol O-Methyltransferase Inhibitors. Dopamine Agonists. Enzyme Inhibitors. Genetic Therapy. Humans. Levodopa. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors. Nitrophenols. Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate / antagonists & inhibitors

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  • (PMID = 11233302.001).
  • [ISSN] 0015-5691
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon yakurigaku zasshi. Folia pharmacologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nippon Yakurigaku Zasshi
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiparkinson Agents; 0 / Aromatic Amino Acid Decarboxylase Inhibitors; 0 / Benzophenones; 0 / Catechol O-Methyltransferase Inhibitors; 0 / Dopamine Agonists; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors; 0 / Nitrophenols; 0 / Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate; 46627O600J / Levodopa; BF4C9Z1J53 / Amantadine; CIF6334OLY / tolcapone; MNX7R8C5VO / Carbidopa
  • [Number-of-references] 60
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82. Al-Rawi PG, Tseng MY, Richards HK, Nortje J, Timofeev I, Matta BF, Hutchinson PJ, Kirkpatrick PJ: Hypertonic saline in patients with poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage improves cerebral blood flow, brain tissue oxygen, and pH. Stroke; 2010 Jan;41(1):122-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Hypertonic saline in patients with poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage improves cerebral blood flow, brain tissue oxygen, and pH.
  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Delayed cerebral ischemia and infarction due to reduced CBF remains the leading cause of poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.
  • This study explores whether CBF enhancement with HS in patients with poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage is associated with improved cerebral tissue oxygenation.
  • METHODS: Continuous monitoring of arterial blood pressure, intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, brain tissue oxygen, carbon dioxide, pH, and middle cerebral artery flow velocity was performed in 44 patients.
  • CBF in a region surrounding the tissue oxygen sensor was calculated.
  • RESULTS: Thirty minutes postinfusion, a significant increase in arterial blood pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, flow velocity, brain tissue pH, and brain tissue oxygen was seen together with a decrease in intracranial pressure (P<0.05).
  • A significant increase in brain tissue oxygen persisted for 240 minutes.
  • Patients with favorable outcome responded better to HS in terms of increased CBF, brain tissue oxygen, and pH and reduced intracranial pressure compared with those with an unfavorable outcome.
  • A sustained increase in brain tissue oxygen (beyond 210 minutes) was associated with favorable outcome (P<0.023).
  • CONCLUSIONS: HS augments CBF in patients with poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage and significantly improves cerebral oxygenation for 4 hours postinfusion.
  • Favorable outcome is associated with an improvement in brain tissue oxygen beyond 210 minutes.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain / blood supply. Brain / metabolism. Cerebrovascular Circulation / physiology. Oxygen / metabolism. Saline Solution, Hypertonic / administration & dosage. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / drug therapy. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Blood Flow Velocity / drug effects. Blood Flow Velocity / physiology. Female. Humans. Hydrogen-Ion Concentration. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Middle Aged


83. Mizuno Y, Kanazawa I, Kuno S, Yanagisawa N, Yamamoto M, Kondo T: Placebo-controlled, double-blind dose-finding study of entacapone in fluctuating parkinsonian patients. Mov Disord; 2007 Jan;22(1):75-80
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Placebo-controlled, double-blind dose-finding study of entacapone in fluctuating parkinsonian patients.
  • We conducted a multicenter randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind parallel-group study in Japanese Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with wearing-off motor fluctuations to determine the clinical efficacy and safety of entacapone as an adjunct to concomitant treatment with levodopa and a dopa decarboxylase inhibitor (DCI).
  • We randomized 341 patients to receive entacapone 100 or 200 mg or placebo per dose of levodopa/DCI for 8 weeks.
  • The primary efficacy variable was on time change while awake, determined by patients' diaries.
  • Mean baseline on time in each group was approximately 8 hours.
  • Mean on time change at final assessment was 1.4 hours each for entacapone 100-mg and 200-mg groups and by 0.5 hours for the placebo group (P < 0.05).
  • In conclusion, both entacapone 100 and 200 mg were equally effective in increasing on time of PD patients with wearing-off fluctuations, although the safety and tolerability profile appeared more favorable for the 100-mg dose.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiparkinson Agents / therapeutic use. Catechols / therapeutic use. Nitriles / therapeutic use. Parkinson Disease / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Cross-Over Studies. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Double-Blind Method. Drug Evaluation. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Levodopa / therapeutic use. Male. Middle Aged

