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1. de Mari K, Maynard L, Sanquer A, Lebreux B, Eun HM: Therapeutic effects of recombinant feline interferon-omega on feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-infected and FeLV/feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-coinfected symptomatic cats. J Vet Intern Med; 2004 Jul-Aug;18(4):477-82
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  • [Title] Therapeutic effects of recombinant feline interferon-omega on feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-infected and FeLV/feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-coinfected symptomatic cats.
  • The clinical efficacy of a recombinant feline interferon, rFeIFN-omega, was evaluated for the treatment of cats presented with clinical signs associated with feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection and FeLV/feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) coinfection in the field.
  • During the initial 4-month period, interferon (IFN)-treated cats (n = 39) had significantly reduced clinical scores compared with placebo (n = 42), with all cats having received concomitant supportive therapies.
  • Compared with the control, the IFN-treated group showed significantly lower rates of mortality: 39% versus 59% (1.7-fold higher risk of death for controls) at the 9-month time point and 47% versus 59% (1.4-fold higher risk of death for controls) at the 12-month time point.
  • The IFN treatment was associated with minor but consistent improvement in abnormal hematologic parameters (red blood cell count, packed cell volume, and white blood cell count), apparently underlying the positive effects of IFN on clinical parameters.
  • These data demonstrate that rFeIFN-omega initially has statistically significant therapeutic effects on clinical signs and later on survival of cats with clinical signs associated with FeLV infection and FeLV/FIV coinfection.

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  • (PMID = 15320583.001).
  • [ISSN] 0891-6640
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of veterinary internal medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Vet. Intern. Med.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interferon Type I; 0 / interferon omega 1
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2. Rao S, Cunningham D, Hawkins RE, Hill ME, Smith D, Daniel F, Ross PJ, Oates J, Norman AR: Phase III study of 5FU, etoposide and leucovorin (FELV) compared to epirubicin, cisplatin and 5FU (ECF) in previously untreated patients with advanced biliary cancer. Br J Cancer; 2005 May 9;92(9):1650-4
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  • [Title] Phase III study of 5FU, etoposide and leucovorin (FELV) compared to epirubicin, cisplatin and 5FU (ECF) in previously untreated patients with advanced biliary cancer.
  • The purpose of this study was to determine whether epirubicin, cisplatin and infused 5FU (ECF) improves overall survival (OS) compared to 5FU, etoposide and leucovorin (FELV) in patients with previously untreated advanced biliary cancer in a prospective randomised study.
  • Patients were randomly assigned to receive epirubicin, cisplatin and infused 5FU ECF or bolus 5FU etoposide and leucovorin (FELV).
  • The median OS for ECF was 9.02 months (95% confidence interval (CI): 6.46-11.51) and FELV 12.03 months (95% CI: 9.3-14.7), P=0.2059.
  • Objective response rates were similar for both arms: ECF 19.2% (95% CI: 6.55-39.3); FELV 15% (95% CI: 3.2-37.9), P=0.72.
  • There was significantly increased grade 3/4 neutropenia with FELV vs ECF (53.8 vs 29.5%, respectively, P=0.020).
  • ECF did not improve OS compared to FELV, but was associated with less acute toxicity.
  • These data suggest that chemotherapy can prolong OS and achieve good symptomatic relief in advanced biliary cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Biliary Tract Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Leucovorin / administration & dosage. Male. Middle Aged. Survival Analysis. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 15856037.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0920
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase III; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; Q573I9DVLP / Leucovorin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2362051
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3. Teske E, van Straten G, van Noort R, Rutteman GR: Chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisolone (COP) in cats with malignant lymphoma: new results with an old protocol. J Vet Intern Med; 2002 Mar-Apr;16(2):179-86
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  • [Title] Chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisolone (COP) in cats with malignant lymphoma: new results with an old protocol.
  • This retrospective study in 61 cats with malignant lymphomas examined the efficacy of a well-established chemotherapy protocol (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisolone [COP]) in the Netherlands, a country with a low prevalence of feline leukemia virus (FeLV).
  • Twenty-two cats (36.1%) had mediastinal lymphoma, 11 (18.0%) had alimentary lymphoma, 7 (11.5%) had peripheral lymphoma, 8 (13.1%) had nasal lymphoma, and 13 (21.3%) had miscellaneous lymphoma (including renal lymphoma in 2 [3.3%]).
  • Of the 54 cats that were tested, only 4 (7.4%) were FeLV positive.
  • The estimated 1- and 2-year disease-free periods (DFPs) in the 46 cats with CR were 51.4 and 37.8%, respectively, whereas the median duration of remission was 251 days.
  • The median survival time and the 1-year survival rate for mediastinal lymphoma were 262 days and 49.4%. respectively.
  • Response to therapy in this study was shown to be a significant prognostic indicator.
  • Young Siamese cats in this study had a greater tendency to develop mediastinal malignant lymphoma at a young age, and all were FeLV negative.
  • In comparison with results reported in other studies with different combination chemotherapy protocols, these are among the highest percentages of remission and the longest survival rates for cats with malignant lymphoma.

