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1. Aljurf M, Zaidi SZ: Chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for adult T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma: current status and controversies. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant; 2005 Oct;11(10):739-54
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  • [Title] Chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for adult T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma: current status and controversies.
  • Adult T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma is a relatively rare aggressive type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma with frequent involvement of extranodal sites.
  • Because of the rarity of this malignancy, it is treated variably and often suboptimally, using approaches similar to those used for other types of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas, with the consequence that outcome is often suboptimal.
  • The collective experience in the management of adult T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma suggests a good outcome for patients with no adverse prognostic factors who are treated with an acute lymphocytic leukemia-like treatment strategy.
  • Patients with adverse prognostic features should be considered for more aggressive therapy-specifically, high-dose chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
  • This article will attempt to review the current status of chemotherapy treatment programs and the relative merits of the different hematopoietic stem cell transplantation programs in this disease, particularly in relation to the pathologic and clinical features that correlate with disease prognosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / therapy. Graft vs Tumor Effect. Humans. Mediastinal Neoplasms / therapy. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16182175.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-8791
  • [Journal-full-title] Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 114
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2. Kadota RP, Mahoney DH, Doyle J, Duerst R, Friedman H, Holmes E, Kun L, Zhou T, Pollack IF: Dose intensive melphalan and cyclophosphamide with autologous hematopoietic stem cells for recurrent medulloblastoma or germinoma. Pediatr Blood Cancer; 2008 Nov;51(5):675-8
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  • [Title] Dose intensive melphalan and cyclophosphamide with autologous hematopoietic stem cells for recurrent medulloblastoma or germinoma.
  • PURPOSE: To determine the response, toxicity, and survival for children with progressive or recurrent medulloblastoma and germinoma using a single myeloablative course of chemotherapy supported by autologous hematopoietic stem cells.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Subjects were in second remission or had minimal residual disease at the time of study entry.
  • CONCLUSION: Myeloablative chemotherapy consisting of cyclophosphamide and melphalan was tolerable in the relapsed brain tumor setting with 19/29 cases achieving CR or CCR status and 9/29 becoming long-term survivors.

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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  • (PMID = 18623206.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-5017
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric blood & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Blood Cancer
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA098543-06; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA98543; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA098413-06; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA098413; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA098543; None / None / / U10 CA098413-06; None / None / / U10 CA098543-06
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; Q41OR9510P / Melphalan
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS123029; NLM/ PMC2900925
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3. Aboody KS, Najbauer J, Schmidt NO, Yang W, Wu JK, Zhuge Y, Przylecki W, Carroll R, Black PM, Perides G: Targeting of melanoma brain metastases using engineered neural stem/progenitor cells. Neuro Oncol; 2006 Apr;8(2):119-26
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  • Given the extensive tropism of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) for pathological areas in the central nervous system, we expanded investigations to determine whether NSPCs could also target multiple sites of brain metastases in a syngeneic experimental melanoma model.
  • Using cytosine deaminase-expressing NSPCs (CD-NSPCs) and systemic 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) pro-drug administration, we explored their potential as a cell-based targeted drug delivery system to disseminated brain metastases.
  • Furthermore, in our therapeutic paradigm, animals with established melanoma brain metastasis received intracranial implantation of CD-NSPCs followed by systemic 5-FC treatment, resulting in a significant (71%) reduction in tumor burden.
  • These data provide proof of principle for the use of NSPCs for targeted delivery of therapeutic gene products to melanoma brain metastases.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Brain Neoplasms / therapy. Melanoma, Experimental / secondary. Melanoma, Experimental / therapy. Neurons / transplantation. Stem Cell Transplantation
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line, Tumor. Immunohistochemistry. Mice. Neoplasm Transplantation

