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1. Turan T, Yıldırım BA, Tulunay G, Boran N, Yıldız F, Köse MF: Experience in stage IB2 cervical cancer and review of treatment. J Turk Ger Gynecol Assoc; 2010;11(1):27-37

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Experience in stage IB2 cervical cancer and review of treatment.
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study is to evaluate and compare the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT), radical hysterectomy (RH) and radiotherapy (RT) in the treatment of stage IB2 cervical cancer.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: Medical records of 86 patients with stage IB2 cervical cancer between 1993 and 2006 were evaluated.
  • Patients who underwent type III RH ± bilateral salphingo-oophorectomy and para-aortic and pelvic lymphadenectomy constituted the RH group (n=18).
  • However, the mean age of the patients was higher in the RT group and nonsquamous type cervical cancer was more frequent in the RH group.
  • CONCLUSION: In our study, none of the treatment modalities were shown to be superior in terms of efficacy.
  • There is need for additional prospective studies comparing multimodal treatment regimens in stage IB2 cervical cancer.

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  • (PMID = 24591891.001).
  • [ISSN] 1309-0399
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the Turkish German Gynecological Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Turk Ger Gynecol Assoc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Turkey
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3939302
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Cervical cancer / neoadjuvant chemotherapy / radical hysterectomy / radiotherapy
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2. Ryu HS, Kang SB, Kim KT, Chang KH, Kim JW, Kim JH: Efficacy of different types of treatment in FIGO stage IB2 cervical cancer in Korea: results of a multicenter retrospective Korean study (KGOG-1005). Int J Gynecol Cancer; 2007 Jan-Feb;17(1):132-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Efficacy of different types of treatment in FIGO stage IB2 cervical cancer in Korea: results of a multicenter retrospective Korean study (KGOG-1005).
  • The purpose of this study is to review FIGO stage IB2 cervical cancers in Korea for the past 10 years, and evaluate the most frequently employed and appropriate management strategy, and also assess the survival benefits of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC).
  • This is a retrospective chart review of 727 FIGO stage IB2 patients from 1995 to 2005.
  • Management strategies were divided into five groups according to the primary treatment modality.
  • The most frequently employed primary treatment modality for stage IB2 cervical cancer in Korea during the past 10 years was radical hysterectomy (RH).
  • For FIGO stage IB2 cervical cancer during the past 10 years in Korea, RH and adjuvant RT or CCRT was the most frequently employed treatment strategy.
  • However, RH demonstrated the best survival rate among the above treatment strategies.
  • [MeSH-major] Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / pathology. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Age Factors. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. Humans. Korea. Middle Aged. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies