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  • (PMID = 11899035.001).
  • [ISSN] 0891-6640
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of veterinary internal medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Vet. Intern. Med.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone
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4. McCaw DL, Boon GD, Jergens AE, Kern MR, Bowles MH, Johnson JC: Immunomodulation therapy for feline leukemia virus infection. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc; 2001 Jul-Aug;37(4):356-63
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  • [Title] Immunomodulation therapy for feline leukemia virus infection.
  • Clinically ill feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-infected cats, treated with Staphylococcus protein A (SPA) or oral interferon alpha (IFN), or both, were compared with cats treated with saline (SAL).
  • Twelve cats survived and completed the 100-week therapy.
  • Significantly more owners of cats treated with SPA/SAL thought their cat's health improved during treatment compared to owners of cats treated with SAL/SAL (P=0.05, pair-wise comparison) or SPA/IFN (P=0.05, pair-wise comparison).
  • No significant differences in body weight, temperature, hematocrit, red blood cell counts, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, reticulocyte counts, white blood cell or neutrophil numbers, lymphocyte concentrations, bone-marrow cytopathology, FeLV status, survival time, activity, or appetite scores were observed.
  • No significant differences in the owners' subjective assessment of their cat's health following treatment with SAL/IFN, SPA/IFN, or SAL/SAL were seen.
  • Therapy with SPA as a single agent results in the owners' subjective impression of improved health of their FeLV-infected cats.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, Viral / blood. Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Leukemia Virus, Feline / immunology. Leukemia, Feline / therapy. Staphylococcal Protein A / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adjuvants, Immunologic / administration & dosage. Adjuvants, Immunologic / therapeutic use. Administration, Oral. Animals. Cats. Drug Administration Schedule. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay / veterinary. Female. Immunotherapy / veterinary. Male. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 11450836.001).
  • [ISSN] 0587-2871
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Am Anim Hosp Assoc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adjuvants, Immunologic; 0 / Antigens, Viral; 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Staphylococcal Protein A
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5. Kohn B, Weingart C, Eckmann V, Ottenjann M, Leibold W: Primary immune-mediated hemolytic anemia in 19 cats: diagnosis, therapy, and outcome (1998-2004). J Vet Intern Med; 2006 Jan-Feb;20(1):159-66
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  • [Title] Primary immune-mediated hemolytic anemia in 19 cats: diagnosis, therapy, and outcome (1998-2004).
  • The CT was performed in 92 cats; it was negative in 5 healthy, in 9 sick nonanemic, and in 55 cats with different types of anemia.
  • The CT was positive in 18 anemic cats (2 feline leukemia virus (FeLV) positive, 1 with cholangiohepatitis, 15 with no underlying disease).
  • Moreover, agglutination persisted after saline washing in 5 anemic cats (1 lymphoma, 4 pIMHA).
  • Initial treatment consisted of blood transfusions (10), crystalloids (11), prednisolone (19), antibiotics (19), and H2-blockers (11).

