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1. Bishu K, Gricz KM, Chewaka S, Agarwal R: Appropriateness of antihypertensive drug therapy in hemodialysis patients. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol; 2006 Jul;1(4):820-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Appropriateness of antihypertensive drug therapy in hemodialysis patients.
  • The prevalence and treatment of hypertension in hemodialysis (HD) patients exceeds 85% in the United States.
  • Because of uncertainties in the evaluation of BP, it is unclear whether the HD patients who are being treated with medications are truly hypertensive.
  • For ascertainment of the appropriateness of antihypertensive therapy, a prospective study in which antihypertensive drugs were discontinued in HD patients and 44-h interdialytic ambulatory BP monitoring was performed and left ventricular mass and inferior vena cava were measured by echocardiography was conducted.
  • An average of 2.3 medications were tapered and discontinued in 41 black participants (age 56 yr, 46% men, 54% diabetes, duration of dialysis 5.3 yr).
  • It is concluded that a majority of the treated black hypertensive patients are appropriately receiving therapy for hypertension.
  • Those who have well-controlled home BP and no left ventricular hypertrophy may have a cautious withdrawal of their antihypertensive drugs.
  • [MeSH-major] Antihypertensive Agents / therapeutic use. Hypertension / drug therapy. Renal Dialysis

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  • (PMID = 17699292.001).
  • [ISSN] 1555-905X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin J Am Soc Nephrol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / PHS HHS / / 5R01-NIDDK062030-03
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antihypertensive Agents
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2. Bertolini F, Fusetti L, Mancuso P, Gobbi A, Corsini C, Ferrucci PF, Martinelli G, Pruneri G: Endostatin, an antiangiogenic drug, induces tumor stabilization after chemotherapy or anti-CD20 therapy in a NOD/SCID mouse model of human high-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Blood; 2000 Jul 1;96(1):282-7
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  • [Title] Endostatin, an antiangiogenic drug, induces tumor stabilization after chemotherapy or anti-CD20 therapy in a NOD/SCID mouse model of human high-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
  • Both chemotherapy and chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies are effective agents against B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).
  • To evaluate the effect of the antiangiogenic drug endostatin used alone and after the administration of cyclophosphamide (CTX) or the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab, we generated a new model of human NHL by transplanting Namalwa cells intraperitoneally into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice.
  • First, we determined the most effective treatment schedule for the drugs assessed.
  • When administered alone, CTX (3 courses of 75 mg/kg of body weight given intraperitoneally), rituximab (3 courses of 25 mg/kg given intraperitoneally), and endostatin (5 courses of 50 microg given subcutaneously) delayed tumor growth, and CTX was the most effective in controlling bulky disease.
  • When given after chemotherapy or immunotherapy, endostatin effectively induced tumor stabilization.
  • When mice given CTX or rituximab on days 3, 5, and 7 after transplantation were randomly assigned to receive endostatin or phosphate-buffered saline on days 15 to 19, tumor growth was prevented in endostatin-treated mice as long as the drug was administered.
  • The specific antiangiogenic action of endostatin was confirmed by in vitro and in vivo studies indicating that the drug inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis of endothelial (but not of NHL) cells.
  • In conclusion, sequential administration of chemotherapy and endostatin seems promising for treating bulky NHL, and the less toxic sequential administration of rituximab and endostatin is promising for treating limited disease. (
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Burkitt Lymphoma / drug therapy. Collagen / therapeutic use. Peptide Fragments / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Antigens, CD20 / immunology. Apoptosis / drug effects. Cyclophosphamide / therapeutic use. Endostatins. Endothelium, Vascular / drug effects. Endothelium, Vascular / pathology. Humans. Mice. Mice, Inbred NOD. Mice, SCID. Rituximab. Transplantation, Heterologous. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 10891463.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-4971
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Antigens, CD20; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Endostatins; 0 / Peptide Fragments; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; 9007-34-5 / Collagen
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3. Honda T, Soejima H, Honda T: Long-term low-dose cibenzoline in patients with chronic renal failure undergoing hemodialysis. Jpn Circ J; 2000 Jan;64(1):72-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Long-term low-dose cibenzoline in patients with chronic renal failure undergoing hemodialysis.
  • Because most anti-arrhythmic drugs are eliminated from the kidney, anti-arrhythmic drug therapy is largely restricted in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD).
  • Cibenzoline is a widely used antiarrhythmic drug excreted mainly from the kidney.
  • The present study evaluated the safety and efficacy of reduced doses of cibenzoline (25 and 50 mg/day chronically) in 8 patients with maintenance HD.
  • Cibenzoline was administered for more than 3 months without any problems in 7 of the 8 patients, although the medication was discontinued in 1 patient due to nausea and anorexia.
  • In conclusion, low doses of cibenzoline are safe and effective in patients undergoing maintenance HD.
  • However, intermittent monitoring is essential to ensure therapeutic drug concentrations.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Arrhythmia Agents / therapeutic use. Arrhythmias, Cardiac / drug therapy. Imidazoles / therapeutic use. Kidney Failure, Chronic / therapy. Renal Dialysis / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Atrial Fibrillation / drug therapy. Atrial Fibrillation / etiology. Atrial Fibrillation / prevention & control. Atrial Flutter / drug therapy. Atrial Flutter / etiology. Atrial Flutter / prevention & control. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Electrocardiography, Ambulatory. Female. Heart Ventricles. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 10651210.001).
  • [ISSN] 0047-1828
  • [Journal-full-title] Japanese circulation journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Jpn. Circ. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] AUSTRALIA
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Arrhythmia Agents; 0 / Imidazoles; Z7489237QT / cifenline
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4. Grillo-López AJ, Hedrick E, Rashford M, Benyunes M: Rituximab: Ongoing and future clinical development. Semin Oncol; 2002 Feb;29(1S2):105-112
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Rituximab: Ongoing and future clinical development.
  • Monoclonal antibodies have been used as therapeutic agents for many years.
  • In 1997, rituximab (Rituxan; Genentech, Inc, South San Francisco, CA, and IDEC Pharmaceuticals, San Diego, CA) became the first monoclonal antibody to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for a cancer indication.
  • The use of rituximab in the treatment of low-grade or follicular, relapsed, or refractory CD20-positive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was approved in November 1997 for United States marketing under the trade name Rituxan.
  • In June 1998, rituximab was approved for all European Union countries under the trade name MabThera as therapy for patients with stage III/IV, follicular, chemoresistant, or relapsed (≥ 2 relapses) non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • Rituximab served to heighten interest in the therapeutic applications of monoclonal antibodies.
  • Literally dozens of antibodies are currently under investigation for a variety of malignant and non-neoplastic indications.
  • The US Food and Drug Administration approved a new (revised) package insert in early 2001.
  • A significant amount of clinical research has been performed over the past 9 years, which has served to further our understanding of the potential clinical applications for this novel therapeutic agent.
  • Ongoing and future clinical trials are reviewed in this article.
  • However, much remains to be accomplished in key areas such as combinations with chemotherapy, biologics (including other antibodies), and radiotherapy/radioimmunotherapy; its role within multimodality regimens; and other malignant (beyond low-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) and nonmalignant applications.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2002 W.B. Saunders Company. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28140083.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-8708
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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5. German Low Grade Lymphoma Study Group, Hiddemann W, Dreyling M, Unterhalt M: Rituximab plus chemotherapy in follicular and mantle cell lymphomas. Semin Oncol; 2003 Feb;30(1S2):16-20

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Rituximab plus chemotherapy in follicular and mantle cell lymphomas.
  • Rituximab shows high single-agent activity in both previously untreated and relapsed or refractory indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • In combination with chemotherapy, rituximab has achieved response rates higher than 90% with long duration of remission in phase II studies.
  • Therefore, randomized phase III studies have been undertaken to determine whether rituximab plus chemotherapy can significantly improve outcomes compared with conventional chemotherapy in indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • A study by the German Low-Grade Study Group has evaluated rituximab in combination with FCM (fludarabine/cyclophosphamide/mitoxantrone) in a randomized setting versus FCM alone in patients with relapsed or refractory follicular, mantle cell, or lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma.
  • Superiority of rituximab plus FCM was seen in both follicular lymphoma (n = 53; ORR 92% v 75%; CR 40% v 21%) and, most strikingly, in mantle cell lymphoma (n = 38; ORR 65% v 33; CR 35% v 0%).
  • A trend towards longer overall and disease-free survival for rituximab plus FCM has been observed, but longer follow-up is required.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28140216.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-8708
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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6. Coiffier B: Effective Immunochemotherapy For Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma. Semin Oncol; 2004 Feb;31 Suppl 2:7-11
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effective Immunochemotherapy For Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.
  • In the past, CHOP chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone) was considered the gold standard treatment for aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL).
  • CHOP is only curative in approximately 40% of patients, and numerous clinical trials have been carried out to find a treatment that can increase the cure rate.
  • For some patients with aggressive NHL, it is possible to improve survival by intensification of chemotherapy compared with standard CHOP.
  • Early high-dose treatment/autologous stem cell transplantation may be beneficial for some patients, but not in patients with low-risk disease or those over 60 years of age who are not eligible for autologous stem cell transplantation.
  • The most striking and consistent improvement over CHOP chemotherapy in the treatment of aggressive NHL is the addition of rituximab.
  • A phase III randomized study Groupe d'Etudes des Lymphomes de l'Adulte (GELA LNH 98.5) compared rituximab plus CHOP with CHOP alone in treatment of 399 patients aged 60 to 80 years of age with aggressive NHL.
  • The benefits of adding rituximab to CHOP were not restricted to a subgroup of patients, but were evident in patients with high- and low-risk disease.
  • The addition of rituximab to CHOP also overcame bcl-2-associated resistance to chemotherapy.
  • There is no standard chemotherapy regimen for relapsed patients, but results from several single-arm studies suggest the addition of rituximab will increase the complete response rate to many different salvage regimens.
  • The development of newer treatment strategies incorporating rituximab may improve the cure rate further.

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  • (PMID = 28140109.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-8708
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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7. Tong Y, Hou H: The alteration of QT dispersion in hemodialysis subjects. Kidney Blood Press Res; 2006;29(4):231-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVE: We attempted to observe the alterations in QTd and QTcd in chronic renal failure (CRF) patients before and after hemodialysis (HD) to determine the relevant determinants of QTc duration in HD.
  • METHODS: The HD was carried out 2 or 3 times/week in a standard setting for 4-4.5 h.
  • No drug therapy was applied during HD, except for isotonic NaCl infusions and sodium heparin.
  • Maintenance drug therapy, including digitalis, antihypertensive, anti-anginal, and beta-blocking agents, was not changed.
  • In the study, we investigated the alterations in QTd and QTcd in 68 CRF patients before and after HD with 12-lead ECG.
  • Plasma Na(+), K(+), ionized Ca, creatinine, urea nitrogen, and hemoglobin were also controlled before and after HD.
  • RESULTS: In our study QTd and QTcd significantly increased at the end of HD (p < 0.01).
  • Plasma Na(+) and K(+) decreased, and ionized Ca increased after HD (p < 0.05, 0.01).
  • Plasma Na(+), K(+), ionized Ca levels, ultrafiltration volume and myocardial ischemia appear to be the main determinants of QTc duration in HD, not hypertension, gender, patient age, or duration of chronic HD.
  • CONCLUSION: Changes in plasma Na(+), K(+) and ionized Ca, the ultrafiltration volume and presence of ischemic heart disease in HD have significant effects on QTcd.
  • ECG data demonstrate that the risk of arrhythmia could be higher with decreased plasma Na(+) and K(+), increased ionized Ca, the presence of ischemic heart disease and an increased ultrafiltration rate during HD.
  • These results might provide some valuable references for proper HD programs.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Failure, Chronic / complications. Kidney Failure, Chronic / therapy. Long QT Syndrome / etiology. Renal Dialysis / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 16960462.001).
  • [ISSN] 1420-4096
  • [Journal-full-title] Kidney & blood pressure research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Kidney Blood Press. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 9NEZ333N27 / Sodium; RWP5GA015D / Potassium; SY7Q814VUP / Calcium
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8. Taler SJ, Textor SC, Augustine JE: Resistant hypertension: comparing hemodynamic management to specialist care. Hypertension; 2002 May;39(5):982-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Hypertension represents an imbalance of hemodynamic forces within the circulation, usually characterized by elevated systemic vascular resistance.
  • We studied the utility of serial hemodynamic parameters in the selection and titration of antihypertensive medication in resistant hypertensive patients using highly reproducible noninvasive measurements by thoracic bioimpedance.
  • Resistant hypertension patients (n=104) were randomized to drug selection based either on serial hemodynamic (HD) measurements and a predefined algorithm or on drug selection directed by a hypertension specialist (SC) in a 3-month intensive treatment program.
  • Blood pressure was lowered by intensified drug therapy in both treatment groups (169+/-3/87+/-2 to 139+/-2/72+/-1 mm Hg HD versus 173+/-3/91+/-2 to 147+/-2/79+/-1 mm Hg SC, P<0.01 for systolic and diastolic BP), using similar numbers and intensity of antihypertensive medications.
  • Blood pressures were reduced further for those treated according to hemodynamic measurements, resulting in improved control rates (56% HD versus 33% SC controlled to </=140/90 mm Hg, P<0.05) and incremental reduction in systemic vascular resistance measurements.
  • Our results demonstrate superior blood pressure control using a treatment algorithm and serial hemodynamic measurements compared with clinical judgment alone in a randomized prospective study.
  • Our measurements of thoracic fluid volume support occult volume expansion as a mediator of antihypertensive drug resistance and use of impedance measurements to guide advancing diuretic dose and adjustment of multidrug antihypertensive treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Antihypertensive Agents / therapeutic use. Blood Pressure / drug effects. Hypertension / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenergic beta-Antagonists / therapeutic use. Aged. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Calcium Channel Blockers / therapeutic use. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Heart Rate / drug effects. Hemodynamics / drug effects. Humans. Male. Nursing Care. Treatment Outcome. Vascular Resistance / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 12019280.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4563
  • [Journal-full-title] Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hypertension
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic beta-Antagonists; 0 / Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Antihypertensive Agents; 0 / Calcium Channel Blockers
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9. Hillmen P: Advancing Therapy For Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia-the Role Of Rituximab. Semin Oncol; 2004 Feb;31 Suppl 2:22-26

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Advancing Therapy For Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia-the Role Of Rituximab.
  • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) remains incurable despite decades of clinical trials.
  • Some patients survive for long periods without requiring definitive therapy, while others die rapidly despite intensive treatment.
  • Because most patients with CLL express CD20 on their malignant cells, the chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab has been incorporated into treatment regimens in efforts to improve outcome.
  • Rituximab monotherapy has limited activity in previously untreated and refractory/relapsed CLL patients with response rates that are generally lower than those seen in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • Although increased dosing intensity and frequency leads to higher response rates than seen in patients treated with standard dose rituximab, responses are almost always partial remissions and the doses used are not feasible in routine clinical practice.
  • On the other hand, combining rituximab with chemotherapy has proved to be feasible and appears to be synergistic with fludarabine-based chemotherapy in the treatment of CLL on the basis of recent phase II trials.
  • In these studies, response rates (including complete remissions) to rituximab in combination with fludarabine-containing regimens are higher than those reported in similar phase II studies with any other treatment regime.

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  • (PMID = 28140106.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-8708
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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10. Enblad G, Gustavsson A, Sundström C, Glimelius B: Patients above Sixty Years Lymphoma Treated with a New Strategy of Age with Hodgkin's. Acta Oncol; 2002;41(7-8):659-667

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Patients above Sixty Years Lymphoma Treated with a New Strategy of Age with Hodgkin's.
  • In the Swedish National Care Programme for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) a less intensive chemotherapy regimen with individualized dosing (LVPP/OEPA) was introduced in 1989.
  • The CR rates (67% vs. 65%) for patients treated with 6-8 cycles of chemotherapy were also similar in the two time periods.
  • The survival of elderly HL patients was thus not improved from 1985-1988 to 1989-1992.
  • Thus efforts to improve the chemotherapy regimen with individualized dosing did not change the outcome.
  • Many patients experienced myelosuppression and opportunistic infections that may have contributed to the poor treatment results.

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  • (PMID = 28758859.001).
  • [ISSN] 1651-226X
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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11. Hainsworth JD: Prolonging remission with rituximab maintenance therapy. Semin Oncol; 2004 Feb;31 Suppl 2:17-21

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prolonging remission with rituximab maintenance therapy.
  • Maintenance therapy using rituximab is currently under consideration as a means of prolonging remission in patients with indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • A phase II trial using rituximab as first-line therapy followed by maintenance treatment was carried out in patients with previously untreated indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • The overall response rate improved from 47% (7% complete response) after initial treatment to 73% (37% complete response) after maintenance treatment; median progression-free survival was 37 months.
  • A similar study in patients with previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) also showed some improvement in response rates after maintenance therapy and a median progression-free survival of 19 months.
  • The improved remission duration suggested in these phase II trials has been confirmed in a randomized, phase III trial performed by the Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research.
  • Patients with follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who had objective response or stable disease after a standard 4-week course of rituximab were randomized to either observation or further maintenance rituximab treatment.
  • Median event-free survival was longer in patients who received maintenance therapy (23 v 12 months; P = .02).
  • These include optimum schedule/duration, use after initial chemotherapy/rituximab combinations, efficacy versus retreatment at progression, and efficacy in other B-cell neoplasms.

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  • (PMID = 28140104.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-8708
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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12. Czuczman MS, Fallon A, Mohr A, Stewart C, Bernstein ZP, McCarthy P, Skipper M, Brown K, Miller K, Wentling D, Klippenstein D, Loud P, Rock MK, Benyunes M, Grillo-López AJ, Bernstein SH: Rituximab in combination with CHOP or fludarabine in low-grade lymphoma. Semin Oncol; 2002 Feb;29(1S2):36-40
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Rituximab in combination with CHOP or fludarabine in low-grade lymphoma.
  • Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is composed of a group of lymphoid malignancies that has been increasing in incidence at an annual rate of 4% to 7% over the last 20 years in both the United States and Europe.
  • Low-grade and follicular lymphomas account for approximately 40% of the incidences of NHL in the United States.
  • While patients with intermediate- and high-grade lymphomas are potentially curable with combination chemotherapy, low-grade and follicular lymphomas are still considered to be essentially incurable with standard therapy.
  • Although low-grade lymphomas characteristically respond well to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents, the disease typically follows a course of recurrent relapse and progressively shorter remissions, and ultimately death from lymphoma.
  • Median survival for patients with low-grade lymphoma is 6.2 years from diagnosis and just 5 years from time of first relapse.
  • Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed for these patients.
  • One approach to the development of innovative strategies for treatment of NHL has been the generation of monoclonal antibodies to specific B-cell antigens expressed on NHL cells.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2002 W.B. Saunders Company. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28140090.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-8708
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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13. Gisselbrecht C, Mounier N: Improving Second-Line Therapy in Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma. Semin Oncol; 2004 Feb;31 Suppl 2:12-16

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Improving Second-Line Therapy in Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.
  • The prognosis is poor for patients relapsing following treatment with standard chemotherapy for aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • High-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation is a potential curative approach for these patients.
  • The primary aim of second-line therapy is the attainment of a complete response, because response rate is predictive of outcome following autologous stem cell transplantation.
  • A number of strategies have been explored to improve the complete response rate to standard second-line regimens.
  • Ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide (ICE) can offer an improved response rate compared with the standard regimens of dexamethasone, cisplatin, and cytarabine (DHAP) and etoposide, methylprednisolone, high-dose cytarabine, and cisplatin (ESHAP).
  • Because the addition of rituximab to chemotherapy regimens leads to improved complete response rates compared with chemotherapy alone, it should be considered as an important component of second-line regimens for aggressive NHL.

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  • (PMID = 28140103.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-8708
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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14. Seymour JF: New Treatment Approaches To Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma. Semin Oncol; 2004 Feb;31 Suppl 2:27-32

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] New Treatment Approaches To Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.
  • Disseminated indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is considered incurable with conventional chemotherapy regimens, and more than 50% of patients die within 5 years of their first relapse.
  • Therefore, newer treatment approaches have been used to try to improve survival and ultimately provide a cure for patients with disseminated indolent NHL.
  • The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab has been extensively evaluated and is now an integral component of many treatment strategies.
  • The activity of rituximab was first shown in the pivotal trial in patients with relapsed and refractory low-grade and follicular lymphoma.
  • More recent studies have shown somewhat higher activity of rituximab when used first-line, with further improvements with maintenance therapy.
  • Rituximab in combination with chemotherapy has been shown to achieve high response rates, and two prospective randomized studies from the German Low-grade Lymphoma Study Group have shown significantly higher response rates and longer survival for patients receiving rituximab concurrently with chemotherapy compared with those receiving chemotherapy alone.
  • Further data from ongoing phase III studies are still needed to determine whether rituximab can help alter the natural history of indolent NHL, and longer follow-up of these patients will help determine the optimal role for rituximab in treatment of indolent NHL.