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  • (PMID = 16524944.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-8517
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuro-oncology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1871940
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4. Kushner BH, Cheung NK, Kramer K, Dunkel IJ, Calleja E, Boulad F: Topotecan combined with myeloablative doses of thiotepa and carboplatin for neuroblastoma, brain tumors, and other poor-risk solid tumors in children and young adults. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2001 Sep;28(6):551-6
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  • Topotecan appears to be relatively unaffected by the most common multidrug resistance mechanisms, may potentiate cytotoxicity of alkylators, has good penetration into the central nervous system, is active against a variety of neoplasms, and has myelosuppression as its paramount toxicity.
  • Post-transplant treatment included radiotherapy alone (four patients) or plus biological agents (11 patients with neuroblastoma).
  • With a follow-up of 6+ to 32+ (median 11+) months, event-free survivors include 10/11 neuroblastoma patients (first CR), 4/5 brain tumor patients (second PR or CR), 1/3 patients with metastatic Ewing's sarcoma (first or second CR), and a patient transplanted for multiply recurrent immature ovarian teratoma; a patient with desmoplastic small round-cell tumor (second PR) had progressive disease at 8 months.
  • Favorable results for disease control, manageable toxicity, and the antitumor profiles of topotecan, thiotepa, and carboplatin, support use of this three-drug regimen in the treatment of neuroblastoma and brain tumors; applicability to other tumors is still uncertain.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Neuroblastoma / drug therapy. Thiotepa / administration & dosage. Topotecan / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Humans. Infant. Male. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Remission Induction. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11607767.001).
  • [ISSN] 0268-3369
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA61017; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA72868
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Clinical Trial, Phase III; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 7M7YKX2N15 / Topotecan; 905Z5W3GKH / Thiotepa; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin
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5. Landen JW, Hau V, Wang M, Davis T, Ciliax B, Wainer BH, Van Meir EG, Glass JD, Joshi HC, Archer DR: Noscapine crosses the blood-brain barrier and inhibits glioblastoma growth. Clin Cancer Res; 2004 Aug 1;10(15):5187-201
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  • Although the mechanism by which it suppresses coughing is currently unknown, it is presumed to involve the central nervous system.
  • In this study, we show that noscapine inhibits the proliferation of rat C6 glioma cells in vitro (IC(50) = 100 microm) and effectively crosses the blood-brain barrier at rates similar to the ones found for agents such as morphine and [Met]enkephalin that have potent central nervous system activity (P < or = 0.05).
  • Daily oral noscapine treatment (300 mg/kg) administered to immunodeficient mice having stereotactically implanted rat C6 glioblasoma into the striatum revealed a significant reduction of tumor volume (P < or = 0.05).
  • This was achieved with no identifiable toxicity to the duodenum, spleen, liver, or hematopoietic cells as determined by pathological microscopic examination of these tissues and flow cytometry.
  • Furthermore, noscapine treatment resulted in little evidence of toxicity to dorsal root ganglia cultures as measured by inhibition of neurite outgrowth and yielded no evidence of peripheral neuropathy in animals.
  • However, evidence of vasodilation was observed in noscapine-treated brain tissue.
  • These unique properties of noscapine, including its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier, interfere with microtubule dynamics, arrest tumor cell division, reduce tumor growth, and minimally affect other dividing tissues and peripheral nerves, warrant additional investigation of its therapeutic potential.
  • [MeSH-major] Antitussive Agents / pharmacology. Blood-Brain Barrier / drug effects. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Glioblastoma / drug therapy. Noscapine / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Brain / metabolism. Brain / pathology. Bromodeoxyuridine / pharmacology. Cattle. Cell Count. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid. Coloring Agents / pharmacology. DNA / metabolism. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Endothelium, Vascular / pathology. Female. Flow Cytometry. Humans. Image Processing, Computer-Assisted. Inhibitory Concentration 50. Mice. Mice, Nude. Mice, SCID. Microcirculation / metabolism. Microtubules / drug effects. Mitosis. Models, Biological. Neoplasm Transplantation. Neuroglia / metabolism. Rats. S Phase. Time Factors. Tubulin / chemistry

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  • (PMID = 15297423.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Antitussive Agents; 0 / Coloring Agents; 0 / Tubulin; 8V32U4AOQU / Noscapine; 9007-49-2 / DNA; G34N38R2N1 / Bromodeoxyuridine
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6. Gardner SL, Asgharzadeh S, Green A, Horn B, McCowage G, Finlay J: Intensive induction chemotherapy followed by high dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell rescue in young children newly diagnosed with central nervous system atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors. Pediatr Blood Cancer; 2008 Aug;51(2):235-40
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  • [Title] Intensive induction chemotherapy followed by high dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell rescue in young children newly diagnosed with central nervous system atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors.
  • BACKGROUND: Central nervous system (CNS) atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT) are rare tumors of childhood with a dismal prognosis.
  • Historically, surgery and standard dose chemotherapy have resulted in a median survival of 8.5 months from diagnosis.
  • METHODS: Thirteen children newly diagnosed with CNS AT/RT were treated with either the "Head Start I" (HS I) or "Head Start II" (HS II) regimens.
  • Therapy included resection followed by five cycles of cisplatin, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide.
  • Consolidation for both regimens included carboplatin, thiotepa, and etoposide with autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell rescue (AHPCR).
  • Eight patients died of disease (six on HS I); one patient died from infection; one patient died from secondary malignancy following treatment for recurrent AT/RT.
  • CONCLUSION: Three of seven children with CNS AT/RT treated on HS II have experienced long term remissions.
  • Long term survival can be achieved in a subset of young children with CNS AT/RT following resection with the use of multi-drug chemotherapy including high dose methotrexate and myeloablative chemotherapy without radiation therapy (RT).
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / therapy. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Rhabdoid Tumor / therapy. Teratoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Transplantation, Autologous