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  • (PMID = 16496936.001).
  • [ISSN] 0891-6640
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of veterinary internal medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Vet. Intern. Med.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Histamine H2 Antagonists; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone
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6. Milner RJ, Peyton J, Cooke K, Fox LE, Gallagher A, Gordon P, Hester J: Response rates and survival times for cats with lymphoma treated with the University of Wisconsin-Madison chemotherapy protocol: 38 cases (1996-2003). J Am Vet Med Assoc; 2005 Oct 1;227(7):1118-22
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  • [Title] Response rates and survival times for cats with lymphoma treated with the University of Wisconsin-Madison chemotherapy protocol: 38 cases (1996-2003).
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine response rates and survival times for cats with lymphoma treated with the University of Wisconsin-Madison chemotherapy protocol.
  • ANIMALS: 38 cats with lymphoma.
  • PROCEDURE: Medical records were reviewed, and information on age, sex, breed, FeLV and FIV infection status, anatomic form, clinical stage, and survival time was obtained.
  • Overall median survival time was 210 days (interquartile range, 90 to 657 days), and overall duration of first remission was 156 days (interquartile range, 87 to 316 days).
  • Age, sex, anatomic form, and clinical stage were not significantly associated with duration of first remission or survival time.
  • Median survival time for cats with complete remission (654 days) was significantly longer than median survival time for cats with partial remission (122 days) and for cats with no response (11 days).
  • CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Results suggested that a high percentage of cats with lymphoma will respond to treatment with the University of Wisconsin-Madison chemotherapy protocol.
  • Age, sex, anatomic form, and clinical stage were not significantly associated with duration of first response or survival time, but initial response to treatment was.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cat Diseases / drug therapy. Cat Diseases / mortality. Lymphoma / veterinary
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cats. Female. Male. Neoplasm Staging / veterinary. Remission Induction. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome. Wisconsin

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  • (PMID = 16220673.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-1488
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Vet. Med. Assoc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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7. Kristal O, Lana SE, Ogilvie GK, Rand WM, Cotter SM, Moore AS: Single agent chemotherapy with doxorubicin for feline lymphoma: a retrospective study of 19 cases (1994-1997). J Vet Intern Med; 2001 Mar-Apr;15(2):125-30
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  • [Title] Single agent chemotherapy with doxorubicin for feline lymphoma: a retrospective study of 19 cases (1994-1997).
  • Medical records of 21 cats with confirmed lymphoma treated with single-agent doxorubicin were reviewed.
  • Doxorubicin was given at a dosage of 25 mg/m2 (n = 8) or 1 mg/kg (n = 11) IV, every 3 weeks for a total of 5 treatments.
  • Four of 16 tested cats were positive for feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and all 16 cats tested negative for feline immunodeficiency virus.
  • Cats that achieved CR to doxorubicin and FeLV-negative cats had significantly longer survival times.
  • Therefore, if doxorubicin is used for the treatment of feline lymphoma, it should be combined with other effective chemotherapeutic drugs in a combination protocol.

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  • (PMID = 11300595.001).
  • [ISSN] 0891-6640
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of veterinary internal medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Vet. Intern. Med.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin
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8. Kyle KN, Wright Z: Apparent feline leukemia virus-induced chronic lymphocytic leukemia and response to treatment. J Feline Med Surg; 2010 Apr;12(4):341-4
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  • [Title] Apparent feline leukemia virus-induced chronic lymphocytic leukemia and response to treatment.
  • Chylothorax secondary to chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was diagnosed in a feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-positive 8-year-old castrated male domestic shorthair feline.
  • The leukemia resolved following therapy with chlorambucil, prednisone, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and lomustine.
  • To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of CLL in an FeLV-positive cat.
  • Although a causative relationship cannot be proven, patients diagnosed with either disease may benefit from diagnostics to rule out the presence of the other concurrent condition.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cat Diseases / drug therapy. Cat Diseases / virology. Chylothorax / veterinary. Leukemia Virus, Feline. Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell / veterinary
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Antiviral Agents / administration & dosage. Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. Cats. Leukemia, Feline / complications. Leukemia, Feline / drug therapy. Leukemia, Feline / virology. Male. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2009 ISFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • [CommentIn] J Feline Med Surg. 2010 Dec;12(12):995; author reply 996 [21126679.001]
  • (PMID = 19945894.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-2750
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of feline medicine and surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Feline Med. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Antiviral Agents
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9. Collado VM, Gómez-Lucía E, Tejerizo G, Miró G, Escolar E, Martín S, Doménech A: Effect of type I interferons on the expression of feline leukaemia virus. Vet Microbiol; 2007 Jul 20;123(1-3):180-6

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  • [Title] Effect of type I interferons on the expression of feline leukaemia virus.
  • Ten-fold serial dilutions of three recombinant IFNs available for therapy, human IFNalpha(2a), IFNalpha(A/D) and feline IFNomega were added to the chronically FeLV-infected cell line FL74.
  • However, reverse transcriptase activity (RT), directly proportional to the amount of infectious free virions, decreased with increasing concentrations of IFN and longer treatment times.
  • Results of its evaluation by annexin V-Fluos staining showed that IFNs decreased the viability of treated FeLV-infected cells, and increased apoptosis, but not of non-infected cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / pharmacology. Gene Expression Regulation, Viral / drug effects. Interferon Type I / pharmacology. Leukemia Virus, Feline / drug effects. Leukemia Virus, Feline / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Apoptosis. Cats. Cell Line. Humans. RNA-Directed DNA Polymerase / metabolism. Recombinant Proteins

