[X] Close
You are about to erase all the values you have customized, search history, page format, etc.
Click here to RESET all values       Click here to GO BACK without resetting any value
Items 1 to 14 of about 14
1. Wolter KG, Wang SJ, Henson BS, Wang S, Griffith KA, Kumar B, Chen J, Carey TE, Bradford CR, D'Silva NJ: (-)-gossypol inhibits growth and promotes apoptosis of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in vivo. Neoplasia; 2006 Mar;8(3):163-72
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Resistance to chemotherapy is a common problem encountered in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).
  • Both produced tumors in a murine floor-of-mouth model that mimics human HNSCC, exhibiting growth and invasion into adjacent tissues.
  • Mice were randomized into three groups: vehicle control and two daily intraperitoneal (-)-gossypol treatment groups (5 and 15 mg/kg).
  • In the control group, tumors grew progressively, whereas in (-)-gossypol treatment groups, tumor growth was significantly suppressed.
  • Residual tumors remained growth-suppressed for 2 weeks after cessation of (-)-gossypol treatment.
  • Our results demonstrate that (-)-gossypol can inhibit tumor growth in an orthotopic model of aggressive HNSCC.

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Carcinoma, Squamous Cell.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Oral Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Gossypol .
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2000 Jun 20;97(13):7124-9 [10860979.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Rev Cancer. 2005 Nov;5(11):876-85 [16239906.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Cell Biol. 2001 Feb;3(2):183-91 [11175751.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 2000 Dec 27;19(56):6627-31 [11426648.001]
  • [Cites] Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2001 Apr;66(3):239-48 [11510695.001]
  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 2002 Apr;112(4):638-44 [12150516.001]
  • [Cites] Antisense Nucleic Acid Drug Dev. 2002 Jun;12(3):193-213 [12162702.001]
  • [Cites] J Am Chem Soc. 2002 Oct 9;124(40):11838-9 [12358513.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2003 Aug 20;106(2):160-6 [12800189.001]
  • [Cites] Biochem Pharmacol. 2003 Jul 1;66(1):93-103 [12818369.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 2003 Jul;9(7):2856-65 [12855666.001]
  • [Cites] J Cell Physiol. 2003 Sep;196(3):532-40 [12891710.001]
  • [Cites] J Med Chem. 2003 Sep 25;46(20):4259-64 [13678404.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 2003 Sep 18;22(40):6243-56 [13679863.001]
  • [Cites] J Cancer Res Clin Oncol. 2004 Jan;130(1):8-14 [14605879.001]
  • [Cites] Chem Biol. 2004 Mar;11(3):389-95 [15123268.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Biochem Biophys. 2004 Aug 15;428(2):179-87 [15246875.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Oncol. 2004 Aug;25(2):445-51 [15254743.001]
  • [Cites] J Pathol. 2004 Aug;203(4):927-32 [15258995.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Cells. 1990 Aug-Sep;2(8-9):275-80 [2223389.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1991 Jun 13;324(24):1685-90 [2034244.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Metastasis Rev. 1992 Sep;11(2):121-39 [1327566.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1994 Apr 1;54(7):1707-14 [7511048.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 1994;19(1):25-35 [7815102.001]
  • [Cites] Behring Inst Mitt. 1996 Oct;(97):72-100 [8950468.001]
  • [Cites] J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 1997 Jun;55(6):613-23; discussion 623-5 [9191644.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 1997;76(1):21-8 [9218727.001]
  • [Cites] Melanoma Res. 1997 Oct;7(5):364-72 [9429219.001]
  • [Cites] Gynecol Oncol. 1998 Sep;70(3):398-403 [9790794.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 1997 Nov;3(11):2039-46 [9815595.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 2004 Nov 15;10(22):7757-63 [15570010.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Cancer Ther. 2005 Jan;4(1):13-21 [15657349.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2005 Mar 10;114(1):32-8 [15523684.001]
  • [Cites] Nature. 2005 Jun 2;435(7042):677-81 [15902208.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Cancer Ther. 2005 Jul;4(7):1096-104 [16020667.001]
  • [Cites] Life Sci. 2000 Oct 20;67(22):2663-71 [11105982.001]
  • (PMID = 16611409.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-5586
  • [Journal-full-title] Neoplasia (New York, N.Y.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neoplasia
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA97248; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA097248; United States / NIDCR NIH HHS / DE / R01 DE013346; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA083087; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA046592; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA83087; United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / T32 DC05356; United States / NIDCR NIH HHS / DE / K08 DE014620; United States / NIDCR NIH HHS / DE / DE00452-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 5 P30 CA46592; United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / P30 DC005188; United States / NIDCR NIH HHS / DE / K23 DE000452; United States / NIDCR NIH HHS / DE / DE014620-01A1; United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / T32 DC005356; United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / P30 DC05188; United States / NIDCR NIH HHS / DE / R01 DE13346
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / BCL2L1 protein, human; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / bcl-X Protein; KAV15B369O / Gossypol
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1578526
  •  go-up   go-down


