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1. Wang ES, Straus DJ, Teruya-Feldstein J, Qin J, Portlock C, Moskowitz C, Goy A, Hedrick E, Zelenetz AD, Noy A: Intensive chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, high-dose methotrexate/ifosfamide, etoposide, and high-dose cytarabine (CODOX-M/IVAC) for human immunodeficiency virus-associated Burkitt lymphoma. Cancer; 2003 Sep 15;98(6):1196-205
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Intensive chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, high-dose methotrexate/ifosfamide, etoposide, and high-dose cytarabine (CODOX-M/IVAC) for human immunodeficiency virus-associated Burkitt lymphoma.
  • BACKGROUND: In the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), standard-dose chemotherapy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is becoming the standard of care.
  • In contrast, the safety and efficacy of intensive regimens have not been established for Burkitt lymphoma (BL), a highly aggressive lymphoma for which moderate-dose chemotherapy is substandard in the HIV-negative population.
  • METHODS: To evaluate the feasibility of intensive chemotherapy in HIV-associated BL, the authors retrospectively reviewed 14 HIV-positive adults with BL treated at their center between 1988 and 2000.
  • Eight patients were treated between 1996 and 2000 with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, high-dose methotrexate/ifosfamide, etoposide, and high-dose cytarabine (CODOX-M/IVAC), one of the currently preferred intensive-dose chemotherapy regimens for BL.
  • Six received other chemotherapy.
  • RESULTS: Of the 14 HIV-positive patients, 63% had a complete response after CODOX-M/IVAC treatment, compared with 67% of patients receiving other chemotherapy.
  • Similar outcomes were seen despite the fact that 88% of CODOX-M/IVAC-treated HIV-positive patients had Stage IV disease, compared with one-third of HIV-positive patients treated with other chemotherapy.
  • HIV status did not adversely affect long-term EFS independent of the treatment regimen (P = 0.88).
  • When EFS was evaluated according to chemotherapy regimen independent of HIV status, CODOX-M/IVAC was found to be associated with improved EFS (P = 0.05) in all patients, and particularly those at high risk.
  • HIV-positive patients treated with CODOX-M/IVAC tolerated chemotherapy well with similar rates of myelosuppression and infectious complications as HIV-negative patients.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The current nonrandomized retrospective study suggested that intensive chemotherapy with CODOX-M/IVAC is feasible and well tolerated in HIV-positive adults with BL.
  • In the post-HAART era, intensive chemotherapy such as CODOX-M/IVAC may be appropriate in all adult patients with BL, and especially those with poor prognostic factors, regardless of HIV status.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Burkitt Lymphoma / drug therapy. Cytarabine / administration & dosage. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Ifosfamide / administration & dosage. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / drug therapy

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2003 American Cancer Society.DOI 10.1002/cncr.11628
  • (PMID = 12973843.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate; IVAC protocol
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2. Blum KA, Lozanski G, Byrd JC: Adult Burkitt leukemia and lymphoma. Blood; 2004 Nov 15;104(10):3009-20
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  • [Title] Adult Burkitt leukemia and lymphoma.
  • The World Health Organization Classification of Lymphoid Neoplasms identifies Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia as a highly aggressive mature B-cell neoplasm consisting of endemic, sporadic, and immunodeficiency-associated variants.
  • These subtypes share many morphologic and immunophenotypic features, but differences exist in their clinical and geographic presentations.
  • All of these subtypes possess chromosomal rearrangements of the c-myc oncogene, the genetic hallmark of Burkitt lymphoma that contributes to lymphomagenesis through alterations in cell cycle regulation, cellular differentiation, apoptosis, cellular adhesion, and metabolism.
  • Brief-duration, high-intensity chemotherapy regimens containing aggressive central nervous system prophylaxis have had remarkable success in the treatment of this disease, with complete remission rates of 75% to 90% and overall survivals reaching 50% to 70% in adults.
  • Although Burkitt lymphoma cells are extremely chemosensitive, biologically targeted therapies should be developed because current treatment options are suboptimal for patients with poor prognostic features or in the setting of relapsed disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Burkitt Lymphoma / diagnosis. Burkitt Lymphoma / therapy

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  • (PMID = 15265787.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-4971
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA95426-01A1
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 88
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3. Costello RT, Zerazhi H, Charbonnier A, de Colella JM, Alzieu C, Poizot-Martin I, Cohen R, Bardou VJ, Xerri L, Olive D, Nezri M, Lepeu G, Gastaut JA: Intensive sequential chemotherapy with hematopoietic growth factor support for non-Hodgkin lymphoma in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. Cancer; 2004 Feb 15;100(4):667-76
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  • [Title] Intensive sequential chemotherapy with hematopoietic growth factor support for non-Hodgkin lymphoma in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.
  • BACKGROUND: Optimal treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) has yet to be defined, because chemotherapy could exacerbate immunodeficiency, with subsequent adverse effects for patients.
  • METHODS: The authors investigated the feasibility of an intensive chemotherapy regimen for HIV-associated NHL.
  • Thirty-eight patients were treated with a first course of cyclophosphamide (Cy), vincristine, and prednisone; followed by 3 courses of high-dose Cy (2000 mg/m2), doxorubicin (Doxo; 50 mg/m2), vincristine, and prednisone (modified high-dose CHOP); 1 course of high-dose methotrexate (MTX; 8000 mg/m2); and 1 course of high-dose cytarabine (8000 mg/m2).
  • Radiotherapy was added to the treatment regimen for patients with bulky disease or residual tumor.
  • Chemotherapy was administered in conjunction with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor and antiretroviral therapy.
  • The complete response rate was 60.5%, with a total response rate of 79%.
  • Both an International Prognostic Index score of 0 or 1 and Burkitt-type histology had positive effects on survival, whereas CD4-positive lymphocyte counts, viral burden, and previous highly active antiretroviral therapy did not.
  • CD4-positive T lymphocyte levels decreased from 0.197 +/- 0.156 x10(9)/L before treatment to 0.152 +/- 0.1 x10(9)/L at 6 months after the end of treatment.
  • A decrease in viral load, from 380,000 +/- 785,000 copies/mL before treatment to 25,000 +/- 43,000 copies/mL at 6 months after the end of treatment, also was observed.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The results of the current study indicate that intensive chemotherapy is effective and tolerable for patients with HIV-associated NHL.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / administration & dosage. HIV Infections / complications. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / virology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Anti-HIV Agents / therapeutic use. CD4 Lymphocyte Count. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Cytarabine / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Injections, Intravenous. Male. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Middle Aged. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Prognosis. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Treatment Outcome. Vincristine / administration & dosage. Viral Load