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  • (PMID = 17507184.001).
  • [ISSN] 0378-1135
  • [Journal-full-title] Veterinary microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vet. Microbiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Interferon Type I; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; EC 2.7.7.49 / RNA-Directed DNA Polymerase
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10. Langston CE, Reine NJ, Kittrell D: The use of erythropoietin. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract; 2003 Nov;33(6):1245-60
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  • Other uses that are poorly characterized in veterinary medicine include treatment of cancer patients on chemotherapy, hematologic disorders, and anemic FeLV-infected cats as well as preoperative conditioning for elective surgeries that may involve significant blood loss.
  • Careful monitoring of therapy is necessary for optimal results.
  • Several complications are associated with rHuEPO therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Anemia / veterinary. Cat Diseases / drug therapy. Dog Diseases / drug therapy. Erythropoietin / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cats. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Dogs. Recombinant Proteins

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  • (PMID = 14664197.001).
  • [ISSN] 0195-5616
  • [Journal-full-title] The Veterinary clinics of North America. Small animal practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vet. Clin. North Am. Small Anim. Pract.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 11096-26-7 / Erythropoietin
  • [Number-of-references] 99
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11. Malik R, Gabor LJ, Foster SF, McCorkell BE, Canfield PJ: Therapy for Australian cats with lymphosarcoma. Aust Vet J; 2001 Dec;79(12):808-17
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  • [Title] Therapy for Australian cats with lymphosarcoma.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine the response of Australian cats with lymphosarcoma to chemotherapy and/or surgery in relation to patient and tumour characteristics, haematological and serum biochemical values and retroviral status.
  • DESIGN: Prospective study of 61 client-owned cats with naturally-occurring lymphosarcoma subjected to multi-agent chemotherapy and/or surgery.
  • PROCEDURE: An accepted chemotherapy protocol utilising l-asparaginase, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, methotrexate and prednisolone was modified and used to treat 60 cats with lymphosarcoma.
  • Clinical findings were recorded before and during therapy.
  • Owner satisfaction with the results of chemotherapy was determined using a questionnaire sent after the completion of chemotherapy.
  • RESULTS: One cat, with lymphosarcoma limited to a single mandibular lymph node, was treated using surgery alone and was cured.
  • The other 60 cats were treated using multi-agent chemotherapy, although seven cats with localised intestinal, ocular and subcutaneous lesions had these lesions partially (2 intestinal lesions) or completely (2 eyes, 2 intestinal lesions and a cluster of regional lymph nodes) resected prior to starting chemotherapy.
  • The median survival time for these 60 cats was 116 days.
  • Three cats were censored from further analysis as their long-term survival data were uninterpretable because they died of causes unrelated to lymphosarcoma or were prematurely lost to follow-up.
  • Twenty cats were classed as 'long-term survivors' based on survival time in excess of one year and at least 14 were 'cured' based on the absence of physical evidence of lymphosarcoma 2-years after initiating treatment.
  • Excluding the one FeLV ELISA-positive cat with mediastinal LSA, 7 of 9 cats less than 4 years-of-age were long-term survivors (median survival time >1271 days).
  • On the basis of 27 replies to a questionnaire, owners were generally very satisfied with the response to chemotherapy, irrespective of the survival time of the individual patient.
  • Eighty five percent of owners expressed complete satisfaction with their decision to pursue chemotherapy and 70% believed their cat's health status improved during the first 2-weeks of treatment.
  • Importantly, 78% of owners considered that chemotherapy required a very substantial time commitment on their part.
  • CONCLUSIONS: It was possible to cure approximately one quarter of cats with lymphosarcoma using sequential multi-agent chemotherapy and/or surgery.