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  • (PMID = 18381756.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-5017
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric blood & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Blood Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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7. Marachelian A, Butturini A, Finlay J: Myeloablative chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell rescue for childhood central nervous system tumors. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2008 Jan;41(2):167-72
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  • [Title] Myeloablative chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell rescue for childhood central nervous system tumors.
  • Myeloablative chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell rescue has been evaluated in the treatment of children and young adults with brain tumors for whom conventional therapy is either too toxic (for example, radiotherapy in infants) or ineffective (for example, recurrent malignant tumors).
  • With this strategy, myeloablative chemotherapy is administered to patients after initial surgery, and standard-dose chemotherapy.
  • The success of myeloablative chemotherapy depends on the histological type of tumor, extent of disease and of surgical resection, and response to prior chemotherapy.
  • Here, we review results of myeloablative chemotherapy with hematopoietic progenitor cell rescue in brain tumors of different histologies.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / therapy. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy / methods. Disease-Free Survival. Humans. Myeloablative Agonists / therapeutic use. Transplantation Conditioning. Transplantation, Autologous / methods

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  • (PMID = 18176620.001).
  • [ISSN] 0268-3369
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Myeloablative Agonists
  • [Number-of-references] 47
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8. Bouffet E: The role of myeloablative chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic cell rescue in central nervous system germ cell tumors. Pediatr Blood Cancer; 2010 Apr;54(4):644-6
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  • [Title] The role of myeloablative chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic cell rescue in central nervous system germ cell tumors.
  • This review of the experience of high dose chemotherapy in patients with recurrent or refractory intracranial germ cell tumor confirms that sustained tumor control can be achieved with this modality both in germinoma and non-germinomatous germ cell tumors.
  • These promising results have led some cooperative groups to incorporate in their protocols a high dose chemotherapy component for newly diagnosed patients with high-risk features or poor response to initial chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / therapy. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Clinical Trials as Topic. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans

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  • (PMID = 20146220.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-5017
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric blood & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Blood Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 15
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9. Sajedi M, Wolff JE, Egeler RM, Pinto A, Hughes R, Anderson RA, Coppes MJ: Congenital extrarenal non-central nervous system malignant rhabdoid tumor. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2002 May;24(4):316-20
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  • [Title] Congenital extrarenal non-central nervous system malignant rhabdoid tumor.
  • Malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) is a rare tumor occurring mostly in kidneys and central nervous system (CNS).
  • Although the masses in axilla and bone marrow responded rapidly to chemotherapy, the elbow lesion increased in size.
  • Despite intense treatment, the tumor relapsed in lungs and the patient died 12 months after diagnosis.
  • Review of the literature showed twenty additional congenital MRTs arising from sites outside of the kidney and central nervous system were published in the literature.
  • The median overall survival time for all (n = 21) patients was 2.0 months (0-24 months).
  • The only patient who survived had a localized tumor at initial diagnosis.
  • Congenital, extrarenal, non-CNS MRTs are aggressive tumors with poor outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / pathology. Rhabdoid Tumor / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Axilla / pathology. Bone Marrow / pathology. Elbow / pathology. Fatal Outcome. Female. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Humans. Infant, Newborn. Male. Microscopy, Electron. Survival Rate. Thorax / pathology

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  • (PMID = 11972104.001).
  • [ISSN] 1077-4114
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 22
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10. Rosenfeld A, Kletzel M, Duerst R, Jacobsohn D, Haut P, Weinstein J, Rademaker A, Schaefer C, Evans L, Fouts M, Goldman S: A phase II prospective study of sequential myeloablative chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell rescue for the treatment of selected high risk and recurrent central nervous system tumors. J Neurooncol; 2010 Apr;97(2):247-55
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  • [Title] A phase II prospective study of sequential myeloablative chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell rescue for the treatment of selected high risk and recurrent central nervous system tumors.
  • High risk/recurrent CNS tumors have a poor prognosis.
  • We studied tandem high dose chemotherapy (HDC) with hematopoietic progenitor stem cell rescues (HPCR) as potentially curative therapy.
  • Diagnoses were medulloblastoma (n = 9), germ cell tumor (n = 4), high grade astrocytoma (n = 2), supratentorial PNET (n = 1), pineoblastoma (n = 2), or papillary meningioma (n = 1).
  • Toxicity was significant with six treatment related deaths including four with veno-occlusive disease.
  • This regimen of sequential HDC/HPCR in high risk/recurrent CNS tumor patients is not feasible due to toxicity.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / therapy. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Carboplatin / adverse effects. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Etoposide / adverse effects. Female. Humans. Infant. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Male. Melphalan / administration & dosage. Melphalan / adverse effects. Thiotepa / administration & dosage. Thiotepa / adverse effects. Transplantation Conditioning