3. Yessaian A, Magistris A, Burger RA, Monk BJ: Radical hysterectomy followed by tailored postoperative therapy in the treatment of stage IB2 cervical cancer: feasibility and indications for adjuvant therapy. Gynecol Oncol; 2004 Jul;94(1):61-6
International Agency for Research on Cancer - Screening Group. diagnostics - Histopathology and cytopathology of the uterine cervix - digital atlas .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Radical hysterectomy followed by tailored postoperative therapy in the treatment of stage IB2 cervical cancer: feasibility and indications for adjuvant therapy.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine the outcome, complications and likelihood of requiring adjuvant therapy of patients with stage IB2 cervical cancer treated with primary radical hysterectomy and lymph node dissection.
  • Fifty-eight of these women (9.6% of all radical hysterectomies) were diagnosed with FIGO stage IB2 cancers.
  • Forty-six patients (79%) had invasion involving the outer 1/3 of the cervical stroma, six had positive vaginal margins while five had occult parametrial extension.
  • According to criteria established by GOG protocol 92, 30 (52%) patients should have theoretically received adjuvant pelvic radiation while 21 (36%) would have qualified for adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation according to the results of GOG protocol 109.
  • Despite the lack of adjuvant therapy in most cases, only 21 women (38%) recurred of whom 11 failed on the pelvic wall, with an estimated 5-year survival of 62.1%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Radical hysterectomy and tailored adjuvant radiation therapy in stage IB2 cervical cancer is feasible.
  • Even without the liberal use of adjuvant therapy, survival in this high-risk group compares favorably to primary chemotherapy and radiation.
  • According to recently published randomized clinical trials, most patients should receive adjuvant postoperative therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Brachytherapy / adverse effects. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant / adverse effects. Female. Humans. Hysterectomy / adverse effects. Lymph Node Excision. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant / adverse effects. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 15262120.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-8258
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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4. Hoh JK, Choi JS, Lee JH, Lee KW, Han JS, Lee EJ: Repeat laparoscopic paraaortic lymphadenectomy for an isolated lymph node recurrence in a patient with stage IB2 cervical cancer. J Minim Invasive Gynecol; 2009 Nov-Dec;16(6):781-4
International Agency for Research on Cancer - Screening Group. diagnostics - Histopathology and cytopathology of the uterine cervix - digital atlas .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Repeat laparoscopic paraaortic lymphadenectomy for an isolated lymph node recurrence in a patient with stage IB2 cervical cancer.
  • We report a case of repeat laparoscopic paraaortic lymphadenectomy (LPAL) after surgery and concurrent chemoradiation of cervical cancer, FIGO stage IB2.
  • Twelve months after the initial treatment, F-18 fluoro-deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography showed an isolated paraaortic lymph node recurrence in a 49-year-old woman.
  • The patient received 3 cycles of combination chemotherapy and showed a complete clinical recovery.
  • Repeat LPAL is thus a feasible and effective procedure to remove and confirm of an isolated paraaortic lymph node recurrence after previous surgery and chemoradiation for treating cervical cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Laparoscopy / methods. Lymph Node Excision / methods. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 19896611.001).
  • [ISSN] 1553-4650
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of minimally invasive gynecology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Minim Invasive Gynecol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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5. Moore DH: The role of radical hysterectomy and neoadjuvant chemotherapy in carcinoma of the cervix. Curr Oncol Rep; 2002 Mar;4(2):145-51
International Agency for Research on Cancer - Screening Group. diagnostics - Histopathology and cytopathology of the uterine cervix - digital atlas .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The role of radical hysterectomy and neoadjuvant chemotherapy in carcinoma of the cervix.
  • The patient presenting with a bulky stage IB2 cervical cancer is a therapeutic challenge.
  • None of the current surgical or radiation treatment strategies satisfactorily leads to a high rate of disease-free survival and a low risk of treatment-related complications including ovarian failure and psychosexual deficits.
  • Neoadjuvant chemotherapy may allow for reductions in tumor bulk, thereby rendering radiation therapy more effective or surgery more feasible.
  • Impressive clinical response rates to cisplatin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy have been achieved with acceptable toxicity.
  • There are still too few comparative studies and phase III trials to assess the effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radical surgery relative to standard treatments.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Hysterectomy. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / drug therapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Clinical Trials as Topic. Female. Humans. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11822986.001).
  • [ISSN] 1523-3790
  • [Journal-full-title] Current oncology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Oncol Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 35
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6. Loizzi V, Cormio G, Vicino M, Selvaggi L: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy: an alternative option of treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer. Gynecol Obstet Invest; 2008;65(2):96-103
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Neoadjuvant chemotherapy: an alternative option of treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer.
  • Although the incidence of cervical cancer has declined in both North America and Europe, it still represents the second most common cancer in women and the fifth most common malignancy worldwide.
  • Most patients in the developed countries present with disease either confined to the cervix or with limited extension beyond it.
  • Historically, the standard treatment was usually radiotherapy or radical hysterectomy with node dissection.
  • In 1999, five randomized clinical trials performed by the Gynecologic Oncology Group, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the Southwest Oncology Group have demonstrated a significant outcome advantage when cisplatin-based chemotherapy was administered during radiation in patients with cervical cancer.
  • In the current review, we will analyze the role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy and surgery as an alternative option treatment to the standard chemoradiation for locally advanced cervical cancer (stage Ib2 or larger).
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
  • [MeSH-minor] Cisplatin / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Hysterectomy. Neoplasm Staging. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Survival Analysis

