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1. Moustafa H, Riad R, Omar W, Zaher A, Ebied E: 99mTc-MIBI in the assessment of response to chemotherapy and detection of recurrences in bone and soft tissue tumours of the extremities. Q J Nucl Med; 2003 Mar;47(1):51-7
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  • [Title] 99mTc-MIBI in the assessment of response to chemotherapy and detection of recurrences in bone and soft tissue tumours of the extremities.
  • AIM: This prospective study is focused on the assessment of tumour response in a group of 28 bone sarcoma patients using (99m)Tc-MIBI scintigraphy.
  • METHODS: The quantitative changes in MIBI uptake before and after chemotherapy were measured and associated with the pathological evaluation of the degree of tumour necrosis.
  • Besides this, another group of 40 patients with bone and soft tissue tumours was studied in order to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of (99m)Tc-MIBI scintigraphy versus computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting the status of the disease and its recurrences.
  • Following 3-4 courses of chemotherapy, bone tumours were assessed by comparing the uptake ratio in the viable tumours with the amount of necrotic processes described in the surgically removed specimens.
  • RESULTS: In the first group of patients the rate of tumour response to chemotherapy, calculated according to the percentage of necrosis and the (99m)Tc-MIBI uptake ratios, was as follows: complete response in 12 patients, partial response in 8 and no response in 8 patients.
  • In the second group of patients (40 patients) (99m)Tc-MIBI scintigraphy proved to be able to detect recurrences of bone and soft tissue tumours.
  • CONCLUSION: The application of (99m)Tc-MIBI scan in the management of patients treated with chemotherapy may allow an early identification of the non-responder patients and lead to a choice of different strategies (alternative chemotherapy or salvage surgery).
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Bone Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / drug therapy. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Technetium Tc 99m Sestamibi
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Extremities / radionuclide imaging. Female. Giant Cell Tumors / diagnosis. Giant Cell Tumors / drug therapy. Giant Cell Tumors / radionuclide imaging. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / radionuclide imaging. Preoperative Care. Radiopharmaceuticals. Sarcoma / diagnosis. Sarcoma / drug therapy. Sarcoma / radionuclide imaging. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12714955.001).
  • [ISSN] 1125-0135
  • [Journal-full-title] The quarterly journal of nuclear medicine : official publication of the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine (AIMN) [and] the International Association of Radiopharmacology (IAR)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Q J Nucl Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 971Z4W1S09 / Technetium Tc 99m Sestamibi
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2. Xu J, Sun H, Xiao Y: [Application of medial head gastrocnemius muscle flap to limb-salvage operation of proximal tibial malignant tumor]. Zhongguo Xiu Fu Chong Jian Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2007 Apr;21(4):352-5
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  • [Title] [Application of medial head gastrocnemius muscle flap to limb-salvage operation of proximal tibial malignant tumor].
  • METHODS: From January 2001 to September 2005, 13 patients (8 males, 5 females; aged 14-57 years, averaged 29.7 years) suffering from the proximal tibial tumors were treated with a limb-salvage operation.
  • Among them, there were 4 patients with osteosarcoma, 6 with malignant fibrous histocytoma, 1 with malignant giant cell tumor, 1 with synovial sarcoma, and 1 with Ewing's sarcoma.
  • One or two cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy were used to each of the patients before operation.
  • All of the patients underwent the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle flap transposition to reconstruct the soft tissues after resection of the tumors and reconstruction of the bone defect by prothesis or bone-graft or the two methods combined.
  • 2 months) in all the patients revealed that. there was no flap necrosis, no skin necrosis at the incision margins, and no infection or fracture of the implanted bone.
  • The patient with malignant fibrous histocytoma died of systemic metastasis 20 months after operation.
  • The patient with Ewing's sarcoma had a local tumor recurrence 18 months after operation; though treated with the focal cleaning and the bone cement filling, the patient still developed lung metastasis of the tumor 26 months after operation.
  • The patient with osteosarcoma underwent amputation 12 months after operation because of the tumor recurrence.
  • According to the function assessment by the Mankin system, there were 6 patients who had an excellent result, 4 had a good result, and 3 had a poor result, with a satisfaction rate of 77%.
  • CONCLUSION: The flap transposition of the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle can reconstruct the soft tissue defect, decrease the local complication rate and improve the clinical outcome of the limb salvage for the proximal tibia malignant tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Limb Salvage / methods. Osteosarcoma / surgery. Soft Tissue Injuries / surgery. Surgical Flaps / blood supply. Tibia
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee. Bone Transplantation / methods. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 17546876.001).
  • [ISSN] 1002-1892
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhongguo xiu fu chong jian wai ke za zhi = Zhongguo xiufu chongjian waike zazhi = Chinese journal of reparative and reconstructive surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhongguo Xiu Fu Chong Jian Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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3. Guo W, Tang XD, Li X, Ji T, Sun X: [The analysis of the treatment of giant cell tumor of the pelvis and sacrum]. Zhonghua Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2008 Apr 1;46(7):501-5
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  • [Title] [The analysis of the treatment of giant cell tumor of the pelvis and sacrum].
  • OBJECTIVE: To discuss the surgical management, local recurrence rate and complications of giant cell tumor (GCTs) of the pelvic and sacrum.
  • According to the site of the tumors on the bone, they was classified into three regions: 8 patients involved region I (ilium), 10 region II (acetabulum) and 4 region III (ischiopubic).
  • Surgical management: 2 patients received 3 times of operations and 7 underwent 2 operations.
