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1. Xicoy B, Ribera JM, Miralles P, Berenguer J, Rubio R, Mahillo B, Valencia ME, Abella E, López-Guillermo A, Sureda A, Morgades M, Navarro JT, Esteban H, GESIDA Group, GELCAB Group: Results of treatment with doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine and highly active antiretroviral therapy in advanced stage, human immunodeficiency virus-related Hodgkin's lymphoma. Haematologica; 2007 Feb;92(2):191-8
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  • [Title] Results of treatment with doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine and highly active antiretroviral therapy in advanced stage, human immunodeficiency virus-related Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Although doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine (ABVD) is considered the standard chemotherapy regimen for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL), information on the results of this therapy in human immunodeficiency (HIV)-related HL is scarce.
  • We analyzed the results of the ABVD regimen and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in patients with advanced stage, HIV-related HL.
  • Response to chemotherapy, overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) were recorded.
  • RESULTS: The median age of the patients was 37 years (range, 24-61) and 29 (47%) had a previously known diagnosis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.
  • The median CD4 lymphocyte count at diagnosis was 129/muL (range 5-1,209).
  • The histologic subtype of HL was nodular sclerosis in 17 patients (27%), mixed cellularity in 25 (41%), lymphocyte depletion in 10 (16%) and non-specified in the remaining 10 (16%).
  • Twenty-one (34%) patients were in stage III and 41 (66%) in stage IV.
  • INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: In patients with advanced stage, HIV-related HL, treatment with ABVD together with HAART is feasible and effective.
  • This supports the concept that patients with HIV-related HL should be treated in the same way as immunocompetent patients if HAART, adequate supportive therapy and anti-infectious prophylaxis are given concomitantly.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. HIV Infections / drug therapy. Hodgkin Disease / drug therapy. Hodgkin Disease / virology. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Bleomycin / administration & dosage. CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes / metabolism. Dacarbazine / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Proportional Hazards Models. Treatment Outcome. Vinblastine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 17296568.001).
  • [ISSN] 1592-8721
  • [Journal-full-title] Haematologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Haematologica
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; ABVD protocol
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2. Thorek DL, Tsao PY, Arora V, Zhou L, Eisenberg RA, Tsourkas A: In vivo, multimodal imaging of B cell distribution and response to antibody immunotherapy in mice. PLoS One; 2010;5(5):e10655
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  • BACKGROUND: B cell depletion immunotherapy has been successfully employed to treat non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • In recent years, increasing attention has been directed towards also using B-cell depletion therapy as a treatment option in autoimmune disorders.
  • However, it appears that the further development of these approaches will depend on a methodology to determine the relation of B-cell depletion to clinical response and how individual patients should be dosed.
  • METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cellular imaging of the targeted population in vivo may provide significant insight towards effective therapy and a greater understanding of underlying disease mechanics.
  • Following antibody mediated B cell depletion (anti-CD79), NIR-only labeled cells were expeditiously cleared from the circulation and spleen.
  • Interestingly, B cells labeled with both SPIO and NIR were not depleted in the spleen.
  • CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Whole body fluorescent tracking of B cells enabled noninvasive, longitudinal imaging of both the distribution and subsequent depletion of B lymphocytes in the spleen.
  • Quantification of depletion revealed a greater than 40% decrease in splenic fluorescent signal-to-background ratio in antibody treated versus control mice.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cells, Cultured. Fluorescence. Lymphocyte Depletion. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Organ Specificity. Spleen / immunology. Spleen / pathology. Staining and Labeling. Whole Body Imaging

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  • (PMID = 20498725.001).
  • [ISSN] 1932-6203
  • [Journal-full-title] PloS one
  • [ISO-abbreviation] PLoS ONE
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2871797
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3. Prajapati V, Mydlarski PR: Rituximab: a B-cell depletion therapy for dermatologic disease. Skin Therapy Lett; 2007 Jul-Aug;12(6):6-9
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  • [Title] Rituximab: a B-cell depletion therapy for dermatologic disease.
  • Rituximab (Rituxan, Genentech/ Biogen Idec) is a genetically engineered chimeric murine/human monoclonal antibody directed against CD20, a B lymphocyte-specific antigen.
  • Initially approved for the treatment of relapsed or refractory low-grade or follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), rituximab has been increasingly used to treat a variety of immune-mediated and autoimmune diseases.
  • While anecdotal case reports recommend its "off-label" use in dermatology, randomized clinical trials are required to firmly establish the safety and efficacy of this emerging biologic therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. B-Lymphocytes / immunology. Immunologic Factors / therapeutic use. Lymphocyte Depletion / methods. Skin Diseases / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Autoimmune Diseases / drug therapy. Humans. Lymphoma, B-Cell / drug therapy. Rituximab. Skin Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 17762903.001).
  • [ISSN] 1201-5989
  • [Journal-full-title] Skin therapy letter
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Skin Therapy Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Immunologic Factors; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab
  • [Number-of-references] 31
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4. Zaja F, Iacona I, Masolini P, Russo D, Sperotto A, Prosdocimo S, Patriarca F, de Vita S, Regazzi M, Baccarani M, Fanin R: B-cell depletion with rituximab as treatment for immune hemolytic anemia and chronic thrombocytopenia. Haematologica; 2002 Feb;87(2):189-95
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  • [Title] B-cell depletion with rituximab as treatment for immune hemolytic anemia and chronic thrombocytopenia.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Rituximab reacts specifically with the CD20 antigen and induces B-cell depletion.
  • DESIGN AND METHODS: Seven patients (one with cold agglutinin disease, two with warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia, four with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura) previously refractory to conventional treatments were treated with weekly infusions of rituximab, 375 mg/m2, for 4 weeks.
  • Only treatment with steroids, if strictly necessary, was allowed during the period of rituximab administration, but only patients who reached steroid suspension were considered responders.
  • The pharmacokinetics of rituximab were quantified during therapy and the follow-up period.
  • RESULTS: All patients had marked, even if temporary, B-cell depletion.
  • Three patients, 1 with cold agglutinin disease (CAD) and 2 with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), had a complete hematologic response.
  • In the patient with cold agglutinin disease a decrease in the agglutinin titer was observed.
  • Treatment tolerance was satisfactory and no infections or other late events were registered.
  • Serum rituximab concentrations appeared to be similar to those calculated in a historical control group of patients with follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who received rituximab as consolidation of response after first-line CHOP chemotherapy.
  • These results, along with data from literature, suggest that this agent may have a therapeutic role in autoimmune diseases.
  • [MeSH-major] Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune / therapy. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Autoimmune Diseases / therapy. B-Lymphocyte Subsets / drug effects. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Immunotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Antigens, CD20 / immunology. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Resistance. Female. Humans. Immunoglobulin G / blood. Immunoglobulin M / blood. Male. Middle Aged. Prednisone / therapeutic use. Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic / drug therapy. Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic / immunology. Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic / therapy. Rituximab. Treatment Outcome