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2006 Movement Disorder Society.
  • (PMID = 17094103.001).
  • [ISSN] 0885-3185
  • [Journal-full-title] Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mov. Disord.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiparkinson Agents; 0 / Catechols; 0 / Nitriles; 46627O600J / Levodopa; 4975G9NM6T / entacapone
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84. Pootrakul P, Breuer W, Sametband M, Sirankapracha P, Hershko C, Cabantchik ZI: Labile plasma iron (LPI) as an indicator of chelatable plasma redox activity in iron-overloaded beta-thalassemia/HbE patients treated with an oral chelator. Blood; 2004 Sep 1;104(5):1504-10
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Persistent levels of plasma nontransferrin bound iron (NTBI) have been associated with tissue iron overload and toxicity.
  • We characterized NTBI's susceptibility to deferoxamine (directly chelatable iron [DCI]) and redox activity (labile plasma iron [LPI]) during the course of long-term, continuous L1 (deferiprone) treatment of patients with hemoglobin E disease and beta-thalassemia (n = 17).
  • Daily administration of L1 (50 mg/kg) for 13 to 17 months caused both LPI and DCI to decrease from respective initial 5.1 +/- 0.5 and 5.4 +/- 0.6 microM to steady mean levels of 2.18 +/- 0.24 and 2.81 +/- 0.14 microM.
  • The steady lowest levels of LPI and DCI were attained after 6 to 8 months, with a half time (t(1/2)) of 2 to 3 months.
  • Serum ferritin and red cell membrane-associated iron followed a similar course but attained steady basal levels only after 10 to 12 months of continuous treatment, with a t(1/2) of 5 to 7 months.
  • These studies indicate that LPI and DCI can serve as early indicators of iron overload and as measures for the effectiveness of iron chelation in reducing potentially toxic iron in the plasma.
  • [MeSH-major] Hemoglobin E. Iron / blood. Iron Chelating Agents / therapeutic use. Iron Overload / drug therapy. Pyridones / therapeutic use. beta-Thalassemia / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 15155464.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-4971
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Iron Chelating Agents; 0 / Pyridones; 0 / Transferrin; 2BTY8KH53L / deferiprone; 9034-61-1 / Hemoglobin E; E1UOL152H7 / Iron
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85. Motomura K, Egawa C, Komoike Y, Inaji H, Koyama H: [Controversies in breast conservation treatment for breast cancer]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2004 Feb;31(2):168-75
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Controversies in breast conservation treatment for breast cancer].
  • Breast conservation treatment has become the standard treatment for early breast cancer patients, after the equivalence of mastectomy and breast conservation treatment was demonstrated in prospective, randomized trials and large retrospective studies.
  • New questions, such as the feasibility of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in improving breast conserving rate, the appropriateness of breast conservation treatment in ductal carcinoma in situ, the effectiveness of radiation therapy in patients treated by breast conservation, and patient selection for breast conservation without radiation, are now being raised.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / surgery. Mastectomy, Segmental
  • [MeSH-minor] Carcinoma in Situ / surgery. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / radiotherapy. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / surgery. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Mastectomy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / epidemiology. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 14997746.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Number-of-references] 60
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86. Tseng MY, Hutchinson PJ, Richards HK, Czosnyka M, Pickard JD, Erber WN, Brown S, Kirkpatrick PJ: Acute systemic erythropoietin therapy to reduce delayed ischemic deficits following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a Phase II randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Clinical article. J Neurosurg; 2009 Jul;111(1):171-80
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  • [Title] Acute systemic erythropoietin therapy to reduce delayed ischemic deficits following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a Phase II randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Clinical article.
  • OBJECT: Delayed ischemic deficits (DIDs), a major source of disability following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), are usually associated with severe cerebral vasospasm and impaired autoregulation.
  • Systemic erythropoietin (EPO) therapy has been demonstrated to have neuroprotective properties acting via EPO receptors on cerebrovascular endothelia and ischemic neurons.
  • In this trial, the authors explored the potential neuroprotective effects of acute EPO therapy following aSAH.
  • METHODS: Within 72 hours of aSAH, 80 patients (age range 24-82 years) were randomized to receive intravenous EPO (30,000 U) or placebo every 48 hours for a total of 90,000 U.
  • No differences were demonstrated in the incidence of vasospasm and adverse events; however, patients receiving EPO had a decreased incidence of severe vasospasm from 27.5 to 7.5% (p=0.037), reduced DIDs with new cerebral infarcts from 40.0 to 7.5% (p=0.001), a shortened duration of impaired autoregulation (ipsilateral side, p<0.001), and more favorable outcome at discharge (favorable Glasgow Outcome Scale score, p=0.039).
  • CONCLUSIONS: This preliminary study showed that EPO seemed to reduce delayed cerebral ischemia following aSAH via decreasing severity of vasospasm and shortening impaired autoregulation.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Ischemia / drug therapy. Brain Ischemia / prevention & control. Erythropoietin / administration & dosage. Neuroprotective Agents / administration & dosage. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Blood Pressure / drug effects. Blood Transfusion. Double-Blind Method. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Homeostasis / drug effects. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Placebos. Treatment Outcome. Ultrasonography, Doppler, Transcranial. Vasospasm, Intracranial / diagnostic imaging. Vasospasm, Intracranial / drug therapy. Vasospasm, Intracranial / prevention & control. Young Adult

