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1. Mace J, Sybil Biermann J, Sondak V, McGinn C, Hayes C, Thomas D, Baker L: Response of extraabdominal desmoid tumors to therapy with imatinib mesylate. Cancer; 2002 Dec 1;95(11):2373-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Response of extraabdominal desmoid tumors to therapy with imatinib mesylate.
  • BACKGROUND: Desmoid tumor represents a rare monoclonal neoplasm arising from deep musculoaponeurotic structures and may occur sporadically or in association with the familial adenomatous polyposis and Gardner syndromes.
  • Desmoid tumors do not appear to demonstrate metastatic potential; however, local infiltrative growth results in significant morbidity and potential mortality.
  • Although the delineation of optimal therapy for desmoid tumors has been confounded by several factors, surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy for a positive surgical margin remains the standard approach.
  • METHODS: The authors performed immunohistochemical and qualitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis on nine desmoid tumor specimens that demonstrated consistent positivity for c-kit as well as PDGFR-alpha and PDGFR-beta.
  • At the time of last follow-up, 2 patients had received therapy with imatinib mesylate at a dose of 400 mg twice daily.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Imatinib mesylate has been reported to have activity against desmoid tumor, most likely because of c-kit and PDGFR receptor tyrosine kinase activity inhibition, and warrants further study.
  • In addition, the use of imatinib mesylate in the treatment of this neoplasm preferably should be in the context of a formal prospective clinical trial.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Fibroma / drug therapy. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / drug therapy. Piperazines / pharmacology. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit / biosynthesis. Pyrimidines / pharmacology. Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor beta / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Benzamides. Humans. Imatinib Mesylate. Male. Salvage Therapy. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2002 American Cancer Society.DOI 10.1002/cncr.11029
  • (PMID = 12436445.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Pyrimidines; 8A1O1M485B / Imatinib Mesylate; EC 2.7.10.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor beta
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2. Meazza C, Bisogno G, Gronchi A, Fiore M, Cecchetto G, Alaggio R, Milano GM, Casanova M, Carli M, Ferrari A: Aggressive fibromatosis in children and adolescents: the Italian experience. Cancer; 2010 Jan 1;116(1):233-40
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Aggressive fibromatosis in children and adolescents: the Italian experience.
  • BACKGROUND: Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) is a rare tumor of intermediate malignancy that has a strong potential for local invasiveness and recurrence.
  • METHODS: The authors retrospectively analyzed 94 patients aged < or =21 years, including 23 patients who underwent complete surgery (Group I), 42 patients who underwent incomplete surgery with microscopic residual tumor (Group II), and 29 patients who underwent either biopsy or macroscopically incomplete surgery (Group III).
  • Local recurrences developed in 22% of patients in Group I, in 76% of patients in Group II, and in 76% of patients in Group III.
  • Two of 7 patients with abdominal disease died of tumor progression, whereas none of the patients with extra-abdominal AF died of their disease.
  • Systemic treatment was given to 15 patients as first-line treatment and to 34 patients at time the time they developed recurrent disease: The response rate was 47% in the former patients and 50% in the latter patients.
  • Objective responses were observed in 11 of 19 patients who received combined methotrexate plus vinblastine/vinorelbine, in 7 of 15 patients who received alkylating-agent chemotherapy, and in 4 of 11 patients who received other therapies (tamoxifen, sulindac, interferon alfa).
  • Local recurrences did not affect the chance of responding to systemic therapy or the survival rate.
  • Good responses to systemic treatments, and particularly to low-dose chemotherapy, were observed as reported previously in adults.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Prognosis. Survival Rate. Vinblastine / administration & dosage. Vinblastine / analogs & derivatives

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 19950127.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; Q6C979R91Y / vinorelbine; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
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3. Fontanesi J, Mott MP, Lucas DR, Miller PR, Kraut MJ: The role of irradiation in the management of locally recurrent non-metastatic soft tissue sarcoma of extremity/trunkal locations. Sarcoma; 2004;8(2-3):57-61
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The role of irradiation in the management of locally recurrent non-metastatic soft tissue sarcoma of extremity/trunkal locations.
  • BACKGROUND: Patients who have had initial curative intent therapy for non-metastatic soft tissue sarcoma, and who subsequently relapse at the initial site without evidence of metastatic disease, have various options regarding local treatment.
  • The treatment options available will be determined by the extent of relapse, previous therapy rendered, and patient characteristics.
  • We reported on a series of 31 patients treated initially with only surgery for extremity/trunkal high-grade soft tissue sarcoma and then seen for recurrence at our institution between 1980 and 1999.
  • Local re-treatment consisted of combined modality therapy, most often aggressive surgical debulking/resection and irradiation, in an effort to reduce the need for amputation and, where anatomically allowable, to maintain a functional limb.
  • METHODS: Thirty-one patients with locally recurrent, non-metastatic high-grade soft tissue sarcoma, (excluding extraabdominal desmoid) were retrospectively reviewed to determine local control, survival, and complication rates associated with the relapsed disease.
  • All patients had multimodality re-treatment most often utilizing aggressive surgical debulking and irradiation.
  • Nine patients also received multi-agent, multi-cycle chemotherapy using various regimens.
  • In addition, the impact of surgical margin at the time of re-resection (gross versus microscopic disease), radiation treatment type, total radiation dose delivered, size of relapse, histological sub-type, sex and age, were evaluated to determine if they had any impact on the re-establishment of local control and subsequent survival.
  • Time to local failure following re-treatment ranged between 3 and 72 months following re-treatment (median=12 months).
  • Five patients had significant treatment related complications.
  • Two patients developed a soft tissue necrosis and one patient had a wound healing problem that resolved with conservative management.
  • No statistical significance in the development of local control could be found based on surgical margin status, total dose of irradiation (greater or less than 60 Gy), size of recurrence (greater than 5 cm), histological sub-type, sex, or age (greater than 50 years).
  • CONCLUSION: Selective locally recurrent, non-metastatic soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity/trunkal regions should still be considered eligible for aggressive limb-sparing therapy.
  • The role of chemotherapy in this group of patients remains investigational.
  • In a surprising finding, one patient re-relapsed in the re-treatment site at 72 months, thus justifying continued strict surveillance not only in the primary site but also for subsequent metastatic disease.