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  • (PMID = 28140107.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-8708
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. Leonard JP, Link BK: Immunotherapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with hLL2 (epratuzumab, an anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody) and Hu1D10 (apolizumab). Semin Oncol; 2002 Feb;29(1S2):81-86

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Immunotherapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with hLL2 (epratuzumab, an anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody) and Hu1D10 (apolizumab).
  • Clinical activity of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies both in the unlabeled (rituximab [Rituxan; Genentech, Inc, South San Francisco, CA, and IDEC Pharmaceuticals, San Diego, CA]) and radiolabeled forms, as well as radioimmunoconjugates targeting other antigens, has resulted in the exploration of alternative targets for immunotherapeutic strategies in lymphoma.
  • We report on the rationale for and initial efforts in the development of two unlabeled, humanized monoclonal antibodies directed against molecules commonly expressed in B-cell malignancies. hLL2 (epratuzumab; Immunomedics, Inc, Morris Plains, NJ) binds to the CD22 antigen, while Hu1D10 (apolizumab; Protein Design Labs, Inc, Fremont, CA) reacts with a polymorphism on the HLA-DR beta chain.
  • Preclinical studies and early clinical evaluations suggest that these agents have a potential role as novel therapeutic targets for lymphoma with acceptable toxicity profiles.
  • Further efforts will explore optimal clinical settings for their use, as well as define treatment regimens either as single agents or in combination with chemotherapy or other biologics.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2002 W.B. Saunders Company. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28140096.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-8708
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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16. Hartmann JT, Rick O, Thomas M, Schleicher J, Metzner B, Flasshove M, Kollmannsberger C, Schmoll HJ, Kanz L, Bokemeyer C: The role of paclitaxel in the first-line treatment of patients with 'poor prognosis' germ cell tumor (GCT) undergoing sequential high dose chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):4633

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The role of paclitaxel in the first-line treatment of patients with 'poor prognosis' germ cell tumor (GCT) undergoing sequential high dose chemotherapy.
  • In order to determine the impact of T on survival (OS) and toxicity the analysis compares the results of two prospective trials in pts with 'poor prognosis' GCT.
  • METHODS: In the first trial pts have received high dose VIP chemotherapy (HD-VIP) at dose level [etoposide 250 mg/sqm, ifosfamide 2 g/sqm, cisplatin 20 mg/sqm, d1-5, q d22] for 3 consecutive cycles as part of a phase I/II dose trial.
  • Pts received G-CSF 5 μg/kg s.c. from d+1 after treatment to leukocyte recovery >2000/μl and reinfusion of PBSC at day +2.
  • The comparative trial consisted of pts treated in an identical fashion but additionally receiving T at a dose of 225 mg/sqm added on day 1 as a 3-h infusion prior to cisplatin (HD-VIP+T.
  • RESULTS: 155 pts have been analyzed, 59 pts in HD-VIP and 96 pts in HD-VIP+T. 112 pts and 414 cycles are fully assessable for toxicity, 152 pts for OS.
  • Pts characteristics (HD-VIP compared to HDVIP+T): Median age 29 (16-42) vs. 31 yrs (18-54), mediastinal primary 11 vs. 24%, liver mets 40 vs. 40%, bone 7 vs. 4%, CNS 20 vs. 19%, elevated AFP, HCG, LDH: 39 vs. 30%, 61 vs. 58% and 77 vs. 77%.
  • Dose intensity of the 3- vs. 4-drug regimen achieved have been 98% and 95%.
  • Median time to recovery of granulocytes and thrombocytes (>500/μl resp.
  • >25.000μl) have been day 15 and 16 independent from the addition of T.
  • Differences in grade III/IV toxicity in favor of HD-VIP were seen in terms of stomatitis (14 vs. 49%), neutropenic fever (3 vs. 20%) and manifest infection (3 vs. 19%) (P.05).
  • 88% of pts attained a favorable response (NED/CR/PRm-) to HD-VIP compared to 67% in the HD-VIP+T (P<.05).
  • After a median follow up period of 34 mos (range, 9-78) and 16 (0-47) the calculated 3-yr OS rates were 69.9 (CI95%, 54.3-83.3) for HD-VIP and 67.3% (56.3-78.3) for HD-VIP+T (P=.3).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The addition of paclitaxel to HD-VIP dose level 6 as first-line therapy was associated with a moderately elevated toxicity.
  • No substantial impact on survival can be anticipated for HD-VIP+T.

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  • (PMID = 28015771.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Lerner RE, Weisdorf DJ, Miller JS, McGlave PB, Burns LJ: The international prognostic index at relapse predicts autologous stem cell transplantation outcome for aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in second remission or chemosensitive first relapse. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6661

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The international prognostic index at relapse predicts autologous stem cell transplantation outcome for aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in second remission or chemosensitive first relapse.
  • : 6661 Background: Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has become the standard treatment for patients with relapsed aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) responding to conventional salvage chemotherapy.
  • The international prognostic index (IPI) was developed to identify patients with aggressive NHL who have different risks for death.
  • Clinical features predictive of overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed.
  • With a median follow-up of 5 years (range 205 days to 14 years), OS and PFS at 5 years were 37% (95% CI 26-48) and 37% (95% CI 26-48), respectively.
  • The high-risk group (3, 4, or 5 IPI factors) had 3.2 times (95% CI 1.5-6.6, p = .002) the risk of death and 3.5 times (95% CI 1.6-7.3, p = .001) the risk of relapse as the low-risk group (0, 1, or 2 IPI factors).
  • In Cox regression analysis, high-risk IPI status (RR 3.8, 95% CI 1.7-8.4, p = .001) and bone marrow (BM) involvement at diagnosis (RR 2.9, 95% CI 1.3 - 6.3, p = .009) were independent predictors for poor OS.
  • Patients with high-risk IPI status at relapse should be considered for novel therapeutic approaches.

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  • (PMID = 28016372.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Cunningham D, Smith P, Mouncey P, Qian W, Pocock C, Ardeshna KM, Radford J, Davies J, McMillan A, Linch D: A phase III trial comparing R-CHOP 14 and R-CHOP 21 for the treatment of patients with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8506

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase III trial comparing R-CHOP 14 and R-CHOP 21 for the treatment of patients with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • : 8506 Background: The addition of rituximab to standard therapy with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (CHOP21) has resulted in improved survival outcomes in the treatment of diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (DLBC NHL).
  • In addition, the administration of CHOP as a 14 day cycle (CHOP14) has shown benefit over standard CHOP21 chemotherapy.
  • This randomised study was designed to evaluate the toxicity and survival outcomes achieved with the addition of rituximab to CHOP14 (R-CHOP14), as compared to standard therapy (R-CHOP21) in newly diagnosed DLBC NHL.
  • METHODS: Patients were randomised to receive either eight cycles of standard R-CHOP21 or six cycles of R-CHOP14 (+ G-CSF) with two additional cycles of single agent rituximab.
  • Patient characteristics in the R-CHOP21 and R-CHOP14 arms are; IPI score of ≥4 17%:15%, stage III/IV disease 63%:62%, B symptoms 44%:47%, bulk disease 51%:48%.
  • 82% of patients in the R-CHOP21 arm completed study therapy as compared to 89% in the R-CHOP14 arm.
  • The radiological complete response rate (CR/CRu) is 47% in both treatment arms.
  • With a median follow-up 14 months 805 patients remain alive.

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  • (PMID = 27960856.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Sachdeva A, Sachdeva S, Mohan R, Pruthi PK, Gupta S, Dhawan S, Vineeta J, Yadav SP, Singh N: Late effects: Ten years long term follow up of pediatric oncology patients - From nihilism to cautious optimism. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8568

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Late effects: Ten years long term follow up of pediatric oncology patients - From nihilism to cautious optimism.
  • : 8568 Background: We have seen spectacular improvement in the survival rates of pediatric patients suffering from cancer, but long term effects of the tumors as well as the treatment modalities uised remain a cause for concern especially in countries with limited resources.
  • We have evaluated over a ten year period the long term effects of Anthracyclines in pediatric patients Methods: Non-invasive cardiological methods were used to detect these fatal side effects early.
  • They were treated for ALL (30), Wilms (10) Hodgkins Lymphoma (12), Neurblastoma(6).
  • The doses ranged from 180 mg/mt<sup>2</sup> to 350mg/mt<sup>2</sup> of Doxorubicin.
  • Their Echocardiograms and ECG was done at baseline before administration of Chemotherapy and then repeated 1year after the last injection of Anthracyclines.and for long term follow up they were evaluated again at 3 years The Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction (LVEF) was calculated.
  • Out of the seven patients showing a significant fall in LVEF there was only one who had a anthracycline dose of less than 200mg/mt<sup>2</sup>.

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  • (PMID = 28013868.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Hentrich M, Gerl A, Lutz L, Karthaus M, Schiel X: Unexpected toxicity (UT) and opportunistic infections (OI) after rituximab-containing therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e19546

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Unexpected toxicity (UT) and opportunistic infections (OI) after rituximab-containing therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL).
  • : e19546 Background: Rituximab (R) is increasingly used for the treatment of B-NHL.
  • METHODS: The records of consecutive pts treated at 2 institutions from 01/06 to 12/08 with R-containing chemotherapy or R-maintenance therapy (R-M) for NHL were analyzed for severe UT and OI.
  • Pts received a median of 6 cycles (range 1 - 18) of R.
  • A total of 517 cycles of R were evaluable for OI or UT.
  • 7 of 99 pts (7%) (2 females, 5 males) with a median age of 69.5 yrs (range 41-76) experienced UT (n=4) or OI (n=3).
  • UT consisted of interstitial pneumonitis (IP) in 2 pts after 8 and 6 cycles of R-CHOP for diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL), a case of congestive heart failure (NYHA III°) after 6x R-CHOP + 2x R-M for follicular lymphoma (FL) and a case of grade 4 pancytopenia lasting for 22 days following 2x R-FC for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
  • IP completely resolved after initiation of prednisone (n=1) or under empiric antimicrobial therapy (n=1).
  • Congestive heart failure improved under appropriate therapy and the pt received 2 more cycles of R-M.
  • Pancytopenia slowly recovered under therapy with G-CSF, R was terminated.
  • OI consisted of pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia after 5x R-CHOP-14 for DLCL, Epstein-Barr-virus (EBV)-associated hepatitis after 5x R-CHOP-21 for relapsed FL and generalized herpes zoster following 6x R-bendamustine (RB) + 1x R-M for recurrent BALT-lymphoma.
  • Infections resolved under antimicrobial therapy.
  • Moreover, 2 pts were transferred to us for therapy of enterovirus-induced encephalitis after 6x R-CHOP-21 + 2x R-M for FL (n=1) and cerebral toxoplasmosis in a pt heavily pretreated with R-containing therapy for relapsed mantle cell lymphoma (n=1).
  • Awareness of UT/OI, rapid diagnostic proceedings and, whenever possible, initiation of therapy are essential.
  • In selected cases reexposure of R may be feasible.

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  • (PMID = 27960975.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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21. Schilling MB, Parks C, Deeter RG: Costs and outcomes associated with febrile neutropenia-related hospitalizations across patients with varying cancer types: A retrospective analysis. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20560

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Costs and outcomes associated with febrile neutropenia-related hospitalizations across patients with varying cancer types: A retrospective analysis.
  • : e20560 Background: Neutropenia, the major dose-limiting toxicity of chemotherapy, is a frequent, often serious, and sometimes fatal complication of myelosuppressive chemotherapy.
  • Its economic and clinical impact is often under-appreciated, and thus this study evaluates the contribution of febrile neutropenia (FN) by tumor type as related to healthcare cost and mortality.
  • METHODS: FN patients in this study were identified as having cancer (ICD-9-CM: 140.xx - 208.xx), neutropenia (288.0x) and either opportunistic infections (110 total codes) or fever of unknown origin (780.6) who were hospitalized between 1/05 and 6/08 in a retrospective cohort study from the Aspen US healthcare database (∼11 million pts, >342 inpatient facilities, and >300 million charge-detail records).
  • Unadjusted mean healthcare cost of hospitalization, length of hospital stay (LOS), and mortality rates were calculated, stratifying by cancer type (breast, metastatic breast, and lung cancers, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), or other hematologic tumors).
  • RESULTS: Among 598 hospitalized patients (mean age 63 years; 53% female) with cancer experiencing FN, the mean cost of hospitalization, LOS and mortality varied significantly by tumor type ( Table ).
  • Considerable variations exist across cancer types for hospitalization costs, LOS and mortality.
  • The tumor type is important in assessing the economic and clinical impact of FN hospitalizations.

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  • (PMID = 27961149.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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22. Spunt SL, Harper JA, Krasin MJ, Billups CA, Rodriguez-Galindo C: Ewing sarcoma family tumors (ESFT) as second malignant neoplasms (SMN) following treatment of a primary malignant neoplasm (PMN) during childhood. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8539

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Ewing sarcoma family tumors (ESFT) as second malignant neoplasms (SMN) following treatment of a primary malignant neoplasm (PMN) during childhood.
  • Demographic data, diagnostic and treatment information for both the PMN and SMN, and outcome data were recorded.
  • The median age at diagnosis of PMN was 4.2 years (range, 0.8-12.5 years), and of ESFT was 13.4 years (range, 4.9-22.0 years).
  • The PMN was retinoblastoma (n=3), Wilms tumor (n=2), acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n=1 each).
  • Six patients received chemotherapy for treatment of the PMN including alkylating agents (n=3), anthracyclines (n=6), and etoposide (n=1).
  • Four also received radiotherapy (RT) for the PMN (dose range, 10.8-48 Gy, median 30 Gy).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of ESFT as a SMN following treatment of childhood cancer is similar to the proportion of ESFT as a PMN in childhood.
  • Survival appears to be only slightly inferior to that of de novo ESFT.

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  • (PMID = 28013834.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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23. Waters J, Chau I, Norman AR, Pollard M, Wotherspoon A, Cunningham D: Gemcitabine (GEM), cisplatin (P) and methylprednisolone: A salvage regimen in relapsed Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6589

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Gemcitabine (GEM), cisplatin (P) and methylprednisolone: A salvage regimen in relapsed Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • : 6589 Background: Relapsed HD and NHL remain a therapeutic challenge.
  • Non-cross resistant therapy incorporating P is a standard approach, but the optimal regimen has not been defined.
  • GEM, a novel nucleoside analogue has shown limited single agent activity in heavily pre-treated lymphomas.
  • METHODS: Patients (pts) had relapsed HD or NHL, received at least 1 prior chemotherapy regimen, performance status 0-2, adequate organ function.
  • Prior treatment with P or GEM was not permitted.
  • Pts with HIV-related lymphoma were excluded.
  • Treatment was repeated every 28 days for up to 6 cycles.
  • Pt characteristics: median age 41 yrs (range 17-68); M/F 29/13; PS 0/1/2: 13/23/5; histology: diffuse large B-cell NHL 11, T-cell NHL 6, other NHL 7, HD 18; stage I/II/III/IV: 1/10/12/19; IPI 0/1/2/3/4: 5/17/11/8/1; number of prior treatment regimens 1/2/3/>3: 18/12/3/9.
  • Median disease-free interval: 5.0 months (range 0.4 - 48.8).
  • 18 pts relapsed within 90 days of last chemotherapy.
  • The overall response rate was 76% (95% CI, 58.8%-88.2%) with 7 CR, 21 PR, 7 NR and 2 PD.
  • Median time to disease progression is 6.2 months and median overall survival 25.8 months.
  • There was no grade 4 non-haematological toxicity.
  • CONCLUSIONS: GEM-P is an active and feasible salvage regimen in relapsed and refractory HD and NHL.

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  • (PMID = 28016178.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. Dunleavy KM, Butrynski J, Steinberg S, Grant N, White T, Jaffe ES, Wilson WH: Phase II study of EPOCH infusional chemotherapy in relapsed or refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). A report on toxicity, efficacy and prognostic indicators of outcome. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6598

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II study of EPOCH infusional chemotherapy in relapsed or refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). A report on toxicity, efficacy and prognostic indicators of outcome.
  • : 6598 Background: In relapsed/refractory HL, an effective and well tolerated salvage regimen has important roles both prior to autologous stem cell transplant (SCT) and as palliative therapy in patients (pts) who are ineligible for or have failed SCT.
  • METHODS: Eligible pts had relapsed/refractory HL and adequate organ function unless due to HL.
  • Pts received fixed dose EPOCH chemotherapy (etoposide 200 mg/m<sup>2</sup>, vincristine 1.6 mg/m<sup>2</sup> (no cap) and doxorubicin 40 mg/m<sup>2</sup> CIVI x 96-hrs D1-4; cyclophosphamide 750 mg/m<sup>2</sup> IV D5 and prednisone 60 mg/m<sup>2</sup> qd D1-6 ) with G-CSF q21 days until disease progression or stabilization over ≥ 2 cycles.
  • Histology included nodular sclerosis 34 (64%), mixed cellularity 3 (25%), and lymphocyte depleted 5 (9%) classical HL, and nodular lymphocyte predominant HL 1 (2%).
  • 24 (45%) pts had had ≥ 2 prior regimens, 27 (51%) pts received chemotherapy within the previous 10 mos, and 40 (75%) pts had responded to their last treatment.
  • There was one treatment related death.
  • 45 (84%) pts responded with 23 (44%) CR and 21 (40%) PR.
  • With a median follow-up of 68 mos, the median progression-free (PFS) and overall survivals (OS) are 10 and 40 mos, and at 68 mos median follow-up, PFS and OS are 21% and 41%.
  • Multivariate analysis revealed that the no. of prior drugs and response to the preceding regimen significantly influenced OS and PFS; in addition PFS was significantly influenced by performance status and mos since previous chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: EPOCH is well tolerated and has a high response rate in relapsed/refractory HL.
  • It should be considered as salvage therapy prior to SCT or for palliation in incurable HL.

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  • (PMID = 28016222.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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25. Rubio-Martínez A, Recasens V, Martos C, Montañés A, García-Carpintero G, Gómez-López L, Rubio-Félix D, Giraldo P: Predictive factors to develop a second neoplasia in a Hodgkin disease cohort patients. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6707

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Predictive factors to develop a second neoplasia in a Hodgkin disease cohort patients.
  • : 6707 Background: Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is a rare malignancy, incidence rate (IR): 2.4/105 inh/y, 85% can be cured.
  • The importance of late effects of therapy have become more apparent.
  • PURPOSE: to determine the IR of second malignancies (SM)in HL and to compare with cancer IR in general population during 1978-1998.
  • DATA SOURCE: clinical reports and poblational based Cancer Registry.
  • VARIABLES: demographic data, date of HL diagnosis, histological subtype, stage, treatment schedule (chemotherapy, radiotherapy, combined), date SM diagnosis, subtype and location of cancer.
  • Cohort was stratified according to age, gender and schedule of therapy.
  • RESULTS: IR of HL in our population is 2.4 cases/105 inh/y (F:1.87; M:3.03); estimated cancer IR in our area: 255.2 SD 32.3 cases/105 inh/y (1978-1998).
  • Subtype: NE 71%, MC22%, LP 24; stage: IA 12.7%, IB 1.6%, IIA 27.9%, IIB 5%, IIIA 16.9%, IIIB 14.4% IVA 9.3% IVB 11.8%.
  • Radiotherapy 16.1% (mantle 50%, inverted-Y 11.8 %, both: 1.6%;cobalt 59.3%, linear accelerator 4.2%; total dose 20-36 Gy), chemotherapy 39.8% (ABVD 14.4%, MOPP 15.5%, CMOPP 23.7%, CMOPP/ABVD 18.6%, ABVD/MOPP 15.2%), combined 44%.
  • HL relapsed: 10.1%, mean time: 49 m.
  • Developed a SM 15(12.7%), mean 102.3 m; range 9-285: 11 a non-hematological neoplasia: adenocarcinoma (colon, breast, lung, oropharynx, skin, cavum, parotida. thyroid) and 4 a hematological neoplasia (AML and NHL).
  • The global risk of cancer in HL was 10.0 and 6.5 when only non hematological tumor were considered.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of SM among long-time survivors of HL is higher than in normal population.
  • In other essays the major risk has been observed in patients treated with radiotherapy either alone or combined with chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 28014611.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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26. Mones J, Coleman M, Kostakoglu L, Fiore JM, Muss D, Furman R, Stewart P, Kroll S, Goldsmith SJ, Leonard JP: A dose-escalation study of tositumomab and iodine I 131 tositumomab (Bexxar) in pts with previously treated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) with &gt; 25% bone marrow involvement. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6575

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A dose-escalation study of tositumomab and iodine I 131 tositumomab (Bexxar) in pts with previously treated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) with > 25% bone marrow involvement.
  • : 6575 Introduction: The Bexxar therapeutic regimen can produce durable and complete responses in patients with relapsed/refractory low-grade NHL.
  • Virtually all previous studies of radioimmunotherapeutic agents (including Bexxar therapy) for NHL excluded patients with extensive bone marrow involvement (BMI) with tumor (>25% intertrabecular space) due to risk of excess hematologic toxicity.
  • Therefore, we evaluated Bexxar therapy specifically in this patient population to assess safety and toxicity in a dose-escalation study.
  • A patient-specific dose of Iodine 131 Tositumomab was administered to deliver a defined amount of total body radiation.
  • Dose escalation began at a total body dose of 45 cGy (subsequently increased in increments of 10 cGy).
  • Dose limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as ANC < 500/mm<sup>3</sup> or platelets <25,000/mm<sup>3</sup> for >17 d; or ANC <750/mm<sup>3</sup> or platelets <50,000/mm<sup>3</sup> for >24 d.
  • Three patients (estimated BMI 40-60%) received 55 cGy, with 1 having hematologic DLT concurrent with lymphoma progression with extensive BMI.
  • Non-hematologic toxicities were minimal and were similar to previous studies.
  • CONCLUSION: Treatment of patients with >25 % bone marrow involvement with Bexxar therapy was well tolerated at 45 cGy total body dose and can result in lymphoma responses.
  • Further studies with additional patients and at higher doses are required to further characterize the MTD and to establish efficacy.