2. Schubert MM, Eduardo FP, Guthrie KA, Franquin JC, Bensadoun RJ, Migliorati CA, Lloid CM, Eduardo CP, Walter NF, Marques MM, Hamdi M: A phase III randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial to determine the efficacy of low level laser therapy for the prevention of oral mucositis in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation. Support Care Cancer; 2007 Oct;15(10):1145-54
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase III randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial to determine the efficacy of low level laser therapy for the prevention of oral mucositis in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation.
  • This phase III randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study was designed to compare the ability of 2 different low level GaAlAs diode lasers (650 nm and 780 nm) to prevent oral mucositis in HCT patients conditioned with chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy patients were enrolled and randomized into 1 of 3 treatment groups: 650 nm laser, 780 nm laser or placebo.
  • All active laser treatment patients received daily direct laser treatment to the lower labial mucosa, right and left buccal mucosa, lateral and ventral surfaces of the tongue, and floor of mouth with energy densities of 2 J/cm2.
  • Study treatment began on the first day of conditioning and continued through day +2 post HCT.
  • Low level laser therapy was well-tolerated and no adverse events were noted.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Laser Therapy. Stomatitis / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Preventive Medicine / methods. Treatment Outcome. Washington

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transplantation.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Lasers Surg Med. 2001;29(2):179-84 [11553908.001]
  • [Cites] Bone Marrow Transplant. 1989 Mar;4(2):181-6 [2650788.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2004 May 1;100(9 Suppl):2026-46 [15108223.001]
  • [Cites] Bone Marrow Transplant. 2000 Jun;25(12):1269-78 [10871732.001]
  • [Cites] Lasers Surg Med. 2002;31(4):263-7 [12355572.001]
  • [Cites] Curr Opin Oncol. 2005 May;17(3):236-40 [15818167.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1995 Dec 15;76(12):2550-6 [8625084.001]
  • [Cites] Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1988 Jul;66(1):130-8 [3043305.001]
  • [Cites] Support Care Cancer. 2000 Jan;8(1):33-9 [10650895.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2001 Apr 15;19(8):2201-5 [11304772.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1997 Jul 1;38(4):697-703 [9240635.001]
  • [Cites] Indian J Med Res. 2006 Oct;124(4):399-402 [17159259.001]
  • [Cites] Support Care Cancer. 1999 Jul;7(4):244-52 [10423050.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer B Oral Oncol. 1996 Nov;32B(6):381-7 [9039221.001]
  • [Cites] Crit Rev Oral Biol Med. 2002;13(5):380-9 [12393757.001]
  • [Cites] Lasers Surg Med. 2004;34(3):260-5 [15022254.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer J. 2002 May-Jun;8(3):247-54 [12074324.001]
  • [Cites] Int Nurs Rev. 2005 Mar;52(1):68-72 [15725279.001]
  • [Cites] Cell Prolif. 2002 Aug;35 Suppl 1:93-102 [12139712.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1992 May 15;69(10):2469-77 [1568168.001]
  • [Cites] Oncology (Williston Park). 2003 Dec;17(12):1767-79; discussion 1779-82, 1791-2 [14723014.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Rev Cancer. 2004 Apr;4(4):277-84 [15057287.001]
  • [Cites] Bone Marrow Transplant. 2001 May;27 Suppl 2:S3-S11 [11436115.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2004 May 1;100(9 Suppl):1995-2025 [15108222.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Haematol. 2000 Aug;110(2):292-9 [10971384.001]
  • [Cites] Lasers Med Sci. 2004;18(4):204-6 [15042424.001]
  • [Cites] Lasers Surg Med. 1989;9(1):50-8 [2927230.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1988 Oct;6(10):1562-8 [3049951.001]
  • [Cites] J Pain Symptom Manage. 1991 Jan;6(1):15-23 [1988533.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2004 Dec 16;351(25):2590-8 [15602019.001]
  • [Cites] Blood. 2007 Mar 1;109(5):2250-5 [17053058.001]
  • (PMID = 17393191.001).
  • [ISSN] 0941-4355
  • [Journal-full-title] Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Support Care Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase III; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  •  go-up   go-down