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  • (PMID = 19768658.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-7373
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; 905Z5W3GKH / Thiotepa; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; Q41OR9510P / Melphalan
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11. Goldman SC, Bracho F, Davenport V, Slack R, Areman E, Shen V, Lenarsky C, Weinthal J, Hughes R, Cairo MS: Feasibility study of IL-11 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor after myelosuppressive chemotherapy to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells from heavily pretreated patients. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2001 Jun-Jul;23(5):300-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Feasibility study of IL-11 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor after myelosuppressive chemotherapy to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells from heavily pretreated patients.
  • After completion of ICE chemotherapy, patients received daily subcutaneous injections of G-CSF (5 microg/kg per day) and IL-11 (50-100 microg/kg per day) until peripheral stem cell apheresis.
  • Diagnosis included three relapsed Hodgkin disease, three relapsed central nervous system tumors, one relapsed Wilms tumor, and one relapsed rhabdomyosarcoma.
  • Seven of the eight patients have subsequently undergone myeloablative chemotherapy with autologous PBSC transplantation and have reconstituted hematopoiesis with a median time to neutrophil recovery of 10 days and platelet recovery of 15.5 days.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the regimen of ICE/IL-11 plus G-CSF is successful in mobilizing large numbers of CD34+ PBSC cells with a limited number (one) of apheresis collections in patients that have previously been heavily pretreated with chemotherapy/radiotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Marrow Diseases / therapy. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / pharmacology. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization / methods. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. Interleukin-11 / pharmacology. Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Blood Cell Count. Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Carboplatin / adverse effects. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Etoposide / adverse effects. Feasibility Studies. Female. Flow Cytometry. Graft Survival. Humans. Ifosfamide / administration & dosage. Ifosfamide / adverse effects. Male. Radiotherapy / adverse effects. Recombinant Proteins / pharmacology. Salvage Therapy. Transplantation Conditioning