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  • [CommentIn] J Neurosurg. 2010 Mar;112(3):699-700 [20192676.001]
  • [CommentIn] J Neurosurg. 2014 Jan;120(1):293-4 [24180572.001]
  • (PMID = 19344224.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3085
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / G0600986; United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / G9439390
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neuroprotective Agents; 0 / Placebos; 11096-26-7 / Erythropoietin
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87. Tejada JG, Taylor RA, Ugurel MS, Hayakawa M, Lee SK, Chaloupka JC: Safety and feasibility of intra-arterial nicardipine for the treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage-associated vasospasm: initial clinical experience with high-dose infusions. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol; 2007 May;28(5):844-8

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Safety and feasibility of intra-arterial nicardipine for the treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage-associated vasospasm: initial clinical experience with high-dose infusions.
  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Delayed cerebral ischemia from vasospasm is a major complication after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), but complications and/or low efficacy are associated with current therapy.
  • We report our initial experience with intra-arterial use of a calcium channel blocker, nicardipine.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of a consecutive series of patients with clinical and angiographic vasospasm treated with intra-arterial nicardipine was performed.
  • Follow-up of at least 2 months in 10 survivors revealed minor or no deficits in most patients with a Glasgow Outcome Score of 1 or 2 in 9 of 10 patients (90%).
  • CONCLUSION: In this small series, high-dose intra-arterial nicardipine infusion to treat SAH-associated vasospasm seems to be safe and effective.
  • [MeSH-major] Nicardipine / administration & dosage. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / complications. Vasodilator Agents / administration & dosage. Vasospasm, Intracranial / drug therapy. Vasospasm, Intracranial / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cerebral Angiography. Feasibility Studies. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intra-Arterial. Male. Middle Aged. Postoperative Complications / drug therapy. Postoperative Complications / etiology. Postoperative Complications / radiography. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17494654.001).
  • [ISSN] 0195-6108
  • [Journal-full-title] AJNR. American journal of neuroradiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AJNR Am J Neuroradiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Vasodilator Agents; CZ5312222S / Nicardipine
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88. Avitsian R, Fiorella D, Soliman MM, Mascha E: Anesthetic considerations of selective intra-arterial nicardipine injection for intracranial vasospasm: a case series. J Neurosurg Anesthesiol; 2007 Apr;19(2):125-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Anesthetic considerations of selective intra-arterial nicardipine injection for intracranial vasospasm: a case series.
  • Cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage can decrease cerebral blood flow with the potential for stroke.
  • Induction of Triple-H therapy (hypertension, hypervolemia, and hemodilution) is an accepted medical therapy to decrease the delayed cerebral ischemia related to vasospasm.
  • Recently selective intra-arterial injection of nicardipine during angiography has also been proposed as a therapeutic modality for the management of distal vasospasm not amenable to balloon angioplasty.
  • We are reporting the hemodynamic changes in 11 patients who underwent this procedure.
  • A significantly higher drop in systolic blood pressure but not for diastolic blood pressure or mean arterial pressure after the injection was seen in patients who were not intubated in the intensive care unit before the procedure.
  • Selective intra-arterial injection of nicardipine during angiography can cause significant hemodynamic instability and requires supportive management by the anesthesiologist.
  • [MeSH-major] Anesthesia. Calcium Channel Blockers / therapeutic use. Nicardipine / therapeutic use. Vasospasm, Intracranial / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Blood Pressure / drug effects. Female. Heart Rate / drug effects. Humans. Injections, Intra-Arterial. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / complications