5. Smolewski P, Robak T, Krykowski E, Blasiñska-Morawiec M, Niewiadomska H, Pluzanska A, Chmielowska E, Zambrano O: Prognostic factors in Hodgkin's disease: multivariate analysis of 327 patients from a single institution. Clin Cancer Res; 2000 Mar;6(3):1150-60
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  • [Title] Prognostic factors in Hodgkin's disease: multivariate analysis of 327 patients from a single institution.
  • On the basis of a retrospective study of 327 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD), the prognostic significance of several factors, accepted previously and recently proposed, has been analyzed with regard to response to treatment and the survival time.
  • The only independent, pretreatment factors negatively influenced by either time of survival or response to treatment were the following: age at diagnosis of more than 45 years, advanced (IIIB/IV) clinical stage, poor clinical status according to Karnofsky's scale (score less than 70), presence of systemic symptoms, mixed cellularity/lymphocyte depletion histological type, multisite peripheral nodal localization of the disease, abdominal lymphadenopathy, and large primary tumor mass (bulky disease).
  • Short time to achieve complete remission (during the first four courses of chemotherapy) has proven to be significantly positive predictive factor.
  • Cumulative dose of cytostatics lower than programmed was a significantly negative prognostic factor that correlated with a shorter time of survival.
  • High activity of serum lactate dehydrogenase correlated moderately with poor response to the first-line treatment but did not influence the survival time.
  • Other clinical, morphological, and biochemical parameters influenced neither the prognosis nor the response to treatment.
  • High expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, p53, and BCL-2 correlated with poor response to the treatment and/or short time of survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Hodgkin Disease / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen / analysis. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 / analysis. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / analysis

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  • [ErratumIn] Clin Cancer Res 2000 May;6(5):2120
  • (PMID = 10741746.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
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6. Hamaguchi Y: [Molecular mechanisms of B lymphocyte depletion by CD20 immunotherapy]. Nihon Rinsho Meneki Gakkai Kaishi; 2009 Feb;32(1):29-34
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  • [Title] [Molecular mechanisms of B lymphocyte depletion by CD20 immunotherapy].
  • Anti-CD20 antibody immunotherapy effectively treats non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and autoimmune disease.
  • However, the cellular and molecular pathways for B cell depletion remain undefined and the in vivo effect of immunotherapy on tissue B cells and their subsets is generally unknown.
  • To identify the mechanisms for B cell depletion in vivo, a new mouse model for anti-CD20 immunotherapy was developed using a panel of twelve mouse anti-mouse CD20 monoclonal antibodies.
  • Anti-CD20 antibodies rapidly depleted the vast majority of circulating and tissue B cells in an isotype-restricted manner that was completely dependent on effector cell Fc receptor expression.
  • B cell depletion utilized FcgammaRI-, FcgammaRIII- and FcgammaRIV-dependent pathways, while B cells were not eliminated in FcR common gamma chain-deficient mice.
  • Monocytes were the dominant effector cells for B cell depletion, with no demonstrable role for T or NK cells.
  • Although most anti-CD20 antibodies activated complement in vitro, B cell depletion was completely effective in mice with genetic deficiencies in C3 complement components.
  • The considerable factors that determine the effectiveness of anti-CD20 immunotherapy are following: the expression level of CD20 on B cell surface; the dosage of anti-CD20 mAb; the association of Fcgamma receptor with the isotype of the antibies; B cell subpopulations within different tissues.
  • These findings have important clinical implications for anti-CD20 and other antibody-based therapies.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / pharmacology. B-Lymphocytes / immunology. Lymphocyte Depletion
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity / immunology. Autoimmune Diseases / drug therapy. Immunotherapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy. Mice. Receptors, IgG / immunology. Rituximab