3. Yang H, Liu S, Liang C, Peng W: [Studies of mouse interleukin-2 gene therapy for head, and neck sequamous cell carcinoma using polycationic liposome-mediated transduction]. Sichuan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban; 2003 Jan;34(1):9-11, 30
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Studies of mouse interleukin-2 gene therapy for head, and neck sequamous cell carcinoma using polycationic liposome-mediated transduction].
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the immunological mechanism of mouse IL-2 gene therapy and the optimal lipid to DNA ratios of lipid-DNA complexed (lipoplexes) by using polycationic liposome-mediated Tumors were established in the transduction for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).
  • METHODS: floor of mouth in C3H/HeJ immunocompetent mice with SCCVII cell line.
  • The supernatants of SCCVII cell and tumour tissues were collected for IL-2 expression by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
  • By use of lipoplexes with L:D = 3:1, higher IL-2 expression of tumor tissues and greater activities of NK cell and CTL of murine spleen were noted in the treated group as compared with those A comparison of naked plasmid and lipid-complexed found in naked DNA and empty plasmid (EP).
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Genetic Therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy. Interleukin-2 / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line, Tumor. Drug Carriers. Killer Cells, Natural / immunology. Lipids. Mice. Mice, Inbred C3H. Neoplasm Transplantation. Polyamines. T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic / drug effects. Transfection / methods

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Genes and Gene Therapy.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15600166.001).
  • [ISSN] 1672-173X
  • [Journal-full-title] Sichuan da xue xue bao. Yi xue ban = Journal of Sichuan University. Medical science edition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Sichuan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drug Carriers; 0 / Interleukin-2; 0 / Lipids; 0 / Lipofectamine; 0 / Polyamines; 0 / polycations
  •  go-up   go-down


Advertisement
4. Cox S, Zoellner H: Physiotherapeutic treatment improves oral opening in oral submucous fibrosis. J Oral Pathol Med; 2009 Feb;38(2):220-6
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Physiotherapeutic treatment improves oral opening in oral submucous fibrosis.
  • The pathogenesis of OSF remains unclear, while surgical and pharmacological treatments have limited success, and are often inaccessible in communities using areca nut where OSF is prevalent.
  • Improved outcomes are reported for surgical treatment when followed by physiotherapy.
  • We tested the hypothesis that physiotherapy alone can modify tissue remodelling in OSF to increase oral opening.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-four Nepali OSF patients were managed for 4 months in three randomly assigned groups receiving either: five times daily physiotherapy by inter-positioning tongue spatulas between teeth and adding a new spatula every 5-10 days; local injection of hyaluronidase with steroids; or no active treatment.
  • Progressive mucosal involvement was always in the same order, starting with the soft palate, and then progressing to the fauces, unilateral buccal mucosa, bilateral buccal mucosa, floor of mouth and finally lip mucosa (p < 0.006).
  • [MeSH-major] Mouth / physiopathology. Oral Submucous Fibrosis / physiopathology. Oral Submucous Fibrosis / therapy. Physical Therapy Modalities
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Child. Female. Humans. Hyaluronoglucosaminidase / therapeutic use. Male. Middle Aged. Nepal. Range of Motion, Articular. Young Adult

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Oral submucous fibrosis.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18673417.001).
  • [ISSN] 1600-0714
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of oral pathology & medicine : official publication of the International Association of Oral Pathologists and the American Academy of Oral Pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Oral Pathol. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.2.1.35 / Hyaluronoglucosaminidase
  •  go-up   go-down


5. Shikani AH, Domb AJ: Polymer chemotherapy for head and neck cancer. Laryngoscope; 2000 Jun;110(6):907-17
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Polymer chemotherapy for head and neck cancer.
  • OBJECTIVES: To study a new method of delivery of chemotherapy for the treatment of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of the head and neck, to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of four anticancer agents (cisplatin, fluorouracil [5-FU], methotrexate [MTX], and paclitaxel) loaded into the biodegradable polymer, polyanhydride polymer poly(FAD:SA), and to evaluate the effectiveness and toxicity of the drug-polymer combination against human SCCs, both in vitro and in vivo.
  • STUDY DESIGN: Poly(FAD:SA) was loaded with different chemotherapeutic drugs and its in vitro and in vivo drug release and tissue penetration characteristics were studied.
  • The biocompatibility and toxicity of the polymer-drug combination were determined.
  • The effectiveness of the drug-polymer was evaluated against three different human SCCs (larynx O11, pharynx FADU, and floor of mouth UM- SCC1) cultured in vitro and in nude mice carrying human SCC xenografts.
  • METHODS: The in vitro drug release pharmacokinetics of the drugs were performed using atomic absorption spectrometry for cisplatin and high-pressure liquid chromatography for the 5-FU, MTX, and paclitaxel studies.
  • In vitro tumor cytotoxicity was assessed by growth assay.
  • RESULTS: All four chemotherapy drugs demonstrated a continuous release that followed first-order kinetics from the polymer.
  • Tumor cytotoxicity revealed that the polymer was very effective against the human SCCs O11, FADU, and UM- SCC1 in vitro.
  • The tumor animal model was the nude mouse carrying human floor of mouth SCC xenografts.
  • Different amounts of cisplatin were incorporated into the polymers (5% and 7% drug/polymer at a weight/weight [wt/wt] load).
  • Thirty-five days after implantation of the polymer in nude mice, the mean treated tumor size was 65.5% of controls in the 5% group and 31.8% in the 7% group.
  • Seventy days after implantation the mean treated tumor size was 41.4% of controls in the 5% group and 38.1% in the 7% group, indicating a statistically significant delay of tumor growth compared with controls or with intraperitoneally injected cisplatin.
  • The blank polymer was well tolerated by the mouse and had no effect on tumor growth.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The study results indicate that polymer chemotherapy is effective against a variety of SCCs of the head and neck, both in vitro and in vivo, and may become a useful therapeutic option for head and neck cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Polymers
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Biodegradation, Environmental. Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid / methods. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Cisplatin / pharmacokinetics. Disease Models, Animal. Drug Carriers. Humans. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Methotrexate / pharmacokinetics. Mice. Mice, Nude