  • There were 19 patients managed with intralesional marginal excision and 2 patients with intralesional marginal excision and adjuvant radiotherapy, another 3 patients with widely marginal excision as the treatment of sacral lesions.
  • RESULTS: One recurrent patient with the large, ragged tumor died of serious infection in 2 weeks after the second surgery.
  • One patient of malignant giant cell tumor of sacrum died at 15 months after surgery.
  • One patient with postoperation sarcoma underwent reoperation and radiotherapy but died at the 13th month.
  • One patient with sacral lesion occurred pulmonary metastases in two years after surgery, and received chemotherapy with ADM, DDP and IFO.
  • One year later there was no much change in metastatic tumor.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The treatment for GCT of the pelvic and sacrum should be more aggressive because of high incidence of local recurrence after intralesional excision.
  • Although it might induce sacral nerve deficit, widely marginal excision is the best surgical procedure because of its low recurrence rate.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone / surgery. Pelvic Bones. Sacrum

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  • (PMID = 18785558.001).
  • [ISSN] 0529-5815
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua wai ke za zhi [Chinese journal of surgery]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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4. Burnei G, Burnei C, Hodorogea D, Gavriliu S, Georgescu I, Vlad C: Osteoarticular reconstructive surgery in malignant bone tumors: the importance of external fixators. J Med Life; 2008 Jul-Sep;1(3):295-306
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  • [Title] Osteoarticular reconstructive surgery in malignant bone tumors: the importance of external fixators.
  • The patients with malignant bone tumors (table 1.) were studied by sex, tumor type, location, age at the moment of diagnosis, age at the moment of the last evaluation, type of surgery, external fixator implanted, complications, results and survival period.
  • We also considered for each patient the extent of the tumor to diaphysis, soft tissue involvement, involvement of physis and epiphyseal invasion, articular extent, vessels and nerves invasion, presence of metastases and local skin invasion.
  • The certain diagnosis was based on pathological anatomy exam, because clinical and imagistic data were not decisive in each case.
  • The conservative treatment is preferred to the amputation, which is being used in very few cases.
  • The development of reconstructive bone surgery is sustained by the possibility to delineate the tumor by diagnosis based on imaging and by the possibility to use modern preoperative and postoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy.
  • Since then the same treatment was preferred also in malignant bone tumors, because the relapse appeared as frequent as in cases with amputation but the physical and psychological comfort made the patients to accept it readily.
  • The goal of malignant bone tumors treatment is to save the life of the patient, to preserve the affected limb, to maintain the length and function of the limb.
  • Oncologic surgery consists of "en bloc" tumor resection followed by bone reconstruction or modular prosthetic replacement.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Chondrosarcoma / surgery. External Fixators. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone / surgery. Osteosarcoma / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Fatal Outcome. Female. Femur / surgery. Humans. Humerus / surgery. Male. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures / methods. Retrospective Studies. Sarcoma, Ewing / surgery. Tibia / surgery. Transplantation, Autologous. Transplantation, Homologous. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20108507.001).
  • [ISSN] 1844-122X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of medicine and life
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Med Life
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Romania
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5. Koswig S, Budach V: [The role of radiotherapy in the treatment of bone neoplasms]. Chirurg; 2002 Dec;73(12):1174-80
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  • [Title] [The role of radiotherapy in the treatment of bone neoplasms].
  • Primary malignant bone neoplasms are relatively rare.
  • The most common bone tumors are osteosarcoma,Ewing's sarcoma,chondrosarcoma, fibrosarcoma,malignant fibrous histiocytoma of bone, giant cell tumor, aneurysmal bone cyst and chordoma.
  • These tumors are generally considered to be a radioresistant entities, but it has been suggested that radiotherapy may be effective in a palliative and in some curative situations, if a sufficient dose is given to an adequate volume.
  • Only for the management of primary Ewing's sarcoma the radiation therapy is an essential part in the multimodal therapy concept.
  • The most common bone neoplasms and the role of the radiotherapy are discussed in these chapter.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Chondrosarcoma / radiotherapy. Osteosarcoma / radiotherapy. Sarcoma, Ewing / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bone Cysts, Aneurysmal / radiotherapy. Bone Cysts, Aneurysmal / surgery. Child. Child, Preschool. Chordoma / radiotherapy. Chordoma / surgery. Clinical Trials as Topic. Combined Modality Therapy. Dose Fractionation. Female. Fibrosarcoma / radiotherapy. Fibrosarcoma / surgery. Follow-Up Studies. Giant Cell Tumors / radiotherapy. Giant Cell Tumors / surgery. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / drug therapy. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / radiotherapy. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / surgery. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Palliative Care. Postoperative Care. Radiotherapy Dosage. Risk Factors. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 12491046.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-4722
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Chirurg; Zeitschrift für alle Gebiete der operativen Medizen
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chirurg
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Number-of-references] 33
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6. Shi X, Wu S, Zhao J: [Limb salvage with osteoarticular allografts after resection of proximal tibia bone]. Zhongguo Xiu Fu Chong Jian Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2006 Oct;20(10):966-9
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  • [Title] [Limb salvage with osteoarticular allografts after resection of proximal tibia bone].
  • METHODS: From 1998 to 2003, 15 patients (7 males, 8 females; aged 14-56 yr. average 33) with bone tumor of the proximal tibia underwent osteoarticular allografts. among whom 7 had progressive giant cell tumor without any previous chemotherapy; 8 had malignant tumor with previous chemotherapy, including 6 patients with osteosarcoma, 1 with spindle cell sarcoma, and 1 with malignant fibrous histiocytoma.