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  • (PMID = 19252375.001).
  • [ISSN] 1349-7413
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon Rinshō Men'eki Gakkai kaishi = Japanese journal of clinical immunology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nihon Rinsho Meneki Gakkai Kaishi
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Receptors, IgG; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab
  • [Number-of-references] 14
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7. Balwierz W, Klekawka T, Moryl-Bujakowska A, Matysiak M, Sopyło B, Wachowiak J, Kaczmarek-Kanold M, Sońta-Jakimczyk D, Janik-Moszant A, Chybicka A, Chaber R, Kowalczyk JR, Mitura-Lesiuk M, Balcerska A, Stachowicz-Stencel T, Wysocki M, Kołtan A, Krawczuk-Rybak M, Muszyńska-Rosłan K, Młynarski W, Stolarska M, Sobol G, Wieczorek M, Karolczyk G, Urbanek-Dadela A: [Can children with Hodgkin's disease be treated with chemotherapy only?]. Przegl Lek; 2010;67(6):375-81
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  • [Title] [Can children with Hodgkin's disease be treated with chemotherapy only?].
  • [Transliterated title] Czy dzieci z choroba Hodgkina moga być leczone wyłacznie chemioterapia?
  • Currently over 90% of children and adolescents with Hodgkin's disease (HD) can be cured thanks to use of multidrug chemotherapy (CT) combined with involved-field radiotherapy (IF-RT).
  • However, the intensive treatment may increase the risk of late complications which may impair the patients' quality of life.
  • In order to decrease the incidence of late complications the protocol with limited use of IF-RT was introduced in centers of Polish Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group (PPLLSG).
  • This study presents the treatment results of patients treated with CT only in comparison with the therapy results of children treated with CT and IF-RT.
  • In 45 patients with IA-IIA stages presenting favorable risk factors (small mediastinal tumor, peripheral nodular mass of a maximum diameter < 6 cm, involvement of less than three nodular regions, ESR < 50 mm after 1 h, histologic type other than lymphocyte depletion and very good treatment response assessed after 3 CT cycles) IF-RT was omitted.
  • Our results show that the use of CT only in precisely selected group of patients with HD do not impair the treatment results and may decrease the risk of late life threatening complications.
  • Treatment response assessment with the use of PET may in future increase the number of patients treated without RT and limit the need of the use of invasive diagnostic methods in patients with residual mass.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Hodgkin Disease / drug therapy. Hodgkin Disease / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 21344765.001).
  • [ISSN] 0033-2240
  • [Journal-full-title] Przegla̧d lekarski
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prz. Lek.
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
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8. Thompson LD, Fisher SI, Chu WS, Nelson A, Abbondanzo SL: HIV-associated Hodgkin lymphoma: a clinicopathologic and immunophenotypic study of 45 cases. Am J Clin Pathol; 2004 May;121(5):727-38
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  • [Title] HIV-associated Hodgkin lymphoma: a clinicopathologic and immunophenotypic study of 45 cases.
  • We retrospectively analyzed 45 cases of HIV-associated Hodgkin lymphoma (HIV-HL).
  • HIV-HL generally is a disease of young white men (mean age, 40.1 years) who acquired HIV infection by homosexual or bisexual behavior (68%), intravenous drug use (24%), and/or blood transfusion (8%).
  • The mean interval between the diagnosis of HIV and HIV-HL was 5.2 years.
  • Morphologic classification of nodal biopsy specimens (2001 World Health Organization criteria) included 15 mixed cellularity Hodgkin lymphomas (MCHLs), 14 nodular sclerosis Hodgkin lymphomas (NSHLs), 9 lymphocyte depleted Hodgkin lymphomas (LDHLs), and 7 classic Hodgkin lymphomas, type not further categorized.
  • The Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells expressed positive immunoreactivity with fascin (30/30 [100%]), CD30 (35/37 [95%]), CD15 (32/36 [89%]), bcl-X(L) (25/31 [81%]), bcl-2 (15/29 [52%]), CD20 (4/34 [12%]), bcl-6 (3/28 [11%]), and Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein-1 (32/33 [97%]) and were nonreactive for CD138/syndecan-1.
  • At diagnosis, most patients (n = 27) had high-stage disease (IV(E)) associated with an aggressive course (16% 5-year survival).
  • LDHL behaved more aggressively than MCHL and NSHL (15% vs 40%, 5-year survival, respectively), as did disease with a sarcomatoid pattern (11% 5-year survival).
  • Chemotherapy and radiotherapy proved efficacious in a minority of these patients.
  • [MeSH-major] HIV Infections / pathology. Hodgkin Disease / pathology. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / pathology


9. Ali A, Sayed H, Farrag A, El-Sayed M: Risk-based combined-modality therapy of pediatric Hodgkin's lymphoma: a retrospective study. Leuk Res; 2010 Nov;34(11):1447-52
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  • [Title] Risk-based combined-modality therapy of pediatric Hodgkin's lymphoma: a retrospective study.
  • We conducted a retrospective analysis to investigate the clinical outcome of combined-modality therapy using multiagent chemotherapy and involved-field radiotherapy in treatment of children with Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • Fifty eight cases with newly diagnosed Hodgkin's lymphoma were analyzed.
  • High-risk disease (stage IIIB and IV), presence of B symptoms, lymphocyte depletion subtype, bulky disease and late response to chemotherapy were poor prognostic factors.
  • Stage-adapted combined-modality therapy resulted in satisfactory outcome in treatment of pediatric Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Hodgkin Disease / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Prognosis. Radiotherapy. Retrospective Studies. Risk Assessment