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  • (PMID = 17413999.001).
  • [ISSN] 0898-4921
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgical anesthesiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Neurosurg Anesthesiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Calcium Channel Blockers; CZ5312222S / Nicardipine
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89. Taran A, Eggemann H, Costa SD, Smith B, Bischoff J: Ovarian cyst torsion and extreme ovarian stimulation in a premenopausal patient treated with tamoxifen for ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast. Am J Obstet Gynecol; 2006 Oct;195(4):e5-6
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  • [Title] Ovarian cyst torsion and extreme ovarian stimulation in a premenopausal patient treated with tamoxifen for ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast.
  • Tamoxifen is increasingly used in adjuvant endocrine therapy for postsurgery breast cancer patients and in chemoprevention for high-risk patients.
  • We present a case of bilateral ovarian cyst development with consecutive unilateral cyst torsion and elevated serum estradiol in a premenopausal patient treated with tamoxifen after breast-conserving surgery.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / drug therapy. Ovarian Cysts / chemically induced. Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome / chemically induced. Tamoxifen / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Estradiol / blood. Female. Humans. Torsion Abnormality

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  • (PMID = 17000228.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-6868
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of obstetrics and gynecology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 094ZI81Y45 / Tamoxifen; 4TI98Z838E / Estradiol
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90. Uesato M, Nabeya Y, Miyazaki S, Aoki T, Akai T, Shuto K, Tanizawa T, Miyazaki M, Matsubara H: Postoperative recurrence of an IPMN of the pancreas with a fistula to the stomach. World J Gastrointest Endosc; 2010 Oct 16;2(10):349-51

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  • [Title] Postoperative recurrence of an IPMN of the pancreas with a fistula to the stomach.
  • We report on a case of a 74 year old man who was diagnosed with a recurrence of non-invasive carcinoma of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (non-invasive IPMN) by postoperative gastroscopy (GS).
  • A histopathological study revealed non-invasive adenocarcinoma.
  • We diagnosed a recurrence of IPMN and administered chemotherapy again.
  • However, he died of his original illness.

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  • (PMID = 21160585.001).
  • [ISSN] 1948-5190
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of gastrointestinal endoscopy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Gastrointest Endosc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2999103
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Endoscopy / Fistula / Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm / Recurrence / Stomach
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91. Gold HT, Do HT, Dick AW: Correlates and effect of suboptimal radiotherapy in women with ductal carcinoma in situ or early invasive breast cancer. Cancer; 2008 Dec 1;113(11):3108-15
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  • [Title] Correlates and effect of suboptimal radiotherapy in women with ductal carcinoma in situ or early invasive breast cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: The study aimed to identify factors associated with less-than-optimal radiotherapy (RT) and its impact on disease-free survival in women aged 66+ years diagnosed with stage I breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).
  • METHODS: The subjects were women diagnosed from 1991 to 1999 in the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database who underwent breast-conserving surgery and RT within 12 months postdiagnosis.
  • The authors conducted descriptive and multivariate survival analyses, and considered age, race, poverty, marital status, comorbidity indices, rural/urban, radiation oncologist density, comedo necrosis histology (DCIS only), chemotherapy receipt (stage I only), and RT completion (3+ weeks of treatment) and delay (8+ weeks postsurgery without chemotherapy; 4+ weeks postchemotherapy).
  • Subjects with stage I disease who were more likely to delay RT were of black race (odds ratio [OR], 1.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17-2.08), whereas women in areas of high radiation oncologist density were less likely to delay (OR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.66-0.81).
  • Those living in high poverty areas were less likely to complete RT (P < .03), as were those undergoing chemotherapy (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.15-2.88).
  • Stage I breast cancer patients with delayed RT were more likely to experience a subsequent breast event (OR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.00-1.30), and those with incomplete RT had a higher rate of overall mortality (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.06-1.63).
  • Factors associated with lower subsequent breast events included older age, lower poverty, and being married.
  • RT delays of 12+ weeks (or 8+ weeks postchemotherapy) had a strongly negative impact on subsequent events (OR, 3.94; 95% CI, 2.51-6.17 for DCIS; OR, 2.77; 95% CI, 1.84-2.59 for stage I).
  • CONCLUSIONS: RT should be facilitated to ensure completion and timeliness, especially for early invasive breast cancer patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Radiotherapy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Carcinoma in Situ / radiotherapy. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / mortality. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / radiotherapy. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / surgery. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Multivariate Analysis. Radiotherapy Dosage. SEER Program. Time Factors