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  • (PMID = 28016193.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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27. Crown JP, Leyvraz S, Verrill M, Guillem V, Efremidis A, Garcia-Conde Bru J, Welch R, Montes A, Leonard R, Baselga J: Effect of tandem high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) on long-term complete remissions (LTCR) in metastatic breast cancer (MBC), compared to conventional dose (CDC) in patients (pts) who were not selected on the basis of response to prior C: Mature results of the IBDIS-I. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):631

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effect of tandem high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) on long-term complete remissions (LTCR) in metastatic breast cancer (MBC), compared to conventional dose (CDC) in patients (pts) who were not selected on the basis of response to prior C: Mature results of the IBDIS-I.
  • CDC (mg/m<sup>2</sup>): doxorubicin 50/ docetaxel 75 (AT) x 4 followed by cyclophosphamide / methotrexate/5FU; versus HD: 3xAT followed by tandem autograft-supported HDC (#1-Ifosphamide12,000/carboplatin AUC18/etoposide 1200; #2:-cyclophosphamide 6000/thiotepa 800).
  • There were 5 treatment-related deaths on HDC, and 2 on CDC.
  • Nineteen HDC pts are alive, versus 10 CDC (median survival: 961v 804 days, RR=0.68; p=0.08) Conclusion: These results do not justify routine HDC, but, given the failure of other treatments to produce a meaningful rate of LTCR in this "incurable cancer", do mandate further study of this approach.

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  • (PMID = 28017078.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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28. Weycker D, Hackett J, Edelsberg J, Oster G, Glass A: Duration of G-CSF therapy and risk of hospitalization for neutropenia or infection. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6731

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Duration of G-CSF therapy and risk of hospitalization for neutropenia or infection.
  • : 6731 Background: Clinical trials have demonstrated that 10-12 days of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) prophylaxis is effective in reducing the risk of febrile neutropenia in patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy.
  • In clinical practice, however, many patients receive shorter courses of prophylaxis.
  • METHODS: Using a large US health-insurance claims database, we identified all adults with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) who received myelosuppressive chemotherapy and G-CSF prophylaxis between 1998 and 2002; unique cycles of chemotherapy were identified.
  • Pooling all such cycles, we used a GEE (Generalized Estimating Equation) model (with a logistic link function) to examine the relationship between duration of G-CSF prophylaxis and risk of hospitalization for neutropenia or infection, adjusting for potential confounders.
  • RESULTS: Duration of G-CSF prophylaxis was <10 days (mean+/-SD, 6.6+/-3.3) in 77% of 336 patient-cycles during which G-CSF prophylaxis was administered.
  • Risk of hospitalization was significantly lower (OR: 0.81, p<0.01) with each additional dose of G-CSF, up to a maximum of 14 doses; patients receiving 5 doses of G-CSF, for example, were approximately 3 times (OR: 2.9, 95%CI 1.5-5.5) more likely to be hospitalized than those receiving 10 doses.
  • A higher Charlson Index also was associated with a higher risk of hospitalization (OR: 1.25, p<0.01).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Among NHL patients receiving G-CSF prophylaxis, risk of hospitalization is related to duration of therapy.

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  • (PMID = 28014497.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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29. Ferreri AJ, Reni M, Martelli M, Pangalis G, Frezzato M, Cabras G, Fabbri A, Corazzelli G, Zucca E, Cavalli F: Randomized phase II trial on primary chemotherapy with high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) alone or associated with high-dose cytarabine (HD-araC) for patients with primary CNS lymphoma (I.E.L.S.G. #20 Trial): Tolerability, activity, and survival analyses. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8545

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Randomized phase II trial on primary chemotherapy with high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) alone or associated with high-dose cytarabine (HD-araC) for patients with primary CNS lymphoma (I.E.L.S.G. #20 Trial): Tolerability, activity, and survival analyses.
  • : 8545 Background: HD-MTX-based chemotherapy (cht) is the conventional approach to primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL), but superiority of polycht over HD-MTX alone is unproven.
  • A benefit of adding HD-araC to MTX has been suggested.
  • This is a randomized phase II trial comparing HD-MTX monocht versus HD-MTX plus HD-araC as primary cht in immunocompetent patients (pts) with PCNSL.
  • METHODS: 79 HIV- pts with newly diagnosed PCNSL, age 18-75 ys, ECOG-PS≤3, and measurable disease were randomly assigned to receive 4 courses (interval 3 weeks) of MTX 3.5 g/mq (control arm; n=40) or MTX (same dose) + araC 2 g/mq × 2/d, d 2-3 (experimental arm; n=39).
  • No differences in clinical presentation between arms were observed.
  • Causes of cht interruption were: progressive disease in 20 MTX and 8 MTX+araC pts, toxicity in 1 MTX and 7 MTX+araC pts and refusal in 2 MTX+araC pts.
  • All G3-4 non-hematological toxicities were <5%.
  • At a median follow-up of 30 m., 31 MTX and 22 MTX+araC pts experienced failure, with a 3-yr FFS of 21±6% and 38±8% (p=0.01), respectively.
  • No differences in relapse sites or salvage efficacy between treatment arms were observed.
  • Twelve MTX and 20 MTX+araC pts are alive, with a 3-yr OS of 32±8% and 46±9% (p=0.07).
  • The addition of HD-araC to HD-MTX resulted in significantly better outcome and acceptable toxicity.

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  • (PMID = 27960962.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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30. Skarin AT, Vekeman F, Laliberté F, Afonja O, Lafeuille M, Barghout V, Duh MS: Pattern of utilization of pegfilgrastim in patients with chemotherapy-induced neutropenia: A retrospective analysis of administrative claims data. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):9624

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pattern of utilization of pegfilgrastim in patients with chemotherapy-induced neutropenia: A retrospective analysis of administrative claims data.
  • : 9624 Background: Pegfilgrastim is a long-acting granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) used to prevent or treat febrile neutropenia associated with myelosuppressive anticancer therapies.
  • According to the prescribing information, pegfilgrastim should not be administered within 14 days before or 24 hours after cytotoxic chemotherapy because of the potential for myeloid toxicity.
  • Patients who had a cancer diagnosis and chemotherapy within 120 days of their first pegfilgrastim injection were identified.
  • The proportion of pegfilgrastim injections that were followed by administration of chemotherapy within 11 and 9 days was calculated.
  • Analysis was also stratified by cancer type [Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), lung, breast].
  • Among all cancer types, 19.2% of pegfilgrastim injections had a chemotherapy claim within the following 11 days.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Based on the retrospective analysis of this administrative claims database, the use of pegfilgrastim within 11 days of an administration of chemotherapy was observed in 15-20% of cases which is inconsistent with the recommended guidelines.
  • Pegfilgrastim use in these situations may have the potential to increase sensitivity of rapidly dividing myeloid cells to cytotoxic chemotherapy.
  • Further research is being conducted to assess the related clinical and economic impact of this pattern of usage.

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  • (PMID = 27963900.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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31. Lotz J, Selle F, Fizazi K, Gravis G, Bui B, Delva R, Bay J, Baron A, Robain M, Biron P: A phase II trial of high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) supported by haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in patients (pts) with disseminated germ-cell tumors (GCTs) failing chemotherapy and with adverse prognostic factors: The TAXIF II protocol. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5028

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase II trial of high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) supported by haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in patients (pts) with disseminated germ-cell tumors (GCTs) failing chemotherapy and with adverse prognostic factors: The TAXIF II protocol.
  • : 5028 Background: HDCT using the etoposide-carboplatin ± ifosfamide regimen is able to circumvent resistance in GCT pts, even when used as third-line or later therapy (Lotz, Ann Onco.l 2005 / Einhorn, N Eng J Med. 2007).
  • Thiotepa (TTP) and P can be safely combined at HD with good efficacy.
  • METHODS: Non-resistant/refractory GCTs pts failing CT and with adverse prognostic factors were planned to receive 2 cycles combining (mg/m<sup>2</sup>) E (100) and P (250), given on day 1 and 14 supported by filgrastim (F), followed by 3 consecutive HDCTs [1 course combining a 3-d combination of P (360) + TTP (720), followed by 2 ICE regimens (IFM, 12 g/m<sup>2</sup>, CBDCA, AUC 20, VP16, 1,500 mg/m<sup>2</sup>), given on 5 days with HSCT and F].
  • Inclusion criterias were mainly: radiologically and/or biologically mesurable disease, seminomatous GCT in relapse after 2 lines of CT (BEP/VeIP), non-seminomatous GCT in relapse after 1 or 2 lines of CT or in PR after 1 line of CT, primary mediastinal GCT in first relapse.
  • RESULTS: From 09/04 to 12/07, 45 pre-treated (BEP ± VeIP) pts with gonadal (89%) or extra-gonadal T (11%) were treated in second-line (27%), 3rd-line (44 %) or more (29 %).
  • At the time of analysis (12/08), the final overall response rate was 47%, 10 pts were in continuous CR (median time, 8 m; range, 1-18), and 37 pts (82%) were alive at a median F/U of 9 m (range, 1-26).
  • One pt died of multi-organ failure and 7 died of disease progression.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This HDCT program preceded by 2 semi-intensive cycles of E-P is highly effective in non-resistant/refractory pts with disseminated GCTS failing CT and with adverse prognostic factors.

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  • (PMID = 27962914.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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32. Reiter A, Meinhardt A, Burkhardt B, Zimmermann M, Borkhardt A, Kontny U, Mann G, Schrappe M: Phase II window study on rituximab in newly diagnosed pediatric mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10000

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II window study on rituximab in newly diagnosed pediatric mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).
  • : 10000 Background: Pediatric mature B-cell NHL differ from aggressive B-NHL of adults in terms of biology and treatment outcome.
  • In contrast to adults, rituximab (Rx) is not established in the treatment of pediatric B-NHL has not be determined yet.
  • Exclusion: Lansky performance scale 5, pre-treatment, impaired renal-, heart-, liver-function, hepatitis B, pre-existing disease, pregnancy.
  • TREATMENT: Rx 375 mg/m<sup>2</sup> IV at day 1; concomitant therapy: Rasburicase, steroids only for anaphylaxis, intrathecal (IT) triple drug at days 1, 3 for CNS+ pts only.
  • Begin of chemotherapy at day 5.
  • Forty-nine pts were not evaluable for response: Withdrawal (anaphylaxis 8, ATL 2, suspected progression, not verified 4, other 2), IT therapy in CNS- pts (8), corticosteroids (3), technical inadequacy of response evaluation (21), no index lesion (1).
  • RR by histology: BL/B-ALL 29/68, DLBCL 6/14, juvenile follicular lymphoma 1/2, PMBCL 1/1, B-NHL nfs 0/2.
  • Fifty pts were non-RPs.

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  • (PMID = 27962545.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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33. Metzger ML, Hudson MM, Wilimas J, Krasin M, Larry K, Howard SC: Hypothyroidism secondary to radiation and chemotherapy in pediatric Hodgkin's Disease. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8532

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Hypothyroidism secondary to radiation and chemotherapy in pediatric Hodgkin's Disease.
  • : 8532 Background: Hypothyroidism in pediatric Hodgkin's disease (HD) survivors is reported due to neck irradiation (RT).
  • An effect of chemotherapy remains controversial.
  • METHODS: Records of 467 newly diagnosed HD patients treated on different regimens between 1979 and 2002 were reviewed.
  • Radiation dose to the neck and clinical features were recorded.
  • Hypothyroidism was defined as a TSH > 4.7 or need for thyroxine therapy.
  • RESULTS: Of 457 evaluable patients, 261 (57%) were male, 378 (83%) white; median age was 15.2 years (range 3 -21.7) and median time of thyroid follow up was 4.5 years (range 0.1 to 22.3).
  • Treatment regimens used during this period were COPP, COPP/ABVD, VAMP, VEPA, VAMP/COP or Stanford V combined with RT or RT alone in selected patients with localized disease.
  • The Table shows the cumulative incidence of hypothyroidism at 5 and 10 years according to the RT dose given.
  • Age at treatment was not a risk factor for developing hypothyroidism.
  • The relative risk for females compared to males of developing hypothyroidism was 1.6 (p=0.0002) while the relative risk for blacks of developing hypothyroidism was 0.36 (p=0.0015) compared to non-blacks.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Chemotherapy added to moderate (21-26.9Gy) dose RT, resulted in a higher incidence of hypothyroidism than high dose RT (>27Gy) alone.
  • Table: Hypothyroidism Cumulative Incidence according to Radiation Dose / Chemotherapy [Figure: see text] No significant financial relationships to disclose.

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  • (PMID = 28013851.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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34. Federico M, Levis A, Luminari S, Chisesi T, Marcheselli L, Goldaniga M, Vitolo U, Neri S, Brugiatelli M, Gobbi PG: ABVD vs. STANFORD V (SV) vs. MOPP-EBV-CAD (MEC) in advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma. Final results of the IIL HD9601 randomized trial. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6507

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] ABVD vs. STANFORD V (SV) vs. MOPP-EBV-CAD (MEC) in advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma. Final results of the IIL HD9601 randomized trial.
  • : 6507 Background: About 30% of patients with advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) do not respond to initial therapy with ABVD or relapse.
  • METHODS: Patients with advanced stage HL (IIB-IV) and no previous treatment were randomised to receive 6 courses of ABVD or 6 courses of MEC or 12 weeks of SV.
  • At the end of chemotherapy radiotherapy was delivered to residual masses or to the sites of previous bulky disease.
  • At the end of the therapy a CR was achieved by 88% of pts treated with ABVD, 94% with MEC and 72% with SV (P < 0.01).
  • At the time of present analysis, 2 pts per each arm died due to second cancer.

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  • (PMID = 28016886.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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35. Hernandez-Ilizaliturri FJ, Khubchandani S, Olejniczak SH, Hoskin P, Czuczman MS: Strategies to overcoming rituximab-chemotherapy resistance by targeting the autophagy pathway using bortezomib in combination with the Bcl-2 inhibitor obatoclax in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8543

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Strategies to overcoming rituximab-chemotherapy resistance by targeting the autophagy pathway using bortezomib in combination with the Bcl-2 inhibitor obatoclax in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL).
  • : 8543 We found that repeated rituximab exposure leads to deregulation of Bcl-2 proteins and concomitant chemotherapy resistance.
  • We demonstrated that obatoclax (O), a potent Bcl-2 inhibitor, enhanced the anti-tumor activity of rituximab or chemotherapy agents.
  • Studies were conducted in rituximab sensitive (RSCL) and resistant cell lines (RRCL), as well as in malignant B-cells derived from patients with NHL (n = 20).
  • Cells were exposed in vitro to escalating doses of O with/without B.
  • To further study the mechanisms of O and/or B action, RSCL or RRCL were exposed to O or B with or without caspase inhibitors; viability was evaluated as above and apoptosis by flow cytometry and PARP cleavage.
  • O or B monotherapy induced time- and dose-dependent cell death of all cells tested.
  • In vitro exposure of RRCL, RSCL and lymphoma specimens to O and B resulted in significant synergistic activity.
  • The ability of O or B to induce PARP cleavage varied between patient samples and was not observed in RRCL.
  • Inhibition of caspase activity did not affect the ability of O or B to kill NHL cells.
  • Our findings strongly suggest that O added to B may result in a novel and potent therapeutic strategy against aggressive NHL.

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  • (PMID = 27960960.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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36. Kohrt HE, Advani R, Hoppe R, Rosenberg S, Horning S, Lee PP: Dynamic CD8 T-cell responses to tumor-associated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antigens in patients with EBV-negative Hodgkin's disease. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8573

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Dynamic CD8 T-cell responses to tumor-associated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antigens in patients with EBV-negative Hodgkin's disease.
  • : 8573 Background: Multiple translational efforts in HD are actively investigating augmentation of the anti-tumor immune response by stimulating cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against tumor-associated EBV antigens.
  • It has previously been believed that this therapeutic strategy and presence of EBV-specific CTLs are limited to EBV-positive HD.
  • Here, we challenge this belief by characterizing EBV-specific CTL responses in EBV-negative HD.
  • METHODS: Among 52 consecutive patients with EBV-negative HD, CTL responses to latent antigens (LMP2, LMP2a) and lytic antigens (BMLF, BRLF) were serially assessed at diagnosis, during chemotherapy, and throughout followup for 2 years by IFN-γ Elispot and flow cytometric tetramer analysis.
  • RESULTS: We detected weak EBV-specific responses to both lytic and latent antigens by IFN-γ Elispot among patients with EBV-negative HD.
  • Chemoradiotherapy was associated temporally with an initial decrease in LMP2A- and BMLF1-specific responses during the first 5-15 weeks of treatment, which subsequently became more robust 20-50 weeks after diagnosis, 2 to 4-fold greater compared to response at diagnosis.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We confirm evidence of EBV-specific CTLs in patients with EBV-negative HD and provide the first report of dynamic variance in this population during treatment, challenging prior belief that patients with HD remain immunodeficient following therapy and arguing that the clinical significance of EBV-specific immune responses in EBV-negative HD should be further investigated.

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  • (PMID = 27961017.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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37. Hassan MA, Sleem MM: Phase II trial comparing darbepoetin alfa every 3-week versus weekly epoetin alfa for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20724

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II trial comparing darbepoetin alfa every 3-week versus weekly epoetin alfa for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia.
  • : e20724 Background: Anemia is common in patients receiving chemotherapy and may adversely affect health-related quality of life.
  • Erthyrpiotic factors darbepoetin alfa (DA) and epoetin alfa (EA) are currently approved for the treatment of anemia in patients with nonmyeloid malignancies who receive chemotherapy.
  • METHODS: Forty patients with a diagnosis of nonmyeloid malignancy with 8 weeks of planned chemotherapy, age 18 years, and anemia (hemoglobin 10 g/dL).
  • Treatment was hold at week 6 for nonresponse, which was defined as failure to achieve a hemoglobin increment of at least 2 g/dL above the baseline measurement.
  • RESULTS: Forty patients with a diagnosis of nonmyeloid malignancy, the median age was 49 years and 52 years for DA and EA groups respectively, The majority of patients had solid tumors: Common cancer types for (DA - EA) groups were gastrointestinal (8 -5), breast (3-6), lung (3-3), soft tissue sarcoma (2-1), genitourinary (2-1), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (1-1), multiple myeloma (1-1), Hodgkin's lymphoma (0-1), and metastatic with unknown primary in (1-0) respectively .
  • Transfusion incidence from week 6 to the end of the treatment phase (the primary end point) was required in 5 patients (25%) in both groups.

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  • (PMID = 27962022.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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38. Tanvetyanon T, Choudhury AM: Use of erectile dysfunction clinic among men with active, non-pelvic malignancies. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8280

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Use of erectile dysfunction clinic among men with active, non-pelvic malignancies.
  • Urogenital problems can cause erectile dysfunction (ED) in patients with cancers of pelvic organs; in other cancers, however, treatment, psychogenic factors, and cancer-related symptoms can also lead to ED.
  • ED related to cancers of pelvic organs is well recognized by the publics and physicians; but those associated with non-pelvic malignancies receive little attention.
  • We identify the prevalence of patients with active, non-pelvic cancers, who attended the ED clinic in a large VA hospital.
  • METHODS: Medical records of patients who attended the ED clinic, the only place treatment of ED was prescribed, during November 1999 - 2003 were reviewed.
  • Patients were included if the first visit was made between 6 months before cancer was diagnosed and 12 months after cancer therapy was completed.
  • Patients with indolent, non-invasive malignancies, or cancers of prostate, bladder, or rectum were excluded.
  • RESULTS: During the observation period, when 1781 visits were made to the clinic, and when 1394 new patients with non-pelvic malignancies were diagnosed; 18 patients with active, non-pelvic malignancies attended this clinic.
  • Cancer diagnoses were lung 13; non-Hodgkin lymphoma 3; head and neck 2; liver 2; colon, kidney and pancreas 1 each.
  • Nine patients visited the clinic before their cancers were discovered at a median of 3 months before diagnosis; 5/9 had lung cancer.
  • The rest visited the clinic at a median of 7 months after diagnosed; 7/9 were actively undergoing chemotherapy or radiation.
  • Treatment of ED were sildenafil in 50%, vacuum constriction device 28%, intraurethral prostaglandin E-1 6%, intracavernosal alprostadil 6%; and 11% chose no treatment.
  • Treatment of ED was effective in many patients even during cancer treatment.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Very few patients with active, non-pelvic cancers attend the ED clinic.
  • Further studies to identify barrier to participation in the treatment of ED in this group of patients are warranted.