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20599270.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-5835
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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10. Kubeck JP, Merola A, Mathur S, Brkaric M, Majid K, Shanti N, Caruso S, Yuan S, Lowe T, Dwyer A, Haher T, O'Brien M: End organ effects of high-dose human equivalent methylprednisolone in a spinal cord injury rat model. Spine (Phila Pa 1976); 2006 Feb 1;31(3):257-61
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  • OBJECTIVE: To analyze the histologic effects of high-dose human equivalent methylprednisolone on the pulmonary, cardiac, intestinal, renal, hepatic, and splenic tissues in a spinal cord injury rat model.
  • SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: There are numerous investigations of various medical interventions for the treatment of acute spinal cord trauma.
  • Although it has been nearly 2 decades since the first National Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study investigated the role high-dose steroids might play in the treatment of acute spinal cord trauma, controversy still exists regarding the efficacy of this treatment.
  • Lymphocytic depletion was seen in as little as 4 hours after methylprednisolone infusion and continued until 48 hours.
  • Pulmonary tissues variably showed interstitial congestion and eosinophilic alveolar collections.
  • Intestinal mucosal tissues showed edema and autolyzed mucosa from 16 hours onwards.
  • Cardiac, kidney, and hepatic tissue did not differ significantly from controls.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Histologically, HDE methylprednisolone caused significant splenic lymphocytic depletion changes in as little as 4 hours.
  • The kidney, lung, cardiac, intestinal, splenic, and hepatic tissues from the aforementioned animals were then sectioned and analyzed using histologic staining techniques by a qualified pathologist.
  • [MeSH-major] Methylprednisolone / administration & dosage. Methylprednisolone / adverse effects. Spinal Cord Injuries / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Disease Models, Animal. Humans. Intestines / drug effects. Intestines / pathology. Lymphopenia / chemically induced. Lymphopenia / pathology. Pulmonary Eosinophilia / chemically induced. Pulmonary Eosinophilia / pathology. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley

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  • (PMID = 16449896.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-1159
  • [Journal-full-title] Spine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Spine
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] X4W7ZR7023 / Methylprednisolone
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11. Mandigers CM, Verdonck LF, Meijerink JP, Dekker AW, Schattenberg AV, Raemaekers JM: Graft-versus-lymphoma effect of donor lymphocyte infusion in indolent lymphomas relapsed after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2003 Dec;32(12):1159-63
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. PROCARBAZINE .

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  • [Title] Graft-versus-lymphoma effect of donor lymphocyte infusion in indolent lymphomas relapsed after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.
  • Donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) are used to treat relapsed haematological diseases after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT).
  • We treated seven patients with DLI for indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma relapsed after SCT.
  • In available blood and bone marrow samples, lymphoma cells were analysed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction of t(14;18)-positive cells in follicular lymphoma, and by immunophenotyping in small lymphocytic lymphoma.
  • Evaluable responses to pre-DLI therapy were stable disease in one and partial remission (PR) in two patients.
  • Six patients responded to DLI (complete remission (CR) in four and PR in two).
  • After DLI, acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) occurred in 3/6 patients, classified as grade 2, whereas only limited chronic GVHD was seen (n=5).
  • In the remaining patient, not responding to DLI, progressive disease was seen later on; chemotherapy followed by another DLI resulted in CR.
  • In three cases, clinical responses to DLI could be substantiated by molecular or immunophenotypic analysis of lymphoma cells.
  • We conclude that DLI is effective for treatment of indolent lymphoma relapsing after SCT.
  • [MeSH-major] Graft vs Tumor Effect. Lymphocyte Transfusion. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / therapy. Salvage Therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Female. Graft vs Host Disease / etiology. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Lymphocyte Depletion. Male. Mechlorethamine / administration & dosage. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Middle Aged. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Prednisolone / administration & dosage. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Procarbazine / administration & dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Recurrence. Remission Induction. Rituximab. Tissue Donors. Transplantation, Homologous / adverse effects. Treatment Outcome. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 14647270.001).
  • [ISSN] 0268-3369
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 35S93Y190K / Procarbazine; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab; 50D9XSG0VR / Mechlorethamine; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate; ProMACE-MOPP protocol; VAP-cyclo protocol
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12. Alebouyeh M, Moussavi F, Haddad-Deylami H, Vossough P: Successful ambulatory treatment of Hodgkin's disease in Iranian children based on German-Austrian DAL-HD 85-90: single institutional results. Ann Oncol; 2005 Dec;16(12):1936-40
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Hodgkin Disease.

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  • [Title] Successful ambulatory treatment of Hodgkin's disease in Iranian children based on German-Austrian DAL-HD 85-90: single institutional results.
  • BACKGROUND: Hodgkin's disease (HD) accounts for 7.5% of childhood malignancies in Iran.
  • In order to minimize chemotherapy toxicity and avoid eventual hospitalization and psychological and financial burdens we have applied since 1988, for the first time in Iran, a treatment regimen based on subsequently revised DAL-HD 85-90 and later GPOH-HD 95 protocols.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: During the period 1988-2004, 40 children with HD received DAL/GPOH-HD-adapted treatment; 25 males (62.5%) and 15 females (37.5%) (male/female ratio 1.7; age 4-14 years, mean 8.8).
  • Clinical evaluation and staging was performed in all patients.
  • Staging was as follows: stage I; seven (17.5%); II, 11 (27.5%); III, 11 (27.5%); and IV, 11 (27.5%).
  • Histopathology: 22 patients had mixed cellularity (MC; 55%), 13 nodular sclerosis (32.5%), four lymphocyte predominance (LP; 10%) and one patient lymphocyte depletion (2.5%).
  • Stage IA and IIA patients (n = 15) received either OPA x2 (vincristine, prednisolone, doxorubicin) or OPPA x2 or OPEA x2 (vincristine, prednisolone, procarbazine and doxorubicin), the latter receiving etoposide instead of procarbazine, and applied to males.
  • Twenty nine patients (72.5%) received radiotherapy (20-25 Gy); four to the involved field (stage I), 25 to the upper mantel (stage II and also III with either residual or mediastinal mass) and three additionally to spleen and para-aortic lymph nodes.
  • Eleven patients received only chemotherapy.
  • Relapse occurred in eight patients (20%); seven stage IV (MC) and one stage IA (LP) with progression to IIIB.
  • Salvage chemotherapy consisted of MOPP/ABVD hybrid; six patients achieved a second sustained remission and three patients died: two due to relapse and progressive disease and the third one in CR, owing to thrombocytopenic hemorrhage and foudroyant pneumonia.
  • Aside from minor acute toxicities, three patients demonstrated azoospermia at the age of 18 years and one of these patients suffered non-Hodgkin lymphoma as a second malignancy.
  • Both received appropriate treatment and are over 10 years in CR.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The DAL/GPOH-HD-based treatment approach proved to achieve long-term sustained cure even in children with advanced HD disease.
  • The essentially outpatient diagnosis and treatment modus did not compromise the disease outcome, and was well tolerated and accepted by the patients and their parents.
  • The employed drugs are easily available and affordable.
  • This treatment approach is suitable for ambulatory use in developing countries.