  • RESULTS: The follow-up for an average of 21 months (range, 3-58 months) revealed that among the 8 patients with malignant tumor of the proximal tibia undergoing chemotherapy, 5 had union of the bone, 3 had no union of the bone; among the 3 patients, 2 had a complication of infection and 1 had a local recurrence.
  • According to the Mankin score, 2 patients had a perfect result, 2 good, 1 fair, and 3 poor, with a 50% effectiveness rate.
  • Among the 7 patients with progressive giant cell tumor at the upper part of the tibia, none had infection or local recurrence, but 2 had nonunion of the bone and 2 had joint instability, aided by the knee-aiding system.
  • According to the Mankin score, 3 patients had a perfect result, 2 good, and 2 fair, with a 71% effectiveness rate.
  • CONCLUSION: The osteoarticular allograft of the proximal tibia has many advantages in spite of a relatively high rate of complications, and it is the limb salvage of choice for the progressive benign or malignant bone tumors of the proximal tibia.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Limb Salvage / methods. Osteosarcoma / surgery. Tibia
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Bone Transplantation. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Transplantation, Homologous. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17140064.001).
  • [ISSN] 1002-1892
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhongguo xiu fu chong jian wai ke za zhi = Zhongguo xiufu chongjian waike zazhi = Chinese journal of reparative and reconstructive surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhongguo Xiu Fu Chong Jian Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
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7. Bertoni F, Bacchini P, Staals EL, Davidovitz P: Dedifferentiated parosteal osteosarcoma: the experience of the Rizzoli Institute. Cancer; 2005 Jun 1;103(11):2373-82
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  • [Title] Dedifferentiated parosteal osteosarcoma: the experience of the Rizzoli Institute.
  • BACKGROUND: Dedifferentiated parosteal osteosarcoma (DPOS) is a variant of osteosarcoma in which a high-grade sarcoma coexists with a conventional parosteal osteosarcoma (c-POS), either at presentation (synchronous type) or at the time of recurrence (metachronous type).
  • The objective of this study was to analyze the clinicopathologic and radiographic features of a relatively large number of patients with DPOS in an attempt to define further the histologic and biologic behavior of this rare entity.
  • METHODS: In a series of 120 patients with parosteal osteosarcoma who were seen at the Rizzoli Institute from 1958 to 2000, the authors identified 29 patients who were diagnosed with DPOS.
  • The authors reviewed the clinical and radiologic features, histologic sections, treatments, and outcomes in this group of patients with DPOS.
  • One tumor involved the scapula, one involved the ilium, and another involved the skull.
  • Histologically, the dedifferentiated component was high-grade osteoblastic osteosarcoma in 14 patients, fibroblastic osteosarcoma in 10 patients, giant cell-rich osteosarcoma in 3 patients, and chondroblastic osteosarcoma in 2 patients.
  • Twenty-eight patients underwent surgery, and 18 of those patients received chemotherapy (5 patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and 13 patients received adjuvant).
  • Of the nine patients who died, one patient received no treatment, five patients underwent surgery (with three patients achieving adequate margins) in combination with chemotherapy, and three patients underwent surgery only (with adequate margins achieved).
  • Of the 20 patients who remained alive, 13 patients underwent surgery (with 10 patients achieving adequate margins) in combination with chemotherapy, whereas 7 patients underwent surgery only (all with adequate margins).
  • One patient died of causes unrelated to the tumor, and another patient died shortly after undergoing resection of a lesion in the skull.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Dedifferentiation occurred in approximately 24% of patients with c-POS.
  • The prognosis for patients with DPOS was better than the prognosis for patients with dedifferentiated central and dedifferentiated peripheral chondrosarcoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Cell Differentiation. Osteosarcoma, Juxtacortical / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15852358.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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8. Antonescu CR, Rosenblum MK, Pereira P, Nascimento AG, Woodruff JM: Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma: a study of 16 cases and confirmation of a clinicopathologically distinct tumor. Am J Surg Pathol; 2001 Jun;25(6):699-709
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  • [Title] Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma: a study of 16 cases and confirmation of a clinicopathologically distinct tumor.
  • Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) is an uncommon tumor of deep soft tissues, originally described in 1995 by Meis-Kindblom et al.
  • The group consisted of six male and 10 female patients (age range, 14-55 years; mean age, 40 years), and the tumors were located in a limb or limb girdle (n = 7), base of the penis (n = 1), back or chest wall (n = 3), and head and neck (n = 5).
  • Tumor size ranged from 3.7 to 22 cm (mean, 8.9 cm).
  • Histologically, the SEFs were composed predominantly of small to moderate-size round to ovoid, relatively uniform cells, often with clear cytoplasm, embedded in a hyalinized fibrous stroma.
  • The only consistent immunohistochemical finding was a strong, diffuse reactivity of tumor cells for vimentin.
  • Bone invasion and tumor necrosis, features not reported before, were found in six cases each.
  • Treatment consisted of intralesional excision (n = 2), attempted wide local excision (n = 11), and amputation (n = 3), with either adjuvant radiation therapy (n = 9) or chemotherapy (n = 3).
  • Eight patients (57%) died of disease 16 to 86 months after diagnosis.
  • SEF shares some pathologic features with two other fibrosing fibrosarcomas, low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma and hyalinizing spindle cell tumor with giant rosettes, but in the authors' experience behaves clinically as a fully malignant sarcoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Fibrosarcoma / pathology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 11395547.001).