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2004 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 14770420.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-HIV Agents; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine; 143011-72-7 / Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate; CHOP protocol
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4. Astrow AB, Tarabay G, Salerno VE, Cook WA, Lin R, Lascher S, Li Z, Mazumder A, Halperin I, Cho J, Jaffar Z, McLaughlin M, Blum RH, Kempin SJ: Long-term survival in patients with human immunodeficiency virus-associated small non-cleaved cell lymphoma: the role for short course intensive chemotherapy. Hematol Oncol; 2003 Sep;21(3):131-40
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Long-term survival in patients with human immunodeficiency virus-associated small non-cleaved cell lymphoma: the role for short course intensive chemotherapy.
  • While intensive chemotherapy is recommended for the treatment of non-HIV related adult small non-cleaved lymphoma (SNCL), including Burkitt's and Burkitt-like lymphoma, optimal treatment for patients with HIV-associated SNCL is not known.
  • Median follow-up, survival and survival at the median follow-up time were 4.5 months, 4 months and 49% respectively.
  • Of this cohort 39% were complete responders (CR) and 36% were long-term lymphoma-free survivors.
  • Short course intensive chemotherapy (McMaster) was administered to 23 patients; 17 received less intensive conventional combination chemotherapy; and four received single-agent chemotherapy or no treatment.
  • Conventional chemotherapy may be curative for early stage HIV-SNCL.
  • In advanced disease, McMaster chemotherapy was found to be associated with substantial early mortality but was curative in a significant number of patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / drug therapy. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Burkitt Lymphoma / virology. Cohort Studies. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Registries. Remission Induction. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
  • (PMID = 14579241.001).
  • [ISSN] 0278-0232
  • [Journal-full-title] Hematological oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hematol Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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5. Noy A: Controversies in the treatment of Burkitt lymphoma in AIDS. Curr Opin Oncol; 2010 Sep;22(5):443-8
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  • [Title] Controversies in the treatment of Burkitt lymphoma in AIDS.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The success of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) has transformed HIV infection into a survivable chronic disease in developed countries.
  • Increasingly then, the risks of HIV associated cancers become paramount.
  • Burkitt lymphoma is one of the cancer subtypes highly disproportionately affecting HIV infected patients.
  • RECENT FINDINGS: Recent conference proceedings appear to corroborate early reports that intensive therapy of HIV-Burkitt lymphoma is feasible and effective.
  • Moreover, as breakthroughs in the pathogenesis of lymphoma in general and Burkitt lymphoma in particular suggest that HIV infection plays a significant role, the opportunity for targeted therapy based on differences in biology are wholly untapped.
  • SUMMARY: Advances are being made in HIV-Burkitt lymphoma, but future studies need to incorporate our expanding understanding of biology to improve efficacy and reduce toxicity, preferably by integrating a biologic approach to this curable disease.

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  • (PMID = 20683266.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-703X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Oncol
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA121947-03S4; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA121947; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA121947-03S4
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Retroviral Agents
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS237420; NLM/ PMC3415038
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6. Mak YK, Chan CH, Li CK, Lee MP, Tsang YW: Clinical profiles of human immunodeficiency virus-associated lymphoma in Hong Kong. Hong Kong Med J; 2003 Apr;9(2):91-7
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  • [Title] Clinical profiles of human immunodeficiency virus-associated lymphoma in Hong Kong.
  • OBJECTIVE: To identify the clinical and prognostic features of human immunodeficiency virus-associated lymphoma in the local population with a view to designing more effective treatment strategies.
  • SUBJECTS AND METHODS: All patients (n=10) with human immunodeficiency virus-associated lymphoma managed at Queen Elizabeth Hospital from January 1995 to December 2001.
  • RESULTS: All patients were men with a median age of 39 years.
  • The median CD4 cell count at the time of diagnosis of lymphoma was 0.056 x 10(9)/L.
  • All tumours were diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, with the exception of one systemic Burkittlike lymphoma.
  • Systemic lymphoma was diagnosed in seven patients and three had primary central nervous system lymphoma.
  • Combined antiretroviral therapy was continued or given to five of the six patients who received some form of chemotherapy or radiotherapy treatment.
  • Of the two patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma who received whole brain irradiation therapy, one patient survived 41 months in clinical remission after diagnosis and the other patient died of sepsis while in partial remission 19 months after diagnosis.
  • The four patients with systemic lymphoma who received standard- or reduced-dose chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone had a median survival of 3 months.
  • CONCLUSION: The clinical profiles of these patients were similar to those of patients with human immunodeficiency virus-associated lymphoma in western countries.
  • Other innovative treatment approaches should be investigated to prolong the survival of this patient group.