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  • (PMID = 18521396.001).
  • [ISSN] 1357-714X
  • [Journal-full-title] Sarcoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Sarcoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Egypt
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2395609
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4. Piza-Katzer H, Rhomberg M: [Extra-abdominal fibromatosis--extra-abdominal desmoid. Review and personal experiences]. Chirurg; 2000 Aug;71(8):904-11
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Extra-abdominal fibromatosis--extra-abdominal desmoid. Review and personal experiences].
  • [Transliterated title] Extra-abdominelle Fibromatose--extra-abdominelles Desmoid. Ubersicht und eigene Erfahrung.
  • Extraabdominal desmoids represent one group of deep fibromatoses.
  • While in former times surgery was thought to be the only kind of therapy, nowadays adjuvant procedures like radiation, hormonal therapy and also chemotherapy are becoming more and more important.
  • Amputation or other mutilating procedures should be done only if the tumor recurs repeatedly.
  • [MeSH-major] Fibromatosis, Abdominal / surgery. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Humans. Infant. Middle Aged. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 11013809.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-4722
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Chirurg; Zeitschrift für alle Gebiete der operativen Medizen
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chirurg
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY
  • [Number-of-references] 21
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5. Röpke M, Kalinski T, Wördehoff H, Aumann V, Bürger T: [Multicentric extra-abdominal fibromatosis: a rare case]. Z Orthop Ihre Grenzgeb; 2006 Mar-Apr;144(2):223-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Multicentric extra-abdominal fibromatosis: a rare case].
  • Extra-abdominal aggressive fibromatosis is a benign fibroblastic neoplasia with an infiltrative nature and a high tendency of local recurrence.
  • Here, we report on a very rare case of multicentric fibromatosis.
  • The aim of the multimodal treatment was a limb salvage procedure.
  • Adjuvant radiation therapy and chemotherapy was necessary because of the renunciation of wide resections in favour of the functionality of the limb.
  • [MeSH-major] Fibroma / diagnosis. Fibroma / surgery. Leg / surgery. Limb Salvage. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / diagnosis. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Abdomen. Adult. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Rare Diseases / diagnosis. Rare Diseases / surgery. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16625455.001).
  • [ISSN] 0044-3220
  • [Journal-full-title] Zeitschrift für Orthopädie und ihre Grenzgebiete
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Z Orthop Ihre Grenzgeb
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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6. Fontanesi J, Mott MP, Kraut MJ, Lucas DP, Miller PR: The role of postoperative irradiation in the treatment of locally recurrent incompletely resected extra-abdominal desmoid tumors. Sarcoma; 2004;8(2-3):83-6

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The role of postoperative irradiation in the treatment of locally recurrent incompletely resected extra-abdominal desmoid tumors.
  • BACKGROUND: To define the efficacy of postoperative irradiation in patients with recurrent extra-abdominal desmoid tumors in whom surgical intervention has resulted in microscopically or grossly positive surgical margins.
  • METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed on all patients referred to the department of radiation oncology at the Detroit Medical Center with a diagnosis of recurrent extra-abdominal desmoid tumor.
  • Three patients were noted to have multifocal disease at the time of initial representation.
  • Local control, survival, follow-up, and subsequent development of new tumors are measured from the last day of treatment with irradiation.
  • Seven patients had received chemotherapy/hormonal therapy prior to surgery and/or irradiation.
  • The most commonly used drug was tamoxifen (n=6).
  • The type of radiation delivered included external beam irradiation alone (n=3), combined external beam irradiation and brachytherapy (n=4), brachytherapy alone (n=3) and 252-Cf neutron brachytherapy alone (n=3).
  • No patient has died of tumor-related causes.
  • Salvage at the failed sites was possible in twom of three with re-irradiation using external neutrons and/or aggressive surgical intervention and systemic therapy.
  • In one site there was development soft tissue necrosis.
  • CONCLUSION: Based on our experience we recommend postoperative irradiation for all recurrent extra-abdominal desmoid lesions with microscopically or grossly positive surgical margins.
  • Furthermore, patients with recurrent desmoid tumors involving the bony structures of the hand or feet are poor candidates for brachytherapy alone.
  • For patients with extremity lesions, brachytherapy may be a reasonable treatment option provided adequate margins around the tumor bed are covered.