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  • (PMID = 28016734.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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39. Flowers C, Sinha R, Kaufman J, Shenoy P, Lewis C, Bumpers K, Rogatko A: Bortezomib plus modified R-CHOP as initial therapy for indolent B-cell lymphomas: Phase I results. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8577

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Bortezomib plus modified R-CHOP as initial therapy for indolent B-cell lymphomas: Phase I results.
  • : 8577 Background: Adding rituximab (R) to chemotherapy improves survival for patients (pts) with follicular lymphoma (FL) and other indolent non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL), but not all pts respond.
  • Bortezomib (B) + RCHOP has a high complete response (CR) rate, but higher doses of B with standard vincristine produced severe neuropathy.
  • We developed a phase I/II trial to test if adding B to RCHOP with modified vincristine dosing can be well-tolerated and yield a high CR rate.
  • METHODS: Untreated pts with indolent NHL and indications for treatment based on GELF criteria or FLIPI ≥3 received R 375mg/m<sup>2</sup>, cyclophosphamide 750mg/m<sup>2</sup>, doxorubicin 50mg/m<sup>2</sup>, vincristine 1.4mg/m<sup>2</sup> (capped at 1.5mg) on day 1, B 1.0- 1.6mg/m<sup>2</sup> days 1 and 8, and prednisone 100mg days 1-5 for 6-8 cycles.
  • The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined as the regimen at which <30% grade ≥3 non-hematological or grade ≥4 hematological toxicity (>14 days) occurs.
  • Dose escalation used the Escalation with Overdose Control Bayesian method with upper bound (θ=0.3).
  • This facilitated MTD finding with fewer pts given prior data on B+RCHOP.
  • Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT) Neurotoxicity (11-item; 4 point scale), EMG, nerve conduction velocity and epidermal nerve fiber density measures were taken at baseline and after cycle 4.
  • 6 pts (55%) had stage IV disease; 8 (64%) had FLIPI ≥2.
  • Treatment was well tolerated.
  • 3 continue on treatment.

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  • (PMID = 27962274.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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40. Papadopoulos A, Vrettos I, Kamposioras K, Charitos D, Giannopoulos G, Pectasides D, Niakas D, Economopoulos T: Comparing health-related quality of life (HRQL) of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy with family members in a tertiary hospital. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20535

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Comparing health-related quality of life (HRQL) of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy with family members in a tertiary hospital.
  • : e20535 Background: In Greece there is limited information concerning the HRQL of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.
  • The aim of this study was to estimate and compare the HRQL of cancer patients and their relatives during the period of chemotherapy and to investigate potential differences in HRQL.
  • METHODS: 122 family members (45 men and 77 women) of mean age 48.3 ±14.5 and 122 cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy (49 men and 73 women) of mean age 56.6 ±15.4 1SD completed the SF-36 health survey by personal interview.
  • The SF-36 health survey was used to evaluate and compare HRQL which contains eight scales measuring physical functioning (PF), role physical (RP), bodily pain (BP), general health perception (GH), vitality (VT), social functioning (SF), role emotional (RE), and mental health (MH), with higher scores (0-100 range) reflecting better-perceived health.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although the physical health was significantly higher in the family members as it was expected for a healthy population, the mental health and especially MCS was significantly lower from the cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 27960974.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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41. Strada MR, Frascaroli M, Jedrychowska I, Palumbo R, Poggi G, Bernardo A, Villani G, Melazzini M, Bernardo G: Prospective phase II study of integrated rehabilitative treatment in oncologic patients with neuromotor damage from vertebral metastases. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8207

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prospective phase II study of integrated rehabilitative treatment in oncologic patients with neuromotor damage from vertebral metastases.
  • : 8207 Background: Breast, lung and prostate cancer are associated with a high incidence of bone and osteomedullar metastases, often responsible of a neuromotor damage.
  • METHODS: Treatment was performed throughout the following steps, with short-term objectives:.
  • Primary tumor was breast carcinoma in 21 pts (47%), lung cancer in 12 pts (27%), prostate carcinoma in 8 pts (18%), ependyma, testis, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma in each one of the remaining 4 pts.
  • Most pts (82%) had received combined chemo-radiotherapy; while radiotherapy and chemotherapy alone were given in 6 and 3 pts, respectively.
  • Treatment compliance was good, with no drop-out; improvement of QoL was observed in 93% of pts (43/45) by FACT-G.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that such an integrated rehabilitative program in metastatic pts with neuromotor damage from vertebral metastases produced a good clinical activity in both preventing the damages following neurological deficit and optimizing the residual motor potentialities, also improving patient QoL throughout the achievement of the best possible autonomy.

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  • (PMID = 28016814.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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42. Yamazaki T, Sawada U, Kura Y, Ito T, Hatta Y, Takeuchi J, Takei K, Uenogawa K, Saiki M: Combination of rituximab with dose-intensified CHOP (double-CHOP) followed by high-dose chemotherapy for high risk diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBL). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6684

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Combination of rituximab with dose-intensified CHOP (double-CHOP) followed by high-dose chemotherapy for high risk diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBL).
  • : 6684 Background: Rituximab increases response rates and duration of response when combined with CHOP chemotherapy in DLBL and has proved to be effective for in vivo purging.
  • Based on these results, we performed a prospective trial of the combination with rituximab and double-CHOP (D-CHOP) followed by high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) for patients with high-risk DLBL.
  • METHODS: Previously untreated patients with DLBL according to WHO classification, high-intermediate (H-I) and high (H) risk according to International Prognostic Index (IPI) were enrolled in our study.
  • Patients were treated with a standard CHOP for induction, and a D-CHOP (cyclophosphamide (CY) 750 mg/m2, day 1 and 2; doxorubicin50 mg/m2, day 1 and 2; vincristine 1.4 mg/m2, day 1; prednisolone 50 mg/m2 day 1 through 5) was applied every 21 days for 3 cycles.
  • Rituximab (375 mg/m2) was given 48 hours before each cycle of D-CHOP.
  • After the third cycle of D-CHOP, cytapheresis was performed.
  • If the number of stem cells was too small, high-dose methotrexate (8 g/m2 on day 1 with leucovorin rescue) was administered.
  • All patients achieved CR or good PR after 3 cycles of D-CHOP regimen.
  • Three patients received HD-MTX.
  • CONCLUSION: Combination of rituximab with D-CHOP followed by HDC appears effective for high risk DLBL.

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  • (PMID = 28016426.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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43. Vigil CE, Ayala E, Sokol L: Autologous stem cell transplant in peripheral T cell lymphomas: Single institution 10-year retrospective analysis. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e19538

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Autologous stem cell transplant in peripheral T cell lymphomas: Single institution 10-year retrospective analysis.
  • : e19538 Background: Peripheral T-cell lymphoma is a rare entitydisease, compromising 10% of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma worldwide and 5% of all lymphoid neoplasms in the United States.
  • The long-term survival of conventional therapies has led the exploration of alternatives.
  • High-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, has been explored in recent years with little experiences.
  • METHODS: A retrospective analysis on patients with diagnosis of peripheral T-cell lymphoma receiving autologous stem cell transplant was conducted (January 1997 to July 2008).
  • The patients were stratified according to their International Prognostic Index (IPI), disease status at the time of transplant and histology type.
  • RESULTS: Twenty-nine subjects were identified, with a median age of 51; 13 patients had Anaplastic T cell, 18 patient had PTCL-nos, and 6 patients with angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma.
  • Seventeen patients (58.62%) presented with an aa IPI score greater than 2.4 patients were in complete remission, 15 at first relapse, 4 in greater than 1 episode, and 6 with refractory disease at the time of transplantion.Kaplan Meier overall survival (OS) 72 and relapse free survival (RFS) was 62 at 1 year respectively.
  • A multivariate analysis and new risk stratification based on the IPI score system and disease status at time of transplant were employed.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The status at time of transplant with new methods for evaluation of minimal residual disease may help in assessing outcome.

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  • (PMID = 27961010.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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44. Campos A, Costa NM, Vaz CP, Carvalhais A, Roncon S, Campilho F, Pimentel P: Secondary malignancies after stem cell transplantation. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6651

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 6651 Background: Several reports have suggested that patients who undergo stem cell transplantation (SCT) are at increased risk of developing therapy-related secondary malignancies because of several risk factors, including malignant primary disease, conditioning with radiation and/or chemotherapy, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD).
  • Twelve post-transplant malignancies were identified in 10 patients (11 after autologous and 1 after allogeneic SCT), 7 male and 4 female, with a median age of 32 years (range: 1-55).
  • RESULTS: At 10 years the actuarial probability of a second neoplasm after SCT was 6.0% (± 2.5%), being 3.2% (± 3.2%) for allogeneic, and 8.0% (± 3.5%) for autologous SCT.
  • The mean follow-up time was 29 months (± 1.3).
  • The median time from SCT to diagnosis of second neoplasm was 10.5 months (range: 2.96-71.5), and overall survival at 10 years was 40% (± 17%).
  • The remaining patient, a man with primary diagnosis of acute myeloid leukaemia M5, underwent allogeneic SCT conditioned with busulfan and cyclophosphamide.
  • He developed a late severe chronic GVHD with mouth involvement, being treated mainly with cyclosporine and prednisone.
  • The follow-up time is necessarily insufficient for allogeneic SCT.
  • There is a trend between autologous SCT for Hodgkin disease and secondary myelodysplastic syndrome.
  • More studies are necessary to define risks factors, mainly for patients with a long expectancy of life after SCT.

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  • (PMID = 28016395.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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45. Jurczak W, Wywial A, Zaluska A, Pasowicz M, Skotnicki AB: Extranodal masses compressing spinal cord in Hodgkin's disease and follicular lymphoma. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6728

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Extranodal masses compressing spinal cord in Hodgkin's disease and follicular lymphoma.
  • : 6728 Background: Standard staging procedures in Hodgkin's disease (HD) include full physical examination and imaging studies: usually CT scan of the chest and abdomen.
  • In case of low grade lymphomas (like follicular lymphoma - FL) in advanced clinical stage, they may be even less thorough.
  • Therefore the disease within vertebral column -best visualized by magnetic resonance studies (NMR) -may be missed at diagnosis.
  • METHODS/RESULTS: During the last 2 years 3 cases of infiltration of vertebral column (extranodal masses localized within the vertebral canal, compressing but not infiltrating the spinal cord) were diagnosed in over 100 patients treated for HD and FL at that time.
  • In a FL patient they were diagnosed at presentation, while in two HD cases they were found 6 and 9 months after completing the first line therapy, being the cause of early relapse (primary resistance?
  • ). They were not reported in a routine 3- monthly CT scans performed in purpose to monitor non-progressive residual masses.
  • Radiotherapy -if used in the first line therapy -seems to be a feasible and effective treatment: FL patient is in CR, since IFRT was applied after chemoimmunotherapy (6 cycles of cladribine and cyclophosphamide combined with a standard dose of Rituximab, recycled at day 21); one HD patient treated with 6 cycles of ABVD and Mantle field radiotherapy relapsed evidently below the irradiated field.
  • However both HD cases developed resistance despite second line regimens and high dose chemotherapy supported by autologous stem cell transplant.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Therefore we conclude, that HD and FL patients with any neurological signs or symptoms at diagnosis should be considered as likely candidates for NMR imagind studies.

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  • (PMID = 28014665.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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46. Daw NC, Neel MD, Rao BN, Billups CA, Wu J, Jenkins JJ, Villarroel M, Luchtman-Jones L, Quintana J, Santana VM: Frontline treatment of localized osteosarcoma without methotrexate: Results of the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital OS99 trial. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10036

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Frontline treatment of localized osteosarcoma without methotrexate: Results of the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital OS99 trial.
  • : 10036 Background: Standard treatment of osteosarcoma includes cisplatin and high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX), but both agents are associated with significant toxicity and MTX administration requires complex pharmacokinetic monitoring.
  • In our previous OS91 trial, the combination of carboplatin and ifosfamide with doxorubicin and HD-MTX yielded outcomes comparable to those of cisplatin-based regimens with less long-term toxicity in localized osteosarcoma.
  • METHODS: Between 1999 and 2006, we conducted a multi-institutional trial (OS99) to evaluate the activity of carboplatin, ifosfamide, and doxorubicin without HD-MTX in newly-diagnosed patients with localized osteosarcoma.
  • Treatment comprised 12 cycles of chemotherapy given every 3 weeks: 3 consecutive cycles of carboplatin (dose targeted to AUC 8 mg/ml×min on day 1) and ifosfamide (2.65 g/m<sup>2</sup> daily for 3 days) and one cycle of doxorubicin (25 mg/m<sup>2</sup> daily for 3 days) followed by definitive surgery (week 12) and 2 additional cycles of carboplatin/ifosfamide and 3 cycles each of ifosfamide/doxorubicin and carboplatin/doxorubicin for a total of 35 weeks.
  • The most common tumor site was the femur (n = 46; 64%).
  • Forty of the 66 (60.6%) evaluable patients had good histologic response (tumor necrosis > 90%) to preoperative chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: OS99 produced outcomes similar to cisplatin or HD-MTX containing regimens and offers an alternative treatment regimen especially for patients with renal compromise and institutions where pharmacokinetic monitoring of MTX is not available.

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  • (PMID = 27962584.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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47. Kirova YM, Dumont J, Validire P, Vincent-Salomon A, Decaudin D, Clough CB, Servois V, Savignoni A, Fourquet A: Management of localized primary breast B-cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Role of CNS prophylaxis. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6722

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Management of localized primary breast B-cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Role of CNS prophylaxis.
  • : 6722 Background:to evaluate the results of combined treatment modality with doxorubicin-based chemotherapy (C), locoregional radiotherapy (RT) and CNS prophylaxis in NHL of the breast.
  • METHODS: From 1984 to 1999, 20 female pts with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the breast, were treated at the Curie Institute.
  • Following biopsy-established diagnosis, complete physical exam, CAT of the chest, abdomen, pelvis, and brain, CSF, gastric endoscopy, usual blood work, bone marrow biopsy were done.
  • The C protocols were: time-modified CHOP: D1, 10, 20,35,50,65 (n=14) or MACOP-B variant (n=3), both with IT MTX and araC.
  • Three pts received ACVB P with IT MTX and 2 HD MTX infusions.
  • Total dose was 40 Gy in 20-22 fractions using megavoltage photons.
  • RT to CNS (18 Gy/10 fr.) was delivered in the same time.
  • The CR rate was 100% at the end of treatment.
  • Currently, 8 pts followed-up 5-15 yrs, are still alive and never experienced recurrence, 1 pt is alive with a low grade LNH.
  • Two patients had died from other diseases in CR.
  • Though all pts had CR following treatment, relapses occurred in 40% of the pts including late relapses.
  • Prospective studies are needed to improve the long-term results and define the modality of CNS prophylaxis in this rare but aggressive disease.

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  • (PMID = 28014671.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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48. Cheson BD, Vose JM, Bartlett NL, Lopez A, Van der Jagt RH, Tolcher AW, Weisenburger DD, Seiz AL, Shamsili S, Keating AT: Safety and efficacy of YM155 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8502

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Safety and efficacy of YM155 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL).
  • YM155, a survivin suppressant, has exhibited anti-tumor activity in solid tumors and non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL), including DLBCL patients enrolled in Phase I and Phase II monotherapy studies.
  • Patients could continue to receive YM155 until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.
  • RESULTS: Data are presented for the first 27 patients (Phase I and Phase II) who have completed therapy.
  • Three patients (11%) had partial responses (PR) confirmed by independent review using Cheson criteria (N=2; 1999 criteria and N=1; 2007 updated criteria).
  • One patient responded after 2 cycles, completed 5 total cycles and proceeded to SCT (disease-free > 3.7 years post SCT).
  • The third patient responded after 12 cycles and received 26 total cycles (1.5 years) before disease progression.
  • The most common (>4%), treatment-related grade 3/4 adverse events included anemia (16.0%) and neutropenia, fatigue, hemoglobin decrease and deep vein thrombosis (8.0% each).
  • Because of single-agent activity and preliminary data showing synergism when YM155 is combined with other agents additional clinical studies are being planned.

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  • (PMID = 27960852.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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49. Srinivas S, Cholankeril M, Chang VT, Morales-Muyuela E, Duque L, Toomey K, Kasimis B: Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients at a VA medical center: Comorbidity and treatment. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e19559

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients at a VA medical center: Comorbidity and treatment.
  • : e19559 Background: We hypothesized that measures of comorbidity may help explain the number of treatments administered to patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • METHODS: We performed a retrospective, IRB approved protocol, using chart review of all patients diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at the VANJHCS from January 1, 1997 through December 31, 2008.
  • Records were reviewed for demographic, clinical, pathological data, the number of chemotherapy regimens, radiation therapy, and total number of treatments and survival.
  • We tabulated the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CMI), the Kaplan-Feinstein Comorbidity Index (KFI), the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS), International Prognostic Index (IPI), and performance status (PS) were tabulated for 100 patients seen at a VA Medical Center.
  • There were 61 deaths (61%) with M survival(MS) 1068 days(13-3976).
  • The M total number of systemic therapy regimens received was 1(0-4.5), M radiotherapy was 0(0-1) and the overall M total treatment regimens used was 1 (0-4.5).
  • IPI was a significant predictor in the use of radiation therapy (p<0.054) but did not correlate with the use systemic therapy.
  • The CMI was a predictor of the use of systemic chemotherapy (p<0.007), and the total number of treatments received (p<0.011), but not the KFI or the CIRS 17.
  • The performance status did not predict for the number of treatments.
  • In a Cox regression analysis, the number of treatments did not affect survival.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This data provides evidence that one measure of comorbidity, the CMI, may partially explain the number of systemic therapy treatments, and total treatments received by NHL patients.

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  • (PMID = 27961077.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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50. Liang R, Ma SY: Higher incidence of Simian virus 40 in primary gastric diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) than primary nodal disease in Chinese patients, but of no prognostic implication. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6671

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Higher incidence of Simian virus 40 in primary gastric diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) than primary nodal disease in Chinese patients, but of no prognostic implication.
  • : 6671 Background: Studies have reported the detection of simian polyomavirus SV40 DNA sequence in 10-40% of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients and there is compelling evidence that SV40 may contribute to the oncogenesis in human.
  • However, its incidence in Chinese patients, prognostic implication and site predilection are largely unknown.
  • METHODS: We analysed the diagnostic histological specimens from 49 Chinese patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma diagnosed from 1989 to 1996.
  • Primary sites were peripheral lymph node (n=30, 61%), gastric (n=18, 37%) and sternal soft tissue (n=1, 2%).
  • Primary gastric lymphoma had a significantly higher SV40 positivity rate than the nodal disease (5/18, 28% versus 1/30, 3.3%; p=0.02) There was no difference between the SV40 positive and SV 40 negative patients in terms of mean age (51 versus 59), IPI score (2.5 versus 1.9), LDH level (565 versus 675), no. of chemotherapy regimens (6.17 versus 6.3) and first complete remission (CR) rate (67% versus 58%).
  • With a median follow up of 3 years, 31 (63%) patients died (4/6 in SV40 positive versus 27/43 in negative, p=not significant).
  • However, there was a significant association with gastric lymphoma.

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  • (PMID = 28016453.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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51. Shah SR, Dowell J, Wilson P, Hughes R: An evaluation of clinical pharmacy services in hematology/oncology out-patient setting. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6109

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] An evaluation of clinical pharmacy services in hematology/oncology out-patient setting.
  • : 6109 Background: VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, TX provides a unique opportunity for a clinical pharmacist to work as a provider.
  • Clinical pharmacists provide services under specific Scope of Practice document.
  • Even though clinical pharmacists are actively involved in patient care, many clinical pharmacy efforts remains undocumented, resulting in underestimation of the importance of clinical pharmacy services and missed opportunity for improvement and new direction.
  • The purpose of this project was to document and evaluate the services of hematology/oncology clinical pharmacy in the out-patient setting.
  • The template was designed to collect diagnoses, supportive care issues, drug specific interventions and prescriptions written.
  • Patient specific information was documented in password protected PDA by the hematology/oncology pharmacist or pharmacy residents.
  • RESULTS: Clinical pharmacists had 423 patient visits for chemotherapy follow-up or disease management.
  • Clinical pharmacists saw on average 35.25 patients per month.
  • Patient diagnoses included colon-rectal cancer (23%), multiple-myeloma (14%), non-small cell lung cancer (13%), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (10%), myelodysplastic syndromes (5%), chronic myelogenous leukemia (4%) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (4%).
  • Major drug specific interventions included drug addition (41%), discontinuation (23%) and adjustment (21%).
  • Clinical pharmacists were actively involved in prescribing medications.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to document the considerable contribution that clinical pharmacist can make to the care of oncology patients.

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  • (PMID = 28014750.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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52. Park B, Kim W, Eom H, Kim J, Oh S, Suh C: A phase II trial of gemcitabine, ifosfamide, dexamethasone, and oxaliplatin (GIDOX) for patients with refractory or relapsed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8559

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase II trial of gemcitabine, ifosfamide, dexamethasone, and oxaliplatin (GIDOX) for patients with refractory or relapsed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • : 8559 Background: Gemcitabine combined with cisplatin has been known as an effective regimen for lymphoma treatment in salvage setting.
  • We investigated the response rate and toxicity of gemcitabine, ifosfamide, dexamethasone, and oxaliplatin (GIDOx) for recurrent or refractory aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), looking for the more effective and less toxic therapy.
  • METHODS: Patients with recurrent or refractory diffuse large B-cell NHL or mantle cell lymphoma, measurable disease, and more than one previous chemotherapy regimen were eligible.
  • Treatment consisted of gemcitabine 1000 mg/m<sup>2</sup> intravenously (i.v.) on Days 1 and 8, ifosfamide 2000 mg/m<sup>2</sup> i.v. on Day 1, dexamethasone 40 mg orally on Days 1-4, and oxaliplatin 130mg/m<sup>2</sup> i.v. on Day 2, every 21 days.
  • Patients could then proceed to stem cell transplantation (SCT) or receive up to six treatment cycles.
  • The median age of the patients was 54 years (range, 18-75 years) and most had diffuse large-cell lymphoma.
  • After 3 cycles, there were 4 complete responses (CR; 15%) and 10 partial responses (PR; 37%).
  • The RR after completion of all protocol chemotherapy including SCT was 44% (10 CR, 2 PR).