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  • (PMID = 12668818.001).
  • [ISSN] 1024-2708
  • [Journal-full-title] Hong Kong medical journal = Xianggang yi xue za zhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hong Kong Med J
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hemoglobins; 0 / RNA, Viral; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; EC 1.1.1.27 / L-Lactate Dehydrogenase; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone
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7. Cortes J, Thomas D, Rios A, Koller C, O'Brien S, Jeha S, Faderl S, Kantarjian H: Hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone and highly active antiretroviral therapy for patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia. Cancer; 2002 Mar 1;94(5):1492-9
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  • [Title] Hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone and highly active antiretroviral therapy for patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia.
  • BACKGROUND: Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated lymphoma/leukemia have a poor prognosis and are frequently treated with low-intensity therapy.
  • The authors investigated the feasibility and efficacy of hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone (hyper-CVAD), a dose-intensive chemotherapy regimen, in patients with AIDS-associated Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia, as well as the possible impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in these patients.
  • METHODS: Thirteen patients with AIDS-associated Burkitt lymphoma (six patients) or leukemia (acute lymphoblastic leukemia; seven patients) were treated with hyper-CVAD alternating with high-dose methotrexate and ara-C for a total of eight cycles.
  • Nine patients received HAART from the start of induction chemotherapy (seven patients) or later in the course of chemotherapy (two patients).
  • Nine patients were diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection at the time of diagnosis of Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia; the other 4 patients had been diagnosed with HIV infection for a median of 37 months (range, 18-137) prior to the diagnosis of Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia.
  • Eight patients continued in CR after a median of 31 months (range, 7-45) at the time of writing.
  • Six of seven patients who received HAART from the start of chemotherapy were alive and in CR after a median of 29 months (range, 7-45).
  • The regimen was universally myelosuppressive, but the toxicity profiles, recoveries from myelosuppression, and incidences of infectious complications were similar to that of non-HIV patients with Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia treated with the same regimen.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Hyper-CVAD is an effective regimen for patients with AIDS-associated Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia, with acceptable toxicity.
  • The combination of hyper-CVAD and HAART is associated with long-term survival in patients with the two diseases, which, until recently, were both considered invariably fatal and almost futile to treat medically.
  • [MeSH-major] Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome / complications. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. Burkitt Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Dexamethasone / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neutropenia / chemically induced. Survival Analysis. Thrombocytopenia / chemically induced. Treatment Outcome. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 11920506.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; CVAD protocol
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8. Magrath I: Lessons from clinical trials in African Burkitt lymphoma. Curr Opin Oncol; 2009 Sep;21(5):462-8
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  • [Title] Lessons from clinical trials in African Burkitt lymphoma.
  • The present review focuses on the treatment of an AIDS-defining malignancy, Burkitt lymphoma, since the discovery of the tumor in 1958 to provide a backdrop to the increasing necessity of dealing with AIDS-associated Burkitt lymphoma in Africa.
  • RECENT FINDINGS: In Africa, it appears that AIDS-associated Burkitt lymphoma is increasing, but although treatment outcome is presently poor, the demonstration that highly active antiretroviral therapy permits the same treatment results to those in AIDS-unassociated Burkitt lymphoma provides hope for the future.
  • SUMMARY: In the 1960s, the extraordinary response of Burkitt lymphoma to chemotherapy provided considerable encouragement to pioneer oncologists.
  • Within little more than a decade, the most active drugs, the value of combination chemotherapy, and the need for intrathecal treatment, as well as the risk of tumor lysis syndrome had been demonstrated, providing a platform on which further advances could be made in resource-rich countries.
  • Since that time, little progress has been made in Africa, but recent collaborative projects have shown that improved treatment outcome can be achieved at low cost.
  • The impact of the HIV epidemic on the epidemiology and treatment of African Burkitt lymphoma will receive increasing focus in the coming years.
  • [MeSH-major] Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome / complications. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Burkitt Lymphoma / drug therapy. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Africa / epidemiology. Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. Clinical Trials as Topic. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Incidence

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  • (PMID = 19620863.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-703X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 64
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9. Prall FR, Hink EM, Liang X, Durairaj VD: Rapid onset proptosis and vision loss as the initial presentation of Burkitt lymphoma. Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging; 2008 Jul-Aug;39(4):331-4
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  • [Title] Rapid onset proptosis and vision loss as the initial presentation of Burkitt lymphoma.
  • Burkitt lymphoma is a rapidly growing, high-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma occurring in three distinct clinical subtypes: endemic, sporadic, and human immunodeficiency associated.
  • The authors report a case of Burkitt lymphoma presenting as rapidly progressive proptosis and loss of vision.
  • Given the tumor's rapid growth rate, potential for vision loss, and good response to chemotherapy, clinicians should be aware of this rare presentation.
  • [MeSH-major] Blindness / diagnosis. Burkitt Lymphoma / radiography. Exophthalmos / diagnosis. Orbital Neoplasms / radiography
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Humans. Male. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Visual Acuity

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  • (PMID = 18717442.001).
  • [ISSN] 1542-8877
  • [Journal-full-title] Ophthalmic surgery, lasers & imaging : the official journal of the International Society for Imaging in the Eye
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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10. Wulff EA, Simpson DM: Peripheral neuropathy associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related Burkitt's lymphoma. Muscle Nerve; 2000 Nov;23(11):1764-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Peripheral neuropathy associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related Burkitt's lymphoma.
  • Peripheral neuropathy associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related Burkitt's lymphoma usually occurs as a toxic effect of chemotherapeutic agents.
  • Whereas primary peripheral nerve involvement is an unusual complication, we report on a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patient with Burkitt's lymphoma and sciatic neuropathy due to compression by a lymphomatous mass.
  • Therapy with radiation and chemotherapy was followed by clinical and radiological improvement, but recurrent neurological deficits in a similar distribution occurred later from lymphomatous meningitis.
  • [MeSH-major] Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome / complications. Burkitt Lymphoma / complications. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / complications. Nerve Compression Syndromes / etiology


11. Pagano L, Caira M, Valentini CG, Fianchi L: Clinical aspects and therapy of sporadic burkitt lymphoma. Mediterr J Hematol Infect Dis; 2009;1(2):e2009030

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clinical aspects and therapy of sporadic burkitt lymphoma.
  • Burkitt's lymphoma is a highly aggressive mature B-cell neoplasm consisting of endemic, sporadic, and immunodeficiency-associated variants, sharing many morphologic and immunophenotypic features.
  • Brief-duration, high-intensity chemotherapy regimens including aggressive central nervous system prophylaxis have had remarkable success in the treatment of this disease in the sporadic form, with very high complete remission rate and overall survival in adults.
  • Although Burkitt's lymphoma is extremely chemosensitive, biologically targeted therapies should be developed, because current treatment options are suboptimal for patients with poor prognostic features or with relapsed disease.