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  • (PMID = 16157620.001).
  • [ISSN] 0923-7534
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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13. Pangalis GA, Dimopoulou MN, Angelopoulou MK, Tsekouras C, Vassilakopoulos TP, Vaiopoulos G, Siakantaris MP: Campath-1H (anti-CD52) monoclonal antibody therapy in lymphoproliferative disorders. Med Oncol; 2001;18(2):99-107
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

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  • [Title] Campath-1H (anti-CD52) monoclonal antibody therapy in lymphoproliferative disorders.
  • Campath-1H has been used in B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL), T-prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL), and low-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (LGNHL).
  • The responses (complete [CR] and partial [PR]) obtained in untreated B-CLL patients are of the order of 90%.
  • Because of the antibody's higher activity on circulating lymphocytes, it has been used for in vivo purging of residual disease in B-CLL, followed by autologous stem-cell transplantation.
  • In heavily pretreated advanced stage LGNHL, response is achieved only in 14% of cases with B-phenotype; a 50% response rate is noted in mycosis fungoides.
  • The main complications of Campath-1H treatment are caused by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6 release, usually during the first intravenous infusion, and include fever, rigor, nausea, vomiting, and hypotension responsive to steroids.
  • Immunosupression resulting from normal B- and T-lymphocyte depletion is frequent, resulting in an increased risk for opportunistic infections.
  • More clinical trials in a larger number of patients are necessary to determine the exact role and indications of Campath-1H in lymphoproliferative disorders.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antibodies, Neoplasm / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Leukemia, B-Cell / drug therapy. Leukemia, Prolymphocytic / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Humans. Immunosuppression. Infection. Infusions, Intravenous. Interleukin-6 / adverse effects. Interleukin-6 / secretion. Phenotype. Risk Factors. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / adverse effects. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / secretion