  • FeLV-negative cats younger than 4 years (typically with mediastinal lymphosarcoma) had a particularly favourable prognosis.
  • The decision to embark on chemotherapy should be based on the results of induction chemotherapy with l-asparaginase, vincristine and prednisolone, as the response to this was a good predictor of long-term survival.
  • Cats surviving the first 16 weeks of chemotherapy generally enjoyed robust remissions (in excess of 1 year) or were cured of their malignancy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cat Diseases / drug therapy. Cat Diseases / surgery. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / veterinary
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Asparaginase / administration & dosage. Cats. Cohort Studies. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Female. Leukemia Virus, Feline. Male. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. New South Wales. Patient Satisfaction. Prednisolone / administration & dosage. Surveys and Questionnaires. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome. Vincristine / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 11837901.001).
  • [ISSN] 0005-0423
  • [Journal-full-title] Australian veterinary journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Aust. Vet. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone; EC 3.5.1.1 / Asparaginase; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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12. Penzhorn BL, Schoeman T, Jacobson LS: Feline babesiosis in South Africa: a review. Ann N Y Acad Sci; 2004 Oct;1026:183-6
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  • [Title] Feline babesiosis in South Africa: a review.
  • Babesia felis, originally identified in wild cats in the Sudan, was subsequently found to cause clinical disease in domestic cats.
  • Although babesiosis in domestic cats has been reported sporadically from various countries, as a significant disease it appears to be a distinctly South African phenomenon.
  • Apart from an inland focus, feline babesiosis is reported regularly only from coastal regions.
  • The infection is assumed to be tick-borne, but the vector has not been identified.
  • Feline babesiosis tends to be an afebrile, chronic, low-grade disease.
  • Concurrent infections (e.g., Mycoplasma haemofelis, FeLV, FIV) may contribute to the clinical picture.
  • Drugs effective against other Babesia species give variable and questionable results.
  • The drug of choice is primaquine phosphate, which effects a clinical cure but does not sterilize the infection.
  • Repeated or chronic therapy may be required.
  • [MeSH-minor] Anemia, Hemolytic / etiology. Anemia, Hemolytic / veterinary. Animals. Cats. Diagnosis, Differential. Disease Vectors. South Africa / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 15604490.001).
  • [ISSN] 0077-8923
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 24
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13. Ettinger SN: Principles of treatment for feline lymphoma. Clin Tech Small Anim Pract; 2003 May;18(2):98-102
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Principles of treatment for feline lymphoma.
  • Lymphoma is the most commonly diagnosed neoplasm in cats.
  • As feline leukemia virus antigenemia has decreased over the past 15 years, there has been a profound shift in the presence, signalment, and frequency of sites of feline lymphoma in North America.
  • There is variation in anatomic classification systems, but most studies have divided lymphoma into four groups: alimentary, mediastinal, multicentric, or extranodal.
  • Staging allows for evaluation of the extent of disease.
  • As in the dog, lymphoma is a systemic disease in the cat, and chemotherapy is the treatment of choice for most forms.
  • In contrast to canine lymphoma, feline lymphoma is generally more challenging and frustrating to treat than canine lymphoma.
  • Fortunately, cats treated with chemotherapy tend to have less toxicity than dogs.
  • Positive prognostic factors are feline leukemia virus-negative, clinically well at time of diagnosis, and response to therapy.
  • Unfortunately, response cannot be predicted before treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cat Diseases / drug therapy. Lymphoma / veterinary
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cats. Combined Modality Therapy / veterinary. Neoplasm Staging / veterinary. Veterinary Medicine