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  • (PMID = 18521399.001).
  • [ISSN] 1357-714X
  • [Journal-full-title] Sarcoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Sarcoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Egypt
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2395611
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7. Ioannou M, Demertzis N, Iakovidou I, Kottakis S: The role of imatinib mesylate in adjuvant therapy of extra-abdominal desmoid tumors. Anticancer Res; 2007 Mar-Apr;27(2):1143-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The role of imatinib mesylate in adjuvant therapy of extra-abdominal desmoid tumors.
  • BACKGROUND: Extra-abdominal desmoid tumors are rare neoplasms with variable biological behavior.
  • The mainstay of treatment is surgery.
  • Complementary treatment with tyrosine-kinase receptor inhibitor drugs, particularly imatinib mesylate, has been reported in the literature.
  • The purpose of this study was to determine the possible presence of tyrosine-kinase receptors in extra-abdominal desmoid tumors as a marker for imatinib mesylate therapy.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: From 1999 to 2004, immunohistochemical methods were carried-out in 14 patients with histologically confirmed extra-abdominal desmoid tumors to determine c-KIT positivity (existence of tyrosine-kinase receptors and PDGFRA and PDGFRB).
  • RESULTS: All desmoid tumors were c-KIT negative, which demonstrates absence of tyrosine-kinase receptors.
  • CONCLUSION: The histological c-KIT markup is an easy and reliable method that can detect whether a desmoid tumor is sensitive to additional treatment with a tyrosine-kinase receptor inhibitor.
  • Molecular biological analysis for the identification of KIT and PDGFR mutation should be performed before imatinib mesylate is included in any treatment protocol.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / drug therapy. Piperazines / therapeutic use. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 17465254.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Pyrimidines; 8A1O1M485B / Imatinib Mesylate; EC 2.7.10.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor alpha; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor beta
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8. Tanaka K, Yoshikawa R, Yanagi H, Gega M, Fujiwara Y, Hashimoto-Tamaoki T, Hirota S, Tsujimura T, Tomita N: Regression of sporadic intra-abdominal desmoid tumour following administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. World J Surg Oncol; 2008;6:17