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  • (PMID = 11464987.001).
  • [ISSN] 1077-4114
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase I; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interleukin-11; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 143011-72-7 / Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide; ICE protocol 3
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12. van Lochem EG, Wiegers YM, van den Beemd R, Hählen K, van Dongen JJ, Hooijkaas H: Regeneration pattern of precursor-B-cells in bone marrow of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients depends on the type of preceding chemotherapy. Leukemia; 2000 Apr;14(4):688-95
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Regeneration pattern of precursor-B-cells in bone marrow of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients depends on the type of preceding chemotherapy.
  • Immunofluorescence stainings for the CD10 antigen and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) can be used for the detection of leukemic blasts in CD10+ precursor-B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (precursor-B-ALL) patients, but can also provide insight into the regeneration of normal precursor-B-cells in bone marrow (BM).
  • Over a period of 15 years, we studied the regeneration of CD10+, TdT+, and CD10+/TdT+ cells in BM of children with (CD10+) precursor-B-ALL during and after treatment according to three different treatment protocols of the Dutch Childhood Leukemia Study Group (DCLSG) which differed both in medication and time schedule.
  • This study included a total of 634 BM samples from 46 patients who remained in continuous complete remission (CCR) after treatment according to DCLSG protocols VI (1984-1988; n = 8), VII (1988-1991; n = 10) and VIII (1991-1997; n = 28).
  • At first sight this precursor-B-cell regeneration during treatment resembled the massive regeneration of the precursor-B-cell compartment after maintenance treatment, and appeared to be related to the post-induction or post-central nervous system (CNS) therapy stops in protocols VII and VIII.
  • However, careful evaluation of the distribution between the 'more mature' (CD10+/TdT-) and the 'immature' (CD10+/TdT+) precursor-B-cells revealed major differences between the post-induction/post-re-induction precursor-B-cell regeneration (low 'mature/immature' ratio: generally <1.0), the post-CNS treatment regeneration (moderate 'mature/immature' ratio: 1.2-2.8), and the post-maintenance regeneration (high 'mature/ immature' ratio: 5.7-7.6).
  • We conclude that a therapy stop of approximately 2 weeks is already sufficient to induce significant precursor-B-cell regeneration even from aplastic BM after induction treatment.
  • Moreover, differences in precursor-B-cell regeneration patterns are related to the intensity of the preceding treatment block, with lower 'mature/immature' ratios after the highly intensive treatment blocks.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / pharmacology. B-Lymphocytes / drug effects. Hematopoiesis / drug effects. Hematopoietic Stem Cells / drug effects. Precursor B-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Asparaginase / administration & dosage. Asparaginase / pharmacology. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Cell Differentiation. Cell Division / drug effects. Child. DNA Nucleotidylexotransferase / analysis. Dexamethasone / administration & dosage. Dexamethasone / pharmacology. Drug Evaluation. Female. Flow Cytometry. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Male. Microscopy. Neoplasm Proteins / analysis. Neoplasm, Residual. Neoplastic Stem Cells / drug effects. Neoplastic Stem Cells / pathology. Neprilysin / analysis. Vincristine / administration & dosage. Vincristine / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 10764156.001).
  • [ISSN] 0887-6924
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leukemia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone; EC 2.7.7.31 / DNA Nucleotidylexotransferase; EC 3.4.24.11 / Neprilysin; EC 3.5.1.1 / Asparaginase; ALL-VI protocol
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13. Ozkaynak MF, Sahdev I, Gross TG, Levine JE, Cheerva AC, Richards MK, Rozans MK, Shaw PJ, Kadota RP: A pilot study of addition of amifostine to melphalan, carboplatin, etoposide, and cyclophosphamide with autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in pediatric solid tumors-A pediatric blood and marrow transplant consortium study. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2008 Mar;30(3):204-9
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  • [Title] A pilot study of addition of amifostine to melphalan, carboplatin, etoposide, and cyclophosphamide with autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in pediatric solid tumors-A pediatric blood and marrow transplant consortium study.
  • Limited information is available regarding the use of amifostine in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients.
  • Melphalan, carboplatin, etoposide +/- cyclophosphamide is a commonly used preparatory regimen in pediatric solid tumor HSCT.
  • Therefore, we decided to determine the feasibility of the addition of amifostine (750 mg/m b.i.d. x 4 d) to melphalan (200 mg/m), carboplatin (1200 mg/m), and etoposide (800 mg/m) (level 1) and escalating doses of cyclophosphamide (3000 mg/m and 3800 mg/m, levels 2 and 3, respectively) followed by autologous HSCT.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Amifostine / administration & dosage. Amifostine / adverse effects. Bone Marrow Transplantation. Bone Neoplasms / diagnosis. Bone Neoplasms / therapy. Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / diagnosis. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / therapy. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Feasibility Studies. Hodgkin Disease / diagnosis. Hodgkin Disease / therapy. Humans. Hypocalcemia / chemically induced. Hypocalcemia / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / diagnosis. Kidney Neoplasms / therapy. Melphalan / administration & dosage. Neuroblastoma / diagnosis. Neuroblastoma / therapy. Pilot Projects. Recurrence. Risk Factors. Sarcoma / diagnosis. Sarcoma / therapy. Transplantation, Autologous. Transplantation, Homologous. Treatment Outcome. Wilms Tumor / diagnosis. Wilms Tumor / therapy

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  • (PMID = 18376282.001).
  • [ISSN] 1077-4114
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; M487QF2F4V / Amifostine; Q41OR9510P / Melphalan
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14. Damek DM, Lillehei KO, Kleinschmidt-DeMasters BK: Aspergillus terreus brain abscess mimicking tumor progression in a patient with treated glioblastoma multiforme. Clin Neuropathol; 2008 Nov-Dec;27(6):400-7
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  • [Title] Aspergillus terreus brain abscess mimicking tumor progression in a patient with treated glioblastoma multiforme.
  • OBJECTIVE: To detail a case of Aspergillus terreus brain abscess in a patient undergoing treatment for malignant glioma.
  • Central nervous system aspergillosis usually occurs in patients with hematopoietic neoplasms or post transplantation, not in those with solid tumors.
  • PATIENT AND METHODS: The patient had received external beam radiation, temozolomide chemotherapy, and high-dose steroids, and had lymphopenia, but not sustained neutropenia.
  • She developed a brain mass that mimicked tumor progression by neuroimaging criteria; infection was not a consideration.
  • CONCLUSION: Brain tumor patients who receive steroids to control their peritumoral edema may be particularly susceptible to cerebral A. terreus infection, especially when they additionally develop the lymphopenia commonly associated with temozolomide.
  • [MeSH-major] Aspergillus. Brain Abscess / diagnosis. Brain Neoplasms / diagnosis. Glioblastoma / diagnosis. Neuroaspergillosis / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 19130738.001).
  • [ISSN] 0722-5091
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical neuropathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Neuropathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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15. Fenaux P, Bourhis JH, Ribrag V: Burkitt's acute lymphocytic leukemia (L3ALL) in adults. Hematol Oncol Clin North Am; 2001 Feb;15(1):37-50