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  • (PMID = 27960992.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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53. Georgakis GV, Li Y, Robin H, Andreeff M, Susan O, Albert V, Younes A: Selective agnostic monoclonal antibodies to the TRAIL receptors R1 and R2 induce cell death and potentiate the effect of chemotherapy and bortezomib in primary and cultured lymphoma cells. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6595

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Selective agnostic monoclonal antibodies to the TRAIL receptors R1 and R2 induce cell death and potentiate the effect of chemotherapy and bortezomib in primary and cultured lymphoma cells.
  • Recent studies demonstrated that agonisitic antibodies to the TRAIL death receptors R1 and R2 can mimick the activity of TRAIL protein, and therefore may be of therapeutic value.
  • The activity of these novel antibodies have been previously examined in primary lymphoma specimens.
  • METHODS: We evaluated the in vitro activity of two fully human agonistic monoclonal antibodies to the TRAIL death receptors R1 (HGS-ETR1) and R2 (HGS-ETR2) in 5 lymphoma cell lines and 27 primary lymphoid malignancy samples.
  • Both ETR1 and ETR2 inhibited cell prolifeation and induced apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner.
  • When the analysis is restricted to the 13 cases of primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma samples, ETR1 induced at least 10% cell death in 62% of the samples, while ETR2 was effective in 77% of the samples.
  • In some cases, ETR1 and ETR2 synergized with bortezomib (Velcade) and doxorubicin chemotherapy.
  • This preclinical data provide the basis for evaluating these novel antibodies for the treatment of patients with lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

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  • (PMID = 28016229.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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54. Khanna C, Cozzi E, Sharpee R, Vail D, Graham J, Kitchell B, Rusk T: A randomized placebo-controlled pre-clinical trial of the anti-angiogenic thromobspondin-mimetic peptide ABT-526 plus Lomustine chemotherapy versus Lomustine chemotherapy alone in pet dogs with relapsed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):3088

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A randomized placebo-controlled pre-clinical trial of the anti-angiogenic thromobspondin-mimetic peptide ABT-526 plus Lomustine chemotherapy versus Lomustine chemotherapy alone in pet dogs with relapsed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • METHODS: To assess the safety and efficacy of ABT-526 when given in combination with Lomustine chemotherapy, 94 pet dogs with naturally occurring non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), in their first relapse, were entered to a prospective randomized placebo controlled double-blinded clinical trial.
  • Response rate, duration of response, time to progression, and incidence of toxicoses were compared between groups.
  • Lomustine associated dose-limiting toxicities, including neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, gastroenteritis, and elevated alanine transaminase, were similar between treatment groups.
  • No significant difference in the objective response rate was seen between treatment groups [ABT-526+Lomustine = 23/49 (47%) vs placebo+Lomustine = 23/37 (62%); P>0.25].
  • The time to progression for responding cases was also significantly greater in patients receiving ABT-526 plus Lomustine compared to placebo plus Lomustine (41 days vs 21 days; P=0.047).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The significant activity of ABT-526 demonstrated in this preclinical trial appears to be associated with the maintenance of Lomustine induced treatment responses.
  • Further studies of ABT-526, in this relevant naturally occurring model of NHL, are warranted and may be used to define biomarkers that predict responsiveness to antiangiogenic therapy and evaluate the activity of ABT-526 in combination with conventional and novel treatment agents.

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  • (PMID = 28014805.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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55. Gerecitano JF, O'Connor O, Van Deventer H, Hainsworth J, Leonard J, Afanasayev B, Chen M, Seroogy J, Escandon R, Wolff A, Conlan M: A phase I/II trial of the kinesin spindle protein (KSP) inhibitor SB-743921 dosed q14d without and with prophylactic G-CSF in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) or Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8578

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase I/II trial of the kinesin spindle protein (KSP) inhibitor SB-743921 dosed q14d without and with prophylactic G-CSF in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) or Hodgkin lymphoma (HL).
  • Eligible patients (pts) have relapsed or refractory HL or NHL, aggressive (a) or indolent (i), have had at least 1 prior chemotherapy (CT) regimen, and have relapsed after or were not candidates for stem cell transplant.
  • This is a standard 3+3 dose escalation trial design, starting at 2 mg/m<sup>2</sup> and escalating by 1 mg/m<sup>2</sup>.
  • RESULTS: 39 pts were treated (-GCSF) at 6 dose levels (2-7 mg/m<sup>2</sup>).
  • For all 51 pts treated to date, mean age was 52 yr; 53% were male; 39% HL, 33% aNHL, and 28% iNHL; 76% had ≥3 prior CT regimens.
  • There were 2 partial responses (PR), both in elderly pts with HL with ≥2 prior CT regimens, 1 at 6 (-GCSF) and 1 at 8 (+GCSF) mg/m<sup>2</sup>, ongoing at Cycle 4+.
  • This dose density (0.43 mg/m<sup>2</sup>/d) is >2-fold higher than in the FIH trial with a q21d schedule (0.19 mg/m<sup>2</sup>/d).
  • Dose escalation (+GCSF) is continuing.
  • Activity has been observed in HL, with 2 PRs at doses ≥6 mg/m<sup>2</sup>.

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  • (PMID = 27962277.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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56. Czuczman MS, Vose J, Zinzani P, Reeder C, Buckstein R, Haioun C, Bouabdallah R, Polikoff J, Ervin-Haynes A, Witzig T: Efficacy and safety of lenalidomide oral monotherapy in patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: Results from an international study (NHL-003). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e19504

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Efficacy and safety of lenalidomide oral monotherapy in patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: Results from an international study (NHL-003).
  • : e19504 Background: Patients with diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) who are not cured with R-CHOP or high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue have a dismal prognosis.
  • A recent phase II trial (NHL-002) of lenalidomide in patients with relapsed or refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) demonstrated a 19% overall response rate (ORR) with a 7-month median duration of response (DR) in the subset of patients with DLBCL.
  • A supporting international phase II trial (NHL-003) of single-agent lenalidomide was initiated for patients with relapsed or refractory aggressive NHL that had received at least one prior treatment and had measurable disease.
  • METHODS: Patients received 25 mg oral lenalidomide once daily on days 1-21 of every 28-day cycle and continued therapy until disease progression or toxicity.
  • Median time from diagnosis was 2 years (0.4-18.6), patients had received a median of 3 prior treatment regimens (1-10) and 46 of the patients (45%) had received a prior stem cell transplant (DLBCL-stem cell).
  • CONCLUSIONS: This international study demonstrates that lenalidomide is active in heavily pre-treated patients with relapsed or refractory DLBCL and has manageable side effects.

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  • (PMID = 27960873.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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57. Mena RR, Smith J, George S, Geils G, Geils G, Yunus F: Safety and efficacy of pentostatin and rituximab in patients with low-grade B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (Protocol N007). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6569

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Safety and efficacy of pentostatin and rituximab in patients with low-grade B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (Protocol N007).
  • : 6569 Background: Chemotherapy for patients with low grade B-cell malignancies is seldom curative.
  • Therapies that delay disease progression with limited toxicity may benefit patients considerably.
  • Pentostatin and rituximab have demonstrated activity and safety in single agent and combination therapies against B-cell NHL and CLL.
  • Disease response was evaluated between days 57-64 according to the International Working Group criteria for NHL.
  • Patients with PR or SD, could repeat treatment days 8 through 50, at investigators discretion.
  • Safety and time to progression were assessed.
  • Among patients with chemotherapy prior to study, OR rate was 56.6% in NHL (20% CR, 13.3% CRu, 23.3% PR, N=30) and 33.3% in CLL patients (3.7% CR, 3.7% CRu, 25.9 PR, N=27).
  • In patients with no prior chemotherapy, OR rate was 82.3% in NHL (35.3% CR, 8.8% CRu, 38.2 PR, N=34) and 57.1% (14.3% CR, 9.5% CRu, 33.3 PR, N=21) in CLL patients.
  • One patient expired on treatment from causes unrelated to study medications.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Preliminary results suggest that in patients with low grade NHL and CLL, combination chemotherapy with pentostatin and rituximab appears well tolerated and effective.
  • Preliminary results on time to progression will be reported.

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  • (PMID = 28016946.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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58. Sohn B, Yoon D, Kim S, Lee D, Kim S, Huh J, Lee J, Suh C: Outcomes in patients with primary gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma after rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (R-CHOP) chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e19543

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Outcomes in patients with primary gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma after rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (R-CHOP) chemotherapy.
  • : e19543 Background: The optimal therapy for primary gastric diffuse large B- cell lymphoma (DLBCL) still needs to be defined.
  • The aim of this study was to investigate the patient's outcomes after rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (R-CHOP) treatment in primary gastric DLBCL in a single institution.
  • METHODS: We searched AMC Registry for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma and found 26 patients with primary gastric DLBCL, who received R-CHOP as first-line chemotherapy.
  • Ten of 26 patients had localized disease.
  • Remaining patients had disseminated disease.
  • After analyses of 10 patients with localized disease, we found that these patients had received a total 38 cycles, with a median of 3 cycles per patient.
  • Of 10 patients, one patient had 2 cycles of R-CHOP, 4 had 3 cycles, and one had 4 cycles, all 6 patients above followed by consolidation radiotherapy.
  • Remaining one patient and 4 patients had 5 cycles and 6 cycles of R-CHOP, respectively.
  • In patients with localized disease, CR was observed in 10 of 10 patients (100%), and both 3-year EFS and OS was 100% (10 of 10 patients).
  • In analyses with 16 patients with disseminated disease, all patients had received a total 91 cycles, with a median of 6 cycles per patient.
  • In these patients, two patients had radiation therapy after R-CHOP, one patient had CR before consolidation radiation therapy, and another had partial response before radiation therapy.
  • CR after R-CHOP treatment was observed in 10 of 16 patients (62.5%), partial response in 3 patients, stable disease in 1 patient, and progressive disease in 1 patient.
  • Three-year EFS and OS was 61.1% and 57.8% in patients with disseminated disease.
  • Combination with rituximab in CHOP regimen showed excellent prognosis especially in patients with localized disease.
  • In localized disease, CR was 100%, 3-year EFS and OS was 100%.
  • In disseminated disease, CR was 62.5%, 3-year EFS and OS was 61.1% and 57.8%.

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  • (PMID = 27960994.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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59. Bartlett N, Forero-Torres A, Rosenblatt J, Fanale M, Horning SJ, Thompson S, Sievers EL, Kennedy DA: Complete remissions with weekly dosing of SGN-35, a novel antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) targeting CD30, in a phase I dose-escalation study in patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) or systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (sALCL). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8500

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Complete remissions with weekly dosing of SGN-35, a novel antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) targeting CD30, in a phase I dose-escalation study in patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) or systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (sALCL).
  • : 8500 Background: A defining feature of HL and sALCL is CD30 expression on malignant cells.
  • In a previous phase 1 study with q3 wk dosing, 54% of pts achieved an objective response (CR/PR) at SGN-35 doses ≥1.2 mg/kg [ASH 2008 abstract 1006].
  • METHODS: To assess if more frequent dosing might maximize anti-tumor activity with acceptable tolerability, a multicenter, phase 1, weekly dosing, dose-escalation study (3+3 design) was conducted in pts with refractory or recurrent HL or sALCL.
  • SGN-35 was administered weekly at doses of 0.4-1 mg/kg (2-hr IV infusions).
  • Pts with stable disease or better (Cheson 2007) after two 28-day cycles (6 doses) were eligible to continue SGN-35 treatment.
  • Pts received a median of 4 prior therapies; 65% received an autologous SCT.
  • Exposure to SGN-35 (AUC) increased relative to dose level.
  • Multiple CRs were observed at higher doses ( table ); observed time to response in the 1 mg/kg dose group was approximately 8 wks.
  • The 7 pts with CRs all remain on treatment.
  • Enrollment to SGN-35 monotherapy continues at 1.2 mg/kg; combination therapy will be subsequently explored.
  • CONCLUSIONS: SGN-35 was generally well tolerated and induced CRs in 7 of 8 evaluable pts at the two highest doses in heavily pretreated patients.
  • Pivotal trials of this antibody-drug conjugate will initiate in early 2009.

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  • (PMID = 27960851.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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60. Wirth A, Grigg A, Wolf M, Davis S, Hertzberg M, Joseph D, Johnson C, Weih L, Australasian Leukaemia and Lymphoma Group, Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Lymphoma Group: Risk and response adapted treatment for early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (ESHL): Preliminary results of an Australasian Leukaemia & Lymphoma Group/Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group study. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6531

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Risk and response adapted treatment for early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (ESHL): Preliminary results of an Australasian Leukaemia & Lymphoma Group/Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group study.
  • : 6531 Background: Risk- and response-adapted therapy of ESHL may provide an optimal balance of efficacy and toxicity.
  • METHODS: Patients (Pt) with clinically staged ESHL were assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups which determined the initial number of ABVD cycles administered: Group(Gp) A (Stage I-IIA, no risk factors)-3 cycles; Gp B (I-IIA with ≥ 1 risk factor (ESR > 50, bulky disease, extra-nodal disease, > 3 sites)-4 cycles; and Gp C (I-II with B symptoms)-4 cycles.
  • The protocol specified that involved-field radiotherapy 30 Gy (IFRT) be given for Gps A and B if they attained a complete response/unconfirmed (CR/u) or partial response (PR) to initial ABVD, and for Gp C only if they attained a CR/u.
  • Lesser responses/major toxicity led to treatment at clinician discretion.
  • Data presented are for 12 months follow-up after completion of initial treatment.
  • RESULTS: There were 148 eligible pt: median age 34 yrs, 52% male, 32% stage I, 18% B-symptoms, 20% bulky disease, 5% extra-nodal.
  • 10 pt had individualised treatment.
  • Main results are presented in the table: [Figure: see text] Conclusions: Protocol treatment was well tolerated.
  • Response and early progression rates were promising after 3 ABVD+IFRT for pt without risk factors and, if confirmed on follow-up, support further treatment de-escalation studies for this pt group.
  • For pt with B-symptoms or other risk factors, further follow-up is needed to assess the adequacy of 4 ABVD + IFRT, and the importance of the response to initial chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 28016940.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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61. Machover D, Delmas-Marsalet B, Gumus Y, Misra SC, Ulusakarya A, Brahimi N, Goldschmidt E, Frenoy N, Guettier C: Dexamethasone, high-dose cytarabine, and oxaliplatin (DHAOx), and rituximab plus DHAOx (R-DHAOx) for treatment of patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: Results from two consecutive phase II studies. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6681

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Dexamethasone, high-dose cytarabine, and oxaliplatin (DHAOx), and rituximab plus DHAOx (R-DHAOx) for treatment of patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: Results from two consecutive phase II studies.
  • : 6681 Background: To determine, from two consecutive phase II studies, the efficacy of oxaliplatin (L-OHP), cytarabine (ara-C), and dexamethasone (DHAOx), and DHAOx plus rituximab (R-DHAOx), in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL).
  • METHODS: In Study I, treatment consisted of DHAOx (dexamethasone, 40 mg/day, days 1 to 4; L-OHP, 130 mg/m2, day 1; and ara-C, 2,000 mg/m2, every 12 hrs, day 2).
  • In Study II, treatment consisted of R-DHAOx (DHAOx plus rituximab, on day 1, 375 mg/m2).
  • Patients had failed to achieve a complete response (CR) with initial chemotherapy, were in relapse, or could not receive standard treatment.
  • RESULTS: Response to therapy: Study I: Eight patients (61.5%) achieved a CR, and 1 (8%) had a PR.
  • None of the complete responders has relapsed; they had a median disease-free survival (DFS) of 44.6 months.
  • Study II: Fifteen patients (68%) achieved a CR, and 3 (13.5%) had a PR.
  • Responses were obtained in lymphomas of follicular, marginal-zone, mantle-cell, and diffuse large B-cell subtypes, and in patients with or without resistance to prior chemotherapy.
  • TOXICITY: Myelosuppression and dose-related peripheral neuropathy were the most prominent toxic effects.
  • CONCLUSIONS: DHAOx and R-DHAOx are highly active for salvage treatment of patients with B-cell NHLs, and possess toxicity characteristics which compare favorably to those reported with ara-C plus cisplatin-containing regimens.

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  • (PMID = 28016419.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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62. Ogura M, Kagami Y, Itoh K, Tobinai K, Chou T, Aikawa K, Ishizuka N, Hotta T, Shimoyama M, members of the Lymphoma Study Group of Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG-LSG): Standard CHOP therapy for low (L) or low-intermediate (L-I) risk patients (pts) with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL): A multicenter phase II study by Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG 9508). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6703

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Standard CHOP therapy for low (L) or low-intermediate (L-I) risk patients (pts) with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL): A multicenter phase II study by Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG 9508).
  • : 6703 Background: To confirm the efficacy and safety of standard CHOP therapy in Japanese pts with L or L-I risk aggressive NHL, we conducted a multicenter phase II study with overall survival (OS) as primary endpoint.
  • METHODS: Eligibility criteria were as follows: newly-diagnosed, intermediate or high grade NHL by Working Formulation; L or L-I risk by International Prognostic Index (IPI); clinical stage of II, III, IV or bulky I; ages less than 70; PS 0-3.
  • Eight courses of standard CHOP therapy were given every 3 weeks.
  • Involved-field radiotherapy (30 to 40 Gy) was added after chemotherapy for bulky disease at baseline, and was optional for residual tumors.
  • RESULTS: Between June 1995 and May 1999, a total of 213 pts were enrolled, and 173 pts were pathologically eligible (diffuse large B; 68%) by the central review according to WHO classification.
  • Out of 173 pts, 87 and 80 pts were of L and L-I risk, respectively.
  • Three pts with high-intermediate IPI risk, 1 high IPI risk, 1 stage I without bulky disease, and 1 prior radiotherapy were ineligible.
  • % complete response of L and L-I risk pts was 83% (95% CI; 74-90%) and 74% (95% CI; 63-83%), respectively.
  • Non-hematologic toxicities were acceptable; the most frequent grade 3 toxicity was nausea/vomiting (3%), and grade 4 toxicity was observed in one who developed paralytic ileus.
  • One treatment-related death was observed due to hepatitis B virus reactivation.
  • CONCLUSIONS: CHOP was confirmed to be a standard therapy in Japanese pts with L or L-I risk aggressive NHL.
  • However, the relatively low %PFS suggests the necessity of further investigations to find more effective first-line therapy for L-I risk pts.

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  • (PMID = 28014620.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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63. Larocca RV, Cervera A, Hargis JB, Glisson SD, Goldsmith GH, Laureano MA, Foreman B: High-dose (HD) irinotecan in patients with recurrent unresectable high-grade gliomas on glucoronidation-enhancing anticonvulsants (GEACs): A phase I/II study. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):1578

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] High-dose (HD) irinotecan in patients with recurrent unresectable high-grade gliomas on glucoronidation-enhancing anticonvulsants (GEACs): A phase I/II study.
  • The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the objective response rate and time to progression for HD irinotecan in patients with recurrent high-grade gliomas who are concomitantly receiving GEACs.
  • The secondary objective is to determine the optimal dosing of irinotecan on a q2wk schedule and evaluate dose-related toxicities in that setting.
  • METHODS: Patients with radiographic evidence of progressive high-grade astrocytic neoplasms receiving GEACs were enrolled in this prospective, nonrandomized trial: all had received prior chemotherapy (1-2 systemic chemotherapeutic regimens [n = 10] and Gliadel wafers [n = 3]).
  • An initial cohort of 15 patients will be treated with irinotecan at a dose of 750 mg/m<sup>2</sup> q3wk.
  • Median time to progression of the entire cohort was 5 months.
  • Seven patients had stable disease lasting ≥5 months.
  • Two patients had stable disease lasting 10 months (glioblastoma multiforme) and 11 months (anaplastic astrocytoma), respectively.
  • Four patients had disease progression within 3 months.
  • CONCLUSIONS: HD irinotecan appears to be safe when combined with GEACs in this poor-prognosis patient group and has modest activity at the current dosing schedule.

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  • (PMID = 28015722.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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64. Gillespie TW, Patterson H, Harris WB, Shumate M, Nadella P, Jacobs J, Ribeiro MJ: Improving clinical outcomes in elderly oncology patients. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6075

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Improving clinical outcomes in elderly oncology patients.
  • : 6075 Background: Clinical decision-making for elderly patients with cancer is often challenged by limited outcome data from clinical trials; concerns regarding toxicities and co-morbidities; and inability to readily select patients who might tolerate more intensive therapy.
  • The Screening Geriatric Assessment (SGA) is a briefer version and may quickly predict older patients who might tolerate standard therapy.
  • METHODS: A prospective trial (N=57) was conducted to determine the role of SGA in treatment decision-making and improving clinical outcomes.
  • Published evidence, NCCN guidelines for the elderly, and consensus of clinicians at the Atlanta VA Medical Center were used to develop treatment standards for all stages/cell types of non-small cell lung cancer(N=39) or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (N=18).
  • Consenting patients at point of clinical decision-making were enrolled into Cohort A (age ≥ 65; N=29) or B (age 50-64; N=28).
  • All patients were screened for functionality and given an objective score based on the SGA at time of enrollment.
  • Significantly more older patients (75%) were able to finish their prescribed treatment, both radiation and chemotherapy, compared to the younger cohort (47%) (p=0.012).
  • Strong negative correlation was found between relative dose intensity (RDI) delivered and SGA category (p=.005).
  • A regression model was developed that explained 40% of the variance for RDI delivered; primary predictors were thrombocytopenia and febrile neutropenia (p=.04; adjusted r<sup>2</sup> =.24).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The SGA may serve to promote use of standard-of-care to treat elderly patients, and as a practical screening tool to identify older and younger patients at risk for suboptimal clinical outcomes.
  • Chronological age alone is a poor predictor of dose reductions/delays, toxicities, or ability to complete therapy.