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Regression of sporadic intra-abdominal desmoid tumour following administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug.
  • BACKGROUND: Desmoid tumours or fibromatoses are rare entities characterized by the benign proliferation of fibroblasts, which can be life-threatening due to their locally aggressive properties.
  • Surgery is widely accepted as the first line of treatment for extra-abdominal desmoids; however, it is not recommended for intra-abdominal desmoids because of the high-risk of recurrence and difficulties with the operation.
  • Here, we report on a patient with sporadic intra-abdominal desmoid tumours, who showed partial response following the intake of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.
  • Computed tomography showed an abnormal multilocular soft-tissue mass (95 x 70 mm) in the right pelvis, which was revealed by biopsy to be a desmoid tumour.
  • Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the tumour cells expressed vimentin, but not smooth-muscle actin, CD34, or desmin.
  • Non-cytotoxic treatment with etodolac (200 mg/day) was chosen because of the patient's age, lack of bowel obstruction, and the likelihood of prostate cancer.
  • Two years after the commencement of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration, computed tomography showed a decrease in tumour size (63 x 49 mm), and the disappearance of intratumoural septa.
  • CONCLUSION: Our case report suggests that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment should be taken into consideration for use as first-line treatment in patients with sporadic intra-abdominal desmoid tumours.
  • [MeSH-major] Abdominal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Fibromatosis, Abdominal / drug therapy. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Humans. Male. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18257933.001).
  • [ISSN] 1477-7819
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2270274
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9. Tamborini E, Negri T, Miselli F, Lagonigro MS, Pricl S, Pilotti S: Re: Response of a KIT-positive extra-abdominal fibromatosis to imatinib mesylate and KIT genetic analysis. J Natl Cancer Inst; 2006 Nov 1;98(21):1583-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Re: Response of a KIT-positive extra-abdominal fibromatosis to imatinib mesylate and KIT genetic analysis.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Fibroma / drug therapy. Mutation. Piperazines / therapeutic use. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit / genetics. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Alanine. Benzamides. Biomarkers, Tumor / genetics. Cysteine. Humans. Imatinib Mesylate. Leucine. Methionine. Mutagenesis. Polymorphism, Genetic. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentOn] J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006 Apr 19;98(8):562-3 [16622127.001]
  • (PMID = 17077361.001).
  • [ISSN] 1460-2105
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the National Cancer Institute
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Natl. Cancer Inst.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comment; Letter; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Pyrimidines; 8A1O1M485B / Imatinib Mesylate; AE28F7PNPL / Methionine; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit; GMW67QNF9C / Leucine; K848JZ4886 / Cysteine; OF5P57N2ZX / Alanine
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10. Al-Otaibi ML, Turcotte RE, Hings I, Beaudet J, Isler M, Nahal A, Wong C: Low-dose chemotherapy for extra-abdominal desmoid tumor. Saudi Med J; 2008 Dec;29(12):1730-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Low-dose chemotherapy for extra-abdominal desmoid tumor.
  • OBJECTIVE: To assess the outcome of patients with extra-abdominal desmoid tumor treated with low dose chemotherapy (methotrexate and vinblastine) both for tumor response and treatment related toxicity.
  • METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the outcome of 12 patients who underwent low dose chemotherapy for extra abdominal desmoid of different locations.
  • We evaluated the patients for their compliance, tumor response, complications of treatment, and impact of treatment on symptoms.
  • The mean tumor size was 11 cm (3-20 cm).
  • Chemotherapy was administered weekly.
  • CONCLUSION: Low dose chemotherapy was found to be a valuable adjunct to prevent local progression and improve symptoms.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Fibroma / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 19082222.001).
  • [ISSN] 0379-5284
  • [Journal-full-title] Saudi medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Saudi Med J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Saudi Arabia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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11. Saleh H, Kapadia R: Aspiration biopsy cytology of extraabdominal desmoid tumor concurrently occurring in a patient with tumoral calcinosis. Diagn Cytopathol; 2008 Sep;36(9):624-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Aspiration biopsy cytology of extraabdominal desmoid tumor concurrently occurring in a patient with tumoral calcinosis.
  • Extraabdominal fibromatosis or desmoid tumor (DT) is a slow growing locally aggressive soft tissue tumor that can occur anywhere in the body.
  • We report the aspiration biopsy cytology features of a case of DT of the right neck area in a 35-year-old man who had a long standing history of tumoral calcinosis.
  • The aspirate was interpreted as "benign spindle cell lesion" and confirmed as DT on histologic examination of the resected mass.
  • We discuss the possible differential diagnoses of other benign or malignant lesions on fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy and especially discuss the aspiration cytology features of DT compared with those of tumoral calcinosis.
  • We also discuss the value of immunohistochemical markers that help in differentiating DT from other entities.
  • [MeSH-major] Calcinosis / complications. Fibromatosis, Abdominal / complications. Fibromatosis, Abdominal / pathology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / complications. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 18677759.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0339
  • [Journal-full-title] Diagnostic cytopathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Diagn. Cytopathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / beta Catenin
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12. Skubitz KM, Manivel JC, Clohisy DR, Frolich JW: Response of imatinib-resistant extra-abdominal aggressive fibromatosis to sunitinib: case report and review of the literature on response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol; 2009 Aug;64(3):635-40
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Response of imatinib-resistant extra-abdominal aggressive fibromatosis to sunitinib: case report and review of the literature on response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors.
  • PURPOSE: Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) is usually a slowly growing locally invasive tumor, but may exhibit a much more aggressive phenotype.
  • The role of chemotherapy in AF is not well defined, but can be useful in some cases.
  • METHODS: We report a case of an aggressive multicentric extra-abdominal AF that was responsive to sunitinib, but resistant to imatinib.
  • RESULTS: A 23-year-old woman developed painful multifocal AF of both legs and gluteal muscles that progressed after surgery and treatment with methotrexate/vinblastine and pegylated-liposomal doxorubicin.
  • After 5 months, she developed progression and again received six cycles of IMV, with cessation of symptoms.
  • Although the AF was symptomatic and progressing, she was hesitant to receive chemotherapy and began treatment with sunitinib 50 mg/day for 28 days of a 42-day cycle.
  • After 13 months of sunitinib, therapy was changed to imatinib 400 mg/day; after 7 days she noticed increasing pain in the AF lesions and decreased knee flexibility.
  • [MeSH-major] Fibromatosis, Aggressive / drug therapy. Indoles / therapeutic use. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Pyrroles / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Benzamides. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Imatinib Mesylate. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Piperazines / therapeutic use. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19404642.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-0843
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer chemotherapy and pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Indoles; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Pyrimidines; 0 / Pyrroles; 0 / sunitinib; 8A1O1M485B / Imatinib Mesylate
  • [Number-of-references] 40
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13. Stengel G, Metze D, Dörflinger B, Luger TA, Böhm M: Treatment of extra-abdominal aggressive fibromatosis with pegylated interferon. J Am Acad Dermatol; 2008 Aug;59(2 Suppl 1):S7-9
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  • [Title] Treatment of extra-abdominal aggressive fibromatosis with pegylated interferon.
  • Aggressive fibromatosis (desmoid tumor) is a very rare neoplasm arising from the musculoaponeurotic structures.
  • We report on a young woman with a large desmoid tumor of the left foot.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / drug therapy. Foot. Interferon-alpha / administration & dosage. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Biopsy. Female. Humans. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Polyethylene Glycols. Recombinant Proteins. Severity of Illness Index

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  • (PMID = 18625396.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-6787
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Acad. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 0 / peginterferon alfa-2b; 30IQX730WE / Polyethylene Glycols; 99210-65-8 / interferon alfa-2b
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14. Mankin HJ, Hornicek FJ, Springfield DS: Extra-abdominal desmoid tumors: a report of 234 cases. J Surg Oncol; 2010 Oct 1;102(5):380-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Extra-abdominal desmoid tumors: a report of 234 cases.
  • BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: To report on the clinical presentation and outcome for 234 patients with extra-abdominal desmoids tumors.
  • METHODS: Since 1977, the authors have treated 234 patients with extra-abdominal desmoid tumors.
  • Thirty-seven had additional radiation and eight had chemotherapy.
  • Of great concern were 24 patients who developed multiple sites metachronously, which required further surgery and in many cases caused disability.
  • [MeSH-major] Fibromatosis, Abdominal / surgery. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / surgery. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Amputation / statistics & numerical data. Child. Combined Modality Therapy. Disabled Persons / statistics & numerical data. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Reoperation. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • [Copyright] J. Surg. Oncol. 2010;102:380-384. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 19877160.001).
  • [ISSN] 1096-9098
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. Baker LH, Wathen K, Chugh R, Thomas D, Thall PF, Maki RG, Samuels BL, Meyers PA, Priebat DA, Benjamin RS: Activity of imatinib mesylate in desmoid tumors: Interim analysis of a Sarcoma Alliance for Research thru Collaboration (SARC) phase II trial. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9013