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Burkitt's acute lymphocytic leukemia is a rare type of adult ALL, probably difficult to distinguish from disseminated Burkitt's lymphoma involving the bone marrow.
  • This tumor is highly proliferative and tends to involve the CNS at diagnosis or early during the disease course.
  • It shows rapid chemosensitivity, initially leading to the risk of severe acute tumor lysis syndrome.
  • Principles of its treatment, by comparison with the other types of ALL, include: 1.
  • A low-dose chemotherapy prephase to prevent acute tumor lysis syndrome.
  • 2. Multiagent chemotherapy using high-dose cyclophosphamide, an anthracycline, high-dose MTX, high-dose ara-C, and probably VP16.
  • A short and intensive treatment (6 to 8 months) without maintenance is indicated.
  • 3. Early intensive CNS treatment, with multiple triple intrathecal injections, high-dose MTX, and high-dose ara-C, and possibly cranial irradiation.
  • Using such approaches, recent results suggest that about two thirds of L3ALL in adults can be cured, more than in any other type of adult ALL.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bone Marrow / pathology. Central Nervous System / pathology. Child. Combined Modality Therapy. Cranial Irradiation. Diagnosis, Differential. Disease Progression. HIV Infections / complications. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Humans. Leukemic Infiltration. Multicenter Studies as Topic. Prognosis. Recurrence. Remission Induction. Risk Factors. Thrombocytopenia / etiology. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Lysis Syndrome / mortality

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  • (PMID = 11253608.001).
  • [ISSN] 0889-8588
  • [Journal-full-title] Hematology/oncology clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hematol. Oncol. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 42
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16. Gardner SL: Application of stem cell transplant for brain tumors. Pediatr Transplant; 2004 Jun;8 Suppl 5:28-32
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Brain tumors are the second most common malignancy in children and the most common solid tumor.
  • The majority of children are treated with surgery alone or in combination with radiation and/or chemotherapy.
  • Recently investigators have used high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue (ASCR) in patients with malignant brain tumors.
  • This approach has been most successful in chemosensitive tumors including medulloblastoma, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (SPNET) and central nervous system germ cell tumors (CNS GCT).
  • In addition, the use of high dose chemotherapy has enabled the reduction and in many cases elimination of radiation therapy to very young children.
  • To date there have been no prospective randomized studies comparing high dose chemotherapy and ASCR with conventional therapy.
  • Radiation therapy is often not an option for patients with recurrent disease and conventional dose chemotherapy rarely if ever results in long-term survival.
  • Unfortunately, the majority of studies using conventional therapy in order to delay irradiation in young children newly diagnosed with malignant brain tumors have been unsuccessful.
  • Although the numbers are small, preliminary data suggest that not only is survival but also quality of life is superior with the use of high dose chemotherapy.
  • In addition, through the use of peripheral blood stem cells and improvements in supportive care, multiple courses of high dose chemotherapy can be administered.
  • High dose chemotherapy with ASCR is a foundation upon which many different types of therapies can be built.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / therapy. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Pediatrics