  • [ISSN] 0147-5185
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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9. Hornick JL, Jaffe ES, Fletcher CD: Extranodal histiocytic sarcoma: clinicopathologic analysis of 14 cases of a rare epithelioid malignancy. Am J Surg Pathol; 2004 Sep;28(9):1133-44
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  • [Title] Extranodal histiocytic sarcoma: clinicopathologic analysis of 14 cases of a rare epithelioid malignancy.
  • Histiocytic sarcoma is a rare malignant neoplasm that occurs in lymph nodes, skin, and the gastrointestinal tract.
  • All patients presented with a solitary mass, ranging in size from 1.8 to 12 cm (median 6.8 cm).
  • Seven tumors arose in soft tissue (6 lower limb; 1 upper limb), 5 in the gastrointestinal tract (1 involving both stomach and colon, 1 ileum, 2 rectum, 1 anus), 1 in the nasal cavity, and 1 in the lung.
  • Binucleated cells were common, and 6 cases contained tumor giant cells.
  • Six patients were treated with postoperative radiation and 7 with chemotherapy (CHOP or ProMACE-MOPP).
  • Two tumors recurred locally, and 5 patients developed distant spread: 3 to lymph nodes, 1 to lung, and 1 to bone.
  • At the last follow-up, 2 patients have died of disseminated disease, 4 and 5 months following initial diagnosis.
  • Histiocytic sarcoma may arise primarily in soft tissue and shows reproducible histologic features, including abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm and a prominent inflammatory infiltrate.
  • Metastatic carcinoma, metastatic melanoma, and large cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas should be excluded by immunohistochemistry.
  • Histiocytic sarcoma has the potential for an aggressive clinical course, most often with lymph node involvement.
  • Tumor size may be a prognostic factor.
  • [MeSH-major] Sarcoma / pathology


10. Feigenberg SJ, Marcus Jr RB, Zlotecki RA, Scarborough MT, Berrey BH, Enneking WF: Radiation therapy for giant cell tumors of bone. Clin Orthop Relat Res; 2003 Jun;(411):207-16
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  • [Title] Radiation therapy for giant cell tumors of bone.
  • For giant cell tumors of bone, does radiotherapy provide a safe and effective treatment?
  • The total doses ranged from 35 to 55 Gy (median, 43 Gy) in fractions of 1.67 to 2.33 Gy per day.
  • Lung metastases in one patient were treated successfully with surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy.
  • In one patient a radiation-induced sarcoma developed 22 years after treatment.
  • The authors conclude that radiation therapy is a safe and effective treatment option for benign giant cell tumors of bone.
  • A total dose greater than 40 Gy is the only variable found to significantly influence local control.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Retrospective Studies. Salvage Therapy. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12782877.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-921X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical orthopaedics and related research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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11. Seo JB, Im JG, Goo JM, Chung MJ, Kim MY: Atypical pulmonary metastases: spectrum of radiologic findings. Radiographics; 2001 Mar-Apr;21(2):403-17
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  • Typical radiologic findings of a pulmonary metastasis include multiple round variable-sized nodules and diffuse thickening of interstitium.
  • A detailed knowledge of the atypical radiologic features of a pulmonary metastasis with a good understanding of the histopathologic background is essential for correct diagnosis.
  • Squamous cell carcinoma is regarded as the most common cell type of a cavitating metastasis, but metastatic nodules from adenocarcinomas and sarcomas also cavitate occasionally.
  • Calcification can occur in a metastatic sarcoma or adenocarcinoma, which makes differentiation from a benign granuloma or hamartoma difficult.
  • Pneumothorax commonly occurs in metastases from an osteosarcoma.
  • Even though tumor emboli in pulmonary arteries can be seen at computed tomography, diagnosis is difficult because they are located in small or medium arteries.
  • A sterilized metastasis after chemotherapy is radiologically indistinguishable from a residual viable tumor.
  • Benign tumors such as uterine leiomyomas and giant cell tumors of the bone rarely metastasize to the lung.
  • [MeSH-major] Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Tomography, X-Ray Computed
  • [MeSH-minor] Calcinosis / pathology. Calcinosis / radiography. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Lung / pathology. Lung / radiography. Pneumothorax / pathology. Pneumothorax / radiography

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  • (PMID = 11259704.001).
  • [ISSN] 0271-5333
  • [Journal-full-title] Radiographics : a review publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiographics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 57
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12. Bertoni F, Bacchini P, Staals EL: Malignancy in giant cell tumor. Skeletal Radiol; 2003 Mar;32(3):143-6
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  • [Title] Malignancy in giant cell tumor.
  • Malignant giant cell tumor is a confusing term that in the past has been used to describe different types of giant cell-rich tumors.
  • We consider two types of malignancy in giant cell tumor of bone: "primary" when it arises in juxtaposition to a benign giant cell tumor and 'secondary' when it arises at the site of a previously treated giant cell tumor.
  • Here we present a case of primary malignancy in giant cell tumor that was initially not recognized as a malignancy.
  • On radiography and histology of frozen sections the lesion had the appearance of a conventional giant cell tumor of bone.
  • After curettage, the permanent histology slides showed areas of highly malignant osteosarcoma juxtaposed to areas of benign giant cell tumor.
  • The patient was treated with chemotherapy and wide resection of the tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Femoral Neoplasms / pathology. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone / pathology. Osteosarcoma / pathology

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  • (PMID = 12605278.001).