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Activity of imatinib mesylate in desmoid tumors: Interim analysis of a Sarcoma Alliance for Research thru Collaboration (SARC) phase II trial.
  • : 9013 Background: Desmoid tumors (aggressive fibromatosis) are rare clonal neoplastic proliferations of connective tissues.
  • Standard treatment involves wide surgical resection and/or radiation therapy.
  • In cases of unresectable or recurrent disease, tamoxifen, chemotherapy, and NSAIDs have been used with varying success.
  • We and others have previously reported desmoid tumors expressing c-kit, PDGFRα, and/or PDGFR.
  • We reported two patients with extraabdominal desmoid tumors treated with the selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib (Gleevec) with significant shrinkage.
  • SARC, in association with the Connective Tissue Oncology Society, initiated a prospective phase II trial in patients with desmoid tumors, or one of nine sarcoma subtypes.
  • Here, we report specifically on patients with desmoid tumors.
  • METHODS: Patients ≥ 10 years old with desmoid tumors that were not curable by surgical management or in whom curative surgery would lead to undesirable functional impairment were eligible.
  • Rules for early termination within each disease type were based on a hierarchical Bayesian probability model accounting for correlation of the responses of the 10 disease types.
  • Tissue specimens were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for expression of c-kit, PDGFRα, PDGFRß, AKT, PTEN, FKHR, and beta catenin.
  • Tumor DNA was analyzed for PDGFRα exon 18 and APC mutations by allelic discrimination PCR.
  • RESULTS: 26 patients with desmoid tumors have been enrolled with 22 currently evaluable.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Imatinib appears to be a promising agent in the management of unresectable or difficult to resect desmoid tumors.

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  • (PMID = 28013675.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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16. Tomasevic ZM, Ristic D: Therapy of aggressive fibromatosis is still an open question: A series of patients treated at a single institution. J Clin Oncol; 2004 Jul 15;22(14_suppl):9060

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Therapy of aggressive fibromatosis is still an open question: A series of patients treated at a single institution.
  • : 9060 Background: Aggressive fibromatosis is a rare, variable disease with several different clinical entities (abdominal, extra-abdominal, etc.).
  • The potential morbidity of surgery and radiotherapy and the high local recurrence have lead investigators to assess the role of non-cytotoxic and cytotoxic chemotherapy in settings in which surgery and radiotherapy are either not possible or unsuccessful.
  • METHODS: We reported a series of patients with inoperable, deep extra-abdominal aggressive fibromatosis, treated with combination of chemo-hormonal therapy.
  • Therapy consisted of six cycles standard CVP regimen, followed by tamoxifen, 20 mg daily.
  • Extremities, was the most frequent localization (5/9); chest wall in 3 and abdominal wall in one patient.
  • Tumor size in most patients was 5-10 cm, and three patients had bulky disease (over 10 cm).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Systemic treatment should be considered in patients with aggressive fibromatosis for whom local treatment approaches are primary not possible or have failed.

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  • (PMID = 28014083.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Kujak JL, Liu PT, Johnson GB, Callstrom MR: Early experience with percutaneous cryoablation of extra-abdominal desmoid tumors. Skeletal Radiol; 2010 Feb;39(2):175-82
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Early experience with percutaneous cryoablation of extra-abdominal desmoid tumors.
  • OBJECTIVE: Surgical resection, radiation therapy and chemotherapy are all accepted as standard treatments for extra-abdominal desmoid (EAD) tumors, but their effectiveness has been limited by frequent local recurrence.
  • The purpose of this article is to describe our early experiences with using percutaneous cryoablation for local control of extra-abdominal desmoid tumors in five patients whose tumors had failed to respond to standard therapy.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a retrospective search of our institution's radiology database for patients who had undergone percutaneous cryoablation for treatment of EAD tumors between June 2004 and July 2007, we identified five patients (three female and two male).
  • Three of these patients had been referred for cryoablation for local tumor control, and two had been referred for palliation of inoperable tumors.
  • The age range of the patients at the time of cryoablation was 9-41 years.
  • RESULTS: For the three patients referred for local control of EAD tumors, complete tumor coverage with the ablation zones was achieved.
  • The third patient, with a 6.1 cm mass, reported improved mild pain at 6 months, and imaging showed a moderate decrease of tumor size.
  • For the two patients referred for palliative therapy, initial partial pain relief was felt 2 weeks after the procedure, At long-term (58 months) follow-up of one patient with a 9.1 cm mass, the tumor was still present although reduced in size, and local pain had returned to its former moderate level.
  • In the other patient who underwent only partial treatment of a 10.0 cm mass, at long-term follow-up (36 months) the mass had enlarged and pain had returned to the pretreatment, moderate level.
  • CONCLUSION: Cryoablation appears to be an effective alternative treatment for the achievement of local control of small and moderately sized EAD tumors, but it is likely of limited use in patients with larger tumors that have untreatable regions due to involvement of vital structures.
  • Continued research evaluating cryoablation for the treatment of EAD tumors is needed.
  • [MeSH-major] Cryosurgery / methods. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / diagnosis. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Abdominal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Abdominal Neoplasms / surgery. Adolescent. Adult. Child. Female. Humans. Male. Pilot Projects. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19768644.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-2161
  • [Journal-full-title] Skeletal radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Skeletal Radiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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18. Rosato L, Mondini G, Serbelloni M, Bertone P, Orlassino R, Cossavella D: [Intra-abdominal desmoid tumors: rare but important disease]. G Chir; 2007 Jan-Feb;28(1-2):20-4