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  • (PMID = 12831069.001).
  • [ISSN] 1096-2867
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical techniques in small animal practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Tech Small Anim Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 26
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14. Mancianti F: [Feline leishmaniasis: what's the epidemiological role of the cat?]. Parassitologia; 2004 Jun;46(1-2):203-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Feline leishmaniasis: what's the epidemiological role of the cat?].
  • [Transliterated title] Leishmaniosi felina: quale ruolo epidemiologico?
  • Feline leishmaniasis (FL) is a quite uncommon feature.
  • Clinical disease has been described in cats since nineties begin.
  • A previous survey by means of IFAT in Liguria and Toscana on 110 and 158 feline sera respectively reports a seroprevalence of 0.9% with low titer, while sera from Sicily seem to be positive at higher dilutions.
  • PCR tests on feline blood samples are in progress, but preliminary results confirm the presence of leishmania DNA in such specimens.
  • Typical signs include nodular to ulcer or crusty lesions on the nose, lips, ears, eyelids, alopecia: clinical signs of cutaneous FL are unspecific and in endemic area this infection must be taken into account.
  • Visceral leishmaniasis is not common in cats: this form shows visceral involvement: liver and spleen are interested, with lymph nodes and kidney.
  • The cat probably has to considerate to play an active role in the disease, in contrast to goats, calves and horses who could act as accidental reservoirs of leishmania, while sheep appears to be not susceptible to experimental infection.
  • Equine leishmaniasis appears as a self-healing skin-dwelling disease, with a massive accumulation of parasites.
  • The animals do not often show detectable specific antibodies and recover without any chemotherapy.
  • Untreated affected cats can frequently die and we also observed lymph nodes and blood involvement indicating a spread of leishmania in feline hosts.
  • This species is believed to have a high degree of natural resistance, as observed following experimental infection.
  • Some of the affected cats were FIV and/or FeLV positive and these viroses such as stress may induce an impaired cellular immune response, even if leishmania infected cat was not submitted to CD4+, CD8+ lymphocyte counts nor other immunological test.
  • However the resistance of the cat to leishmania infection probably depends on genetic factors, not strictly related to cell mediated immunity, taking into account the high seroprevalence of FIV infections (30%) in our country versus the number of clinical cases.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cats / parasitology. Comorbidity. Disease Reservoirs. Disease Transmission, Infectious. Dog Diseases / epidemiology. Dog Diseases / parasitology. Dog Diseases / transmission. Dogs / parasitology. Global Health. Horse Diseases / epidemiology. Horse Diseases / parasitology. Horse Diseases / transmission. Horses / parasitology. Humans. Immunity, Innate. Immunocompromised Host. Ruminants / parasitology. Seroepidemiologic Studies. Zoonoses

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  • (PMID = 15305717.001).
  • [ISSN] 0048-2951
  • [Journal-full-title] Parassitologia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Parassitologia
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Number-of-references] 29
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15. Krick EL, Little L, Patel R, Shofer FS, Sorenmo K, Clifford CA, Baez JL: Description of clinical and pathological findings, treatment and outcome of feline large granular lymphocyte lymphoma (1996-2004). Vet Comp Oncol; 2008 Jun;6(2):102-10
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Description of clinical and pathological findings, treatment and outcome of feline large granular lymphocyte lymphoma (1996-2004).
  • Feline large granular lymphocyte (LGL) lymphoma is an uncommon, morphologically distinct variant of feline lymphoma.
  • Limited information exists in the literature regarding pathological and immunohistochemical descriptions, clinical findings, treatment and survival times.
  • The purpose of this study was to describe clinical features, treatment and outcome in feline LGL lymphoma.
  • Medical records of 45 cats with LGL lymphoma were retrospectively evaluated.
  • All cats tested for feline leukaemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus infection were negative.
  • One complete response and six partial responses were noted in the 23 cats that received chemotherapy as their initial treatment.
  • Median survival time for cats that were treated was 57 days.
  • Based on these results, feline LGL lymphoma appears to be minimally responsive to chemotherapy and is associated with a grave prognosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Cat Diseases / pathology. Lymphoma / veterinary. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / veterinary
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cats. Female. Immunohistochemistry / veterinary. Male. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19178669.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-5829
  • [Journal-full-title] Veterinary and comparative oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vet Comp Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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16. Zoia A, Hughes D, Connolly DJ: Pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade in a cat with extranodal lymphoma. J Small Anim Pract; 2004 Sep;45(9):467-71
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade in a cat with extranodal lymphoma.
  • Serum analysis for feline leukaemia virus antigen was positive.
  • Cytological evaluation of the pleural and pericardial effusions showed lymphoblastic cells indicative of disseminated lymphoma.
  • Following thoracocentesis and pericardiocentesis, the cat was treated for lymphoma using the University of Wisconsin-Madison chemotherapy protocol.
  • The cat was sent home after three days and, at the time of writing (six months after initial presentation), was still symptom free.
  • To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report confirming pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade in the cat as a direct result of an extranodal lymphoma with cytological evidence of neoplastic cells in the pericardial fluid.
  • [MeSH-major] Cardiac Tamponade / veterinary. Cat Diseases / diagnosis. Heart Neoplasms / veterinary. Lymphoma / veterinary. Pericardial Effusion / veterinary
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cats. Echocardiography / veterinary. Male. Pleural Effusion / etiology. Pleural Effusion / pathology. Pleural Effusion / veterinary. Radiography, Thoracic / veterinary. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15460206.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-4510
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of small animal practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Small Anim Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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17. Richter KP: Feline gastrointestinal lymphoma. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract; 2003 Sep;33(5):1083-98, vii
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Feline gastrointestinal lymphoma.
  • Gastrointestinal lymphoma is a common cause of anorexia and weight loss in older cats, with or without vomiting or diarrhea.
  • Most cats are feline leukemia virus-negative and feline immunodeficiency virus-negative.
  • Low-grade gastrointestinal lymphoma may be more common than previously thought, and these cats respond better to chemotherapy agents than cats with high-grade lymphoma.
  • The most significant prognostic indicator is initial response to chemotherapy, with cats that survive the initial induction period generally achieving long-term remission.
  • [MeSH-major] Cat Diseases / diagnosis. Cat Diseases / therapy. Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / veterinary. Lymphoma / veterinary