  • [ISSN] 0364-2348
  • [Journal-full-title] Skeletal radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Skeletal Radiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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13. Singer FR: Paget disease: when to treat and when not to treat. Nat Rev Rheumatol; 2009 Sep;5(9):483-9
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  • Paget disease of bone is a focal disorder of the skeleton that can affect one or more bones.
  • Patients are often asymptomatic, but a subset experience considerable morbidity that can include bone pain and skeletal deformity, as well as a variety of regional complications, such as hearing loss associated with cranial involvement, degenerative arthritis of the hip or knee, fractures of the lower extremities and, rarely, sarcoma or giant cell tumors.
  • Administration of these agents can relieve bone pain, decrease biochemical markers of bone resorption and bone formation, and retard or reverse the early osteolytic phase of the disease.
  • Future studies are needed to determine whether these drugs, if used in an early stage of the disease, can prevent complications in asymptomatic patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Diphosphonates / therapeutic use. Osteitis Deformans / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Bone Density Conservation Agents / therapeutic use. Humans. Incidental Findings. Osteoclasts / drug effects. Osteogenesis / drug effects. Osteolysis / drug therapy. Pain / prevention & control

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  • (PMID = 19652650.001).
  • [ISSN] 1759-4804
  • [Journal-full-title] Nature reviews. Rheumatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nat Rev Rheumatol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bone Density Conservation Agents; 0 / Diphosphonates
  • [Number-of-references] 71
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14. George S, Merriam P, Maki RG, Van den Abbeele AD, Yap JT, Akhurst T, Harmon DC, Bhuchar G, O'Mara MM, D'Adamo DR, Morgan J, Schwartz GK, Wagner AJ, Butrynski JE, Demetri GD, Keohan ML: Multicenter phase II trial of sunitinib in the treatment of nongastrointestinal stromal tumor sarcomas. J Clin Oncol; 2009 Jul 01;27(19):3154-60
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  • [Title] Multicenter phase II trial of sunitinib in the treatment of nongastrointestinal stromal tumor sarcomas.
  • PURPOSE To evaluate the potential benefit of continuous daily dosing sunitinib in patients with advanced nongastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) sarcomas.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS A total of 53 patients with advanced non-GIST soft tissue sarcomas received sunitinib 37.5 mg daily.
  • [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography was performed on a subset of 24 patients at baseline and after 10 to 14 days of therapy.
  • One patient (desmoplastic round cell tumor [DSRCT]) achieved a confirmed partial response (PR) and remained on study for 56 weeks.
  • CONCLUSION Sunitinib demonstrated notable evidence of metabolic response in several patients with non-GIST sarcoma.
  • The relevance of disease control observed in subtypes with an indolent natural history is unknown, however, the durable disease control observed in DSRCT, solitary fibrous tumor, and giant cell tumor of bone suggests that future evaluation of sunitinib in these subtypes may be warranted.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Indoles / therapeutic use. Pyrroles / therapeutic use. Sarcoma / drug therapy. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Positron-Emission Tomography. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult


15. Théoleyre S, Mori K, Cherrier B, Passuti N, Gouin F, Rédini F, Heymann D: Phenotypic and functional analysis of lymphocytes infiltrating osteolytic tumors: use as a possible therapeutic approach of osteosarcoma. BMC Cancer; 2005;5:123
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  • [Title] Phenotypic and functional analysis of lymphocytes infiltrating osteolytic tumors: use as a possible therapeutic approach of osteosarcoma.
  • BACKGROUND: Osteosarcoma is the most common type of primary bone tumor.
  • The use of aggressive chemotherapy has drastically improved the prognosis of the patients with non-metastatic osteosarcomas, however the prognosis of the patients with metastasis is still very poor.
  • Then, new and more effective treatments for curing osteosarcoma, such as immunotherapy are needed.
  • Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) have been involved in the control of tumor development and already assessed with success for the treatment of several cancers including melanoma.
  • While TIL represent a fascinating therapeutic approach in numerous malignant pathologies, there is few report concerning adult bone-associated tumors including osteosarcoma.
  • METHODS: Human TIL were isolated and characterized (phenotype, lytic activity) from twenty-seven patients with bone-associated tumors (osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, giant cell tumor, chondrosarcoma, plasmocytoma and bone metastases).
  • Similar experiments were performed using rat osteosarcoma model.
  • RESULTS: While TIL with a main CD4+ profile were easily isolated from most of the tumor samples, only TIL extracted from osteosarcoma were cytotoxic against allogeneic tumor cells.
  • Similar data were observed in rat osteosarcoma model where TIL were characterized by a main CD4+ profile and high lytic activity against allogeneic and autologous tumor cells.
  • Moreover, rat TIL expansion was not accompanied by refractoriness to further activation stimulus mainly by tumor antigens.
  • CONCLUSION: These results demonstrated that TIL therapy could be a very efficient strategy for the treatment of adult osteosarcoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Lymphocytes / pathology. Osteolysis. Osteosarcoma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Animals. CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes / cytology. Cell Line, Tumor. Disease Models, Animal. Female. Flow Cytometry. Humans. Immunotherapy / methods. Leukocytes / pathology. Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating / cytology. Male. Melanoma / pathology. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Phenotype. Prognosis. Rats

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  • (PMID = 16188028.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2407
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1262697
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16. Chen W, Zhu H, Zhang L, Li K, Su H, Jin C, Zhou K, Bai J, Wu F, Wang Z: Primary bone malignancy: effective treatment with high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation. Radiology; 2010 Jun;255(3):967-78
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  • [Title] Primary bone malignancy: effective treatment with high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation.