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 17878736.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-002X
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic and obstetric investigation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Obstet. Invest.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
  • [Number-of-references] 63
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7. Rocconi RP, Estes JM, Leath CA 3rd, Kilgore LC, Huh WK, Straughn JM Jr: Management strategies for stage IB2 cervical cancer: a cost-effectiveness analysis. Gynecol Oncol; 2005 May;97(2):387-94
International Agency for Research on Cancer - Screening Group. diagnostics - Histopathology and cytopathology of the uterine cervix - digital atlas .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Management strategies for stage IB2 cervical cancer: a cost-effectiveness analysis.
  • OBJECTIVE: To assess the potential effectiveness and medical costs of three common strategies to manage Stage IB2 squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (CXCA).
  • METHODS: A decision analysis model compared three strategies to manage Stage IB2 CXCA:.
  • (1) radical hysterectomy with pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy followed by tailored chemoradiation therapy for high-risk patients (RHYST);.
  • (2) primary chemoradiation therapy for all patients (CTRT); and (3) neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical hysterectomy and tailored chemoradiation therapy for high-risk patients (NAC).
  • CONCLUSIONS: RHYST is the most cost-effective strategy to manage Stage IB2 CXCA and would be favored in settings where resources are limited.
  • Although NAC and CTRT are reasonable treatment strategies, policymakers must be willing to spend approximately $500,000 per additional survivor (NAC) or $2.2 M per additional survivor (CTRT).
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / economics. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / economics. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic. Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic. Combined Modality Therapy / economics. Cost-Benefit Analysis. Data Interpretation, Statistical. Decision Support Techniques. Female. Humans. Hysterectomy / economics. Models, Econometric. Neoadjuvant Therapy / economics. Neoplasm Staging. Sensitivity and Specificity

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  • (PMID = 15863134.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-8258
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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8. Lachance JA, Darus CJ, Stukenborg GJ, Schneider BF, Rice LW, Jazaeri AA: A cost comparison of two strategies for treating stage IB2 cervical cancer. Int J Gynecol Cancer; 2008 Mar-Apr;18(2):274-8
International Agency for Research on Cancer - Screening Group. diagnostics - Histopathology and cytopathology of the uterine cervix - digital atlas .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A cost comparison of two strategies for treating stage IB2 cervical cancer.
  • Patients with stage IB2 cervical cancer at our institution are treated primarily with definitive chemoradiation, or chemoradiation followed by adjuvant hysterectomy.
  • We identified all patients with stage IB2 cervical cancer who received their entire treatment regimen at our institution between 1995 and 2004.
  • All patients received a combination of chemotherapy, external beam radiation, and one brachytherapy procedure, followed by either a second brachytherapy procedure or a simple hysterectomy.
  • We retrieved cost data associated with hospitalization for the completion of respective treatment, including pharmacy, laboratory and pathology, radiation, and operating room services, as well as the costs of supplies and room and board.
  • We identified 46 patients with stage IB2 cervical cancer, 23 who received a second brachytherapy procedure and 23 who underwent simple hysterectomy.
  • We conclude that definitive chemoradiation appears to be associated with lower costs for management of stage IB2 cervical cancer when compared to simple adjuvant hysterectomy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / economics. Hysterectomy / economics. Radiotherapy / economics. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / economics. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy / economics. Costs and Cost Analysis. Female. Humans. Neoplasm Staging

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  • (PMID = 18334009.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-1438
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of gynecological cancer : official journal of the International Gynecological Cancer Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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9. Ostrom K, Ben-Arie A, Edwards C, Gregg A, Chiu JK, Kaplan AL: Uterine evacuation with misoprostol during radiotherapy for cervical cancer in pregnancy. Int J Gynecol Cancer; 2003 May-Jun;13(3):340-3
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Uterine evacuation with misoprostol during radiotherapy for cervical cancer in pregnancy.
  • Radiotherapy as definitive treatment for invasive cervical cancer during pregnancy causes spontaneous abortion in most cases.
  • Two Latin American women, diagnosed with FIGO stage IB2 cervical cancer at approximately 15 weeks gestation, underwent radiotherapy with radiosensitizing chemotherapy.
  • Results included one complete abortion and one incomplete abortion without complications or delays in treatment.
  • These cases demonstrate that induction with misoprostol appears to be a safe and effective alternative to surgical evacuation of the uterus when spontaneous abortion fails to occur during radiotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Abortifacient Agents, Nonsteroidal / therapeutic use. Abortion, Therapeutic / methods. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Misoprostol / therapeutic use. Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic / radiotherapy. Radiotherapy / methods. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Cisplatin / therapeutic use. Female. Humans. Pregnancy. Radiation-Sensitizing Agents / therapeutic use. Treatment Outcome