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  • (PMID = 15125703.001).
  • [ISSN] 1397-3142
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Transplant
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Number-of-references] 25
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17. Hagemeister FB: Treatment of relapsed aggressive lymphomas: regimens with and without high-dose therapy and stem cell rescue. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol; 2002 May;49 Suppl 1:S13-20
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  • [Title] Treatment of relapsed aggressive lymphomas: regimens with and without high-dose therapy and stem cell rescue.
  • Treatment of aggressive lymphoma in relapse is difficult.
  • For this reason, it is useful to know the individual patient's risk of relapse prior to starting initial therapy, since it may be appropriate to treat patients with poor prognoses with intensive programs or investigational studies.
  • In the private practice setting, most patients with these diseases receive CHOP or similar cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin-containing regimens at the time of initial diagnosis.
  • However, there are certain disease-related features which determine whether these patients have a high or low risk of relapse, and investigators are now using combinations of these features to determine which patients may be safely treated with CHOP and which may benefit from more intensive chemotherapy management.
  • For example, the International Prognostic Factor Index system, now in common usage, delineates four different groups of patients with differing complete remission, freedom from progression, and overall survival rates.
  • The Tumor Score System, developed at MDACC, delineates only two groups with very different survival rates, and may be a better scoring system for patients with diffuse large cell lymphomas, primarily because of its inclusion of the serum beta(2)-microglobulin level prior to treatment, an important predictor of relapse.
  • In addition to pretreatment features, certain treatment-related factors are also important in determining the risk of relapse, including the dose of chemotherapy administered and the rapidity of response.
  • Results of a gallium scan with SPECT imaging may be an important method of confirming complete response, and should be incorporated into treatment programs, whether the treatment is standard CHOP or an investigational program.
  • For the patient with relapse or progressive disease following induction with CHOP or a similar regimen, the type of response to initial therapy plays an important role in determining potential response to salvage therapy, including high-dose therapy followed by stem cell rescue.
  • Patients for whom initial treatment fails to achieve any response have a very poor chance of responding to any currently used standard-dose program for relapse.
  • Those with partial responses have a better chance of responding to relapse therapy, but a high risk of disease progression or early relapse, and those with a prior complete response to initial therapy have a good chance of responding to relapse therapy, especially those in whom the complete response lasted more than a year.
  • For these reasons, stem cell transplant (SCT) protocols routinely require complete response with initial therapy as a requirement for entry, although "good partial remission" may be acceptable at certain centers.
  • Other limitations for SCT protocols include age greater than 60 or 65 years, significant chronic obstructive pulmonary, renal, or cardiac disease, a poor performance status, and central nervous system or marrow involvement.
  • For these reasons, there is a continued need for newer treatment programs which offer the potential for higher response rates and better survival rates, not only for those for whom SCT is not an option, but also for those who must have an adequate response to "standard dose therapy" prior to selecting SCT as a treatment option.
  • Three broad groups of relapse therapy for aggressive lymphoma have been described, based upon the drugs contained within these regimens.
  • These include platinum-based, mitoxantrone-based, and ifosfamide-based chemotherapy regimens.
  • Results with these programs vary widely and are likely different because of tumor-related features prior to relapse therapy, including size of mass, beta(2)-microglobulin level, LDH level, and type of response to initial therapy.
  • Other features, such as dose of therapy, specific drugs utilized, and number of prior treatments also play important roles in determining results with relapse therapy.
  • In a study of DHAP followed by transplant or more DHAP, DHAP induced a response in 56% of patients, and at 5 years, significantly more of the responders to DHAP who were subsequently treated with high-dose therapy and bone marrow transplant were free of disease compared to those who continued to receive DHAP after response to this regimen.
  • Therefore, high-dose therapy is clearly better for DHAP responders than is continued DHAP.
  • However, results for the overall population are still not good when non-responders are included in the analysis, and DHAP, a first-generation platinum regimen, may not be the optimal regimen to use prior to high-dose therapy followed by peripheral stem cell rescue.
  • Results varied according to type of response achieved with initial therapy, and serum LDH and beta(2)-microglobulin levels prior to treatment with MINE-ESHAP.
  • Using more intensive doses of ifosfamide and etoposide, we have described therapy for 36 patients with relapsed aggressive lymphomas, prior to pheresis and SCT.
  • Therapy with a similar regimen, combining ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide in standard doses (ICE) has also been described.
  • This regimen has been extensively studied in patients with relapsed aggressive lymphomas and Hodgkin's disease, followed by SCT.
  • In patients with relapsed lymphomas, ICE has achieved a 66% complete response rate, with 89% undergoing transplant.
  • Finally, we have recently studied paclitaxel in combination with topotecan for relapsed and refractory aggressive lymphomas.
  • These and newer combinations should be further developed to treat patients in relapse of aggressive lymphomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carboplatin / therapeutic use. Etoposide / therapeutic use. Ifosfamide / therapeutic use. Lymphoma / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / therapeutic use. Cyclophosphamide. Doxorubicin. Drug Administration Schedule. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Humans. Middle Aged. Prednisone. Prognosis. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Recurrence. Vincristine