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  • (PMID = 28014958.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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65. Hoffman KR: Understanding among medical oncologists of the true monetary cost of therapy. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):6629

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Understanding among medical oncologists of the true monetary cost of therapy.
  • : 6629 Background: While oncologists are educated to deal with the medical complexities of their treatment, a new side effect, that of financial toxicity, has arisen over the past several years.
  • One of the major challenges in private practice is explaining the monetary cost of treatment to the patient.
  • METHODS: 50 medical oncologists agreed to take a survey judging their knowledge of the financial cost of the treatments used in patients with the five most common tumors treated in the office: breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, colorectal cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and three other commonly treated cancers: chronic myelogenous leukemia, multiple myeloma and ovarian cancer.
  • Treatment regimens in the adjuvant and first line metastatic setting were used.
  • Physicians were asked to calculate the cost of treatments to the patient and not the acquisition price of drugs.
  • They were asked to calculate the cost based a patient completing their adjuvant therapy or treatment in the first-line metastatic setting, which was defined by each practicioner.
  • If desired, this included the use of maintenance therapy.
  • In almost all cases where intravenous or oral targeted therapies were used, the physicians under-estimated the actual cost of treatment to the patient by 25-40%.
  • When 'conventional' intravenous chemotherapy was used, they were either correct or over-estimated the cost of treatment by 25 to 33%, especially when generic substitution of trade name drugs were available.
  • More importantly, the actual dollar difference was up to $50,000 when targeted therapies were in the treatment regimen but only around $5,000 when conventional treatments were considered.
  • Nearly all the physicians were 'within the ballpark' when dealing with the cost of oral medications.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Medical oncologists have a poor understanding of the monetary costs of the newer treatments they are prescribing.
  • More education is needed in the economics, including monetary cost-benefit analysis, of oncology practice so that we can better serve our patients and society.

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  • (PMID = 27961808.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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66. Lee GW: The prophylactic use of lamivudine can maintain dose-intensity of doxorubicin in hepatitis-B surface antigen (HBs Ag)-positive patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who received cytotoxic chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6607

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The prophylactic use of lamivudine can maintain dose-intensity of doxorubicin in hepatitis-B surface antigen (HBs Ag)-positive patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who received cytotoxic chemotherapy.
  • : 6607 Background: We investigated the effectiveness of lamivudine to prevent hepatitis flare up due to reactivation of hepatitis-B virus (HBV) in hepatitis-B surface antigen (HBs Ag)-positive patients with Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) during cytotoxic chemotherapy.
  • METHODS: HBsAg-positive patients with NHL were identified from the lymphoma database of the Asan Medical Center from January 1995 to August 2002, and their medical records were reviewed.
  • We found that 31 patients were received cytotoxic chemotherapy among 41 NHL patients with HBsAg-positive during same period.
  • We divided them into 2 groups of HBs Ag patients with NHL as follows: Group A who received cytotoxic chemotherapy with lamivudine 100mg daily; Group B without any prophylactic antiviral therapy.
  • RESULTS: There were no significant differences between Group A and B in several clinical variables.
  • The mean dose intensity of doxorubicin (Adriamycin) actually delivered was 13.3mg/m<sup>2</sup>/week (80% Relative Dose intensity [RDI]) in Group A and 9.1mg/m<sup>2</sup>/week (55% RDI) in Groups B (p<0.001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that the frequency of chemotherapy-related HBV reactivation may be significantly decreased by lamivudine prophylaxis with maintenance of the dosage of adriamycin.

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  • (PMID = 28016584.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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67. Buckstein R, Crump M, Shaked Y, Foden C, Nayar R, Taylor D, Bertolini F, Baruchel S, Man S, Kerbel R: Palliation of relapsed aggressive histology NHL with high-dose celecoxib and 'metronomic' low-dose cyclophosphamide. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):3016

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Palliation of relapsed aggressive histology NHL with high-dose celecoxib and 'metronomic' low-dose cyclophosphamide.
  • : 3016 Background: Relapsed aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) has a poor prognosis; and new treatments are needed.
  • Angiogenesis is increased in aggressive NHL, and may be a target in these diseases.
  • Low dose chronic chemotherapy (metronomic chemotherapy, MC) inhibits angiogenesis in vitro.
  • Since COX-2 may promote neoplasia and tumour angiogenesis, selective COX-2 inhibitors may have anti-tumour effects in NHL.We assessed response to MC and COX-2 inhibition and toxicity in patients (pts) with relapsed aggressive NHL following anthracycline based chemotherapy.
  • METHODS: Pts with measureable disease and normal renal function received cyclophosphamide 50 mg po qd + celecoxib 400 mg po bid.
  • RESULTS: To date 21 of a planned 32 pts have been treated; 17 are evaluable for response.
  • Median 3.3 yrs from diagnosis (range 0.9 to 9.5); 5 in 1st relapse, 4 in 2nd, 4 in 3rd, 4 in 4th and 2 with PD.
  • Median # of previous chemotherapy regimens: 3 (range 1-6); prior ASCT: 7.
  • Median time to death or last follow-up: 8.5 mos (range 1.8-17); 6/17 pts responded (1 CRu, 5 PR,ORR 35%) at a median time of 4.6 mos, and 4 remain in PR at 18, 14, 12 and 3 mos.
  • Two pts have SD and 10 have progressed at a median time of 1.9 mos (range <1-9); 7 have died of NHL.
  • Adverse events(# pts): grade 3-4 ANC (2), grade 3 plt (3), grade 3 hypertension(1), grade 3 headache(1) and grade 3 drug rash(1).
  • CONCLUSIONS: MC with high-dose celecoxib and low dose cyclophosphamide is well tolerated and active in heavily treated relapsed aggressive NHL.

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  • (PMID = 28015166.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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68. Kim J, Kim E, Sohn B, Yoon D, Yoo C, Kim S, Lee D, Kim S, Lee J, Suh C: BEAM or BuCyE high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7097

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] BEAM or BuCyE high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients.
  • : 7097 Background: The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy and toxicity of two high-dose regimens for autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL): BEAM (BCNU, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan) and BuCyE (busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide).
  • METHODS: We analysed 65 NHL patients, who underwent high-dose chemotherapy with BEAM (N=43) or BuCyE (N=22), followed by ASCT, at the Asan Medical Center.
  • RESULTS: Median age was 46 years (range: 15-68), and baseline characteristics, such as gender, International Prognostic Index (IPI), age adjusted IPI, stage and status of disease at ASCT, and median number of infused CD 34+cells/kg were well balanced between groups.

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  • (PMID = 27961268.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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69. Dale DC, Crawford J, Agboola O, Lyman GH, Anc Study Group: Febrile neutropenia and reduced dose intensity in patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) treated with CHOP and CNOP. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6599

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Febrile neutropenia and reduced dose intensity in patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) treated with CHOP and CNOP.
  • : 6599 Background: Myelosuppression remains the major dose-limiting toxicity of systemic chemotherapy in patients with intermediate grade NHL.
  • Recent studies support the importance of sustaining dose intensity in this setting.
  • METHODS: A survey of 1243 community oncology practices including nearly 5500 patients receiving chemotherapy for NHL was undertaken to evaluate the impact of demographic, clinical and treatment related factors on delivered dose intensity.
  • Relative dose intensity (RDI) was estimated for each drug as the ratio of dose intensity received to standard dose intensity for each regimen.
  • RESULTS: This analysis is limited to 3536 patients with aggressive NHL (Working Formulation D-H) treated with CHOP (87%) or CNOP (13%) chemotherapy over a 10-year period from 1992 to 2001.
  • Febrile neutropenia (FN) occurred one or more times in 21% of patients of which 76% required hospitalization.
  • In multivariate analysis, significant risk factors for FN included age >65 (OR=1.8), female gender (OR=1.5), heart disease (OR=3.3), liver disease (OR=3.4) and ECOG performance status ≥2 (OR=2.1).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Nearly one-half of patients with aggressive NHL histology treated with CHOP-like regimens experienced substantial dose reductions related to age, stage, gender, obesity, regimen and previous FN hospitalization.

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  • (PMID = 28016223.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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70. Sieniawski M, Josting A, Breuer K, Sven T, Diehl V, Engert A: Fertility in male patients with Hodgkin's disease after therapy -results from the German Hodgkin Lymphoma Study Group (GHSG). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6547

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Fertility in male patients with Hodgkin's disease after therapy -results from the German Hodgkin Lymphoma Study Group (GHSG).
  • : 6547 Background: Treatment results in Hodgkin Disease (HD) have improved tremendously over the last two decades.
  • Therefore long term sides effects of therapy are of growing importance.
  • Infertility after therapy of HD is considered as a side effect of chemotherapy and radiotherapy.
  • However patients with HD have increased risk for inadequate semen quality even prior to treatment.
  • To investigate the influence of therapy on the fertility status in patients with HD we performed semen analysis before and after treatment.
  • METHODS: Semen quality was evaluated in patients with first diagnosis of HD enrolled into trials of the GHSG between 1988 and 2002.
  • Patients had no history of chemotherapy or radiotherapy.
  • RESULTS: We included 111 male patients with a median age of 26 years (range 16-52 years).
  • At first diagnosis 10 patients were in clinical stage (CS) I, 60 in CS II, 60 in CS III and 8 in CS IV; systemic symptoms were present in 52 patients.
  • In 9 patients therapy regimens consisted only of chemotherapy, in 12 of radiotherapy and in 90 of combined modality.
  • 71 patients underwent fertility screening before therapy; normospermia was diagnosed in 19 patients.
  • All 111 patients underwent at least once a fertility screening after therapy; in 38 patients (34%) a recovery of spermatogenesis was observed (1<sup>st</sup> year: 18% (n=7); 2<sup>nd</sup> year: 24% (n=9); 3<sup>rd</sup> year: 26% (n=10); after 3<sup>rd</sup> year: 132% (n=12).
  • From 12 patients treated with radiotherapy 11 (92%) recovered from azoospermia, from 9 patients treated only with chemotherapy only 1 patient recovered and from 90 patient treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy recovered 26 (29%).
  • Recovery rate from azoospermia was lower in patients treated with BEACOPP chemotherapy, with systemic symptoms and elevated BSG.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We confirmed that HD patients had inadequate semen quality even prior to treatment.
  • The majority of patients had azoospermia after treatment, but recovery of spermatogenesis was observed, in general after 2 years after the end of therapy.

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  • (PMID = 28016927.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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71. Bernardi D, Milan I, Balzarotti M, Giacalone A, Uziel L, Siracusano L, Ferreri AJ, Spina M, Santoro A, Tirelli U: Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in elderly patients (pts): Patient-tailored treatment according to a comprehensive geriatric evaluation. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6678

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in elderly patients (pts): Patient-tailored treatment according to a comprehensive geriatric evaluation.
  • Therefore, we designed a new approach for elderly pts (>70 years) with aggressive NHL, that allows a pt-tailored treatment with the aim of maintaining a balance between the desire of curing the tumor and the need of providing a good quality of life.
  • These pts receive CHOP (those with a very good functional status) or CEOP (if mild cardiopathy is present) or CVP (if severe cardiopathy is present) or CEO (if diabetes mellitus is present).
  • Dose reductions of chemotherapy (CT) are also applied according to IADL and ADL.
  • Non-hematologic toxicity was evaluated in 56 patients (239 cycles) and was as follows: G3 gastrointestinal in 2 cycles, G3 neurologic in 9 cycles, G3 infection in 4 cycles.
  • We also believe that a similar approach should be employed for future studies aimed at determining the best treatment for elderly pts affected by any cancer type.

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  • (PMID = 28016436.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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72. Sola CB, Silva L, Saliba R, De Lima M, Giralt S, Qazilbash M, Champlin R, Khouri I, Popat U, Hosing C: Outcomes of autologous bone marrow transplantation in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients who failed peripheral blood stem cell mobilization. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7040

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Outcomes of autologous bone marrow transplantation in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients who failed peripheral blood stem cell mobilization.
  • : 7040 Background: Patients (pts) with relapsed/refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) who fail to mobilize adequate peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) often undergo bone marrow (BM) harvest for autologous transplantation.
  • METHODS: In this retrospective study (May 1996-September 2006), we identified 36 out of a total of 750 pts with advanced NHL, who failed to collect adequate PBSC and subsequently underwent BM harvest followed by ABMT.
  • Decision to harvest BM was left to the treating clinician.
  • Twelve pts (35%) had history of BM involvement with lymphoma.
  • Median number of chemotherapy cycles received prior to mobilization was 3 (range 1-6).
  • At the time of stem cell mobilization 18 (50%) were in complete remission (CR), 13 (37%) were in partial remission (PR) and 5 (13%) had progressive disease (PD).
  • RESULTS: The median total nucleated cell dose and CD34+ cell dose harvested/kg were 3.72 x 10<sup>8</sup> (range 0.25-58.0) and 1.6 x 10<sup>6</sup> (range 0.03-5.8), respectively.
  • After ABMT, 33 of 35 evaluable (94%) pts engrafted neutrophils with median time to ANC 0.5 x 10<sup>9</sup>/L of 23 days (range 8-47).
  • Median time to platelet count 20 x 10<sup>9</sup>/L was 63 days (range 11-375).
  • Causes of death were: disease progression/relapse in 15 (60%), secondary malignancy in 3 (12%), multiorgan failure in 5 (20%), and unknown in 2 (8%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: ABMT is feasible in pts who fail to mobilize adequate PBSC, however, these pts have longer time to engraftment.
  • Non-myeloablative allogeneic transplantation may provide better outcomes with similar toxicity and needs to be further studied.

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  • (PMID = 27961403.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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73. Mankan N, Madhunapantala S, Maini A: An unusual presentation of body cavity lymphoma. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6699

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] An unusual presentation of body cavity lymphoma.
  • : 6699 Background: BCL (Body Cavity Lymphoma) is an uncommon primary NHL (Non-Hodgkin's lymphoms) that proliferates within serous body cavities - pleural, pericardial or peritoneal, resulting in recurrent effusions.
  • In the absence of HIV infection, it almost universally develops in the background of HHV-8/KSHV (Human Herpes Virus-8/ Kaposi's Sarcoma Herpes Virus) infection with or without EBV (Epstein Barr Virus).
  • He is heterosexual, monogamous, non-smoker and denied alcohol or intravenous drug abuse.
  • Clinical examination revealed a right-sided pleural effusion only.
  • Pleural fluid LDH 4500 U/L and cytology revealed Large cell lymphoma.
  • Bone marrow aspiration biopsy and flow-cytometry were negative for disease.
  • CD4 count was 400 and CD8 was 300 with a ratio of 1.3.
  • A diagnosis of BCL was made.
  • He underwent therapeutic thoracentesis with relief of respiratory symptoms.Standard CHOP-like chemotherapy has been planned for this patient.

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  • (PMID = 28014390.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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74. Von Drygalski A, Tran TB, Messer K, Pu M, Corringham S, Nelson C, Ball ED, Ball ED: Predictors of survival in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HD-ASCT). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22086

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Predictors of survival in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HD-ASCT).
  • : e22086 Background: Individualized care in MBC requires predictors of survival for tailored treatment.
  • Although HD-ASCT has not resulted in improved overall survival (OS), retrospective analyses may identify patients who benefited.
  • We reviewed records of all patients (n=96) in the bone marrow transplant registry at UCSD treated with HD-ASCT for MBC between 1989 and 2000.
  • METHODS: Age, race, stage at diagnosis, histology, estrogen receptor (ER) and menopausal status, body mass index (BMI) in kg/m2, time to transplant and death, sites of metastasis, disease status prior to and after transplant, and days in hospital were extracted.
  • Brookmeyer & Crowley's 95% confidence intervals, Cox models for predictors of a time-to-event variable and Schoenfeld tests for proportional hazard assumptions were applied.
  • RESULTS: Median OS was 5.6 ys (CI 4.1-7.4) after initial diagnosis and 1.7 ys (CI 1.36-2.07) after transplant.
  • OS after HD-ASCT at 12 ys was 8.2% and, although not statistically significant, 18.5% in ER- and 2.6% in ER+ patients, respectively.
  • Stratified by ER status, stage at diagnosis was an independent predictor of OS.
  • Patients with stage I at diagnosis were at lowest risk of death when compared to stage II-IV patients with HRs of 2.7 (II vs I CI 1.4-5.2), 4.6 (III vs I CI 2.1-10) and 17 (IV vs I CI 6.1- 47.8).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The study highlights that ∼10% of patients experience ≥10 ys survival with HD- ASCT.
  • Obesity, late stage at diagnosis, lobular infiltrating histology and visceral metastasis were independent negative predictors of OS.
  • Although survival was influenced by various disease characteristics, obesity was the only significant patient derived factor.
  • These data may be useful stratification tools for future trials employing HD-ASCT as treatment modality in MBC.

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  • (PMID = 27963264.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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75. Azim HA, Malek RA, Santoro L, Gandini S, Bociek RG, Azim HA Jr: High-dose intense doxorubicin-based regimens in aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: A systematic overview. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e19528

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] High-dose intense doxorubicin-based regimens in aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: A systematic overview.
  • : e19528 Background: Aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma represents around 60% of lymphomas in the Western world and even more in Egypt.
  • CHOP has been long been recognized as the standard chemotherapy regimen in this disease.
  • The addition of rituximab (R) to CHOP in the treatment of B-cell subtypes has resulted in a significant improvement in all treatment endpoints.
  • Thus CHOP is still offered to these patients as well as those with T-cell subtypes.
  • Data from the early 1990s have suggested that the dose intensity (DI) of doxorubicin may have a prognostic value.
  • Hence we conducted a metaanalysis on chemotherapy regimens incorporating higher DI doxorubicin and compare them to CHOP in terms of complete response (CR) rate, event free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OAS).
  • METHODS: A MEDLINE and COCHRANE library search was performed using the search terms 'CHOP', 'lymphoma' and 'randomized trials'.
  • Eligible trials were randomized trials, having CHOP as a control arm and any chemotherapy regimen administering doxorubicin at a higher DI than that of CHOP (16mg/m2/week) as the investigational arm.
  • Confidence intervals were estimated according to the method developed by Parmar.
  • They included 3,668 patients randomly assigned to either CHOP (1,660 patients) or DI doxorubicin-based regimen (2008 patients).
  • Patients receiving DI doxorubicin-based regimen had a significantly better overall survival (HR; 0.79; 95% CI: 0.66-0.94).
  • As for the EFS and CR analyses, there was a trend in favor of patients who received the DI regimens; however the difference was not statistically significant (HR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.71-1.03 & OR: 0.8; 95% CI: 0.63-1.02 respectively).
  • CONCLUSIONS: High DI doxorubicin-based regimens are associated with a better OAS compared to CHOP.
  • Such approach should be considered in patients with aggressive B-cell lymphomas not offered R as well as those with T-cell lymphomas.

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  • (PMID = 27960914.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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76. Caggiano V, Morrison VA, Fridman M, Delgado DJ: A model to predict delivery of reduced chemotherapy dose intensity in the first three cycles of treatment among patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6100

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A model to predict delivery of reduced chemotherapy dose intensity in the first three cycles of treatment among patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer.
  • : 6100 Background: Reduction of chemotherapy dose intensity is common among patients receiving treatment for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and breast cancer.
  • A recent publication suggests that neutropenia is a cause of dose modifications, and that maintaining chemotherapy dose intensity in the initial cycles may be associated with improved outcomes.
  • We evaluated possible risk factors associated with delivery of reduced chemotherapy dose intensity in the first 3 cycles of treatment among a sample of patients with NHL or breast cancer.
  • METHODS: A historical case series of 1617 patients (704 NHL and 913 early-stage breast cancer) who received initial chemotherapy at 16 community and academic oncology practices between 1991 and 1999 were studied.
  • Reduced average relative dose intensity (ARDI) was defined as at least a 20% or 15% reduction in dose intensity for NHL and breast cancer patients, respectively.
  • Stepwise logistic regression was used to select risk factors significantly associated with a reduction in ARDI.
  • RESULTS: 427 of 1617 patients (26%) received reduced ARDI within the first 3 cycles of chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Increased age, comorbidity (heart, renal or hepatic), low body surface area, and no preemptive growth factor in cycle 1 were associated with increased risk for delivery of reduced chemotherapy dose intensity in cycles 1 through 3 after controlling for differences in diagnosis.