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  • (PMID = 11778765.001).
  • [ISSN] 1357-0560
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical oncology (Northwood, London, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antibodies, Neoplasm; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Interleukin-6; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; 3A189DH42V / alemtuzumab
  • [Number-of-references] 60
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14. Igarashi T, Ohtsu T, Fujii H, Sasaki Y, Morishima Y, Ogura M, Kagami Y, Kinoshita T, Kasai M, Kiyama Y, Kobayashi Y, Tobinai K, IDEC-C2B8 Study Group: Re-treatment of relapsed indolent B-cell lymphoma with rituximab. Int J Hematol; 2001 Feb;73(2):213-21
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  • [Title] Re-treatment of relapsed indolent B-cell lymphoma with rituximab.
  • The purpose of this study was to investigate the toxicity and the efficacy of re-treatment with rituximab, a chimeric mouse human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, in relapsed patients with indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) who responded to rituximab in the previous phase I or phase II study.
  • Thirteen patients with relapsed B-cell NHL, each of whom was confirmed to have Revised European-American Lymphoma Classification type II, 1-6 histology (indolent B-NHL), enrolled in this re-treatment study.
  • Rituximab re-treatment was well tolerated with no grade 3/4 nonhematological toxicities, similar to that of the initial treatment.
  • No patients developed detectable human anti-chimeric antibody.
  • Partial responses were observed in 5 of 13 patients (38%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 14% to 68%); 6 patients showed stable disease and 2 showed progressive disease.
  • Overall survival rate was 93% at 19 months of median follow-up after rituximab re-treatment.
  • Median progression-free survival (PFS) after the re-treatment was 5.1 months (95% CI, 4.1 to 5.6 months), and the median PFS after the initial treatment was 8.2 months (95%CI, 5.9 to 11.3 months).
  • Although rituximab re-treatment induced prolonged depletion of normal peripheral blood B cells in all patients, no significant decrease in serum immunoglobulin or complement level was observed.
  • In conclusion, rituximab re-treatment was well tolerated, and it may produce a prolonged PFS in some patients with indolent B-cell NHL who showed initial response to rituximab.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. Lymphoma, B-Cell / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents / toxicity. B-Lymphocytes / cytology. Complement System Proteins / analysis. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Immunoglobulins / blood. Infection / etiology. Lymphocyte Count. Male. Middle Aged. Recurrence. Rituximab. T-Lymphocytes / cytology. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11372734.001).
  • [ISSN] 0925-5710
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Immunoglobulins; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab; 9007-36-7 / Complement System Proteins
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15. Petera J, Macharová H, Pohanková R, Malír A, Coupek P, Konecný M, Patera J, Pecina J, Drbal J, Koukalová H, Vásová I: Radiotherapy of early stages Hodgkin's disease. 10 years experience of the Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute. Neoplasma; 2000;47(2):129-32
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  • [Title] Radiotherapy of early stages Hodgkin's disease. 10 years experience of the Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute.
  • Radiotherapy and chemotherapy, alone or in combination, are curative treatment methods in early stages of Hodgkin's disease (HD).
  • The choice of treatment depends on the stage of the disease, histological type and localization of the tumor, as well as on other prognostic factors.
  • A retrospective study was conducted including 145 patients with clinical Stages I and II of HD according to Ann Arbor classification, all treated in the Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute in Brno during the years 1985 through 1994.
  • 41 patients were diagnosed with Stage IA tumor, 1 patient with Stage IB, 75 patients with Stage IIA and 28 with Stage IIB disease.
  • The histological types of the disease were lymphocyte predominant in 23 patients, nodular sclerosis in 49 patients, mixed cellularity in 65 cases and lymphocyte depletion in 8 cases.
  • 39 patients were treated with combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
  • 15 patients were given chemotherapy alone, 7 patients from this group experienced a relapse.
  • The five-year survival was 81% in patients with Stages IA and IIA disease, 65% in Stages IB and IIB disease.
  • Radiotherapy remains the curative method of choice in highly selected group of patients with early stages of Hodgkin's disease.
  • The results of radiotherapy alone are unsatisfactory in unselected clinical Stage I--II patients because of the presence of patients with adverse prognostic factors, particularly B symptomatology, mixed cellularity/lymphocyte depletion histology, higher age.
  • These patients are candidates for combined treatment.
  • Modern equipment and meticulous treatment are conditions crucial for the outcome of curative radiotherapy in patients with Hodgkin's disease.
  • Combination chemotherapy is very effective in the treatment of relapse following the primary radiotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Hodgkin Disease / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bleomycin / administration & dosage. Child. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Male. Mechlorethamine / administration & dosage. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Procarbazine / administration & dosage. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome. Vinblastine / administration & dosage. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 10985481.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-2685
  • [Journal-full-title] Neoplasma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neoplasma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] SLOVAKIA
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 35S93Y190K / Procarbazine; 50D9XSG0VR / Mechlorethamine; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; COPP protocol; MOPP protocol; VBA protocol
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16. Martinelli G, Laszlo D, Bertolini F, Pastano R, Mancuso P, Calleri A, Vanazzi A, Santoro P, Cavalli F, Zucca E: Chlorambucil in combination with induction and maintenance rituximab is feasible and active in indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Br J Haematol; 2003 Oct;123(2):271-7
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  • [Title] Chlorambucil in combination with induction and maintenance rituximab is feasible and active in indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • We investigated the toxicity and efficacy of the chimaeric anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in combination with standard-dose chlorambucil in newly diagnosed and relapsed/refractory indolent B-cell lymphoma patients.
  • A total of 29 patients (15 newly diagnosed and 14 relapsed/refractory) with low-grade or follicular B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) were included in this phase II study.
  • Therapy consisted of chlorambucil 6 mg/m2/d for 6 consecutive weeks in combination with a standard 4-weekly rituximab administration schedule in the induction phase.
  • Patients responding to the induction therapy received four additional cycles with chlorambucil (6 mg/m2/d for 2 weeks/month) plus rituximab (once a month).
  • Twenty-six patients (89%) completed the treatment; only one patient discontinued treatment because of haematological toxicity.
  • At the end of the study, the dose of chlorambucil had to be reduced in seven patients (27%) and six patients (23%) required a delay in further treatment, as a result of toxicity during consolidation therapy.
  • Only one patient was withdrawn from the study because of progressive disease; the 27 patients evaluable for response at the end of consolidation achieved a clinical response (63% complete response and 26% partial response).
  • A significant CD4+ and CD56+ depletion was observed after induction and during consolidation therapy; two herpes zoster virus infections and one perianal abscess represented major infectious morbidities registered during the study.
  • Its definitive role in the treatment of low-grade NHL should be further evaluated in randomized trials.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Lymphoma, B-Cell / drug therapy. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. Antibodies, Monoclonal / adverse effects. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. CD4 Lymphocyte Count. CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes / drug effects. CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes / drug effects. Chlorambucil / administration & dosage. Chlorambucil / adverse effects. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Hematologic Diseases / chemically induced. Humans. Lymphocyte Count. Male. Middle Aged. Rituximab. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 14531908.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1048
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 18D0SL7309 / Chlorambucil; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab
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17. Gocheva L, Koleva I: Long-term outcome of treatment for Hodgkin's disease: the University Hospital Sofia experience. Klin Onkol; 2010;23(1):34-42
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Long-term outcome of treatment for Hodgkin's disease: the University Hospital Sofia experience.
  • BACKGROUND: To establish the efficacy of the combined modality treatment (CMT) including curative extended field radiotherapy (EFRT) and chemotherapy (CHT) by examining the long-term outcome in Hodgkin's disease (HD) patients at the Sofia University Hospital "Queen Giovanna-ISUL", with particular focus on second primary malignancy (SPM), and to establish independent factors correlated with treatment outcome.
  • The clinical stage (CS) distribution was CS I in 1 patient (0.6%), CS II in 86 (50.5%), CS III in 77 (45.3%) and CS IV in 6 (3.5%) patients.
  • Histologic subtypes included lymphocyte predominance 7.6%, mixed cellularity 47.1%, nodular sclerosis 42.9% and lymphocyte depletion 0.6%.
  • The overall treatment consisted of both EFRT and CHT.
  • The daily dose was 1.5-2 Gy, the total dose for EFRT was 20-40 Gy.
  • RESULTS: Follow-up extended from a minimum of 0,3 years to maximum 25,7 years, with a median observation time 12 years.The 5-, 10-, 15-, and 25-year overall survival (OS) in the whole group was 93% : 86% : 82% : 82%, respectively.
  • The following factors were analyzed for their prognostic influence: age, gender, stage, histologic subtype at first diagnosis, sites of involvement, number of involved lymph node areas, B symptoms, hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, elevated serum LDH, daily dose, total dose, boost and technique used in EFRT.
  • In univariate analysis, independent risk factors were gender (p < 0.001), stage (IIB: IIIA) (p = 0.03), mediastinal involvement (p = 0.03), daily dose (p = 0.01) and total dose (p = 0.02).
  • In multivariate analysis, independent risk factors age < or = 15 years (p < 0.001), male gender (p = 0.005), daily dose < or = 1.5 Gy (p = 0.009), and total dose 26-30 Gy (p = 0.048) were found to positively affect OS.
  • We investigated a prognostic model, identifying groups of HD patients with particularly responsive disease, combining prognostic factors as age < or = 15 years (p = 0.001), male gender (p = 0.011), and total dose 26-30 Gy (p = 0.012).
  • CONCLUSION: The performed first Bulgarian study on CMT including EFRT and CHT exhibited a certain therapeutic potential in the treatment of HD patients, expressed in the achievement of high long term outcome and low SPM frequency.
  • [MeSH-major] Hodgkin Disease / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Male. Prognosis. Risk Factors. Survival Rate. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20192072.001).
  • [ISSN] 0862-495X
  • [Journal-full-title] Klinická onkologie : casopis Ceské a Slovenské onkologické spolecnosti
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Klin Onkol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Czech Republic
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18. Dadparvar S, Hussain R, Esteves F, Yu JQ, Grewal RK, Arif S, Cruz R, Barbaria CJ, Woods K, Styler MJ: Thallium-201 imaging in evaluation of Hodgkin's disease. Cancer J; 2002 Nov-Dec;8(6):469-75
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Thallium-201 imaging in evaluation of Hodgkin's disease.
  • PURPOSE: The role of Ga 67 in the evaluation of Hodgkin's disease has been widely established.
  • This prospective study was performed to evaluate the role of Tl 201 imaging in Hodgkin's disease at the time of initial presentation and in the assessment of response to therapy, relapse, and remission.
  • METHODS: Fifty-one consecutive patients (23 female, 28 male) with known Hodgkin's disease underwent 111 Tl 201 and Ga 67 studies.
  • The histopathologies included nodular sclerosis (in 31 cases), mixed cellularity (in 12), lymphocytic predominant (in five), lymphocytic depletion (in one), and unknown (in two).
  • Comparison with Ga 67 imaging, anatomical imaging (computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging), and clinical correlation were performed.
  • Tl 201 imaging was similar in sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy among the nodular sclerosis and the mixed-cellularity Hodgkin's disease.
  • CONCLUSION: Tl 201 imaging offers more specificity with a higher positive predictive value in the diagnosis of Hodgkin's disease.
  • The Ga 67 study is more sensitive than Tl 201 in the detection of disease.
  • Therefore, we recommend Tl 201 imaging in the initial evaluation and assessment of patients' response to radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Hodgkin Disease / radionuclide imaging. Thallium Radioisotopes