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Intra-abdominal desmoid tumors: rare but important disease].
  • Desmoid tumors are rare benign neoplasms with high tendency to local recurrence, and they can be divided into extra- and intra-abdominal types (mesenteric fibromatosis).
  • Six patients (3 men and 3 women) affected by extra-abdominal desmoid tumors have been treated with radical excision.
  • In two patients desmoid was intra-abdominal:.
  • 2) 52 years old man, submitted to an elective excision of a capsulated neoplasm of the little omentum, which had caused an oppressive abdominal pain.
  • In both cases the hystological diagnosis has been desmoid tumor.
  • Surgical treatment of desmoid tumors must aim at radical excision to avoid frequent recurrences (25-65%); these have stimulated the research of other kinds of treatments, since a new surgical operation itself can lead to a further recurrence.
  • Radiotherapy has been investigated with results in 79-96% of cases, antiestrogenic therapy has been used with success in 51% of patients, and high dose tamoxifen seemed to obtain a stable disease in non operable cases.
  • Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been experimented in association with tamoxifen and chemotherapy.
  • Conclusive results on the efficacy of these treatments have not been obtained yet, because of the rarity of the desmoid tumors even in greater Centres.
  • [MeSH-major] Fibromatosis, Abdominal / surgery. Mesentery. Peritoneal Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Abdominal Neoplasms / pathology. Abdominal Neoplasms / surgery. Aged. Female. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / surgery. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17313728.001).
  • [ISSN] 0391-9005
  • [Journal-full-title] Il Giornale di chirurgia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] G Chir
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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19. Leithner A, Schnack B, Katterschafka T, Wiltschke C, Amann G, Windhager R, Kotz R, Zielinski CC: Treatment of extra-abdominal desmoid tumors with interferon-alpha with or without tretinoin. J Surg Oncol; 2000 Jan;73(1):21-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment of extra-abdominal desmoid tumors with interferon-alpha with or without tretinoin.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Surgery is the main treatment for extra-abdominal desmoid tumors, but the results of further management remain uncertain.
  • Therefore, a retrospective analysis was undertaken to evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of treatment with interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) +/- tretinoin in this setting.
  • METHODS: Thirteen patients with extra-abdominal desmoid tumors and a median age of 32 years (range, 15-73) received IFN-alpha.
  • RESULTS: After a mean observation period of 27 +/- 15 months (mean +/- standard deviation) under treatment with IFN-alpha +/- tretinoin, local control was seen in 11 of 13 patients (85%).
  • In another four patients, progression of the desmoid tumor was stabilized.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The data of this retrospective, nonrandomized study on therapy with IFN-alpha +/- tretinoin suggest that such treatment may be effective in prolonging the disease-free interval of patients after intralesional or marginal surgery.
  • Because of the encouraging response rate, this regimen appears to be another nonsurgical treatment alternative.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / drug therapy. Interferon-alpha / administration & dosage. Tretinoin / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Disease Progression. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 10649274.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-4790
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 5688UTC01R / Tretinoin
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20. Sinha A, Gibbons DC, Phillips RK, Clark S: Surgical prophylaxis in familial adenomatous polyposis: do pre-existing desmoids outside the abdominal cavity matter? Fam Cancer; 2010 Sep;9(3):407-11
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Surgical prophylaxis in familial adenomatous polyposis: do pre-existing desmoids outside the abdominal cavity matter?
  • Desmoid tumours (DT) are myofibroblastic proliferations found in 10-25% of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients, either intra-abdominally (IA), in the abdominal wall (AW) or elsewhere (extra-abdominal (EA)).
  • Most DT occur following prophylactic colectomy but occasionally patients present with pre-operative DT.
  • Mutations 3' to codon 1444, predispose to DT and attenuated phenotype, leading to a potential strategy of delaying surgery in patients at high risk of DT.
  • Here we assess if the existence of a pre-operative AW-DT or EA-DT predisposes to IA-DT following laparotomy.
  • Patients were stratified into those having no DT, EA-DT or AW-DT pre-operatively.
  • 587 FAP patients were identified; nine discovered with IA-DT intra-operatively were excluded.
  • 5(0.9%) and 6(1%) of the remainder had a pre-operative EA-DT and AW-DT, respectively; one (0.2%) had both.
  • Six of these 12 developed a post-operative IA-DT.
  • 566(98%) had no pre-operative DT, 50(9%) of these developed IA-DT post-operatively; median time to tumour was 2 (IQR, 1-3.5) years.
  • A pre-operative AW-DT predisposed to IA-DT post-operatively (RR = 7.6, 95% CI 4.0-14.1, P = 0.0009) whilst EA-DT did not (RR = 2.3, 0.4-13.3, P = 0.38).
  • A 3' mutation was significantly associated with post-operative IA-DT in the 'no pre-operative DT' group (P = 0.002).
  • The presence of a DT external to the abdominal cavity pre-operatively, poses a clinical challenge with regards to surgical decision-making.
  • Patients with an AW-DT pre-operatively may warrant a conservative surgical approach, to minimize post-operative IA-DT risk.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenomatous Polyposis Coli / complications. Adenomatous Polyposis Coli / surgery. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / complications