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  • (PMID = 28014761.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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77. Khorana AA, Culakova E, Lyman GH, Francis CW: Incidence of thromboembolic events in a prospective nationwide registry of cancer patients initiating systemic chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8019

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Incidence of thromboembolic events in a prospective nationwide registry of cancer patients initiating systemic chemotherapy.
  • : 8019 Background: Thromboembolic disease (TED) is increased in cancer patients, with an estimated annual rate of 0.5% compared to 0.1% in the general population.
  • TED rates may be further increased with chemotherapy.
  • We conducted a prospective study to determine incidence of symptomatic TED in cancer outpatients on chemotherapy, and a retrospective analysis of TED rates in cancer patients hospitalized with febrile neutropenia.
  • METHODS: Cancer outpatients initiating chemotherapy were registered at 137 community practices nationwide, and followed prospectively for 4 cycles.
  • Pulmonary embolism occurred in 9 patients, and 28 patients developed deep venous thrombosis for a TED incidence of 2% over a median follow-up of 2.3 months.
  • Incidence varied significantly by site of disease (p=0.027) with highest rates in Hodgkin's disease (n=4/38 10.5%), pancreatic cancer (n=2/26, 7.7%) and lung cancer (11/365, 3%).
  • Patients with TED reported a chemotherapy delay of ≥ 7 days in 44% compared to 23% in the study population (p=0.003, OR 2.73).
  • An additional 1.3% develop TED if hospitalized with complications of chemotherapy.
  • TED can lead to significant delays in chemotherapy.
  • Trials of prophylactic anticoagulation in cancer patients on chemotherapy are warranted.

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  • (PMID = 28015837.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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78. Braun E, Katz D, Venugopal P, Larson M, Shammo J, Fung H, Gregory S: Safety analysis of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) in patients with relapsed or refractory low grade, follicular or transformed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma based on age at time of therapy. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e19529

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Safety analysis of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) in patients with relapsed or refractory low grade, follicular or transformed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma based on age at time of therapy.
  • : e19529 Background: Radioimmunotherapy is a therapeutic option for relapsed or refractory indolent, follicular and transformed non Hodgkin's lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma.
  • Although prolongued myelotoxicity has been described with use of iodine I 131 tositumomab (TOSI) and yttrium 90 ibritumomab tiuxetan (IBRI), analysis of toxicity according to patients' age at therapy still lacks.
  • METHODS: Utilizing the Rush University Medical Center database 61 subjects who received RIT between November/2003 and June/2008, either with TOSI or IBRI were divided in 2 groups according to age at time of therapy.
  • Parameters compared between groups were: Time to nadir of lowest absolute neutrophil count (ANC), time to recovery ANC above 1000/mcL, time to nadir of lowest hemoglobin levels, time to recovery to hemoglobin levels above 8g/dL, time to lowest platelet count and time to recovery to platelet count above 100,000/mcL.
  • Groups characteristics such as sex, type of RIT, presence of disease in bone marrow, FLIPI/IPI and use of G-CSF were noted.
  • RESULTS: There was no significant statistical difference between groups in time (number of days) to achieve nadir of ANC (group 1 85.3±208; group 2 50.3±19.9), nadir of hemoglobin levels (group 1 106±60.6; group 2 84±57.0) and time to nadir of platelet level (group 1 53.5±70.7; group 2 41.8±9.6).
  • There was no statistical significant difference between groups in duration of cytopenias, except for time for platelet recovery which was significant longer in group 2 using the Pearson Correlation analysis. (p=0.008). (Days for platelets recovery to levels above 100,000/mcL group 1 29.4±27.7; group 2 108.8 ±207.3).
  • One patient in group 1 and three patients on group 2 were diagnosed with MDS but were also treated with different chemotherapy regimens.
  • CONCLUSIONS: RIT should be considered a safe therapeutic modality in patients with refractory or relapsed indolent, follicular, NHL, transformed and Mantle Cell lymphoma regardless of age.

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  • (PMID = 27960911.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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79. Lossos I, Craig MD, Tallman MS, Boccia RV, Conkling PR, Becerra C, Komarnitsky PB, Hamilton BL, Lewis J, Miller WH: Novel organic arsenic molecule darinaparsin: Development of IV and oral forms. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8501

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Darinaparsin i.v. activity in lymphoma is being evaluated in a phase II study.
  • METHODS: Phase II trial is being conducted in patients diagnosed with advanced lymphomas who had ≥ 1 prior therapy.
  • Phase I oral dose escalation studies are being conducted in patients with advanced malignancies and explore safety, MTD, DLTs and preliminary efficacy of continuous and intermittent dosing schedules.
  • Starting continuous dose is 100 mg BID for 3 weeks with 1 week rest, starting intermittent dose is 300 mg twice weekly for 3 weeks followed by 1 week rest.
  • RESULTS: The phase II study has accrued 28 lymphoma patients (21 non-Hodgkin's, 7 Hodgkin's); median age at baseline 61 years, ECOG ≤2, median number of prior therapies 3.
  • Of these, 1 subject (PTCL) has achieved a complete response, 3 - partial responses (2 marginal zone, 1 Hodgkin's), and 4 stable disease (2 PTCL, 1 DLBCL, 1 Hodgkin's).
  • A total of 63 cycles of darinaparsin have been administered to subjects with lymphoma. No Gr.
  • 3 or higher drug-related AEs were reported.
  • Two SAEs were considered possibly drug-related (fall; neutropenic fever).
  • Phase I studies accrued 35 patients; median age at baseline 58 years, ECOG ≤2, median number of prior therapies 3.
  • Predominant tumor types include: colorectal (17), pancreatic (3), NHL (3).
  • Current darinaparsin dose levels: continuous 200 mg BID, 2× weekly 900 mg.
  • Drug-related AEs include nausea/vomiting, fatigue, decreased appetite/anorexia.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Darinaparsin is active in heavily pretreated patients with advanced lymphoma and has been very well tolerated.

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  • (PMID = 27960853.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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80. Kollmannsberger C, Schleucher N, Rick O, Metzner B, Schaefer-Eckart K, Naumann R, Mayer-Steinacker R, Hartmann JT, Kanz L, Bokemeyer C: Gonadal late effects, fertility and sexual functioning in long-term survivors after high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation (HD-CT) for testicular cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):4537

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Gonadal late effects, fertility and sexual functioning in long-term survivors after high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation (HD-CT) for testicular cancer.
  • : 4537 Background: Dose-intensive chemotherapy is currently used in patients (pts) with "poor prognosis" or relapsed germ cell cancer.
  • No studies have thus far investigated endocrinological disturbances, infertility, parenthood, and subjective patient impairment with respect to sexual functioning in long-term survivors after HD-CT.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: 53 pts treated within prospective trials of the German Testicular Cancer Study Group and a minimum follow-up of 6 months after completion of HD-CT agreed to complete a standardized and validated questionnaire regarding the subjective impact of HD-CT on fertility and sexual functioning.
  • RESULTS: Median age at initial diagnosis was 31 years [17-60].
  • 55% of pts were followed for 1-2 years after therapy and 45% for 2.1-8 years after therapy.
  • 30% of pts had received HD-CT as second-line and 70% as first-line therapy.
  • Testosterone levels were normal in 32/33 pts (97%) with a median of 4.7 ng/ml [range: 1.15-9.97 ng/ml].
  • 70% of pts stated to have had a "very satisfactory sex life" prior to therapy, but only 48% were "very satisfied" after therapy (p=0.05).
  • 27% of pts had a "poor sex life" after therapy in contrast to none prior to therapy (p=0.05).
  • 57% of pts had reported "frequent sexual intercourse" prior to therapy but only 42% after treatment (p=0.05).
  • The frequency of "lack of libido" raised from 11% prior to 34% after therapy (p=0.05).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Pts receiving HD-CT for testicular cancer should be advised about possible effects on sexual functioning and counselling should be offered after therapy.
  • Sperm banking should be recommended to all pts undergoing HD-CT, despite the fact that single pts may still retain full fertility.

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  • (PMID = 28016057.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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81. Razzouk BI, Hockenberry M, Hinds PS, Rackoff W, Hord JD: A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of once-weekly epoetin alfa in children with cancer undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):8527

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of once-weekly epoetin alfa in children with cancer undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy.
  • : 8527 Background: This study was designed to assess the effect of epoetin alfa (EPO) on hemoglobin (Hb) and quality of life (QOL) in children with cancer receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy (CT).
  • METHODS: This was a double-blind, placebo (PBO)-controlled study of pts aged 5-18 y with malignant solid tumors (ST), Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and Hb <12 g/dL.
  • Pts were stratified by tumor type (ST/HL or ALL/NHL) and randomized 1:1 to receive IV EPO 600 U/kg or PBO weekly for 16 wks.
  • Primary end point was pt-reported Peds Quality of Life Inventory (PedQL-I™) Total Score; secondary endpoints included parent-reported PedsQL-I and pt- and parent-reported PedsQL Cancer Module (PedsQL-CM: Cognitive Problems, Communication, Nausea, Pain and Hurt, Physical Appearance, Procedural Anxiety, Treatment Anxiety, Worry), Hb, and transfusions.
  • RESULTS: 222 pts (111 EPO, 111 PBO) were included in the intent-to-treat analysis: 27 HL, 98 ST, 75 ALL, and 22 NHL.

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  • (PMID = 28013753.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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82. Roussel M: Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in women with breast cancer: A retrospective study of 46 patients. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6670

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in women with breast cancer: A retrospective study of 46 patients.
  • Improvement in screening and treatment strategies increased long-term survivors.
  • Those women are then at risk for second malignancies, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).
  • Currently, no genetic or treatment-related risk factors have been demonstrated.
  • RESULTS: Median age at diagnosis of BC was 57 yrs.
  • 78.3% received radiotherapy and 41.3% systemic therapy.
  • B cells lymphomas were mainly represented with 50% follicular lymphoma and 30.4% large cells lymphoma.
  • There was no recurrent cytogenetic abnormality.
  • All pts received appropriate treatments.
  • 22 (47.8%) died of the lymphoma.
  • A 3/1 case control study matched on age, date of BC diagnosis and survival didn't show treatment-related risk factor.
  • There is no evidence in our cohort for treatment-induced NHL.
  • [Figure: see text] S: surgery, RTE: external radiotherapy, CT: chemotherapy, H: hormonotherapy No significant financial relationships to disclose.

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  • (PMID = 28016450.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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83. Patel H, Egorin MJ, Remick SC, Mulkerin D, Takimoto CH, Doroshow JH, Potter D, Ivy SP, Murgo AJ, Ramanathan RK: Comparison of Child-Pugh (CP) criteria and NCI organ dysfunction working group (NCI-ODWG) criteria for hepatic dysfunction (HD): Implications for chemotherapy dosing. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6051

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Comparison of Child-Pugh (CP) criteria and NCI organ dysfunction working group (NCI-ODWG) criteria for hepatic dysfunction (HD): Implications for chemotherapy dosing.
  • : 6051 Background: Patients with HD may require drug dose modification based on the severity of HD.
  • HD is often assessed using CP criteria, the use of which is advocated by the FDA.
  • CP criteria, originally developed for patients with end-stage liver disease, has 5 components -total bilirubin (TB), albumin, prothrombin time, ascites & encephalopathy.
  • METHODS: Forty-five patients with varying degrees of HD were enrolled in a Phase I clinical trial of imatinib mesylate.
  • Patients were stratified into 4 groups as per the NCI-ODWG criteria based on TB & AST: normal [TB & AST ≤ upper limit of normal (ULN)], mild HD (TB > ULN to 1.5 x ULN or AST > ULN), moderate HD (TB >1.5-3 x ULN, any AST) & severe HD (TB >3 - 10 x ULN, any AST).
  • RESULTS: [Figure: see text] Conclusions: When assessed with a composite index of TB & AST (NCI-ODWG criteria), normal-to-mild HD correlated with CP group A (where dose modification of chemotherapeutic agents is usually not necessary).
  • Moderate-to-severe HD assessed by TB & AST correlated with CP groups B & C (where dose modification may be necessary).
  • The NCI-ODWG index, using TB & AST, provides a simple & objective way of assessing HD & can be applied in outpatient clinics & clinical trials for dose modification of chemotherapy.
  • In cancer patients, TB is the predominant factor in classifying the severity of HD . (Support: 1UO1- CA099168 -01 & NIH/NCCR/GCRC #5M01 RR 00056) No significant financial relationships to disclose.

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  • (PMID = 28015131.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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84. Tulpule A, Khan AU, Mohrbacher AF, Espina BM, Buchanan L, Berman N, Gorospe G, Boswell WD, Nathwani BN, Levine AM: A phase II trial of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone (DR-COP) in aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6688

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase II trial of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone (DR-COP) in aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • Chemotherapy cycles were repeated every 21 days and given until 2 cycles beyond complete remission for a maximum of 8 cycles.
  • Baseline demographics: median age 51 years (range 20-74); all pts were CD20+ positive with diffuse large cell lymphoma in 16, high grade not otherwise specified in 2, and follicular grade 3 in 1.
  • 16 (84%) pts had stage IV disease.
  • In total, 15 pts are evaluable for response: 12 complete or clinical complete remissions (80%) have been documented; 3 pts had partial remission with one proceeding to stem cell transplant.
  • Delays in therapy or Doxil dose reductions were required in 5 pts (26%) for grade 2 or 3 hand-foot syndrome (HFS) and in 4 others (21%) for grade 2 mucositis.
  • Other non-hematologic toxicities were grade 1 or 2 in severity.
  • The regimen is well tolerated with the incidence of HFS and mucositis consistent with single agent Doxil at this dose and schedule.

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  • (PMID = 28016418.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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85. Or R, Ackerstein A, Morecki S, Gelfand Y, Samuel S, Slavin S: Treatment of patients with metastatic solid tumors with intentionally mismatched lymphocytes activated with rIL-2 in the outpatient setting. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):2576

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment of patients with metastatic solid tumors with intentionally mismatched lymphocytes activated with rIL-2 in the outpatient setting.
  • : 2576 Background: Graft vs malignancy (GVM) effects are well established in hematological malignancies with potential clinical application for metastatic solid tumors.
  • METHODS: 21 patients with metastates, 12 males, 9 females, 1.5 - 74 (median 52) years old participated: breast (7); colon (4); glioblastoma (3); thyroid (1) ovary (1); multiple myeloma (2) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (1); melanoma (1), carcinoid (1).
  • Median mononuclear cell dose infused 1.4 (range 2-25.5) x 10<sup>7</sup>/Kg.
  • Panorex was given in conjunction with cell therapy to 3 patients with metastatic colon cancer aiming for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.
  • RESULTS: Treatment was well tolerated and no patient required admission.
  • One with colon cancer had PR with transient engraftment of donor cells, showed no evidence of disease no chemotherapy for 16 months.
  • Second patient with metastatic breast cancer developed skin rash compatible with cutaneous GVHD with liver enzyme abnormality.
  • Albeit lack of evidence for chimerism, she had no evidence of progressive disease for 23 months.
  • Two patients with multiple myeloma with no evidence of disease for 57,42 months respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Based on our observations in mice and man, adoptive immunotherapy with transient "parking" of mismatched, hence maximally activatable donor lymphocytes, is a feasible and well tolerated clinical tool, potentially useful for controlling minimal residual disease.

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  • (PMID = 28015294.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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86. Ribeiro MJ, Patterson H, Shumate M, Harris WB, Jacobs J, Nadella P, Gillespie TW: Compliance with guidelines for elderly patients undergoing cancer therapy. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6148

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Compliance with guidelines for elderly patients undergoing cancer therapy.
  • : 6148 Background: More than 50% of all cancers and deaths occur in individuals over age 65.Clinical decision-making for older patients may focus on patient chronological age rather than functional status, due to concerns about tolerance of more intensive and potentially curative regimens.
  • However, published data demonstrate efficacy of standard therapy with similar outcomes in elderly patients.
  • Practice guidelines could establish standards of care that, if followed, may prevent ageism in decision-making and improve clinical outcomes.
  • METHODS: This study (N=57) prospectively evaluated rate of compliance with practice guidelines, as well as toxicities and relative dose intensity (RDI) associated with therapy delivered.
  • Published evidence, NCCN guidelines for the elderly, and consensus of heme-onc clinicians at the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) were used to develop treatment standards for all stages/cell types of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (N=39) or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) (N=18).
  • Consenting patients at point of clinical decision-making were enrolled into Cohort A (age ≥ 65; N=29) or Cohort B (age 50-64; N=28).
  • All patients were screened for functionality and given an objective score based on the Screening Geriatric Assessment (SGA) tool at time of enrollment.
  • Age, performance status and stage of disease did not affect compliance.
  • For patients receiving chemotherapy, significantly more older patients (N=18; 75%) were able to finish their prescribed treatment compared to the younger cohort (N=10; 47%) (p=0.012).
  • Compliance was a significant negative predictor for dose reduction (p=0.021).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to evidence-and consensus-based guidelines can standardize clinical care and potentially improve outcomes in elderly cancer patients.
  • Compliance with standards can promote optimal therapy and completion of treatment plan, avoiding dose reductions and decision-making based primarily on chronological age.

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  • (PMID = 28014814.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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87. Call TG, Constantinou CL, Kahanic SP, Rowland KM, Dakil SR, Hoering A, Li CY, Dewald GW, Kay NE, Witzig TE: NCCTG trial of gemcitabine for relapsed B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6726

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 6726 Background: Gemcitabine demonstrates in vitro activity against lymphoid cell lines, and has shown clinical responses in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • This study was performed to determine the efficacy and toxicity of gemcitabine in B-CLL patients with relapsed disease.
  • METHODS: Patients with relapsed B-CLL and prior treatment with both a purine nucleoside (fludarabine or cladribine) and an alkylating agent were enrolled.
  • Treatment was with gemcitabine (1,000mg/m2) on days 1 and 8 of a 28-day cycle.
  • One patient withdrew prior to treatment and two were deemed ineligible, leaving 19 eligible patients.
  • The median age was 63 years and median prior treatments were 3.
  • Only 6 patients completed the protocol due to: disease progression (8), adverse reaction (3), alternative treatment (2), refusal (1), and death on study (1).
  • Thirteen patients (68%) had stable disease as their best response.
  • The median time to progression was 72 days.
  • The most common non-hematologic toxicity was infection.
  • The death on study occurred in a patient with known heart disease who died of a myocardial infarction.
  • IgVH mutation status was able to be obtained in 9 patients, it was non-mutated in 7 and mutated in 2.
  • Whether it has a role in more chemotherapy naïve CLL patients, or in combination with other agents, remains to be determined.

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  • (PMID = 28014661.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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88. Kudawara I, Ieguchi M, Aoki Y, Naka N, Araki N, Nakanishi H, Matsumine A, Myoui A, Ueda T, Yoshikawa H: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with high-dose ifosfamide, doxorubicin and cisplatin in nonmetastatic osteosarcoma of the extremity. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9039

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with high-dose ifosfamide, doxorubicin and cisplatin in nonmetastatic osteosarcoma of the extremity.
  • : 9039 Background: Doxorubicin (DOX), cisplatin (CDDP) and methotrexate (MTX) are active agents for the treatment of osteosarcoma (OS).
  • Neoadjuvant chemotherapy including these multi-agents has been established.
  • However, ifosfamide (IFM) is mainly used in poor responders to adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Local wide excision was scheduled after 4 courses of chemotherapy.
  • Two cycles of postoperative chemotherapy consisted of DOX + CDDP, IFM and HD-MTX (10-12 g/m2).
  • RESULTS: With a median follow up of 54 months (range, 12 -73 months), 20 pts were continuously disease free, in 3 there was no evidence of disease after pulmonary metastasectomy, 2 were alive with disease and 1 died of disease.

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  • (PMID = 28013724.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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89. Keilholz U, Busse A, Schmittel A, Hütter G, Siehl J, Thiel E: A phase I/IIa clinical trial of CLAOP21 and CLAOP14 in patients with high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and cardiac risk factors. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6708

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase I/IIa clinical trial of CLAOP21 and CLAOP14 in patients with high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and cardiac risk factors.
  • : 6708 Background: CHOP is the standard combination chemotherapy for high-grade Non-Hodgkin's-lymphoma (NHL).
  • We performed a phase I/II study of a modified CHOP regimen including pegliposomal doxorubicin, termed CLAOP, in patients with high-grade NHL and cardiac risk factors.
  • METHODS: A three-weekly (CLAOP21) and a bi-weekly (CLAOP14) regimen were explored: CLAOP21 with 20mg/m2 of pegliposomal doxorubicin every 21 days, and a dose-dense CLAOP14 regimen every 14 days with escalating doses of pegliposomal doxorubicin supported by G-CSF.
  • RESULTS: 113 treatment cycles were administered to 22 patients.
  • In the initial 12 patients CLAOP21/20mg/m2 was well tolerated with a degree of hematotoxicity similar to that reported with regular CHOP.
  • The dose-dense CLAOP14/20mg/m2 was not associated with dose-limiting hematotoxicity, but three febrile episodes occurred in 27 treatment cycles.
  • CLAOP14/25mg/m2 was associated with dose-limiting hematotoxicity and palmar plantar erythema.
  • Grade III leucopenia and febrile infections developed in 3 of 5 patients, and PPE grade III in 2 of 5 patients, respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The recommended dose of pegliposomal doxorubicin in the CLAOP regimen for Phase II/III testing is 20mg/m2.
  • This regimen can be administered to lymphoma patients with concomitant cardiovascular disease without apparent cardiotoxicity.