  • PURPOSE: To evaluate the long-term follow-up results of ultrasonographically (US)-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation in patients with primary bone malignancy.
  • From December 1997 to November 2004, 80 patients with a primary bone malignancy-60 with stage IIb disease and 20 with stage III disease (Enneking staging system)-were treated with US-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation.
  • High-intensity focused ultrasound ablation combined with chemotherapy was performed in 62 patients with osteosarcoma, one patient with periosteal osteosarcoma, and three patients with Ewing sarcoma.
  • The remaining 14 patients had chondrosarcoma, giant cell bone cancer, periosteal sarcoma, or an unknown malignancy and were treated with high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation only.
  • Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging or computed tomography (CT), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were used to assess tumor response.
  • RESULTS: High-intensity focused ultrasound ablation guided by real-time US was performed.
  • Follow-up images demonstrated completely ablated malignant bone tumors in 69 patients and greater than 50% tumor ablation in the remaining 11 patients.
  • Among the patients with stage IIb disease, long-term survival rates were substantially improved in the 30 patients who received the full treatment-that is, complete high-intensity focused ultrasound and full cycles of chemotherapy-compared with the survival rates for the 24 patients who did not finish the chemotherapy cycles and the six patients who underwent partial ablation only.
  • CONCLUSION: US-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation of malignant bone tumors is feasible and effective and eventually may be a component of limb-sparing techniques for patients with these cancers.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / therapy. Ultrasonic Therapy / methods. Ultrasonography, Interventional
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease Progression. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Proportional Hazards Models. Prospective Studies. Survival Rate. Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright RSNA, 2010
  • (PMID = 20501734.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-1315
  • [Journal-full-title] Radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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17. Anderson P, Kopp L, Anderson N, Cornelius K, Herzog C, Hughes D, Huh W: Novel bone cancer drugs: investigational agents and control paradigms for primary bone sarcomas (Ewing's sarcoma and osteosarcoma). Expert Opin Investig Drugs; 2008 Nov;17(11):1703-15
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  • [Title] Novel bone cancer drugs: investigational agents and control paradigms for primary bone sarcomas (Ewing's sarcoma and osteosarcoma).
  • BACKGROUND: New investigational agents and chemotherapy regimens including cyclophosphamide + topotecan, temozolomide + irinotecan, and anti-IGF-1R antibodies in Ewing's sarcoma (ES) and liposomal muramyltripeptide phosphatidylethanolamine (L-MTP-PE), aerosol therapy, and bone-specific agents in osteosarcoma (OS) may improve survival and/or quality of life on 'continuation' therapy.
  • OBJECTIVE: Review of investigational approaches and control paradigms for recurrent or metastatic primary bone tumors.
  • Review some current state-of-the-art approaches for OS including L-MTP-PE, anti-IGF-1R inhibition, aerosol therapies and bone specific agents.
  • RESULTS/CONCLUSION: L-MTP-PE with chemotherapy in OS has been shown to improve survival; compassionate access is available for recurrence and/or metastases.
  • Aerosol therapy (granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, cisplatin, gemcitabine) for lung metastases is a promising approach to reduce systemic toxicity.
  • The bone-specific agents including denosumab (anti-receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand antibody) and bisphosphonates may have benefit against giant cell tumor, ES and OS.
  • Anti-IGF-1R antibody SCH717454 has preclinical activity in OS but best effectiveness will most likely be in combination with chemotherapy earlier in therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Osteosarcoma / drug therapy. Sarcoma, Ewing / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Drug Evaluation, Preclinical. Humans. Immunotherapy. Neoplasm Metastasis / pathology


18. Donthineni R, Boriani L, Ofluoglu O, Bandiera S: Metastatic behaviour of giant cell tumour of the spine. Int Orthop; 2009 Apr;33(2):497-501
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  • [Title] Metastatic behaviour of giant cell tumour of the spine.
  • Lung metastases from giant cell tumours (GCT) of the spine have not been specifically addressed in the literature.
  • We reviewed our cases and compared the incidence, treatment, and outcomes with those from the extremities.
  • Four of the seven patients had presented to our institution with a spine recurrence after previous treatments and the rest developed recurrences later.
  • The treatments for the lung nodules consisted of metastectomy in two and chemotherapy in six patients.
  • Our series shows a higher metastatic rate from spine GCT as compared to those from the extremities, but the overall behaviour and treatment outcomes of the lung metastases are similar.
  • When there is a recurrence of GCT, with or without metastases, the local and possibly the metastases should be biopsied to confirm the original diagnosis.
  • Progression of benign GCT into an aggressive sarcoma has been documented, and the method of management should be altered.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Biopsy, Needle. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Risk Assessment. Survival Rate. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 18461324.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-5195
  • [Journal-full-title] International orthopaedics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int Orthop
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2899057
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19. Guo W, Yang RL, Tang XD, Tang S, Li DS, Yang Y: [Resection and reconstruction for primary pelvic tumors around acetabular]. Zhonghua Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2004 Dec 7;42(23):1419-22
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  • Twelve patients were diagnosed with chondrosarcoma, 1 with Ewing sarcoma, 3 with osteosarcoma, 1 with lymphoma, 1 with carcinosarcoma, 1 with malignant fibrohistiocytoma (MFH), 2 with myeloma, 9 with giant cell tumor (GCT), 1 with aneurysmal bone cyst.