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  • (PMID = 12500856.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-9117
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer journal (Sudbury, Mass.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Gallium Radioisotopes; 0 / Thallium Radioisotopes
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19. Büyükpamukçu M, Varan A, Akyüz C, Atahan L, Ozyar E, Kale G, Köksal Y, Kutluk T: The treatment of childhood Hodgkin lymphoma: improved survival in a developing country. Acta Oncol; 2009;48(1):44-51
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The treatment of childhood Hodgkin lymphoma: improved survival in a developing country.
  • BACKGROUND: To evaluate the clinical characteristics, treatment regimens, and outcome of children with Hodgkin lymphoma in a developing country over a period of 34 years.
  • METHODS: This paper retrospectively evaluates the treatment and prognosis of 614 children with Hodgkin lymphoma disease between 1971 and 2005.
  • All patients were treated with chemotherapy, and also received radiotherapy.
  • RESULTS: There were 452 males and 162 females with a median age of 8 years (2 to 21); 183 patients had B symptoms.
  • There were 165, 185, 145, and 119 patients in stage I, II, III, and IV, respectively.
  • Histopathologic subtypes were mixed cellularity (344 patients), nodular sclerosis (90), lymphocytic predominance (62), lymphocytic depletion (46), unclassified types (69), and nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (3).
  • Overall (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) rates were 83 and 60%, though OS rates varied according to chemotherapy protocol; age; presence of B symptoms, leukocytosis, anemia, and extranodal involvement; and stage at diagnosis.
  • Over the years, the median age of patients increased, as did the frequency of the nodular sclerosing type of disease.
  • The increase in the median age and in the frequency of the nodular-sclerosing type are thought to be related to the development status of Turkey.
  • The ABVD protocol yielded the best survival rates and should be used for treatment of patients with Hodgkin lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Hodgkin Disease / mortality. Hodgkin Disease / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Male. Multivariate Analysis. Neoplasm Staging. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome. Turkey / epidemiology. Young Adult