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  • (PMID = 21416007.001).
  • [ISSN] 2035-3006
  • [Journal-full-title] Mediterranean journal of hematology and infectious diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mediterr J Hematol Infect Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3033171
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12. Straus DJ: Prognostic factors in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Recent Results Cancer Res; 2002;159:143-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prognostic factors in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • Chemotherapy regimens similar to those used for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) not associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have been used for patients with HIV-associated NHL with less success.
  • In a recent trial, patients with intermediate or high-grade NHL were randomized to either low-dose chemotherapy with methotrexate, bleomycin, doxorubicin, vincristine and dexamethasone (m-BACOD) or to standard-dose m-BACOD with sargramostim (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, GM-CSF).
  • With standard-dose m-BACOD and sargramostim, the percentage of complete remissions was 52% with a median survival of 31 weeks (P=n.s.).
  • Myelosuppression was greater with standard-dose chemotherapy.
  • In univariate and multivariate analyses of 21 pretreatment features of patients in this trial, four factors emerged as adversely prognostic with respect to survival: age >35 years, intravenous drug use, CD4 counts < 100/mm3 and stage III/IV disease.
  • The outcome of these patients may be improving with the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), which seems to improve immune function and tolerance of chemotherapy.
  • A recent trial of the AIDS Malignancy Consortium found that low-dose chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone: CHOP) and standard-dose chemotherapy had similar response rates, acceptable toxicity and minimal alterations in cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and indinavir pharmacokinetics in HIV-associated lymphoma patients also on HAART (stavudine, lamivudine and indinavir).
  • There is a suggestion that Burkitt-type lymphomas may tend to occur in HIV-infected patients with relatively well preserved immune function and CD4 cell counts.
  • Recent results from our institution suggest that similar outcomes are achievable with intensive chemotherapy in patients with Burkitt's lymphomas with or without HIV infection.
  • With improved immune status and improved bone marrow function with the use of HAART, it will probably become more possible to treat many patients with aggressive HIV-associated NHL with more intensive treatment regimens.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / therapy

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  • (PMID = 11785838.001).
  • [ISSN] 0080-0015
  • [Journal-full-title] Recent results in cancer research. Fortschritte der Krebsforschung. Progrès dans les recherches sur le cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Recent Results Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Number-of-references] 19
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13. Lim ST, Levine AM: Recent advances in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related lymphoma. CA Cancer J Clin; 2005 Jul-Aug;55(4):229-41; 260-1, 264
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Recent advances in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related lymphoma.
  • Human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients are at an increased risk for developing both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma when compared with the general population.
  • With the remarkable decrease in the incidence of opportunistic infections since the availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), acquired immune deficiency syndrome-related lymphoma (ARL) is now the second most common cancer associated with human immunodeficiency virus after Kaposi sarcoma.
  • Apart from the contribution of HAART, this improvement in prognosis can also be attributed to new initiatives in treatment of these patients, such as the use of effective infusional regimens, the feasibility of high-dose therapy with peripheral stem cell rescue for relapsed or refractory disease, and better supportive care.
  • Nonetheless, several controversial issues persist, including the optimal timing of HAART with combination chemotherapy, the role of rituximab when incorporated into treatment regimens, and the optimal therapy for patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related Burkitt lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / drug therapy. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / physiopathology
  • [MeSH-minor] AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections. Drug Administration Schedule. Humans. Incidence. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation. Prevalence. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 16020424.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-9235
  • [Journal-full-title] CA: a cancer journal for clinicians
  • [ISO-abbreviation] CA Cancer J Clin
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 52
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14. Molina A, Krishnan AY, Nademanee A, Zabner R, Sniecinski I, Zaia J, Forman SJ: High dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation for human immunodeficiency virus-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Cancer; 2000 Aug 1;89(3):680-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] High dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation for human immunodeficiency virus-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy.
  • BACKGROUND: The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has allowed the exploration of more dose-intensive therapy such as autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in selected patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).
  • METHODS: The authors report on the use of myeloablative chemotherapy with ASCT in two HIV positive patients with NHL.
  • The first patient underwent ASCT at the time of first disease remission for poor risk, diffuse, large cell NHL and the second patient had multiply recurrent, chemosensitive Burkitt lymphoma.
  • RESULTS: The target dose of >/= 5 x 10(6)/kg CD34 positive peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) utilized for ASCT was collected using granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) after chemotherapy for mobilization while both patients were receiving concomitant HAART for HIV infection.
  • Both patients remained in clinical disease remission from their lymphoma at 28 months and 20 months after transplant, respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: ASCT is feasible in patients with HIV-associated NHL.
  • Adequate numbers of CD34 positive PBSC can be procured from patients receiving HAART and chemotherapy for NHL.
  • Selected patients with HIV-related lymphoma can tolerate the high dose CBV myeloablative chemotherapy regimen without increased acute regimen-related toxicity.
  • Given the poor prognosis of patients with HIV-associated NHL treated with conventional chemotherapy, further investigation of this approach should be considered.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Anti-HIV Agents / therapeutic use. Antigens, CD34. CD4 Lymphocyte Count. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / administration & dosage. HIV Infections / complications. HIV Infections / drug therapy. HIV Infections / immunology. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization. Humans. Male. Transplantation, Autologous. Viral Load

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2000 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 10931469.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / AI38592; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA30206; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA33572
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-HIV Agents; 0 / Antigens, CD34; 143011-72-7 / Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor
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15. Bibas M, Antinori A: EBV and HIV-Related Lymphoma. Mediterr J Hematol Infect Dis; 2009;1(2):e2009032

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] EBV and HIV-Related Lymphoma.
  • HIV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders represent a heterogeneous group of diseases, arising in the presence of HIV-associated immunodeficiency.
  • The overall prevalence of HIV-associated lymphoma is significantly higher compared to that of the general population and it continues to be relevant even after the wide availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) (1).
  • It has been largely implicated in the development of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders as Burkitt lymphoma (BL), Hodgkin disease (HD), systemic non Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NC).
  • Virus-associated lymphomas are becoming of significant concern for the mortality of long-lived HIV immunocompromised patients, and therefore, research of advanced strategies for AIDS-related lymphomas is an important field in cancer chemotherapy.
  • Detailed understanding of the EBV lifecycle and related cancers at the molecular level is required for novel strategies of molecular-targeted cancer chemotherapy The linkage of HIV-related lymphoma with EBV infection of the tumor clone has several pathogenetic, prognostic and possibly therapeutic implications which are reviewed herein.