  • Among 31 patients with peri-acetabular tumors, 8 were reconstructed with hemi-pelvic prosthesis, 7 with saddle prosthesis, 6 with cauterized tumor bone and total hip arthroplasty, 10 with total hip replacement after curettage of lesion and cemented.
  • RESULTS: Among 21 patients who underwent tumor resection and reconstruction in region II, 6 had local relapse.
  • Two of 3 patients with osteosarcoma were dead.
  • Twenty-one patients with acetabular reconstruction after resection of lesions in region II could sit and stand normally and walked with a cane, several of which even had normal gait.
  • We must pay more attention on the following points in the surgical treatment of periacetabular tumors:.
  • (3) The reconstructed acetabulum is unstable, so the patients must stand with a cane to protect the reconstructed hip joint;.
  • (5) Surgical treatment of pelvic tumors would easily result in poor wound healing especially in the patients receiving chemotherapy or radiotherapy because of extensive soft tissue stripping.
  • The destroyed soft tissue caused by chemotherapy or radiotherapy may increase the great tissue tension after implantation of allograft.

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  • (PMID = 15733453.001).
  • [ISSN] 0529-5815
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua wai ke za zhi [Chinese journal of surgery]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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20. Grabellus F, von Winterfeld F, Sheu SY, Metz KA, Jahnke K, Schmid KW: Unusual aggressive course of a giant cell tumor of soft tissue during immunosuppressive therapy. Virchows Arch; 2006 Jun;448(6):847-51
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  • [Title] Unusual aggressive course of a giant cell tumor of soft tissue during immunosuppressive therapy.
  • Giant cell tumor of soft tissue with low malignant potential (GCT-ST) is a low-grade, primary soft tissue sarcoma with histological and clinical features similar to giant cell tumor of the bone.
  • The main tumor localizations are the extremities, but it may also occur in the head and neck region.
  • The association of sarcomas and immunosuppressive therapy is best known for Kaposi sarcomas, whereas other types of sarcomas are rarely found.
  • We report of a GCT-ST of low malignant potential, which developed under long-term immunosuppression in a patient 12 years after heart transplantation.
  • The tumor presented with an unusual aggressive course and metastatic site: the parotid gland.
  • Therefore, we suggest that in patients with immunosuppression, even low malignant cancerous lesions should be carefully observed, as their local behavior may be aggressive with development of metastasis.
  • [MeSH-major] Giant Cell Tumors / secondary. Immunocompromised Host. Immunosuppressive Agents / adverse effects. Parotid Neoplasms / secondary. Postoperative Complications. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16596381.001).
  • [ISSN] 0945-6317
  • [Journal-full-title] Virchows Archiv : an international journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Virchows Arch.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents
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21. Bouralexis S, Clayer M, Atkins GJ, Labrinidis A, Hay S, Graves S, Findlay DM, Evdokiou A: Sensitivity of fresh isolates of soft tissue sarcoma, osteosarcoma and giant cell tumour cells to Apo2L/TRAIL and doxorubicin. Int J Oncol; 2004 May;24(5):1263-70
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Sensitivity of fresh isolates of soft tissue sarcoma, osteosarcoma and giant cell tumour cells to Apo2L/TRAIL and doxorubicin.
  • Chemotherapy is an established treatment modality for bone sarcomas such as osteosarcoma (OS).
  • However, the use of chemotherapy in high-grade soft tissue sarcomas remains controversial, with the most active chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin (DOX), reported to have a response rate of, at best only 34% and most studies reporting lower response rates.
  • Apo2L/TRAIL is a member of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) family of cytokines and induces death of tumour cells, but not normal cells.
  • Its potent apoptotic activity is mediated through cell surface death domain-containing receptors, DR4/TRAIL-R1 and DR5/TRAIL-R2.
  • We investigated the efficacy of Apo2L/TRAIL as a single agent, and in combination with clinically relevant chemotherapeutic drugs, in fresh isolates of primary malignant cells obtained from biopsy material.
  • The data presented here demonstrate that, in a range of primary bone related tumours, as well as soft tissue sarcomas, chemotherapeutic agents were only moderately effective, in terms of induction of cell death.
  • Apo2L/TRAIL alone had little or no effect on any bone-related tumour or sarcoma in culture.
  • In contrast, the combination of Apo2L/TRAIL and chemotherapeutic drugs produced a significant increase in tumour cell death, with DOX and Apo2L/TRAIL proving to be the most effective combination.
  • These data suggest the potential for Apo2L/TRAIL to increase the effectiveness of chemotherapeutic drugs in bone and soft tissue sarcomas, while perhaps concurrently allowing a reduction in the exposure to drugs such as DOX, and a consequent reduction in toxicity.
  • The synergistic action between these two different classes of agents has yet to be tested in vivo but may prove clinically relevant in the treatment of this refractive class of malignancies.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Doxorubicin / therapeutic use. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone / therapy. Membrane Glycoproteins / therapeutic use. Osteosarcoma / drug therapy. Sarcoma / drug therapy. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins. Child. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand. Transfection. Tumor Cells, Cultured


22. Kapukaya A, Subaşi M, Kandiya E, Ozateş M, Yilmaz F: Limb reconstruction with the callus distraction method after bone tumor resection. Arch Orthop Trauma Surg; 2000;120(3-4):215-8
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  • [Title] Limb reconstruction with the callus distraction method after bone tumor resection.
  • The callus distraction method was applied to nine patients who were referred to us because of a bone tumor.