92. Hao LS, Wang G, Qian K, Luo T, Li XJ, Wu XT: [HIF-1alpha expression and relationship involving tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis in human breast carcinoma]. Sichuan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban; 2007 Jan;38(1):60-3
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  • [Title] [HIF-1alpha expression and relationship involving tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis in human breast carcinoma].
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the expression of hypoxia- inducible 1 alpha (HIF-1alpha) in human breast cancer and its relationship with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA ) protein, other tumor biomarkers and clinical pathologic factors.
  • METHODS: The immunohistochemical staining (SP) was used to measure the expression of HIF-1alpha, VEGF and PCNA in human breast fibroadenoma, usual hyperplasia and breast carcinoma.
  • RESULTS: HIF-1alpha was not found expressing in breast fibroadenoma and hyperplastic lesions.
  • In contrast, the positive rate of HIF-1alpha was found in the ductal carcinoma in situ 55% (DCIS, 11/20) and the invasive breast carcinoma 85% (51/60).
  • VEGF positivity in breast carcinoma was 81.3% (65/80).
  • The total positive rate of PCNA in breast carcinoma was 75% (60/80), that in DCIS was 65% (13/20) and that in invasive carcinoma was 78.3% (47/66).
  • Conclusion The upregulated expression of HIF-1alpha and VEGF in breast carcinoma has a close relationship with tumor angiogenesis, tumor cell proliferation, lymph node metastasis, ER status and stages of histology.
  • This suggests that HIF-1alpha plays an important role in the carcinogenesis and progression of breast carcinoma; is wished to become a new target for radiotherapy, chemotherapy and biotherapy of tumor, which will offer the new ways to diagnosis and treatment of tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit / metabolism. Neovascularization, Pathologic

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  • (PMID = 17294729.001).
  • [ISSN] 1672-173X
  • [Journal-full-title] Sichuan da xue xue bao. Yi xue ban = Journal of Sichuan University. Medical science edition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Sichuan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / HIF1A protein, human; 0 / Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit; 0 / Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
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93. Anan K, Mitsuyama S, Tamae K, Suehara N, Nishihara K, Ogawa Y, Abe Y, Iwashita T, Toyoshima S: Increased dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase activity in breast cancer. J Surg Oncol; 2003 Mar;82(3):174-9
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  • [Title] Increased dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase activity in breast cancer.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Although studies have focused on modulating the bioavailability of 5-FU through inhibition of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) to improve efficacy of the drug, activity of this enzyme in breast cancer has not been thoroughly examined.
  • We measured DPD activity in primary and metastatic lesions and benign breast tumors to evaluate the clinical significance of this enzyme in the treatment of breast cancer.
  • METHODS: DPD activity was measured by catalytic assay and compared in 100 primary tumors (95 invasive carcinomas, 5 intraductal carcinomas), 26 uninvolved adjacent breast tissue specimens, 6 metastatic sites, and 7 intraductal papillomas.
  • RESULTS: The enzyme level in the carcinomas was 4-fold that of adjacent uninvolved breast tissues (101 vs 23 pmol/min/mg protein, P < 0.001).
  • Enzyme activity in intraductal papilloma (120 pmol/min/mg protein) was comparable to that in invasive carcinoma.
  • There were no significant differences in DPD activity related to clinicopathologic features, but a tendency toward increased DPD activity was observed in progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer (P = 0.09).
  • CONCLUSIONS: DPD activity is substantially upregulated in breast cancer tissue and is higher than that reported previously.
  • The clinical implications of DPD inhibitors in patients being treated for breast cancer with oral fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy should be further investigated.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / enzymology. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / enzymology. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / enzymology. Oxidoreductases / pharmacology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 12619061.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-4790
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; EC 1.- / Oxidoreductases; EC 1.3.1.2 / Dihydrouracil Dehydrogenase (NADP); U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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94. Yanagisawa N: [A prospect of treatment for Parkinson's disease in the 21st century]. Nihon Rinsho; 2000 Oct;58(10):1968-74
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  • [Title] [A prospect of treatment for Parkinson's disease in the 21st century].
  • During the last half of the 20th century, medical treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD) showed remarkable progresses, resulting in marked prolongation of life and self-dependency of patients.
  • In Japan, peak of ages of PD patients visiting all medical institutions was between 75 and 84 years of age(1993), with which course of illness is predicted to exceed twenty years in a large number of patients.
  • As exploration of neuroprotective therapies for PD has not been successful yet, continuous progress in neuronal cell death in the substantia nigra result in loss of efficacy of medication, motor fluctuations and CNS side effects such as dyskinesia and psychosis in the long course of dopaminergic supplementation therapies.
  • Future development of medical therapies for PD is expected in different ways.
  • First, elaboration in controlled-release of DCI/levodopa, utilization of dopamine(DA) receptor agonists with different profiles in affinity to DA receptor subtypes and half-time of blood concentration, and utilization of COMT inhibitors.
  • Second, neuroprotection with MAO-B inbitators or DA receptor agonists.
  • Third, treatment for extra-motor symptoms such as dementia, cognitive disorders, depression, autonomic disturbances such as orthortatic hypotension and bladder disturbances, which is essential for maintenance of quality of life of patients with long course of illness.
  • Gene therapy, neuroprotection before development of symptoms in PD may be attained within the first few decades of the next century.
  • In this respect, establishment of preclinical diagnosis with neuroimaging and sensitive motor and psychological tests is imperative.
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Therapy / trends. Forecasting. Parkinson Disease
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antiparkinson Agents / adverse effects. Antiparkinson Agents / therapeutic use. Benzophenones / therapeutic use. Catechol O-Methyltransferase Inhibitors. Dopamine Agonists / adverse effects. Dopamine Agonists / therapeutic use. Genetic Therapy. Humans. Levodopa / adverse effects. Levodopa / therapeutic use. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Nerve Growth Factors / therapeutic use. Nitrophenols. Quality of Life