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  • (PMID = 20428953.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-7292
  • [Journal-full-title] Familial cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Fam. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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21. Fimmanò A, Coppola Bottazzi E, Cirillo C, Tammaro P, Casazza D: [Desmoid tumor of the chest wall foiling surgery]. Ann Ital Chir; 2006 Mar-Apr;77(2):169-72; discussion 172
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Desmoid tumor of the chest wall foiling surgery].
  • CASE REPORT: The patient was subjected to laboratory tests, which showed nothing pathological, and to instrumental tests (RX and TAC of the chest, bony scintigraphy) which showed a roundish solid tumefaction, with no "secondary" interest of bony tissue.
  • The anatomo-pathological test showed a desmoid fibromatosis (desmoid tumor) extra-abdominal (12.5 x 9 x 5 cm).
  • About this kind of neoplastic masses, the risk of post-surgical relapse is very high; so many Authors consider opportune a radio-chemical adjuvant therapy.
  • In this case, the radical excision allowed the Authors to avoid the post surgery pharmacological treatment and to get no relapses after two years from the operation.
  • [MeSH-major] Fibromatosis, Aggressive / surgery. Thoracic Wall
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Thoracotomy. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 17147093.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-469X
  • [Journal-full-title] Annali italiani di chirurgia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Ital Chir
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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22. Lefevre JH, Parc Y, Kernéis S, Goasguen N, Benis M, Parc R, Tiret E: Risk factors for development of desmoid tumours in familial adenomatous polyposis. Br J Surg; 2008 Sep;95(9):1136-9
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  • [Title] Risk factors for development of desmoid tumours in familial adenomatous polyposis.
  • BACKGROUND: Desmoid tumours (DTs) are the primary cause of death of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) following restorative proctocolectomy.
  • The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for DT in a French population.
  • DT sites were mesenteric (73 tumours), abdominal wall (44) and extra-abdominal (seven).
  • Female patients developed DT earlier than males.
  • Although DTs appeared after colectomy in 34 patients, the type of surgery did not influence the risk of DT.
  • Belonging to a family affected by DT did not increase the individual's risk in this population.
  • CONCLUSION: No risk factor for life-threatening mesenteric DT could meaningfully modify the management of patients with FAP.
  • [MeSH-major] Abdominal Neoplasms / etiology. Adenomatous Polyposis Coli / complications. Fibromatosis, Abdominal / etiology. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / etiology. Proctocolectomy, Restorative

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  • (PMID = 18581438.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2168
  • [Journal-full-title] The British journal of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br J Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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23. Soravia C, Berk T, McLeod RS, Cohen Z: Desmoid disease in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis. Dis Colon Rectum; 2000 Mar;43(3):363-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Desmoid disease in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis.
  • PURPOSE: The aim of this retrospective study was to review the clinical features, and surgical and medical management of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis-associated desmoid tumors.
  • METHODS: From 1980 to 1997, 97 of 780 patients with familial adenomatous polyposis developed desmoid disease.
  • Risk factors for desmoid disease, such as prior surgery, age at desmoid tumor diagnosis, pregnancy, and family history were sought.
  • The outcome after noncytotoxic and cytotoxic therapy was evaluated with respect to improvement of symptoms.
  • A family history of desmoid tumors was found in 41 patients (42 percent), and a history of pregnancy was documented in 33 females (56 percent).
  • One-half of the desmoids were located in the mesentery, and 32 percent were located in the mesentery and the abdominal wall.
  • Desmoids developed after colectomy in 77 cases (80 percent), after a mean time of 4.6 years.
  • Partial resection of desmoid tumor was performed in 46 patients (47 percent), resection of extra-abdominal desmoid tumors was performed in 17 cases (17 percent), and biopsy only was performed in 34 patients (35 percent).
  • Postoperative morbidity was 23 percent after desmoid tumor resection.
  • Eight patients (8 percent) died of their intra-abdominal desmoid.
  • Mean follow-up time was 5.3 years.
  • Sulindac, tamoxifen, or toremifene therapy was able to alleviate symptoms in only 4 of 31 patients.
  • Symptomatic improvement was noted after chemotherapy in six of ten patients with extremely complex desmoids.
  • CONCLUSION: Desmoid disease was found in 12.4 percent of our patients with familial adenomatous polyposis.
  • Noncytotoxic therapy was not effective for progressive desmoid tumors, whereas chemotherapy was effective in aggressive cases of intra-abdominal desmoid tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenomatous Polyposis Coli / genetics. Fibromatosis, Abdominal / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Intestinal Obstruction / drug therapy. Intestinal Obstruction / genetics. Intestinal Obstruction / mortality. Intestinal Obstruction / surgery. Male. Middle Aged. Pregnancy. Prognosis. Survival Rate