  • All of the tumors were localised on the femur, and the histological diagnosis was two chondrosarcomas, one Ewing's sarcoma, three osteosarcomas, one giant cell bone tumor, and the remainder benign fibrous histiocytoma.
  • The mean length of the defect after resection of the tumor was 11.5 (range 8-20) cm.
  • Preoperative and postoperative chemotherapy were applied to patients with osteosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma.
  • One patient suffered a tumour recurrence and died after 20 months.
  • Complications included one deep infection, one skin invagination, and one premature consolidation and bone bridge in the defect area.
  • This method can be used without any need for massive autogenous bone graft in repairing defects of any length and diameter produced after excision of the lesion and thus can be considered as an alternative to other techniques.
  • [MeSH-major] Chondrosarcoma / surgery. Femoral Neoplasms / surgery. Giant Cell Tumors / surgery. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / surgery. Osteogenesis, Distraction. Osteosarcoma / surgery. Sarcoma, Ewing / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Bone Transplantation. Child. External Fixators. Female. Femur / radiography. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Time Factors. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 10738888.001).
  • [ISSN] 0936-8051
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of orthopaedic and trauma surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch Orthop Trauma Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY
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23. Beccheroni A, Lucarelli E, Donati D, Sangiorgi L, Capponcelli S, Gorini M, Zambon Bertoja A, Giardino R, Mercuri M, Ferrari S, Bacci G, Picci P: Recovery of stromal stem cells in bone sarcoma patients after chemotherapy: implication for cell-based therapy in bone defect reconstruction. Oncol Rep; 2003 Jul-Aug;10(4):891-6
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  • [Title] Recovery of stromal stem cells in bone sarcoma patients after chemotherapy: implication for cell-based therapy in bone defect reconstruction.
  • Bone sarcomas, such as osteosarcoma (OS) or Ewing sarcoma (ES), frequently arise in the intramedullary region of long bones.
  • Patients affected by bone sarcomas are treated with preoperative aggressive chemotherapy immediately after diagnosis.
  • After chemotherapy, patients undergo surgery that frequently entails the excision of wide bone segments.
  • If a large segment of the bone is lost (defined as a critical defect) the patient undergoes bone reconstruction.
  • Because bone marrow derived stromal stem cells (SSC) offer great promise for cell-based regenerative medicine in bone reconstruction, we investigated whether SSC could be isolated from chemotherapy-treated bone sarcoma patients.
  • We also investigated whether chemotherapy modified SSC differentiation capability.
  • We studied 9 SSC derived from OS and ES patients that had undergone chemotherapy and 5 SSC derived from bone sarcoma patients that had not undergone chemotherapy.
  • SSC could be obtained from all the patients analyzed regardless of whether the patients received chemotherapy or not.
  • Our results also showed that post-chemotherapy SSC can be cultured and expanded ex vivo, these cells retained the ability to differentiate toward the osteogenic lineage in vitro.
  • In conclusion, our results support that SSC cells can be obtained from bone sarcoma patients that undergo chemotherapy and suggest that SSC can be used for cell-based bone reconstruction techniques in bone sarcoma patients treated with preoperative chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplastic Stem Cells / pathology. Osteoblasts / pathology. Stromal Cells / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Cell Differentiation. Cell Division. Cells, Cultured. Child. Chondrosarcoma / drug therapy. Chondrosarcoma / metabolism. Chondrosarcoma / pathology. Female. Giant Cell Tumors / drug therapy. Giant Cell Tumors / metabolism. Giant Cell Tumors / pathology. Humans. Male. Osteosarcoma / drug therapy. Osteosarcoma / metabolism. Osteosarcoma / pathology. Sarcoma, Ewing / drug therapy. Sarcoma, Ewing / metabolism. Sarcoma, Ewing / pathology

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  • (PMID = 12792741.001).
  • [ISSN] 1021-335X
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncol. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
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24. Hornicek FJ, Gebhardt MC, Tomford WW, Sorger JI, Zavatta M, Menzner JP, Mankin HJ: Factors affecting nonunion of the allograft-host junction. Clin Orthop Relat Res; 2001 Jan;(382):87-98
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  • Nonunion of allograft-host junction after bone transplantation is not uncommon, and its treatment frequently is problematic.
  • To improve the understanding of these nonunions, a retrospective review was performed of 163 nonunions in 945 patients who underwent allograft transplantation (17.3%) for various benign and malignant tumors at the authors' institution between 1974 and 1997.
  • Of these 945 patients, 558 did not receive adjuvant therapy.
  • Chemotherapy was administered to 354 patients and only 33 patients received radiation therapy alone.
  • Seventy-one patients had radiation treatment and chemotherapy.
  • In 108 patients, treatment was successful resulting in union of the allograft-host junction.
  • Forty-nine patients did not respond to multiple surgical treatment attempts.
  • The rate of nonunions increased to 27% for the patients who received chemotherapy as compared with 11% for the patients who did not receive chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Transplantation / physiology. Bone and Bones / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Aged. Arthrodesis. Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Bone Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Chi-Square Distribution. Child. Child, Preschool. Chondrosarcoma / surgery. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Fractures, Bone / etiology. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone / surgery. Graft Survival. Humans. Joints / surgery. Male. Middle Aged. Osteosarcoma / surgery. Proportional Hazards Models. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Reoperation. Retrospective Studies. Sarcoma, Ewing / surgery. Surgical Wound Infection / etiology. Transplantation, Homologous. Treatment Outcome. Wound Healing

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  • (PMID = 11154010.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-921X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical orthopaedics and related research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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