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  • (PMID = 11068433.001).
  • [ISSN] 0047-1852
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nippon Rinsho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiparkinson Agents; 0 / Benzophenones; 0 / Catechol O-Methyltransferase Inhibitors; 0 / Dopamine Agonists; 0 / Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors; 0 / Nerve Growth Factors; 0 / Nitrophenols; 46627O600J / Levodopa; CIF6334OLY / tolcapone
  • [Number-of-references] 11
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95. Nasser SM, Smith SG, Chagpar AB: The role of sentinel node biopsy in women undergoing prophylactic mastectomy. J Surg Res; 2010 Dec;164(2):188-92
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  • We sought to determine the incidence of finding occult cancer and the frequency of SLN positivity in patients undergoing contralateral PM.
  • Eight patients (6.9%) had known bilateral cancer; an additional eight patients (6.9%) underwent BPM for risk reduction.
  • The remaining 99 patients who had ipsilateral breast cancer and underwent contralateral PM formed the cohort of interest for this study.
  • Occult contralateral malignancy was found in eight (8.1%); of these, six (75.0%) had DCIS only.
  • Both had ipsilateral inflammatory cancer, and over 15 positive ipsilateral lymph nodes post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Ipsilateral inflammatory breast cancer was correlated with the finding of invasive cancer in the contralateral PM (P = 0.006), and both the finding of ipsilateral inflammatory breast cancer and number of positive lymph nodes correlated with the finding of a positive contralateral SLN.
  • However, patients with ipsilateral inflammatory cancer are at high risk of contralateral malignancy; SLN biopsy on the prophylactic side in these patients may be warranted.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / surgery. Mastectomy / methods. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Analysis of Variance. Cohort Studies. Female. Humans. Inflammatory Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Inflammatory Breast Neoplasms / surgery. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Neoplasm Invasiveness