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  • (PMID = 28014599.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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90. Chow H, Lim CH, Ong W, Ng HJ: Incidence of ifosfamide-induced neurotoxicity in lymphoma patients receiving fractionated ICE-based chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6677

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Incidence of ifosfamide-induced neurotoxicity in lymphoma patients receiving fractionated ICE-based chemotherapy.
  • : 6677 Background: Ifosfamide-induced neurotoxicity is a treatment-related complication that is increasingly being reported.
  • METHODS: We reviewed all Hodgkin's and Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients who received fractionated ICE (D1-3: ifosfamide 2g/m<sup>2</sup> over 2h with an equivalent dose of mesna over 12h, carboplatin [AUC=5 divided equally between 3 days; max=800mg] over 1h, etoposide 75mg/m<sup>2</sup> over 2h; cycles were repeated q28 days) +/- rituximab.
  • Patients who experienced any neurologic symptom prior to initiation of chemotherapy were excluded.
  • All had relapsed or refractory disease.
  • Symptoms were noted within 48-72h after the first dose of ifosfamide and in 6 of 7 cases resolved within 1-7 days.
  • Treatment of symptoms involved the use of methylene blue alone in 2 cases and thiamine combined with methylene blue in 1 case.
  • Previously identified risk factors such as renal and hepatic impairment, prior cisplatin, prior cranial radiation, albumin < 30g/L, pelvic/intra-abdominal involvement, and stage and type of disease were analyzed.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Fractionated ICE-based chemotherapy is associated with a high incidence of ifosfamide-induced neurotoxicity in relapsed or refractory lymphoma patients.

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  • (PMID = 28016448.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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91. Pohl H, Shimoni A, Kroeger N, Martin H, Vucinic V, Basara N, Nagler A, Zander A, Fauser AA, Kiehl MG: Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with Hodgkin's-Lymphoma. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6690

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with Hodgkin's-Lymphoma.
  • : 6690 Background: Due to intensified standard radio-chemotherapy a substantial proportion of patients will be cured of Hodgkin's Lymphoma.
  • In patients with relapse after standard therapy, the therapy of choice is an autologous stem cell transplantation with high remission rates.
  • Despite therapeutic progress some patients suffer from refractory or relapsing disease.
  • As graft versus Hodgkin's lymphoma effects have been described allready, allogeneic stem cell transplantation might be an therapeutic effort in these high risk patients.
  • Disease status at transplant was CR in 2, PR in 1, SD in 5, and PD in 6 patients.
  • Five patients died due to disease progression and one due to refractory GVHD.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Taking into account that all patients were heavily pre-treated and that only two patients were transplanted in CR these data argue for a strong graft versus Hodgkin effect.
  • Furthermore, it's speculative but very likely that the results of allogeneic stem cell transplantation will improve significantly if patients receive the allo transplant earlier during their disease.
  • Thus, risk factors should be defined and those patients with a high risk feature should be scheduled for allo transplant within a controlled clinical trial.

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  • (PMID = 28016396.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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92. Anastasia A Jr, Mazza R Jr, Giordano L, Balzarotti M Sr, Magagnoli M Sr, Castagna L Sr, Spina M, Michieli M, Tirelli U, Santoro A: Complete response (CR) to ifosfamide, gemcitabine, and vinorelbine (IGEV) and outcome in relapsed/refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8568

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Complete response (CR) to ifosfamide, gemcitabine, and vinorelbine (IGEV) and outcome in relapsed/refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) patients.
  • : 8568 Background: High dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cells transplant (ASCT) is the gold standard in patients with relapsed/refractory HL.
  • Response to induction chemotherapy (chemosensitive patients) plays a major role in prognosis, however the role of CR status after induction therapy has not been established.
  • METHODS: One hundred twenty one patients with relapsed/refractory HL received 4 courses of IGEV followed by single (N=59) or tandem (N=19) ASCT (Santoro et al., Haematologica 92, 2007).
  • Response to IGEV was evaluated by Cheson criteria (1999).The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of CR versus no-CR to IGEV induction therapy on the outcome in terms of progression free survival (PSF) and overall survival (OS).
  • In the univariate analysis favourable factors for outcome were CR vs no-CR to IGEV (PFS: p <0.001, OS: p 0.002), A vs B symptoms (PFS: p 0.003; OS: p 0.05), limited vs advanced stage (PFS: p 0.03; OS: p 0.03), and 1 vs≥2 previous chemotherapy lines (PFS: p 0.03, OS: p 0.02); response to last therapy (relapsed vs refractory) influenced PFS (p 0.03) but not OS (p 0.70).
  • The multivariate analysis confirmed the favourable prognostic role of CR to IGEV (PFS HR: 2.5, CI 95%:1.3; 4.6 - OS HR 2.3, CI 95%:1.1;4.8) and of the number of previous chemotherapy lines (PFS HR:1.8, CI 95%:1.0;3.2 - OS HR 2.1, CI 95%:1.1;3.9).
  • CR to IGEV is the strongest indicator of outcome in relapsed/refractory HL.
  • 2. Achievement of CR to IGEV overcomes the role of initial disease status.
  • 3. Efforts are warranted to increase the CR rate by induction therapy.

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  • (PMID = 27961023.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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93. Goy A, Younes A, McLaughlin P, Pro B, Romaguera J, Hagemeister F, Fayad L, Trehu EG, Schenkein D, Rodriguez MA: Update on a phase (ph) 2 study of bortezomib in patients (pts) with relapsed or refractory indolent or aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6581

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Update on a phase (ph) 2 study of bortezomib in patients (pts) with relapsed or refractory indolent or aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL).
  • Preclinical and ph 1 studies suggested the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (VELCADE<sup>™</sup>, Vc) was active in lymphoma.
  • Pts ≥ 16 yr, with relapsed or refractory mantle cell (MCL, gp A) or other B cell lymphomas (gp B) were eligible.
  • There were 25 pts in gp A and 20 pts in gp B, including 10 diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL), 4 follicular lymphoma (FL), 3 transformed (t) FL, 2 small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), 1 Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM).
  • Gp A had 3 median prior therapies (range 1-6); gp B had 4 (range 1-12).
  • In gp A, of 21 evaluable (ev) pts, there were 11 responders: 3 CR, 1 CRu (unconfirmed CR), and 7 PR (RR = 52.3%), 2 MR, 2 no change (NC), 6 POD (progression of disease).
  • In gp B, there were 8 ev DLCL with 1 PR (DOR 4 mo), 1 NC, 6 POD; 4 ev FL with 2 MR, 1 NC, 1 POD; 1 ev tFL with POD; 2 ev SLL with 1 NC, 1 POD; 1 WM pt had PR.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study showed remarkable activity of Vc in MCL and encouraging results in other B cell lymphomas.
  • Future studies will include combinations of Vc with other chemotherapy and/or biological agents.

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  • (PMID = 28016185.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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94. Chatal JF, Harousseau JL, Griesinger F, Meller J, Renner C, Kirsch CM, Naumann R, Kropp J, Wegener WA, Goldenberg DM: Radioimmunotherapy in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) using a fractionated schedule of DOTA-conjugated, &lt;sup&gt;90&lt;/sup&gt;Y-radiolabeled, humanized anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody, epratuzumab. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):2545

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Radioimmunotherapy in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) using a fractionated schedule of DOTA-conjugated, <sup>90</sup>Y-radiolabeled, humanized anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody, epratuzumab.
  • : 2545 Background: A phase I/II, multi-center, dose-escalation trial was conducted to establish the safety, optimal dosing, and preliminary efficacy of <sup>90</sup>Y-epratuzumab administered weekly for 2 or 3 consecutive wks to pts with B-cell NHL who failed ≥1 regimen of standard chemotherapy.
  • METHODS: Eligibility criteria included <25% BM involvement, plts >100,000 cells/mm<sup>3</sup>, and measurable disease by CT with no single mass >10 cm.
  • Twenty-six pts with a median of 3 prior treatments have been treated, including 15 pts without prior bone marrow transplant (BMT) at 5-10 mCi/m<sup>2</sup>/wk (total <sup>90</sup>Y dose, 15-22.5 mCi/m<sup>2</sup>) and11 pts with prior BMT escalated separately at 2.5-5 mCi/m<sup>2</sup>/wk (total <sup>90</sup>Y dose, 5-10 mCi/m<sup>2</sup>).
  • RESULTS: Dose escalation is continuing, with no serious AEs considered treatment-related.
  • One pt in each escalation arm had protocol-defined DLT (>12 wk platelet recovery); otherwise, therapy was well tolerated with no significant toxicity besides transient hematologic depression, including 4 pts retreated without additional toxicity.
  • In 22 pts with treatment evaluations, 13 pts (59%) had an objective response (OR) by IWG criteria, including pts with and without BMT [5/9 (56%) and 8/13 (62%), respectively], with indolent and aggressive disease [8/10 (80%) and 5/12 (42%), respectively], across histologies [follicular NHL, 9/12 (75%); DLCL, 2/4 (50%); mantle cell, 2/6 (33%)], and in pts failing rituximab (9/15, 60%).
  • CONCLUSION: This study shows the feasibility and safety of a dose-fractionation schedule of a <sup>90</sup>Y-labeled anti-CD22 Mab, obtaining therapeutic responses across all pt groups, including durable complete responses, and achieving higher cumulative doses than other RAIT agents given as single doses.

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  • (PMID = 28015227.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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95. Gregory SA, Leonard JP, Knox SJ, Zelenetz AD, Armitage J, Kaminiski M: The iodine I-131 tositumomab therapeutic regimen: Summary of safety in 995 patients with relapsed/refractory low grade (LG) and transformed LG non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6732

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The iodine I-131 tositumomab therapeutic regimen: Summary of safety in 995 patients with relapsed/refractory low grade (LG) and transformed LG non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL).
  • : 6732 Background: The Bexxar (tositumomab and iodine I 131 tositumomab [B]) therapeutic regimen yields high rates of complete and durable responses in pts with relapsed/refractory LG NHL.
  • METHODS: The safety of B therapy was reviewed for 995 pts with relapsed/refractory LG NHL, including 230 pts in 5 clinical trials and 765 pts in an expanded access program (EAP).
  • Demographics and risk factors were similar for both groups except that pts from EAP were less heavily pretreated (median, 2 vs 4 prior therapies) and more frequently received Rituximab (56% vs 17%).
  • All adverse events (AEs) occurring within 13 wks of treatment were reported, regardless of relationship to study drug.
  • Significant (P < .001) predictors of gr 3/4 heme toxicity were number of prior therapies, baseline blood counts, prior fludarabine, and degree of bone marrow (BM) involvement.
  • Delayed toxicities included HAMA responses (cumulative incidence, 9.8% at 2 yr; 10.1% at 5 yr) and hypothyroidism (cumulative incidence, 8.7% at 2 yr; 16.6% at 5 yr), and 35 pts developed MDS/AML after B therapy.
  • The data do not suggest an increased risk of MDS/AML over that seen in pts heavily pretreated with leukemogenic therapies.
  • These data suggest that the risks associated with B therapy are outweighed by the clinical benefits in pts with relapsed/refractory LG NHL.

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  • (PMID = 28014498.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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96. Ahmed S, Siddiqui AK, Rimawih R, Shahid RK, Rossoff LJ, Sison CP, Rai KR: Malignant pleural effusions in lymphoproliferative disorders: A clinico-pathologic study. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):6080

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Malignant pleural effusions in lymphoproliferative disorders: A clinico-pathologic study.
  • : 6080 Objective: To facilitate the diagnosis of malignant involvement of pleura by examining various clinical and cyto-chemical characteristics of pleural effusions in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders and to identify factors that predict mortality in these patients Methods:Clinical data of 86 eligible patients with lymphoproliferative disorders who were hospitalized from 1993 to 2002 on 91 occasions and underwent thoracentesis were reviewed.
  • A logistic regression analysis was carried out to determine prognostic variables that predict malignant involvement of pleura and hospital mortality.
  • Of 86 patients, 60% had non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 23% had CLL, 9% had multiple myeloma, and 7% had Hodgkin's disease.
  • 74% patients had advanced disease, 50% had prior chemotherapy and 10% were in remission.
  • 48 (53%) cases of pleural effusions were due to malignant involvement of pleura.
  • Among various variables examined with respect to their correlation with malignant pleural effusion or hospital mortality, symptomatic pleural effusion (odds ratio 10.3, 95% CI; 1.7-98.3), pleural fluid mesothelial cells % <5 (odd ratio 8.0, 95%CI; 1.4-58.2), pleural fluid: serum LDH >1 (odd ratio 6.4, 95%CI; 1.2-45.6) and pleural fluid lymphocytes % >50 (odd ratio 6.4, 95% CI: 1.2-50) were significantly correlated with malignant pleural effusion whereas secondary cancer (odd ratio 11.9, 95% CI; 2.3-88.8), pleural fluid: serum LDH >1, (odd ratio 10.9, 95% CI; 2.6-64.9), and pneumonia (odd ratio 6.4, 95% CI; 1.7-28.6) were significantly correlated with hospital mortality in multivariate analysis Conclusions: Our results reveal that many clinical and cyto-chemical markers have discriminatory values in identifying malignant effusion in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders.
  • A high pleural fluid to serum LDH level correlates with malignant pleural involvement and mortality.

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  • (PMID = 28014992.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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97. Fowler NH, McLaughlin P, Kwak L, Hagemeister F, Fanale M, Fayad L, Pro B, Samaniego F: Lenalidomide and rituximab for untreated indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8548

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Lenalidomide and rituximab for untreated indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • : 8548 Background: Despite advances in therapy and a better understanding of the natural history of indolent non-Hodgkins lymphomas (NHL), the optimal treatment for newly diagnosed patients (pts) has not been determined.
  • While several combination chemotherapy regimens have response rates approaching 90%, toxicity is common with genotoxic drugs and secondary malignancies is a concern.
  • Lenalidomide has been shown to have single agent activity in indolent NHL, and is approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma and myelodysplastic syndrome.
  • Rituximab is effective as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy for indolent NHL.
  • METHODS: Pts with indolent NHL who were previously untreated, with measurable disease (>1.5 cm), were eligible for enrollment.
  • Pts could receive up to 6 cycles of therapy.
  • Response was assessed after 3 cycles and at the end of therapy using the International Working Group Response Criteria.
  • RESULTS: At time of this report 17 pts have been enrolled and 14 are eligible for safety evaluation.
  • Therapy was well tolerated with the following grade 3 adverse events (AE) reported; myalgia (1 pt), rash (1 pt), peripheral neuropathy (1pt).
  • In the 5 pts eligible for response assessment, 4 pts (80%) attained a complete response (CR), 1 patient (20%) had stable disease (SD).
  • After 3 cycles, one patient had unconfirmed stable disease who also was previously treated with combination chemotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The combination of lenalidomide and rituximab has activity and is well tolerated with minimal toxicity in patients with newly diagnosed indolent lymphoma.

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  • (PMID = 27960963.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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98. Schmid P, Schippinger W, Nitsch T, Huebner G, Kreienberg R, Schultze W, Hausmaninger H, Wischnewsky M, Samonigg H, Possinger K: Up front tandem high-dose chemotherapy (HD) compared to standard chemotherapy with doxorubicin and paclitaxel (AT) in metastatic breast cancer (MBC): Final results of a randomized trial. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):641

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Up front tandem high-dose chemotherapy (HD) compared to standard chemotherapy with doxorubicin and paclitaxel (AT) in metastatic breast cancer (MBC): Final results of a randomized trial.
  • : 641 Background: Trials with late intensification HD have failed to show an advantage in overall survival (OS) for patients with MBC.
  • This trial was initiated to compare up front tandem HD with cyclophosphamide, mitoxantrone and etoposide or standard-dose therapy with AT in patients with MBC.
  • METHODS: Between 04/98 and 02/02, 93 pts below 60 ys of age without prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease were randomly assigned to 6-9 courses of AT q3 wks or double HD with PBSCT.
  • G-CSF-mobilized stem cells were collected before and after the 1st course of HD.
  • HD was repeated after 6 weeks.
  • RESULTS: Due to inadequate accrual the trial was terminated early in 03/02.Treatment groups (HD 48 pts, AT 45 pts) were well balanced for baseline characteristics (median age 49.7 ys, range 27-60; visceral metastases 87.1%; HR+ 71.0%; premenopausal 40.9%).
  • Intent-to-treat (ITT) objective response rate (RR) was 66.7% for HD vs 64.4% for AT (p=0.82).
  • Per protocol (PP) analysis showed 78.0% RR for HD and 64.4% for AT (p=0.26).
  • There was no significant difference in CR (ITT: HD 12.5% vs AT 11.1%; PP: HD 14.6% vs AT 11.1%).
  • After a median follow-up of 22.5 mths, 75 pts have progressed (HD 36, AT 39) and 66 pts have died (HD 34, AT 32).
  • ITT analysis showed no significant difference in median TTP (HD 11.1 mths, AT 10.6 mths; p=0.39), duration of response (DR) (HD 13.9 mths, AT 14.3 mths; p=0.98), treatment-free interval (HD 9.7 mths, AT 6.6 mths; p=0.24) and OS (HD 26.9 mths, AT 23,4 mths; p=0.60).
  • As expected, HD was associated with significantly more grade 3/4 myelosuppression, nausea/vomiting, infection and stomatitis, but less neuropathy than AT.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to our previous analysis (Schmid, ASCO 2002), there are no significant differences in CR, RR, TTP, DR and OS between HD and AT.
  • HD was associated with more acute adverse effects.

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  • (PMID = 28017056.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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99. Binh NN, Chevreau C, Penel N, Bay J, Coindre J, Mathoulin-Pelissier S, Ray-Coquard I, Italiano A, Genève J, Blay J: Consolidation with high-dose chemotherapy for responding patients to standard chemotherapy in advanced, metastatic soft tissue sarcoma (STS): A randomized trial from FNCLCC-French Sarcoma Group. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10505

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Consolidation with high-dose chemotherapy for responding patients to standard chemotherapy in advanced, metastatic soft tissue sarcoma (STS): A randomized trial from FNCLCC-French Sarcoma Group.
  • : 10505 Background: Whether high dose (HD) chemotherapy improves disease-free (DFS) or overall (OS) survival has been suggested in phase II trial, but never explored in a randomized setting.
  • This randomized, open, phase III study was designed to assess whether or not an HD chemotherapy with peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) would improve OS in patients with advanced or metastatic STS responding to MAID chemotherapy.
  • After 4 courses of MAID, patients in PR or CR, or in whom complete surgical removal of all lesions was performed, were proposed for randomisation between 2 more cycles of MAID (control arm) vs 1 MAID followed by an intensification with MICE, ie: mesna (3.6g/m2, d1-5), ifosfamide (4g/m2, d1-4), carboplatin (UCA5, d2-4) and etoposide (300mg/m2, d1-4), followed by PBSC (HD arm).
  • RESULTS: From 03/00 to 06/08, 266 patients were included and 87 were randomised (15 centres); low accrual and new treatment concepts lead to an IDMC in 11/08 who analysed 45 treated in the control arm (41 with full treatment) and 40 in the HD arm [only 21 received MICE, because consent withdrawal (6), insufficient PBSC harvest (5), tumor reprogression (4)].
  • Baseline characteristics (pts and tumors) were similar between treatment arms.
  • With a 39 months follow-up, 25 pts were alive in the control arm, and 19 in the HD arm.
  • The 3 years OS was 45.5% for control arm versus 35.8 for HD arm (HR = 1.12; 95% CI 0.58, 2.14; p = 0.72 Intention to treat analysis); PFS was 29.9% and 12.1 respectively (HR = 1.48; 95% CI 0.87, 2.53; p = 0.14).
  • Higher rate of grade 3 - 4 hematologic (87% vs 46%), and digestive toxicity (33% vs 0%) were observed in the HD arm.
  • Two treatment-related deaths occurred, both in the HD arm.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In this study, HD chemotherapy for STS patients didn't improve OS and DFS.

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  • (PMID = 27963694.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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100. Reategui RD, Beltran B, Morales D, Vera L, Quinones P, Portugal K, Desposorio C, Capellino A, Castillo J: AIDS-related lymphoma (ARL): Efficacy of highly active anti retroviral therapy (HAART) on survival and prognostic factors in a general hospital in Peru. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e19545

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] AIDS-related lymphoma (ARL): Efficacy of highly active anti retroviral therapy (HAART) on survival and prognostic factors in a general hospital in Peru.
  • METHODS: The clinical records of 2,502 HIV-infected patients seen in our institution from March 1997 to March 2008 were reviewed.
  • RESULTS: Forty-eight patients with HIV-associated lymphoma were identified.
  • From the 48 ARL identified 44 were non Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and 4 were Hodgkin lymphoma.
  • From 42 systemic NHL: 38 (90,5%) were of B-cell and 4 (9,5%) were of T-cell.
  • Three groups of patients were included: 13 patients (31%) received HAART previous the diagnosis of ARL, 21 patients (50%) initiated HAART after ARL diagnosis and 8 patients (19%) did not receive HAART.
  • HAART treatment before the diagnosis of NHL increases the survival (54% versus 9,5% versus 25% respectively, p=0.048).
  • Twenty of 42 patients (47,6%) received chemotherapy.
  • This group had a better survival rate than those who did not receive chemotherapy (50% versus 4,5%, p< 0.0001) The overall response to chemotherapy was 80% with CR (n=11, 55%), PR(n=5, 25%) and PD in four (20%).
  • In a multivariate analysis, IPI score > 2, presence of B symptoms and no HAART previous ARL diagnosis were statistically associated to worse survival with p-values of 0.0001, 0.018 and 0.048 respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In our study the use of HAART is effective when started before ARL diagnosis.
  • IPI score > 2, B symptoms and no HAART previous the diagnosis were unfavorable prognostic factors.

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  • (PMID = 27960996.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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