20. Webb IJ, Friedberg nW, Gribben JG, Fisher DC, Spitzer T, Neuberg D, Jallow H, Kim H, Houde H, Monroy R, Schmittling R, Freedman AS: Effective purging of autologous hematopoietic stem cells using anti-B-cell monoclonal antibody-coated high-density microparticles prior to high-dose therapy for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant; 2002;8(8):429-34
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  • [Title] Effective purging of autologous hematopoietic stem cells using anti-B-cell monoclonal antibody-coated high-density microparticles prior to high-dose therapy for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • Contamination of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with tumor cells has been associated with increased incidence of relapse in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma following autologous HSC transplantation.
  • We report a pilot clinical trial in which 10 patients with relapsed B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma received high-dose chemotherapy followed by infusion of autologous HSCs depleted of B-cells by high-density microparticles (HDM) coated with anti-CD19 and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (BCell-HDM).
  • In 6 of the 10 patients, B-cells were detectable by immunocytochemical analysis of the apheresis products prior to treatment.
  • Following treatment with the BCell-HDM, no B-cells were detected in the products from 5 of these patients, a result representing a median depletion of >2.2 logs (range, >0.4 to >5.1 logs).
  • All patients received high-dose cyclophosphamide, BCNU (carmustine), and etoposide prior to reinfusion of their B-cell-depleted autologous HSCs.
  • Engraftment was rapid in all cases, with a median time to achieve an absolute neutrophil count of 0.5 x 10(9)/L of 10 days (range, 8-11 days).
  • The median time to achieve a platelet count of 20 x 10(9)/L unsupported by platelet transfusion was 11.5 days (range, 8-17 days).
  • This nonmagnetic negative-depletion technology is simple, rapid, and effective in depleting target cells to undetectable levels, with excellent recovery of nontarget cells.
  • [MeSH-major] B-Lymphocytes. Cell Separation / methods. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. Hematopoietic Stem Cells / cytology. Lymphoma, B-Cell / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antigens, Differentiation, B-Lymphocyte / immunology. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Graft Survival. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization. Humans. Microspheres. Middle Aged. Pilot Projects. Secondary Prevention. Transplantation, Autologous / methods. Transplantation, Autologous / standards

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  • (PMID = 12234168.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-8791
  • [Journal-full-title] Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 66996
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antigens, Differentiation, B-Lymphocyte
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21. Chaiwatanatorn K, Lee N, Grigg A, Filshie R, Firkin F: Delayed-onset neutropenia associated with rituximab therapy. Br J Haematol; 2003 Jun;121(6):913-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Delayed-onset neutropenia associated with rituximab therapy.
  • The characteristics of severe neutropenia with a delayed onset following administration of rituximab have been evaluated in 53 consecutively treated patients.
  • All but one patient received rituximab for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • Eight episodes of grade 4 neutropenia were detected between 1 and 5 months after rituximab, when administered alone on five occasions, and on three occasions in combination with chemotherapy, where neutrophil counts had recovered prior to the development of neutropenia.
  • Development of neutropenia did not correlate with either the presence of detectable disease or the administration of further treatment.
  • Neutropenia was associated with selective depletion of neutrophil precursors in all but one episode, where it was associated with generalized bone marrow hypoplasia.
  • All episodes developed after a period of either normal or mildly depressed neutrophil counts following treatment with rituximab, and persisted for between several days and several months, before undergoing spontaneous recovery in four instances, and after administration of filgrastim in the remainder.
  • Episodes of neutropenia were associated with disordered immune status manifested by lymphopenia and hypogammaglobulinaemia, raising the possibility that either disturbance of the balance of lymphocyte subsets or an immune dyscrasia induced by rituximab resulted in the development of this type of neutropenia.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy. Neutropenia / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Female. Humans. Leukocyte Count. Male. Middle Aged. Rituximab. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 12786803.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1048
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab
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22. Hull MC, Mendenhall NP, Colgan ME: Subdiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease: the University of Florida experience. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2002 Jan 1;52(1):161-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Subdiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease: the University of Florida experience.
  • PURPOSE: To assess the long-term outcomes and late effects of patients with subdiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: Twenty-one patients with Stage I and II subdiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease were treated with curative intent between February 1966 and February 1998 at the University of Florida.
  • Patient characteristics were as follows: mean age, 38.7 years (range, 3-75 years); 20 males and 1 female; 33% lymphocyte predominant, 43% nodular sclerosing, 14% mixed cellularity, 5% lymphocyte depletion, and 5% unclassified Hodgkin's disease.
  • Treatment included inverted Y irradiation (InY) (8 patients), total nodal irradiation (TNI) (7 patients), and combined modality irradiation and chemotherapy (CMT) (6 patients).
  • There were no deaths from Hodgkin's disease.
  • Treatment failures occurred in 1 of 8 patients after InY, 1 of 7 after TNI, and 1 of 6 after CMT.
  • There were 5 second malignant neoplasms and 3 cardiac events, including 4 second malignant neoplasms and 2 cardiac events in the 9 patients > or =40 years old at diagnosis and 1 second malignant neoplasm and 1 cardiac event in the 12 patients <40 years old.
  • All 3 second solid malignancies in this study occurred 7-14 years after treatment in areas receiving 10-20 Gy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Subdiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease is an uncommon manifestation with excellent disease control achieved with InY, TNI, and CMT.
  • This subgroup of patients with Hodgkin's disease is predominantly male and older than subgroups with other presentations, which may predispose the group to a higher risk for serious adverse events after treatment.
  • We recommend InY with spleen for clinical Stages IA and nodular sclerosis or lymphocyte-predominant clinical Stage IIA, InY alone for pathologic Stages IA and IIA, and CMT for all Stage I/II patients with greater than three involved sites, B symptoms, bulky disease (>6 cm), central (para-aortic) presentation, or splenic involvement.
  • [MeSH-major] Hodgkin Disease / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Diaphragm. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Florida. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Inguinal Canal. Male. Mechlorethamine / administration & dosage. Middle Aged. Myocardial Infarction / etiology. Neoplasm Staging. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Procarbazine / administration & dosage. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 11777634.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 35S93Y190K / Procarbazine; 50D9XSG0VR / Mechlorethamine; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; MOPP protocol
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