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20869074.001).
  • [ISSN] 1095-8673
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of surgical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Surg. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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96. Lombardi D, Scalone S, Crivellari D, Magri MD, La Mura N, Miolo G, Murrone A, Perin T, Coran F, Candiani E, Massarut S, Veronesi A: Epirubicin and docetaxel as neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced breast cancer: a phase II study. Tumori; 2010 Mar-Apr;96(2):229-33
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  • [Title] Epirubicin and docetaxel as neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced breast cancer: a phase II study.
  • AIMS AND BACKGROUND: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is the standard treatment for locally advanced breast cancer.
  • The combination of anthracyclines and taxanes is considered the first choice chemotherapy in advanced breast cancer.
  • We report here the overall results of a phase II study of epirubicin and docetaxel as neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced breast cancer.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Forty-five patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic breast carcinoma were treated with epirubicin, 90 mg/m2, docetaxel, 75 mg/m2, intravenously, every 3 weeks for 4 cycles before and 4 cycles after surgery, followed by tamoxifen for 5 years if estrogen receptor positive and radiation therapy if indicated.
  • Patient characteristics included a median age of 45 years; pre Ipostmenopausal, 311/14 patients; T3-T4 in 33, N0/N1 in 12/33; ductal/lobular in 42/3; ER+ in 23; and HER2 overexpression in 23.
  • Histological examination of the breast and lymph nodes revealed no signs of disease in 3 patients and ductal carcinoma in situ only in 2.
  • Twenty-five patients completed the chemotherapy program.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The neoadjuvant treatment was active and well tolerated, but the incidence of pathologic complete remissions was relatively low.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Epirubicin / administration & dosage. Epirubicin / adverse effects. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Taxoids / administration & dosage. Taxoids / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 20572578.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-8916
  • [Journal-full-title] Tumori
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tumori
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Taxoids; 15H5577CQD / docetaxel; 3Z8479ZZ5X / Epirubicin
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97. Zhang S, Wang L, Liu M, Wu B: Tirilazad for aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. Cochrane Database Syst Rev; 2010;(2):CD006778

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: Delayed cerebral ischaemia is a significant contributor to poor outcome (death or disability) in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH).
  • Tirilazad is considered to have neuroprotective properties in animal models of acute cerebral ischaemia.
  • SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials of tirilazad started within four days of SAH onset, compared with placebo or open control in patients with aneurysmal SAH documented by angiography and computerised tomography (CT) scan or cerebrospinal fluid examination, or both.
  • DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We extracted data relating to case fatality, poor outcome (death, vegetative state, or severe disability), delayed cerebral ischaemia (or symptomatic vasospasm), cerebral infarction and adverse events of treatments.
  • Oral or intravenous nimodipine was used routinely as a background treatment in both groups in all trials.
  • During the treatment period, fewer patients developed delayed cerebral ischaemia in the tirilazad group than in the control group (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.93).
  • Leukocytosis and prolongation of Q-T interval occurred significantly more frequently in the treatment group in only one trial evaluating tirilazad at high dose.
  • There was no significant difference in infusion site disorders or other laboratory parameters between the two groups.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Ischemia / prevention & control. Neuroprotective Agents / therapeutic use. Pregnatrienes / therapeutic use. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Nimodipine / therapeutic use. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20166088.001).
  • [ISSN] 1469-493X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Cochrane database of systematic reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cochrane Database Syst Rev
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Chief Scientist Office / / CZB/4/551
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Meta-Analysis; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neuroprotective Agents; 0 / Pregnatrienes; 110101-67-2 / tirilazad; 57WA9QZ5WH / Nimodipine
  • [Number-of-references] 42
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98. Yamashiro N, Tozaki M, Ogawa T, Kawano N, Suzuki T, Ozaki S, Sakamoto N, Abe S, Fukuma E: Preoperative MRI marking technique for the planning of breast-conserving surgery. Breast Cancer; 2009;16(3):223-8
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  • [Title] Preoperative MRI marking technique for the planning of breast-conserving surgery.
  • BACKGROUND: When performing breast-conserving surgery (BCS), it is essential to achieve a complete resection of the tumor while preserving the cosmetic outcome.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of a MRI marking technique for planning of BCS.
  • The preoperative histopathological diagnosis was ductal carcinoma in situ in 11 and invasive ductal carcinoma in 3.
  • All of the patients with invasive ductal carcinoma were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Twelve patients (86%) had negative margins, but two patients (14%) had positive margins: one patient had a medial margin, while the other had a distal margin.
  • One patient showed a pathologically complete response after chemotherapy; the RMTD was not evaluated.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / surgery. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Mastectomy, Segmental / methods