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  • (PMID = 21416008.001).
  • [ISSN] 2035-3006
  • [Journal-full-title] Mediterranean journal of hematology and infectious diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mediterr J Hematol Infect Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3033170
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16. Tirelli U, Spina M, Jaeger U, Nigra E, Blanc PL, Liberati AM, Benci A, Sparano JA: Infusional CDE with rituximab for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: preliminary results of a phase I/II study. Recent Results Cancer Res; 2002;159:149-53
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Infusional CDE with rituximab for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: preliminary results of a phase I/II study.
  • iCDE) is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic regimen for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), with a complete remission rate of 46% and a median overall survival of 8.2 months (Sparano JA, Blood 1993; 81:2810).
  • Since the majority of HIV-associated NHL are CD20-positive we reasoned that the addition of rituximab to iCDE (R-iCDE) could also improve the poor outcome of these patients.
  • Thirty patients with aggressive HIV-associated NHL were enrolled between June 1998 and October 2000.
  • Characteristics of 29 evaluable patients were: median age: 38 years (range 29-65 years); male sex 24/29; histology: DLCL 16 (55%), Burkitt 10 (35%), ALCL 2 (7%), unclassified 1 (3%); stage: I (35%), II (10%), III (10%), IV (45%); International Prognostic Index: 0, 1 (59%), 2 (24%), 3 (17%), 4, 5 (0); CD4 count: median 132/ mm3 (range 3-470/mm3).
  • All patients were treated with G-CSF and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).
  • Twenty-six of 29 patients received treatment as planned, while chemotherapy had to be discontinued in three patients (2 persistent thrombocytopenias, 1 cerebral hemorrhage).
  • These findings suggest that the combination of rituximab with iCDE in patients with HIV-associated NHL is safe and feasible and that the addition of the anti-CD20 antibody does not increase the risk for infections.
  • The high complete remission rate also indicates a potential therapeutic benefit and warrants further randomized trials.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cyclophosphamide / therapeutic use. Doxorubicin / therapeutic use. Etoposide / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Disease-Free Survival. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Middle Aged. Rituximab. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11785839.001).
  • [ISSN] 0080-0015
  • [Journal-full-title] Recent results in cancer research. Fortschritte der Krebsforschung. Progrès dans les recherches sur le cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Recent Results Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase I; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; ACE protocol 1
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17. Ferry JA: Burkitt's lymphoma: clinicopathologic features and differential diagnosis. Oncologist; 2006 Apr;11(4):375-83
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  • [Title] Burkitt's lymphoma: clinicopathologic features and differential diagnosis.
  • Burkitt's lymphoma is a highly aggressive lymphoma identified and described in the last century by Denis Burkitt in Africa, in areas endemic for malaria.
  • Since its description in African children, it has been recognized outside areas with endemic malaria, frequently also in children as well as among individuals with an underlying immunodeficiency.
  • Since its initial designation as Burkitt's lymphoma, this type of lymphoma and lymphomas closely resembling it have received a variety of names in different classifications of lymphomas and leukemias: undifferentiated lymphoma, Burkitt's and non-Burkitt's type in the modified Rappaport Classification, malignant lymphoma, small non-cleaved cell, Burkitt's type in the Working Formulation, Burkitt's lymphoma and high-grade B-cell lymphoma, Burkitt-like in the REAL Classification, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia, L3 type in the FAB Classification.
  • With the publication of the WHO Classification of Haematopoietic and Lymphoid Tumors, the nomenclature of this lymphoma has come full circle, and it is once again known simply as Burkitt's lymphoma.
  • In recent years, efforts have focused on improving therapy for this rapidly proliferating neoplasm while minimizing, to the extent possible, treatment-associated toxicity.
  • These efforts have led to the development of high-intensity, short-duration combination chemotherapy that has proven extremely effective for a high proportion of Burkitt's lymphoma patients.
  • The differential diagnosis of Burkitt's lymphoma is broad, and precise diagnosis based on histologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic features remains the critical first step in planning appropriate therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Burkitt Lymphoma / pathology


18. Ghez D, Oksenhendler E, Scieux C, Lassoued K: Haemorrhagic cystitis associated with adenovirus in a patient with AIDS treated for a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Am J Hematol; 2000 Jan;63(1):32-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Haemorrhagic cystitis associated with adenovirus in a patient with AIDS treated for a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • We report here on an HIV-positive patient treated for a Burkitt's lymphoma who developed gross haematuria associated with fever and burning urination.
  • Usual causes of haematuria were ruled out: lithiasis, urinary tract lesions, glomerulonephritis, mycobacterium and schistosoma infections, and drug toxicity.
  • Because BK/JC virus shedding is very common (75%) in HIV patients receiving chemotherapy, our data strongly suggest that adenovirus was responsible for the haemorrhagic cystitis in our patient.
  • In conclusion, adenovirus should be considered as a potential cause of haemorrhagic cystitis in AIDS patients whose immunosuppression is aggravated by cytotoxic drugs.
  • [MeSH-major] Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome / complications. Adenoviridae Infections / complications. Burkitt Lymphoma / complications. Cystitis / virology. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / complications

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 10602165.001).
  • [ISSN] 0361-8609
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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19. Behler CM, Kaplan LD: Advances in the management of HIV-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Curr Opin Oncol; 2006 Sep;18(5):437-43
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Advances in the management of HIV-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Human immunodeficiency virus infection is associated with an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
  • Even with a decrease in AIDS-defining illnesses after the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy, HIV-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma remains an important problem.
  • RECENT FINDINGS: Low CD4+ T-lymphocyte count, disease stage, performance status, serum lactate dehydrogenase, and number of extranodal sites of disease are all important prognostic factors for HIV-non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
  • Recent studies have examined the role of infusional chemotherapy, as well as immunotherapy, in the treatment of aggressive HIV-non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and autologous stem cell transplantation for relapsed or refractory HIV-non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
  • New developments in the association of viral infection and pathogenesis of certain subtypes of HIV-non-Hodgkin lymphoma have also recently been reported.
  • SUMMARY: Outcomes of HIV-non-Hodgkin lymphoma are improving with the routine use of highly active antiretroviral therapy and combination chemotherapy.
  • For aggressive HIV-non-Hodgkin lymphoma, infusional chemotherapy regimens are well tolerated and lead to complete response in about 50-75% of cases and a 2-3 years overall survival of 40-60%.
  • The potential benefit of adding rituximab to combination chemotherapy may be offset by infectious complications in severely immunosuppressed patients.
  • HIV-associated Burkitt lymphoma should be treated with an intensive regimen rather than standard cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone-like chemotherapy.
  • Autologous stem cell transplantation should be considered for selected patients with relapsed or refractory HIV-non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Retroviral Agents / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / therapy. Stem Cell Transplantation