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHOTREXATE .
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 10852503.001).
  • [ISSN] 0023-852X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Laryngoscope
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Laryngoscope
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drug Carriers; 0 / Polymers; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
  •  go-up   go-down


6. Adappa ND, Sung CK, Choi B, Huang TG, Genden EM, Shin EJ: The administration of IL-12/GM-CSF and Ig-4-1BB ligand markedly decreases murine floor of mouth squamous cell cancer. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2008 Sep;139(3):442-8
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The administration of IL-12/GM-CSF and Ig-4-1BB ligand markedly decreases murine floor of mouth squamous cell cancer.
  • OBJECTIVE: To assess immune-based gene therapy in a murine floor of mouth (FOM) squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) model.
  • STUDY DESIGN: In vitro and in vivo testing of immune therapy for SCC.
  • Intratumoral injections of viral vectors were administered with systemic Ig-4-1BB ligand in an orthotopic murine FOM SCC model and followed for tumor size and survival.
  • In vivo, tumors treated with advCMV-IL-12/GM-CSF and Ig-4-1BBL showed a striking reduction in tumor volume (vs control P<0.0001) and improved median survival (38 days vs 19 days for control, P<0.0001).
  • CONCLUSION: Combination immune-based therapies effectively improve survival in mice bearing FOM SCC over single-modality therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Genetic Therapy / methods. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor / administration & dosage. Interleukin-12 / administration & dosage. Mouth Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Drug Synergism. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Immunotherapy / methods. Mice. Mouth Floor. Time Factors. Tumor Cells, Cultured

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Genes and Gene Therapy.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Oral Cancer.
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18722228.001).
  • [ISSN] 0194-5998
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 187348-17-0 / Interleukin-12; 83869-56-1 / Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
  •  go-up   go-down


7. O'Malley BW Jr, Li D, McQuone SJ, Ralston R: Combination nonviral interleukin-2 gene immunotherapy for head and neck cancer: from bench top to bedside. Laryngoscope; 2005 Mar;115(3):391-404
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVE/HYPOTHESIS: Intralesional delivery of cytokine genes has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer.
  • In addition to the therapeutic effect of the delivered cytokine gene, the components of the gene delivery system also have been shown to induce beneficial immune responses.
  • On the basis of these principles, we hypothesized that a molecular therapy could be developed that would provide synergistic antitumor activity by way of intralesional expression of interleukin (IL)-2 from a recombinant plasmid combined with induction of endogenous interferon (IFN)-gamma and IL-12 cytokines by immunostimulatory DNA.
  • Our objective in these studies was to create and optimize a novel formulation of cationic lipid and DNA that generates local production of IL-2 protein within a targeted tumor environment with concomitant induction of the antitumor cytokines IFN-gamma and IL-12.
  • STUDY DESIGN: Prospective laboratory drug development plan that would produce human clinical trials.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Engineered bacterial plasmids containing a cytomegalovirus promoter (CMV)-IL-2 expression cassette were specifically formulated with cationic lipids and optimized for antitumor effect in a floor of mouth murine tumor model.
  • For human clinical trials, a phase I 10 patient formulated IL-2 gene therapy study was completed.
  • Subsequently, two large scale, phase II multi-institutional and multi-international studies were initiated comparing non-viral IL-2 gene therapy to palliative methotrexate chemotherapy or in combination with cisplatin.
  • RESULTS: In the preclinical stage, maximum tumor inhibition in animal models was obtained using IL-2 plasmid formulated with 1,2-dioleyloxypropyl-3-trimethyl ammonium chloride (DOTMA):cholesterol (1:1 mol:mol) at a plasmid:lipid charge ratio of 1:0.5 (-/+).
  • Cationic lipid formulated IL-2 plasmid significantly inhibited tumor growth compared with formulated control plasmid (P < .01) or vehicle (lactose; P < .01).
  • Consistent with previously reported studies of the immunostimulatory activity of DNA of bacterial origin, treatment of tumors with control plasmid in cationic lipid formulation induced production of endogenous IFN-gamma and IL-12 but not IL-2.
  • Treatment of tumors with formulated IL-2 plasmid produced IL-2 protein levels that were 5-fold over background and increased IFN-gamma by 32-fold (P < .001) and IL-12 by 5.5-fold (P < .001) compared with control plasmid formulations.
  • The phase I human trial demonstrated dose escalation safety, which was its primary objective, and there was one anecdotal reduction in tumor size.
  • The phase II studies have been initiated and focus on either comparing the novel nonviral IL-2 gene immunotherapy formulation alone to methotrexate or comparing IL-2 gene therapy in combination with cisplatin in recurrent or unresectable patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The preclinical data provided proof of principle for matching a delivered IL-2 transgene with an immunostimulatory nonviral formulation to enhance intralesional production of therapeutic cytokines for the maximization of antitumor response.
  • Human clinical trials have demonstrated this novel therapy to be safe in the human clinical setting.
  • Phase II trials have been initiated to assess efficacy and feasibility as a single or combination therapy for head and neck cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Genetic Therapy / methods. Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy. Immunotherapy / methods. Interleukin-2 / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Cisplatin / therapeutic use. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Double-Blind Method. Humans. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Interferon-gamma / metabolism. Interleukin-12 / metabolism. Methotrexate / therapeutic use. Mice. Mice, Inbred C3H. Palliative Care. Plasmids. Polymerase Chain Reaction. RNA, Messenger / analysis. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction. Transgenes