10. Termrungruanglert W, Tresukosol D, Vasuratna A, Sittisomwong T, Lertkhachonsuk R, Sirisabya N: Neoadjuvant gemcitabine and cisplatin followed by radical surgery in (bulky) squamous cell carcinoma of cervix stage IB2. Gynecol Oncol; 2005 May;97(2):576-81
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  • [Title] Neoadjuvant gemcitabine and cisplatin followed by radical surgery in (bulky) squamous cell carcinoma of cervix stage IB2.
  • OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of gemcitabine in combination with cisplatin as neoadjuvant therapy in patients with cervical carcinoma stage IB2.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Chemotherapy-naive patients with histologic diagnosis of squamous cell cervical carcinoma staged as IB2 were treated with 2 cycles of cisplatin (70 mg/m(2) on day 1) and gemcitabine (1000 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8), given every 21 days.
  • After chemotherapy, patients underwent radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy.
  • At median follow-up time of 36.7 months (range 7-51 months), the 3-year survival was 88.9%.
  • CONCLUSION: Neoadjuvant treatment with gemcitabine/cisplatin combination for patients with cervical cancer (stage IB2) appears encouraging, with manageable and acceptable toxicity profile.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / drug therapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Cisplatin / adverse effects. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Neoplasm Staging


11. Moore DH: Treatment of stage IB2 (bulky) cervical carcinoma. Cancer Treat Rev; 2003 Oct;29(5):401-6
International Agency for Research on Cancer - Screening Group. diagnostics - Histopathology and cytopathology of the uterine cervix - digital atlas .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment of stage IB2 (bulky) cervical carcinoma.
  • Tumour size is an important prognostic factor in patients with stage IB cervical cancer.
  • The patient with stage IB2 (bulky) cervical cancer represents a therapeutic challenge.
  • Neither radical hysterectomy nor primary radiation therapy are sufficiently effective and are associated with significant treatment-related complications including ovarian failure and psychosexual deficits.
  • It appears that extrafascial hysterectomy following radiation therapy does not improve overall survival relative to radiation therapy alone.
  • Consistent with results seen in locally advanced cervical carcinoma, chemoradiation therapy is superior to radiation therapy alone as primary treatment for stage IB2 cervical cancer and as adjuvant therapy for surgically treated patients with high-risk factors for recurrence.
  • Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has resulted in high clinical response rates and operability rates.
  • There are two phase III trials suggesting an improvement in survival with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical hysterectomy versus either surgery (and selected postoperative radiation) or radiation therapy alone.
  • These emerging treatments should be scrutinized in prospective controlled trials.
  • [MeSH-major] Hysterectomy / methods. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / pathology. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Biopsy, Needle. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoadjuvant Therapy / methods. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Risk Assessment. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12972358.001).
  • [ISSN] 0305-7372
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer treatment reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Treat. Rev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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12. Tangsiriwatthana T, Chumworathayi B, Yuenyao P, Luanratanakorn S, Pattamadilok J: Srinagarind Hospital experience in concurrent chemoradiation for 100 patients with stage IB2 to IVA uterine cervical cancer. Radiat Med; 2007 Dec;25(10):502-10
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Srinagarind Hospital experience in concurrent chemoradiation for 100 patients with stage IB2 to IVA uterine cervical cancer.
  • PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine responses, acute adverse effects, and survival outcomes of women with stage IB2 to IVA treated with weekly cisplatin concurrent with pelvic irradiation at Srinagarind Hospital.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: The medical records of 100 women with cervical cancer stage IB2 to IVA who were treated with weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m(2) concurrent with pelvic radiotherapy at Srinagarind Hospital between January 2003 and June 2006 were reviewed and analyzed.
  • Distribution according to International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging was IB2 1.0%, IIB 47.0%, IIIB 51.0%, and IVA 1.0%, respectively.
  • CONCLUSION: Weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m(2)) concurrent with pelvic irradiation for locally advanced cervical cancer was effective with acceptable toxicity in Thai women.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Cisplatin / therapeutic use. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / drug therapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy Dosage. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome