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  • (PMID = 16894290.001).
  • [ISSN] 1040-8746
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Retroviral Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 65
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20. Thielen C, Herens C, Fassotte MF, Detrooz E, Drion P, Diss T, Boniver J, de Leval L: Establishment and characterisation of two novel human KSHV- and EBV-negative Burkitt cell lines, GAL-01 and GAL-02, from a primary lymphomatous effusion. Eur J Haematol; 2006 Oct;77(4):318-26
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Establishment and characterisation of two novel human KSHV- and EBV-negative Burkitt cell lines, GAL-01 and GAL-02, from a primary lymphomatous effusion.
  • OBJECTIVES: Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is a highly aggressive mature B-cell neoplasm comprising endemic, sporadic and immunodeficiency-associated variants.
  • The in vivo effusion occurred in a very peculiar clinical setting; the patient having a previous history of intestinal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
  • METHODS: The morphologic, immunophenotypic and molecular genetic features of GAL cell lines are reported and compared with those of the parental tumour.
  • The findings clearly demonstrated that the Burkitt effusion did not represent disease progression of the intestinal tumour, but represented a second primary haematological malignancy.
  • GAL cells display the phenotype and genotype of a B-cell lineage (positive for CD20, CD79a and clonal rearrangement of Ig heavy chain), carry the c-MYC rearrangement by t(8;22)(q24;q11) translocation and are characterised by the expression of the germinal centre-associated antigens CD10, BCL6, CD38 and absent to low BCL2 expression.
  • CONCLUSIONS: GAL-01 and GAL-02, two novel EBV-negative human BL cell lines represent a potentially useful experimental model to study the biology of BL possibly including the resistance to chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma / pathology


21. Fluri S, Ammann R, Lüthy AR, Hirt A, Aebi C, Duppenthaler A, Leibundgut K: High-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation for children with HIV-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Pediatr Blood Cancer; 2007 Dec;49(7):984-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] High-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation for children with HIV-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
  • In contrast to adults, autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) as part of the salvage strategy after high-dose chemo/radiotherapy in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) related Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is not yet established for children.
  • We report on a 13-year patient with congenital HIV infection and refractory Burkitt lymphoma, who was successfully treated by high-dose therapy (HDT) including rituximab followed by ASCT.
  • After 26 months follow-up the patient remains in complete remission and his HIV parameters have normalized with continued highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).
  • HIV infection may no longer exclude children from ASCT as part of salvage therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Burkitt Lymphoma / therapy. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / therapy. Transplantation Conditioning
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active / methods. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Follow-Up Studies. HIV Infections / complications. HIV Infections / drug therapy. Humans. Male. Recurrence. Remission Induction. Salvage Therapy. Transplantation, Autologous. Treatment Outcome


22. Oriol A, Ribera JM, Esteve J, Sanz MA, Brunet S, Garcia-Boyero R, Fernández-Abellán P, Martí JM, Abella E, Sánchez-Delgado M, Peñarrubia MJ, Besalduch J, Moreno MJ, Borrego D, Feliu E, Ortega JJ, PETHEMA Group, Spanish Society of Hematology: Lack of influence of human immunodeficiency virus infection status in the response to therapy and survival of adult patients with mature B-cell lymphoma or leukemia. Results of the PETHEMA-LAL3/97 study. Haematologica; 2003 Apr;88(4):445-53
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Lack of influence of human immunodeficiency virus infection status in the response to therapy and survival of adult patients with mature B-cell lymphoma or leukemia. Results of the PETHEMA-LAL3/97 study.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Short, intensive multiagent chemotherapy has resulted in significant progress in Burkitt's lymphoma and leukemia.
  • A protocol was designed to treat all adult patients with mature B-cell lymphoma or leukemia with the aims of comparing the response to therapy and survival with regards to their HIV infection status.
  • DESIGN AND METHODS: Fifty-three adult patients with advanced stage Burkitt's lymphoma or Burkitt's leukemia were treated.
  • Response to therapy, survival and toxicity were evaluated according to their HIV infection status.
  • Only age > 60 years was associated with a lower CR rate (OR 0.18, 95%CI 0.04-0.81, p=0.026).
  • Only age > 60 years was associated with a shorter OS (OR 5.1, 95%CI 2.0-12.7, p=0.001).
  • Age > 60 years was the only identified factor associated with a shorter DFS (OR 5.2, 95%CI 1.4-20, p=0.015).
  • INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms the effectiveness of intensive strategies in adult patients with advanced stage Burkitt's lymphoma or leukemia.
  • Advanced age proved to be the main adverse prognostic factor for response to therapy and survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Burkitt Lymphoma / complications. Burkitt Lymphoma / drug therapy. HIV Infections / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / toxicity. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Remission Induction. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12681972.001).
  • [ISSN] 0390-6078
  • [Journal-full-title] Haematologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Haematologica
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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23. Pereira CM, Lopes AP, Meneghini AJ, Silva GB, Monteiro MC, Botelho Tde L: Burkitt's lymphoma in a young Brazilian boy. Malays J Pathol; 2010 Jun;32(1):59-64
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Burkitt's lymphoma in a young Brazilian boy.
  • Burkitt's lymphoma is not an uncommon malignancy in the paediatric population.
  • It is a high-grade non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma which may present as endemic, sporadic and human immunodeficiency-associated subtypes.
  • The African, or endemic, variant usually involves the maxilla and other facial bones while head and neck manifestations in sporadic Burkitt's lymphoma are rare.
  • We described a case of oral Burkitt's lymphoma involving the right jaw in a 4-year-old boy.
  • The patient presented with a rapidly-enlarging swelling of one month duration, toothache-like pain and radiographical appearance of 'floating teeth' in the right mandible.
  • Tumour remission was achieved with six cycles of chemotherapy with the CHOP regime.
  • [MeSH-major] Burkitt Lymphoma / pathology. Mandibular Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antigens, CD20 / biosynthesis. Antigens, CD3 / biosynthesis. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Brazil. Child, Preschool. Cyclophosphamide / therapeutic use. Doxorubicin / therapeutic use. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Neprilysin / biosynthesis. Prednisone / therapeutic use. Vincristine / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 20614728.001).
  • [ISSN] 0126-8635
  • [Journal-full-title] The Malaysian journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Malays J Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Malaysia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD20; 0 / Antigens, CD3; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; EC 3.4.24.11 / Neprilysin; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; CHOP protocol
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24. Cornejo-Juárez P, Volkow-Fernández P, Avilés-Salas A, Calderón-Flores E: AIDS and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Experience at an oncological center in Mexico. Rev Invest Clin; 2008 Sep-Oct;60(5):375-81
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] AIDS and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Experience at an oncological center in Mexico.
  • BACKGROUND: Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) associated with HIV became an AIDS-defining condition early in the epidemic and remains the second most common malignancy in patients with AIDS.
  • With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the incidence and mortality of AIDS-related opportunistic infections and Kaposi's sarcoma has fallen dramatically, this trend is not observed so clearly for NHL.
  • Our objective was to review the clinical spectrum of patients with AIDS-associated NHL and to analyze the impact of HAART on survival at an oncological tertiary center.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: We reviewed all medical records and histopathologic tissue of patients with HIV-associated NHL seen from January 1990 to September 2007 at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia in Mexico City.
  • Survival or follow-up time was calculated from date of diagnosis to death, or to the date on which the patient was last seen.
  • RESULTS: Eighty seven HIV-positive patients were diagnosed with NHL (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma n=69; Burkitt-like n=8; pleomorphic large cell n=7; low-grade n=2, and angiocentric n=1).
  • Overall, 38 patients (43.7%) achieved complete response to NHL therapy, including only 14.3% patients in the non-HAART compared with 57.6% in the HAART group (p < or = 0.0001).
  • Mean survival time for all patients was 11 +/- 16.8 months.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Patients with NHL-HIV who were able to receive treatment with HAART and were sufficiently healthy to receive optimal chemotherapy treatment showed a significantly better prognosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Cancer Care Facilities / statistics & numerical data. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / epidemiology. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / epidemiology. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome / drug therapy. Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Male. Mexico / epidemiology. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19227434.001).
  • [ISSN] 0034-8376
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista de investigación clínica; organo del Hospital de Enfermedades de la Nutrición
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev. Invest. Clin.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Mexico
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25. Kirk O, Pedersen C, Cozzi-Lepri A, Antunes F, Miller V, Gatell JM, Katlama C, Lazzarin A, Skinhøj P, Barton SE, EuroSIDA Study Group: Non-Hodgkin lymphoma in HIV-infected patients in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Blood; 2001 Dec 1;98(12):3406-12
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Non-Hodgkin lymphoma in HIV-infected patients in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy.
  • This study was designed to assess the influence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) among patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).
  • Within EuroSIDA, a multicenter observational cohort of more than 8500 patients from across Europe, the incidences of NHL and subtypes (Burkitt, immunoblastic, primary brain lymphoma [PBL], and other/unknown histology) were determined according to calendar time of follow-up, and for those who initiated HAART (> or =3 drugs) also time on HAART.
  • In an adjusted Cox model for patients on HAART, the latest CD4 cell count and plasma viral load were both significantly associated with diagnosis of NHL; the relative hazard was 1.39 (range, 1.14-1.69) per 50% lower CD4 cell count, and 1.51 (range, 1.21-1.88) per 1 log higher plasma viral load.
  • [MeSH-major] Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome / complications. Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome / drug therapy. Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Brain Neoplasms / complications. Brain Neoplasms / epidemiology. Burkitt Lymphoma / complications. Burkitt Lymphoma / epidemiology. CD4 Lymphocyte Count. Cohort Studies. Female. Humans. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / complications. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / epidemiology. Male. Prospective Studies