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Genes and Gene Therapy.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHOTREXATE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15744147.001).
  • [ISSN] 0023-852X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Laryngoscope
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Laryngoscope
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase I; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Interleukin-2; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 187348-17-0 / Interleukin-12; 82115-62-6 / Interferon-gamma; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
  •  go-up   go-down


8. Pathak KA, Juvekar AS, Radhakrishnan DK, Deshpande MS, Pai VR, Chaturvedi P, Pai PS, Chaukar DA, D'Cruz AK, Parikh PM: In vitro chemosensitivity profile of oral squamous cell cancer and its correlation with clinical response to chemotherapy. Indian J Cancer; 2007 Oct-Dec;44(4):142-6
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] In vitro chemosensitivity profile of oral squamous cell cancer and its correlation with clinical response to chemotherapy.
  • Currently, it is difficult to predict whether a tumor will respond to chemotherapy and which drug(s) will achieve the maximum clinical response.
  • AIMS: To study in vitro chemosensitivity profile of oral cancers and to correlate the in vitro chemosensitivity of oral cancer to clinical response to chemotherapy.
  • METHODS AND MATERIAL: We prospectively studied the chemosensitivity profile of 57 untreated, advanced, unresectable oral cancers to cisplatin, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil and their combinations by using histoculture drug response assay (HDRA) and correlated them to the clinical response to chemotherapy.
  • Of these 52 evaluable patients, 47 had primary gingivo-buccal cancers and five had tongue / floor of mouth cancers.
  • Of these, 31 patients with good performance status received two cycles of chemotherapy using one or more of these test drugs.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Mouth Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / pharmacology. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Biological Assay. Cisplatin / pharmacology. Cisplatin / therapeutic use. Female. Fluorouracil / pharmacology. Fluorouracil / therapeutic use. Humans. In Vitro Techniques. Male. Methotrexate / pharmacology. Methotrexate / therapeutic use. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Oral cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Oral Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUOROURACIL .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHOTREXATE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18322356.001).
  • [ISSN] 0019-509X
  • [Journal-full-title] Indian journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Indian J Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
  •  go-up   go-down


9. Paulino AF, Singh B, Shah JP, Huvos AG: Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Laryngoscope; 2000 Sep;110(9):1479-82
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVE/HYPOTHESIS: Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma (BSCC), an uncommon tumor with predilection for the upper aerodigestive tract, is a distinct variant of squamous carcinoma, because of its unique histological features and ominous clinical behavior.
  • Sites of origin included the larynx (4), tongue (3), pyriform sinus (3), nose (2), floor of mouth (2), mastoid (1), tonsil (1), epiglottis (1), nasopharynx (1), trachea (1), and palate (1).
  • Treatment modalities included surgery with or without chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 13 patients, chemotherapy with irradiation in 2, chemotherapy alone in 2, and radiotherapy alone in 3.
  • Four were alive with disease at the time of writing and five died of disease.
  • CONCLUSION: BSCC is a highly aggressive malignant tumor that presents in elderly patients who have a history of abuse of tobacco or alcohol, or both.
  • Greater number of patients must be studied and compared with age-matched and stage-matched controls of conventional squamous cell carcinoma to determine whether the poor clinical outcome is related more to high-stage presentation or to the tumor's high-grade malignant cytological features.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Carcinoma, Squamous Cell.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 10983946.001).
  • [ISSN] 0023-852X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Laryngoscope
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Laryngoscope
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  •  go-up   go-down