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  • (PMID = 19205832.001).
  • [ISSN] 1880-4233
  • [Journal-full-title] Breast cancer (Tokyo, Japan)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Breast Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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99. Jacquot C, David DJ, Gardier AM, Sánchez C: [Escitalopram and citalopram: the unexpected role of the R-enantiomer]. Encephale; 2007 Mar-Apr;33(2):179-87
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  • [Transliterated title] Escitalopram et Citalopram: le rôle inattendu de l'énantiomère R.
  • Citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is composed of 2 enantiomers, R-citalopram and S-citalopram, 2 different non-superimposable mirror image forms of the same molecule.
  • Citalopram's pharmacologic activity is centered on the S enantiomer's high affinity for the serotonin transporter which is twice as high as citalopram's and 30 to 40 times higher than R-citalopram.
  • This leads to an inhibition of serotonin reuptake two times higher for escitalopram compared with citalopram and confirms that citalopram's pharmacologic activity is due to the S-enantiomer.
  • Contrary to what might be expected, the effect of escitalopram (DCI of S-citalopram) is not superimposable on an equivalent dose of citalopram but is superior.
  • Second, a particular action of R-citalopram may influence the S-enantiomer's kinetic from intestinal absorption to blood-brain barrier.
  • Results of experimentation, after in situ injection to the cortex level, confirm that an interaction between the 2 enantiomers takes place at that level.
  • A direct negative interaction of R-citalopram on one or several effectors that create the antidepressive effect seems justified.
  • We then may conclude that R-citalopram antagonizes the antidepressive effects of escitalopram and that its presence limits the therapeutic effect and reduces the speed of action of citalopram.
  • The antagonism of escitalopram by R-citalopram was not expected and one hypothesis is that a direct interaction between the 2 enantiomers may occur on a particular site of the serotonin transporter.
  • Results have shown that R-citalopram has a significant affinity only for the allosteric site of the transporter, which regulates the affinity of the ligand for the active site at the origin of serotonin reuptake inhibition.
  • Unlike citalopram, escitalopram's pharmacologic action is not blocked by R-citalopram explaining its greater therapeutic efficacy and more rapid mode of action.
  • [MeSH-major] Anxiety Disorders / drug therapy. Citalopram / chemistry. Depressive Disorder, Major / drug therapy. Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Stereoisomerism. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17675913.001).
  • [ISSN] 0013-7006
  • [Journal-full-title] L'Encéphale
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Encephale
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors; 0DHU5B8D6V / Citalopram
  • [Number-of-references] 17
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100. Peihong S, Perry F: Expression of nm23, MMP-2, TIMP-2 in breast neoplasm in Zhengzhou Center Hospital, China. Ethiop Med J; 2007 Jan;45(1):79-83
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  • [Title] Expression of nm23, MMP-2, TIMP-2 in breast neoplasm in Zhengzhou Center Hospital, China.
  • BACKGROUND: In recent years, the carcinoma of the breast threatens to women's health heavily.
  • OBJECTIVE: A prospective study is made in the center hospital of zhengzhou, in order to approach the expression of nm23, MMP-2 (Matrix metallo-proteinase-2), TIMP-2 (it's tissue-inhibitor of the metalloproteinase-2) in the breast neoplasm and the relationship with invasion and metastasis.
  • METHODOLOGY: This study applied the immunohistochemistry technique SP method RESULTS: In fibroadenoma, ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast 4 groups, the positive immunostaining rate of nm23, MMP-2 and TIMP-2 have significant difference among 4 groups (p < 0.05).
  • In the breast invasive ductal carcinoma, the expression of nm23 and TIMP-2 decreased or the expression of MMP-2 increased CONCLUSION: This suggested that invasion and metastasis is ability of the neoplasm.
  • MMP-2 in the breast ductal carcinoma in situ appears of high expression and this suggested that the positive expression of this onco-proteins was the early incident in the genetic course of the breast cancer The unite detection of nm23, MMP-2 and TIMP-2 expression would contribute to the early diagnosis and prognostic assessment of the carcinoma of the breast.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Carcinoma in Situ / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Ductal / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / drug therapy. Fibroadenoma / drug therapy. Matrix Metalloproteinases, Membrane-Associated / therapeutic use. Nucleoside-Diphosphate Kinase / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] China. Female. Humans. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 / metabolism. NM23 Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinases. Neoplasm Metastasis. Prospective Studies. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2

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  • (PMID = 17642161.001).
  • [ISSN] 0014-1755
  • [Journal-full-title] Ethiopian medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ethiop. Med. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ethiopia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / NM23 Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinases; 127497-59-0 / Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2; EC 2.7.4.6 / NME1 protein, human; EC 2.7.4.6 / Nucleoside-Diphosphate Kinase; EC 3.4.24.- / Matrix Metalloproteinases, Membrane-Associated; EC 3.4.24.35 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 9
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