13. Darus CJ, Callahan MB, Nguyen QN, Pastore LM, Schneider BF, Rice LW, Jazaeri AA: Chemoradiation with and without adjuvant extrafascial hysterectomy for IB2 cervical carcinoma. Int J Gynecol Cancer; 2008 Jul-Aug;18(4):730-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Chemoradiation with and without adjuvant extrafascial hysterectomy for IB2 cervical carcinoma.
  • The optimal treatment strategy for stage IB2 cervical carcinoma that maximizes survival while minimizing toxicity remains controversial.
  • The purpose of this study was to compare survival and toxicity in stage IB2 cervical cancer patients treated with chemoradiation and adjuvant extrafascial hysterectomy (cRT + H) versus definitive chemoradiation (cRT).
  • Data were abstracted from patients with IB2 cervical carcinoma primarily treated at a single institution from January 1994 to December 2004.
  • All patients received chemotherapy concurrent with external beam radiation therapy.
  • Patients were subsequently treated with either a single low-dose rate brachytherapy applicator followed by adjuvant extrafascial hysterectomy (n = 24) or a second brachytherapy application to complete full-dose definitive chemoradiation (n = 30).
  • Smokers were significantly (P = 0.04) more likely to have been treated with definitive chemoradiation.
  • No treatment-related deaths occurred.
  • These data complement published results of Gynecologic Oncology Group studies in patients with IB2 cervical cancer.
  • Definitive comparison between the two treatment strategies would require a randomized prospective trial with stratification based on smoking.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / radiotherapy. Carcinoma / surgery. Hysterectomy / methods. Radiation-Sensitizing Agents / therapeutic use. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cohort Studies. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Middle Aged. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cervical Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Hysterectomy.
  • International Agency for Research on Cancer - Screening Group. diagnostics - Histopathology and cytopathology of the uterine cervix - digital atlas .
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  • (PMID = 17949426.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-1438
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of gynecological cancer : official journal of the International Gynecological Cancer Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiation-Sensitizing Agents
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14. Miller ES, Hoekstra AV, Hurteau JA, Rodriguez GC: Cardiac metastasis from poorly differentiated carcinoma of the cervix: a case report. J Reprod Med; 2010 Jan-Feb;55(1-2):78-80
International Agency for Research on Cancer - Screening Group. diagnostics - Histopathology and cytopathology of the uterine cervix - digital atlas .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cardiac metastasis from poorly differentiated carcinoma of the cervix: a case report.
  • BACKGROUND: Disease metastatic to the heart from cervical carcinoma is rare and associated with a poor prognosis.
  • Multimodality treatment has been shown to provide palliative benefit.
  • CASE: A woman presented with stage Ib2 cervical cancer metastatic to the tricuspid valve.
  • She presented with small bowel obstruction from a small bowel metastasis 4 years after initial treatment with chemoradiation.
  • Endomyocardial biopsy confirmed metastatic disease consistent with a cervical primary.
  • The patient was treated with bowel resection, systemic chemotherapy and cardiac radiation.
  • CONCLUSION: Cervical cancer metastatic to the heart is rare and associated with a poor prognosis.
  • Selected patients may benefit from multimodality treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / secondary. Heart Neoplasms / secondary. Tricuspid Valve / pathology. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 20337214.001).
  • [ISSN] 0024-7758
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of reproductive medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Reprod Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. Rob L, Svoboda B, Robová H, Stankusová H, Cwiertka K, Neumannová R, Petera J, Koliba P, Kudela M, Oncogynecology Section of the Czech Gynecologic and Obstetrical Society: [Guideline for gynecological malignant tumors--primary complex therapy in operable stages of malignant tumors of uterus cervix]. Ceska Gynekol; 2004 Sep;69(5):376-83
International Agency for Research on Cancer - Screening Group. diagnostics - A practical manual on visual screening for cervical neoplasia .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Guideline for gynecological malignant tumors--primary complex therapy in operable stages of malignant tumors of uterus cervix].
  • OBJECTIVE: Elaboration of guideline for primary treatment of operable cervical cancer.
  • RESULTS: Team work is essential in the diagnostic and therapeutic procedure.
  • For the treatment of early stage cervical cancer it is possible to perform sentinel lymph node mapping (SLNM) by patent blau and 99mTc together with frozen section.
  • For the treatment of IB2 stage cervical cancer, an alternative for primary surgery or chemoradiotherapy is neoadjuvant chemotherapy, followed by radical surgery.
  • CONCLUSION: The guideline for cervical cancer treatment should represent directions for clinicians and others, who participate in the process of the treatment of cervical cancer.