10. Senel S, Kremer M, Nagy K, Squier C: Delivery of bioactive peptides and proteins across oral (buccal) mucosa. Curr Pharm Biotechnol; 2001 Jun;2(2):175-86
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The identification of an increasing array of highly potent, endogenous peptide and protein factors termed cytokines, that can be efficiently synthesized using recombinant DNA technology, offers exciting new approaches for drug therapy.
  • However, the physico-chemical and biological properties of these agents impose limitations in formulation and development of optimum drug delivery systems as well as on the routes of delivery.
  • Oral mucosa, including the lining of the cheek (buccal mucosa), floor of mouth and underside of tongue (sublingual mucosa) and gingival mucosa, has received much attention in the last decade because it offers excellent accessibility, is not easily traumatized and avoids degradation of proteins and peptides that occurs as a result of oral administration, gastrointestinal absorption and first-pass hepatic metabolism.
  • The relative role of aqueous as opposed to the lipid pathway in drug transport is still under investigation; penetration is not necessarily enhanced by simply increasing lipophilicity, for other effects, such as charge and molecular size, also play an important role in absorption of peptide and protein drugs.
  • Delivery of peptide/protein drugs by conventional means such as solutions has some limitations.
  • The possibility of excluding a major part of drug from absorption by involuntary swallowing and the continuous dilution due to salivary flow limits a controlled release.
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Delivery Systems / methods. Epithelium / metabolism. Mouth Mucosa / metabolism. Peptides / pharmacokinetics. Proteins / pharmacokinetics

  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • The Lens. Cited by Patents in .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 11480421.001).
  • [ISSN] 1389-2010
  • [Journal-full-title] Current pharmaceutical biotechnology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Pharm Biotechnol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Peptides; 0 / Proteins
  • [Number-of-references] 70
  •  go-up   go-down