26. Kenyon C, Pillay K, Jacobs P: Castleman's disease and retroviral therapy. Transfus Apher Sci; 2007 Aug;37(1):81-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Castleman's disease and retroviral therapy.
  • The escalating pandemic of the acquired immunodeficiency disease in sub-Saharan Africa is associated with an increasing incidence of the lymphoproliferative disorders where evidence shows that highly active retroviral therapy can reconstitute immunologic competence and, at least in some groups exemplified by Kaposi's sarcoma, result in an outcome comparable to uninfected controls.
  • Paradoxically other subtypes are less responsive exemplified by Burkitt lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease, where they are localised and may present after starting treatment.
  • This association provides a model to test the concept that pathogenesis may reflect an aberrant response to antigens including human herpesvirus-8 thereby renewing focus on proactive inclusion of anti-herpes drugs with conventional treatment for retrovirus particularly prior to initiating chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome / complications. Giant Lymph Node Hyperplasia / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Africa South of the Sahara. Burkitt Lymphoma / epidemiology. Burkitt Lymphoma / etiology. Burkitt Lymphoma / pathology. Fatal Outcome. Female. Herpesvirus 8, Human. Humans. Models, Biological. Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors / administration & dosage. Sarcoma, Kaposi / epidemiology. Sarcoma, Kaposi / etiology. Sarcoma, Kaposi / pathology. Tuberculosis, Pulmonary / complications. Tuberculosis, Pulmonary / drug therapy. Tuberculosis, Pulmonary / epidemiology. Tuberculosis, Pulmonary / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17931977.001).
  • [ISSN] 1473-0502
  • [Journal-full-title] Transfusion and apheresis science : official journal of the World Apheresis Association : official journal of the European Society for Haemapheresis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transfus. Apher. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors
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27. Northup JK, Gadre SA, Ge Y, Lockhart LH, Velagaleti GV: Do cytogenetic abnormalities precede morphologic abnormalities in a developing malignant condition? Eur J Haematol; 2007 Feb;78(2):152-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Do cytogenetic abnormalities precede morphologic abnormalities in a developing malignant condition?
  • Cytogenetic evaluation of bone marrow and neoplastic tissues plays a critical role in determining patient management and prognosis.
  • Here, we highlight two cases in which the cytogenetic studies challenge the common practice of using hematologic and morphologic changes as key factors in malignant disease management.
  • The first case is that of a lymph node sample from a 40-yr-old non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patient sent for determination of disease progress.
  • Cytogenetic studies of lymph node showed multiple clonal abnormalities, most notably a der(18) from a t(14;18) which is associated with high-grade NHL.
  • After two cycles of chemotherapy with fludarabine, the patient did not show any clinical response, suggesting possible progression to high-grade lymphoma.
  • The second case is of a patient with a history of human immunodeficiency virus and blastic natural killer leukemia/lymphoma.
  • Hematologic studies of ascitic fluid classified the patient as having pleural effusion lymphoma whereas bone marrow analysis showed no malignancy.
  • Bone marrow cytogenetic studies showed multiple clonal abnormalities including a t(8;14), which is commonly associated with Burkitt's lymphoma (BL).
  • To our knowledge, this is the first case wherein a morphologically normal bone marrow showed presence of clonal abnormalities consistent with BL or Pleural effusion lymphoma.
  • After two cycles of CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) chemotherapy, the patient's general condition and ascitis improved and she was discharged.
  • These studies clearly demonstrate that genetic changes often precede morphologic changes in a developing malignant condition.
  • [MeSH-major] Burkitt Lymphoma / genetics. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / genetics. Lymphoma, Follicular / genetics. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / genetics. Translocation, Genetic
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bone Marrow / pathology. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 12 / ultrastructure. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 14 / genetics. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 14 / ultrastructure. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18 / genetics. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18 / ultrastructure. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8 / genetics. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8 / ultrastructure. Chromosomes, Human, X. Clone Cells / pathology. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Disease Progression. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Genes, myc. Humans. Karyotyping. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Male. Mutagenesis, Insertional. Pleural Effusion, Malignant / drug therapy. Pleural Effusion, Malignant / genetics. Pleural Effusion, Malignant / pathology. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Rituximab. Trisomy. Vidarabine / administration & dosage. Vidarabine / analogs & derivatives. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 17313561.001).
  • [ISSN] 0902-4441
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; FA2DM6879K / Vidarabine; P2K93U8740 / fludarabine; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; CHOP protocol
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28. De Meester J, Calvez R, Valitutti S, Dupré L: The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein regulates CTL cytotoxicity and is required for efficient killing of B cell lymphoma targets. J Leukoc Biol; 2010 Nov;88(5):1031-40
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein regulates CTL cytotoxicity and is required for efficient killing of B cell lymphoma targets.
  • WAS is a primary immunodeficiency as a result of mutations in the gene encoding the WASP, a key actin regulator of hematopoietic cells.
  • Whether killing defects in CD8(+) CTLs contribute to WAS-associated immunodeficiency and susceptibility to tumor development remains to be explored.
  • Importantly, the use of a gene therapy lentiviral vector was sufficient to restore efficient cytotoxic activity.
  • [MeSH-minor] B-Lymphocytes / immunology. Burkitt Lymphoma / genetics. Burkitt Lymphoma / immunology. CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes / drug effects. CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes / immunology. Cell Line. Cytokines / genetics. Cytokines / metabolism. Down-Regulation. Flow Cytometry. Humans. Interleukin-2 / immunology. Lymphocyte Activation / immunology. Lymphoma, B-Cell / genetics. Lymphoma, B-Cell / immunology. Microscopy, Confocal. Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell / genetics. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / immunology. Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome / genetics. Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome / immunology