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  • (PMID = 15587894.001).
  • [ISSN] 1210-7832
  • [Journal-full-title] Ceska gynekologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ceska Gynekol
  • [Language] CZE
  • [Publication-type] Consensus Development Conference; English Abstract; Guideline; Journal Article; Practice Guideline; Review
  • [Publication-country] Czech Republic
  • [Number-of-references] 15
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16. Xiao Y, Li JD, Shi HL, Liu JH, Feng YL, Li MD: [Predictive value of in vitro MTT assay chemosensitivity test of cytotoxic drug activity in cervical cancer]. Ai Zheng; 2007 Apr;26(4):386-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Predictive value of in vitro MTT assay chemosensitivity test of cytotoxic drug activity in cervical cancer].
  • BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: In recent years, the neoadjuvant chemotherapy for cervical cancer has evoked more and more attention and has been used widely.
  • But the chemosensitivity of individuals to various antitumor drugs is different.
  • This study was to investigate the chemosensitivity of cervical cancer cells to antitumor drugs using in vitro MTT assay chemosensitivity test.
  • METHODS: The sensitivity of fresh human cervical cancer cells from 32 patients to 9 cytotoxic drugs was tested using in vitro MTT assay.
  • RESULTS: The cytotoxic activities of the 9 drugs for cervical cancer were in sequence from high to low as follows: liposomal paclitaxel, taxol, carboplatin (CBP), ifosfamide (IFO), etoposide (VP-16), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cisplatin (DDP), bleomycin (BLM), and cyclophosphamide (CTX).
  • Generally, cervical cancer cells were more sensitive to paclitaxel, taxol, and CBP than to other drugs (P<0.05) with inhibition rates of 56.56%, 55.66%, and 46.81%, respectively.
  • Stage Ib1 cervical cancer cells were more sensitive to taxol, paclitaxel, and CBP than to other drugs with inhibition rates of 58.71%, 53.00%, and 49.25%, respectively; stage Ib2 cervical cancer cells were more sensitive to paclitaxel and taxol than to other drugs with inhibition rates of 65.26% and 50.06%.
  • Both moderately and poorly differentiated squamous cell cancer cells were more sensitive to taxol, paclitaxel, and CBP than to other drugs with inhibition rates of 52.01%, 49.21%, and 40.02% for the former, and 60.02%, 61.16%, and 48.75% for the latter.
  • CONCLUSIONS: MTT assay, a sensitive and widely used chemosensitivity testing method, is helpful in sensitive drug screening and neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen selection for cervical cancer.
  • Cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to paclitaxel, taxol, and CBP than to other tested drugs in this study.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Cell Survival / drug effects. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Bleomycin / pharmacology. Carboplatin / pharmacology. Cells, Cultured. Cisplatin / pharmacology. Cyclophosphamide / pharmacology. Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor / methods. Etoposide / pharmacology. Female. Fluorouracil / pharmacology. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Paclitaxel / pharmacology






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