11. Stadler P, Putnik K, Kreimeyer T, Sprague LD, Koelbl O, Schäfer C: Split course hyperfractionated accelerated radio-chemotherapy (SCHARC) for patients with advanced head and neck cancer: influence of protocol deviations and hemoglobin on overall survival, a retrospective analysis. BMC Cancer; 2006;6:279
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Split course hyperfractionated accelerated radio-chemotherapy (SCHARC) for patients with advanced head and neck cancer: influence of protocol deviations and hemoglobin on overall survival, a retrospective analysis.
  • BACKGROUND: The advantage of hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy for advanced head and neck cancer has been reported.
  • Furthermore, randomized trials and meta-analyses have confirmed the survival benefit of additional chemotherapy to radiotherapy.
  • We retrospectively analyzed the efficiency and toxicity of the Regensburg standard therapy protocol "SCHARC" and the overall survival of our patients.
  • Around half of the patients were diagnosed with oro-hypopharynx carcinoma (52 %), one third with tongue and floor of mouth tumors (29 %) and one fifth (19 %) suffered from H & N cancer at other sites.
  • The schedule consisted of one therapy block with 30 Gy in 20 fractions over a two week period with concomitant chemotherapy (d 1-5: 20 mg/m2/d DDP + 750-1000 mg/m2/d 5FU (cont. infusion).
  • This therapy block was repeated after a fortnight break up to a cumulative dose of 60 Gy and followed by a boost up to 70 Gy (69-70.5 Gy).
  • RESULTS: Forty patients (63 %) received both radiation and chemotherapy according to the protocol.
  • Most patients were not anemic at beginning of therapy.
  • Therefore, we could assess the influence of pre-treatment hemoglobin on survival.
  • This result suggests an influence of anemia during therapy on prognosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Carcinoma / radiotherapy. Dose Fractionation. Guideline Adherence / statistics & numerical data. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Hemoglobins / analysis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy / adverse effects. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Time. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUOROURACIL .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2005 May 1;23(13):3008-15 [15860857.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2005 Apr 25;92(8):1341-8 [15846296.001]
  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 2005 Jun;115(6):1015-20 [15933512.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Oncol. 2005 Sep;27(3):669-79 [16077915.001]
  • [Cites] Radiother Oncol. 2005 Aug;76(2):200-5 [16024111.001]
  • [Cites] Melanoma Res. 2005 Oct;15(5):417-25 [16179869.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet Oncol. 2005 Oct;6(10):757-64 [16198981.001]
  • [Cites] Radiother Oncol. 2005 Oct;77(1):18-24 [16098619.001]
  • [Cites] BMC Cancer. 2006;6:28 [16448551.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2000 Jan 15;46(2):459-66 [10661354.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2000 Apr 1;47(1):13-47 [10758303.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Biol Markers. 2000 Jul-Sep;15(3):235-6 [11012100.001]
  • [Cites] Strahlenther Onkol. 2000 Oct;176(10):475-80 [11068594.001]
  • [Cites] Strahlenther Onkol. 2001 Apr;177(4):182-8 [11370552.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2001 Jul 15;50(4):865-72 [11429213.001]
  • [Cites] Strahlenther Onkol. 2001 Sep;177(9):469-73 [11591020.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2002 Feb 15;20(4):1000-7 [11844823.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2002 Aug 15;62(16):4617-22 [12183417.001]
  • [Cites] Strahlenther Onkol. 2002 Aug;178(8):436-41 [12240549.001]
  • [Cites] Strahlenther Onkol. 2003 Aug;179(8):521-6 [14509950.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2003 Oct;129(10):1110-4 [14568798.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 2003 Oct 18;362(9392):1255-60 [14575968.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2004 Apr 1;58(5):1418-23 [15050318.001]
  • [Cites] Acta Oncol. 1988;27(2):147-52 [3390345.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1995 Mar 30;31(5):1049-91 [7713776.001]
  • [Cites] Radiother Oncol. 1997 Apr;43(1):47-51 [9165136.001]
  • [Cites] Radiother Oncol. 1998 Aug;48(2):157-64 [9783887.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer. 1998 May;34(6):856-61 [9797698.001]
  • [Cites] Strahlenther Onkol. 1998 Dec;174 Suppl 4:13-6 [9879341.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 1999 Jan;108(1):73-8 [9930544.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1999 Jul 1;44(4):749-54 [10386631.001]
  • [Cites] Strahlenther Onkol. 2004 Dec;180(12):805-10 [15592701.001]
  • [Cites] Semin Oncol. 2004 Dec;31(6):822-6 [15599861.001]
  • [Cites] Head Neck. 2005 Jan;27(1):36-43 [15459918.001]
  • [Cites] ORL J Otorhinolaryngol Relat Spec. 2004;66(6):325-31 [15668532.001]
  • [Cites] Strahlenther Onkol. 2005 Feb;181(2):113-23 [15702300.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2005 Mar 15;61(4):1087-95 [15752888.001]
  • [Cites] J Otolaryngol. 2004 Oct;33(5):295-8 [15931813.001]
  • (PMID = 17150114.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2407
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Hemoglobins; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1702360
  •  go-up   go-down


12. Sung CK, Choi B, Wanna G, Genden EM, Woo SL, Shin EJ: Combined VSV oncolytic virus and chemotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma. Laryngoscope; 2008 Feb;118(2):237-42
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Combined VSV oncolytic virus and chemotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma.
  • OBJECTIVES: Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a negative-strand ribonucleic acid (RNA) virus that replicates specifically in tumor cells and has oncolytic effects in a variety of malignant tumors.
  • In an orthotopic floor of mouth murine SCC model, intratumoral injections of virus combined with systemic cisplatin were tested for tumor control and animal survival.
  • RESULTS: In vitro, virus and cisplatin combination demonstrated rapid replication and enhanced tumor cell kill.
  • In vivo, combined rVSV-F with cisplatin reduced tumor burden and improved survival (P = .2 for both), while rVSV-IL12 monotherapy had better tumor control (P = .06) and survival (P = .024) than combination therapy.
  • In vivo, combination therapy enhancedrVSV-F antitumor activity, but diminished rVSV-IL12 antitumor activity.
  • Combination therapy may provide useful treatment for SCC with the development of more efficient viral vectors in combination with different chemotherapy agents or immunostimulatory agents.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Interleukin-12 / genetics. Oncolytic Virotherapy / methods. Vesiculovirus / genetics. Viral Fusion Proteins / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line, Tumor. Cisplatin / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease Models, Animal. Female. Head and Neck Neoplasms / pathology. Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy. Head and Neck Neoplasms / virology. Membrane Glycoproteins. Mice. Mice, Inbred C3H. Mouth Floor / pathology. Mouth Floor / virology. Polymerase Chain Reaction. RNA, Viral / genetics. Recombinant Fusion Proteins. Survival Rate. Viral Envelope Proteins