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  • (PMID = 14552162.001).
  • [ISSN] 0195-5616
  • [Journal-full-title] The Veterinary clinics of North America. Small animal practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vet. Clin. North Am. Small Anim. Pract.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 58
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18. Abramo F, Bastelli F, Nardoni S, Mancianti F: Feline cutaneous phaeohyphomycosis due to Cladophyalophora bantiana. J Feline Med Surg; 2002 Sep;4(3):157-63
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Feline cutaneous phaeohyphomycosis due to Cladophyalophora bantiana.
  • A case of feline cutaneous phaeohyphomycosis due to Cladophyalophora bantiana is described.
  • Pigmented, yeast-like fungus cells and hyphal elements were easily identified in haematoxylin-eosin stained tissue sections.
  • Cladophyalophora bantiana was isolated from a tissue specimen.
  • This organism, primarily known to cause cerebral infection in humans and cats, only rarely causes cutaneous infection.
  • Despite anti-fungal chemotherapy two relapses occurred.
  • The cat was feline immunodeficiency virus- and feline leukemia virus-negative and even if the owner was unaware of trauma, the hypothesis of wound contamination is the most likely.
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Animals. Antifungal Agents / administration & dosage. Antifungal Agents / therapeutic use. Cats. Diagnosis, Differential. Fluconazole / administration & dosage. Fluconazole / therapeutic use. Male. Nose

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002 ESFM and AAFP
  • (PMID = 12360955.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-612X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of feline medicine and surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Feline Med. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antifungal Agents; 8VZV102JFY / Fluconazole
  • [Number-of-references] 37
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19. Mylonakis ME, Petanides TA, Valli VE, Vernau W, Koytinas AF, Michael RS: Acute myelomonocytic leukaemia with short-term spontaneous remission in a cat. Aust Vet J; 2008 Jun;86(6):224-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Acute myelomonocytic leukaemia with short-term spontaneous remission in a cat.
  • A complete blood count (CBC) and a biochemistry profile showed leukocytosis, numerous blast cells in the peripheral blood, thrombocytopenia, hyperglobulinaemia and a positive test for feline leukaemia virus antigen.
  • A diagnosis of acute myelomonocytic leukaemia was made on the basis of the results of bone marrow cytology, histopathology, and immunochemistry (CD3, CD79a, lysozyme, and myeloperoxidase) tests.
  • Following an unexpected 1-month period of clinical and clinicopathological remission without chemotherapy, the cat relapsed and died 1 week later.
  • [MeSH-major] Cat Diseases / diagnosis. Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Acute / veterinary. Neoplasm Regression, Spontaneous

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  • (PMID = 18498558.001).
  • [ISSN] 0005-0423
  • [Journal-full-title] Australian veterinary journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Aust. Vet. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
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20. Riondato F, Gianella P, Guglielmino R, Cagnasso A, Bo S: Effects of interferon alpha (INF-alpha) therapy on peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets from FIV and FeLV naturally infected cats. Vet Res Commun; 2003 Sep;27 Suppl 1:429-32
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effects of interferon alpha (INF-alpha) therapy on peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets from FIV and FeLV naturally infected cats.
  • [MeSH-major] Cat Diseases / drug therapy. Feline Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome / drug therapy. Leukemia, Feline / drug therapy. Lymphocyte Subsets / drug effects. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / therapeutic use

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  • [Cites] J Biol Response Mod. 1988 Oct;7(5):513-23 [3183686.001]
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  • (PMID = 14535446.001).
  • [ISSN] 0165-7380
  • [Journal-full-title] Veterinary research communications
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vet. Res. Commun.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
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