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  • (PMID = 20689099.001).
  • [ISSN] 1938-3673
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of leukocyte biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Leukoc. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Interleukin-2; 0 / Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; 0 / Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein
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29. Martín Ibáñez I, Arce Casas A, Cruz Martínez O, Estella Aguado J, Martín Mateos MA: Humoral immunity in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Allergol Immunopathol (Madr); 2003 Nov-Dec;31(6):303-10
NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: Cancer and its treatment are a major cause of secondary immunodeficiency in childhood.
  • The objectives of this study are to describe the epidemiology of children with ALL in our hospital and to analyse the evolution of immunoglobulins' concentration at leukaemia's onset, during its treatment and after finishing it.
  • We analysed clinical data and laboratory results (IgG, IgA and IgM concentration) at leukaemia's onset, during its treatment and until 12 months after it.1.
  • During treatment there was a significant decrease in immunoglobulins'concentration, being IgM the most affected (65 % of patients), followed by IgG (53 % of patients).
  • The mean normalization time of immunoglobulins was 12 months.2.
  • During treatment there was a decrease in all immunoglobulins, which was significant for IgG.
  • IgG and IgM decreased in all patients during relapse's treatment.
  • Two patients had a favourable evolution, having a decrease in immunoglobulins'concentration during treatment, significant for IgM, with normalization 6 months after treatment.
  • The rest 3 patients relapsed and died, having a global immunoglobulins'deficit during treatment and previous to death.
  • During treatment the majority of patients have immunoglobulins' deficiency, being IgG and IgM the most affected immunoglobulins.
  • A persistent IgM deficit is associated in our series with a higher risk of relapse and death.
  • In patients with a good outcome immunoglobulins normalize before one year after treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Agammaglobulinemia / etiology. Antibody Formation. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Burkitt Lymphoma / complications. Burkitt Lymphoma / drug therapy. Burkitt Lymphoma / immunology. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunoglobulin A / blood. Immunoglobulin G / blood. Immunoglobulin M / blood. Infant. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell / complications. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell / drug therapy. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell / immunology. Male. Retrospective Studies. Spain / epidemiology. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 14670284.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-0546
  • [Journal-full-title] Allergologia et immunopathologia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Allergol Immunopathol (Madr)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunoglobulin A; 0 / Immunoglobulin G; 0 / Immunoglobulin M
  • [Number-of-references] 11
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30. Zou P, Kawada J, Pesnicak L, Cohen JI: Bortezomib induces apoptosis of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cells and prolongs survival of mice inoculated with EBV-transformed B cells. J Virol; 2007 Sep;81(18):10029-36
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Bortezomib, an inhibitor of the 26S proteasome, is currently approved for treatment of multiple myeloma and is being studied for therapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • We found that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive B cells with type III latency were more susceptible to killing by bortezomib than those with type I latency.
  • Bortezomib induced apoptosis of EBV lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) by inducing cleavage of caspases 8 and 9; apoptosis was inhibited by pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor.
  • Finally, bortezomib significantly prolonged the survival of severe combined immunodeficiency mice inoculated with LCLs.
  • These findings suggest that bortezomib may represent a novel strategy for the treatment of certain EBV-associated lymphomas.

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  • (PMID = 17626072.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-538X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of virology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Virol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / Intramural NIH HHS / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / BCL2L1 protein, human; 0 / BIRC3 protein, human; 0 / Boronic Acids; 0 / EBV-associated membrane antigen, Epstein-Barr virus; 0 / Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins; 0 / NF-kappa B p50 Subunit; 0 / Proteasome Inhibitors; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2; 0 / Pyrazines; 0 / Transcription Factor RelA; 0 / Viral Matrix Proteins; 0 / X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein; 0 / XIAP protein, human; 0 / bcl-X Protein; 69G8BD63PP / Bortezomib; EC 3.4.22.- / CASP8 protein, human; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspase 8; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspase 9; EC 3.4.25.1 / Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex; EC 3.4.99.- / ATP dependent 26S protease; EC 6.3.2.19 / Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2045383
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