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cancer Chemotherapy.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
  • The Lens. Cited by Patents in .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18043494.001).
  • [ISSN] 0023-852X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Laryngoscope
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Laryngoscope
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / G protein, vesicular stomatitis virus; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / RNA, Viral; 0 / Recombinant Fusion Proteins; 0 / Viral Envelope Proteins; 0 / Viral Fusion Proteins; 187348-17-0 / Interleukin-12; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
  •  go-up   go-down


13. Li D, Shugert E, Guo M, Bishop JS, O'Malley BW Jr: Combination nonviral interleukin 2 and interleukin 12 gene therapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2001 Nov;127(11):1319-24
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Combination nonviral interleukin 2 and interleukin 12 gene therapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility and efficacy of combination nonviral lipid-formulated murine interleukin 2 (mIL-2) and polymer-formulated murine interleukin 12 (mIL-12) gene therapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in a murine model.
  • Tumors were established in the floor of mouth in C3H/HeJ immunocompetent mice.
  • RESULTS: The use of combined mIL-2 and mIL-12 gene therapy resulted in significant antitumor effects, compared with each of the single-cytokine and no-treatment (control) groups (P =.01 to P =.02).
  • Combined mIL-2 and mIL-12 treatment consistently produced the greater activation of cytolytic T-lymphocyte and natural killer cells than did single-cytokine treatment or other controls at all concentrations tested.
  • Combined nonviral IL-2 and IL-12 gene therapy may have great potential as a primary or adjuvant treatment for HNSCC in humans.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Genetic Therapy / methods. Head and Neck Neoplasms / drug therapy. Interleukin-12 / genetics. Interleukin-2 / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adjuvants, Immunologic / genetics. Adjuvants, Immunologic / therapeutic use. Animals. Antineoplastic Agents / immunology. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Disease Models, Animal. Drug Therapy, Combination. Gene Transfer Techniques. Injections, Intralesional. Killer Cells, Natural / immunology. Mice. Plasmids. Statistics, Nonparametric. T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic / immunology

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Genes and Gene Therapy.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • The Lens. Cited by Patents in .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 11701067.001).
  • [ISSN] 0886-4470
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of otolaryngology--head & neck surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Otolaryngol. Head Neck Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adjuvants, Immunologic; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Interleukin-2; 187348-17-0 / Interleukin-12
  •  go-up   go-down


14. Mallia RJ, Subhash N, Sebastian P, Kumar R, Thomas SS, Mathews A, Madhavan J: In vivo temporal evolution of ALA-induced normalized fluorescence at different anatomical locations of oral cavity: application to improve cancer diagnostic contrast and potential. Photodiagnosis Photodyn Ther; 2010 Sep;7(3):162-75
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: The focal goal of this study is to identify optimal accumulation periods for ALA-induced PpIX in different healthy anatomical sites of human oral cavity and different types of abnormal mucosa to improve the accuracy of the clinical applications such as photodiagnosis and tissue grading.
  • The optimal accumulation time in different anatomical sites of healthy subjects and abnormal tissues were determined by studying the temporal variation in normalized fluorescence intensities (NFI) at 635, 685 and 705 nm.
  • RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS: In masticatory anatomical locations such as (gingival and hard palate) and in lining mucosa (inner lip, soft palate, floor of mouth, transition to floor of mouth, alveolus and ventral tongue) except vermillion border of lip (VBL) of healthy subjects (designated as group I), it was observed that optimum time for maximum accumulation of PpIX is 90 min.
  • In comparison, for lateral side of tongue (LST) and dorsal side of tongue (DST) tissues (designated as group II), maximum accumulation of PpIX was observed in 150 min of ALA application.
  • For diverse grade lesions of group I mucosa in patients, maximum accumulation of PpIX was observed in 90 min, whereas, in group II mucosa the optimum accumulation time was 150 min as in the case of healthy mucosa.
  • Further, between different grades oral mucosa, maximum variation in NFI take place at these optimal time periods.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The determination of the optimum accumulation time of ALA in oral mucosa based on NFI helps to improve the diagnostic contrast and accuracy of oral cancer diagnosis, and to plan appropriate timing for ensuing PDT.
  • [MeSH-major] Aminolevulinic Acid / pharmacokinetics. Mouth / metabolism. Mouth Diseases / diagnosis. Mouth Mucosa / anatomy & histology. Protoporphyrins / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Topical. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Diagnosis, Oral. Humans. Mouth Neoplasms / diagnosis. Mouth Neoplasms / drug therapy. Mouth Neoplasms / pathology. Photochemotherapy. Spectrometry, Fluorescence. Time Factors

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Oral cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Mouth Disorders.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20728840.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-1597
  • [Journal-full-title] Photodiagnosis and photodynamic therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Photodiagnosis Photodyn Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Protoporphyrins; 553-12-8 / protoporphyrin IX; 88755TAZ87 / Aminolevulinic Acid
  •  go-up   go-down






Advertisement