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  • (PMID = 12042984.001).
  • [ISSN] 0344-5704
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer chemotherapy and pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; UM20QQM95Y / Ifosfamide; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; CHOP protocol; ICE protocol 3
  • [Number-of-references] 38
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18. Heath JA, Broxson EH Jr, Dole MG, Filippa DA, George D, Lyden D, Dunkel IJ: Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoma in a child undergoing an autologous stem cell rescue. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2002 Feb;24(2):160-3
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • In this article, a patient with EBV-lymphoma after autologous stem cell rescue for treatment of a nonhematologic solid tumor is described.
  • The child, a 4-year-old boy, had unilateral retinoblastoma with metastatic spread to the central nervous system.
  • He had previously received both local tumor bed and craniospinal radiation therapy together with intensive myeloablative alkylator chemotherapy before autologous stem cell rescue.
  • Histologically confirmed lymphoma with evidence of active EBV proliferation developed within cervical lymph nodes 3 weeks after his first autologous stem cell rescue.
  • [MeSH-major] Epstein-Barr Virus Infections / complications. Eye Neoplasms / pathology. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Herpesvirus 4, Human / isolation & purification. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / etiology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / etiology. Retinoblastoma / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Acyclovir / therapeutic use. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived. Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / drug therapy. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / secondary. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / therapeutic use. Disease Progression. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Eye Enucleation. Fatal Outcome. Humans. Immunocompromised Host. Immunoglobulins, Intravenous / therapeutic use. Immunosuppressive Agents / adverse effects. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Immunotherapy. Male. Meningeal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Meningeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Meningeal Neoplasms / secondary. Meningeal Neoplasms / therapy. Methylprednisolone / therapeutic use. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Optic Nerve Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Optic Nerve Neoplasms / secondary. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Rituximab. Thiotepa / therapeutic use. Vincristine / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 11998794.001).
  • [ISSN] 1077-4114
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Immunoglobulins, Intravenous; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; 905Z5W3GKH / Thiotepa; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; X4HES1O11F / Acyclovir; X4W7ZR7023 / Methylprednisolone
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19. Lewis LD: Preclinical and clinical studies: a preview of potential future applications of erythropoietic agents. Semin Hematol; 2004 Oct;41(4 Suppl 7):17-25
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Understanding the tissue distribution of erythropoietin receptors and cellular actions of erythropoietic agents may facilitate the development of wider applications for these compounds.
  • Erythropoietin receptors have been identified in the central nervous system (CNS), retina, heart, vascular endothelium, kidney, lung, liver, gastrointestinal and reproductive tracts, and erythroid bone marrow precursors.
  • Potential benefits of erythropoietic agents in several therapeutic areas may result from actions other than hematopoiesis stimulation.
  • Their hematopoietic effects may also have broader applications in treating anemia of the elderly and non-chemotherapy (CT)-related anemia in patients with cancer.
  • Furthermore, because hypoxic tumor cells tend to be more resistant to radiation therapy (RT) and some forms of CT, and more aggressive than normoxic cells, increased oxygenation resulting from anemia correction may increase RT and CT sensitivity, possibly impacting treatment outcomes.
  • Preliminary evidence suggests erythropoietin has CNS neuroprotective effects, including potential clinical benefits in ischemic stroke.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Clinical Trials as Topic / trends. Drug Evaluation, Preclinical / trends. Erythropoietin / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Anemia / chemically induced. Anemia / drug therapy. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Humans. Models, Biological

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  • (PMID = 15768475.001).
  • [ISSN] 0037-1963
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 11096-26-7 / Erythropoietin
  • [Number-of-references] 64
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20. Kawakami M, Kawakami K, Puri RK: Interleukin-4-Pseudomonas exotoxin chimeric fusion protein for malignant glioma therapy. J Neurooncol; 2003 Oct;65(1):15-25
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Interleukin-4-Pseudomonas exotoxin chimeric fusion protein for malignant glioma therapy.
  • Human malignant glioma cell lines, primary cell cultures, and tumor specimens derived from surgical samples have been shown to overexpress high-affinity receptors (R) for interleukin-4 (IL-4) in vitro and in situ.
  • However, IL-4 has been reported to mediate functional effects in several solid tumor cell lines.
  • To target IL-4Rs on tumor cells, we have produced a chimeric recombinant fusion protein consisting of a binding ligand, circularly permuted IL-4 and a mutated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin.
  • Recombinant cpIL4-PE is highly and specifically cytotoxic to glioma cell lines in vitro, while it is not cytotoxic or less cytotoxic to hematopoietic and normal brain cells.
  • The central nervous system toxicities observed were attributed to the volume of infusion and/or nonspecific toxicity.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Glioma / drug therapy. Immunotoxins / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Evaluation, Preclinical. Humans. Interleukin-4. Receptors, Interleukin-4 / metabolism. Recombinant Fusion Proteins / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 14649882.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-594X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunotoxins; 0 / Receptors, Interleukin-4; 0 / Recombinant Fusion Proteins; 0 / interleukin 4 (38-37)-PE38KDEL; 207137-56-2 / Interleukin-4
  • [Number-of-references] 51
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21. Fang SH, Chen Y, Weigel RJ: GATA-3 as a marker of hormone response in breast cancer. J Surg Res; 2009 Dec;157(2):290-5
NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • GATA-3 is a transcription factor that orchestrates gene expression profiles during embryogenesis of a variety of human tissues, including hematopoietic cells, skin, kidney, mammary gland, and the central nervous system.
  • The expression of GATA-3 has a strong association with the expression of estrogen receptor-alpha (ER) in breast cancer, and there is mounting evidence that GATA-3 can be used as a clinical marker to determine response to hormonal therapy and to refine the prognosis of breast cancer patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. GATA3 Transcription Factor / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Cell Differentiation. Cell Proliferation. Female. Humans. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19059610.001).
  • [ISSN] 1095-8673
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of surgical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Surg. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01CA109294
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / GATA3 Transcription Factor; 0 / GATA3 protein, human
  • [Number-of-references] 59
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