24. Seow-Choen F: The management of desmoids in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Acta Chir Iugosl; 2008;55(3):83-7
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  • This risk is about 852 times the risk for the population at large.
  • Desmoids in FAP may occur extra-abdominally, or within the abdominal wall or most commonly intra-abdominally within the mesentery or retroperitoneal.
  • Simple drug treatment with tamoxifen or NSAIDS like sulindac should be used as first line treatment as it carries a response in 30-50% of patients.
  • Surgery should be reserved for extra-abdominal tumours alone and only when needed.
  • Surgery for intra-abdominal desmoids should really only be attempted for intestinal obstruction or ureteric obstruction.
  • Dacarbazine-Doxorubicin chemotherapy may have dramatic response in some cases.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenomatous Polyposis Coli / complications. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / therapy

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  • (PMID = 19069698.001).
  • [ISSN] 0354-950X
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta chirurgica Iugoslavica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Chir Iugosl
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Serbia
  • [Number-of-references] 21
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25. Pikaar A, Nortier JW, Griffioen G, Vasen HF: [Desmoid tumors in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis]. Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd; 2002 Jul 20;146(29):1355-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Desmoid tumors in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis].
  • Desmoid tumours (DT) are slow-growing tumours that consist of proliferations of well-differentiated fibroblasts.
  • The prevalence of desmoid tumours in patients with FAP is 7-12%.
  • The lifetime risk of developing desmoid tumours is about 20%.
  • In FAP, most tumours are intra-abdominal or located in the abdominal wall.
  • Next to colorectal cancer, desmoid tumours are the most frequent cause of death in FAP.
  • Possible risk factors for the development of desmoid tumours are previous surgical procedures, pregnancy, female sex, a family history of desmoid tumours, and specific mutations in the APC-gene.
  • An excision biopsy is needed to establish the diagnosis.
  • Medicinal treatment with NSAIDs is the treatment of first choice, followed by hormonal treatment (e.g., tamoxifen) in combination with NSAIDs.
  • Both forms of treatment lead to a response in about 30-50% of the patients.
  • Surgery is the preferred treatment for extra-abdominal tumours or tumours located in the abdominal wall.
  • Surgical treatment of intra-abdominal tumours is only indicated in patients with obstruction of the bowel or ureter.
  • Chemotherapy is indicated in patients with progressive desmoid tumours when non-cytotoxic treatment has failed.
  • Radiotherapy may play a role in the treatment of irresectable extra-abdominal or abdominal wall tumours, or as adjuvant treatment of tumours with positive margins.
  • [MeSH-major] Abdominal Neoplasms / epidemiology. Adenomatous Polyposis Coli / complications. Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Genes, APC. Humans. Male. Mutation. Pregnancy. Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic / diagnosis. Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic / epidemiology. Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic / etiology. Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic / therapy. Prevalence. Risk Factors. Sex Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12162172.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-2162
  • [Journal-full-title] Nederlands tijdschrift voor geneeskunde
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd
  • [Language] dut
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal
  • [Number-of-references] 28
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26. Pakos EE, Tsekeris PG, Goussia AC: Desmoid tumours of the extremities and trunk: a review of the literature. Int Orthop; 2005 Aug;29(4):210-3

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Desmoid tumours of the extremities and trunk: a review of the literature.
  • Desmoid tumours are rare neoplasms that display local aggressiveness but no propensity to metastasise.
  • They are mainly localized in the abdominal wall, the bowel, and the mesentery or in extra-abdominal sites such as the trunk and the extremities.
  • Surgical resection is the main treatment modality in extremities and trunk, with the optional combination of radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Fibromatosis, Aggressive / diagnosis. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / surgery. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / diagnosis. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 15900438.001).
  • [ISSN] 0341-2695
  • [Journal-full-title] International orthopaedics
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27. Dequanter D, Gebhart M: [Desmoids tumors]. J Chir (Paris); 2002 Sep;139(4):236-9

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Desmoid tumor can be defined as a pseudoencapsulated infiltrative growth of well-differentiated collagenous fibroblasts and fibrocytes arising either in fascia or musculoaponeurotic structures.
  • The etiology of desmoid tumors is poorly defined.
  • Desmoid tumors of the anterior abdominal wall are much less common than extra-abdominal desmoids; they may occur at any age but are most common in the third and fourth decades.
  • Although both sexes may be affected, abdominal desmoids predominate in females, particularly in females of childbearing age.
  • Extra-abdominal desmoids, which most commonly occur on the back, chest wall, head and neck, or lower extremity, have a male predominance.
  • The primary consideration in surgical treatment of desmoid tumors should be the prevention of local recurrence.
  • There is no clear evidence that irradiation or chemotherapy are effective in controlling desmoid tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Fibromatosis, Abdominal. Fibromatosis, Aggressive
  • [MeSH-minor] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Male. Risk Factors. Sex Distribution. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 12410144.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-7697
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal de chirurgie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Chir (Paris)
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 19
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28. Leithner A, Gapp M, Radl R, Pascher A, Krippl P, Leithner K, Windhager R, Beham A: Immunohistochemical analysis of desmoid tumours. J Clin Pathol; 2005 Nov;58(11):1152-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Immunohistochemical analysis of desmoid tumours.
  • BACKGROUND/AIMS: Although the standard treatment for desmoid tumours is complete surgical resection with wide margins, the optimal adjuvant treatment for recurrent or inoperable disease is unclear, often being based on sporadic immunohistochemical reports with a low number of cases.
  • Therefore, a large immunohistochemical study was performed, to provide a theoretical basis for adjuvant treatment regimens.
  • METHODS: One hundred and sixteen tissue samples from 80 patients (49 female, 31 male; mean age, 34 years; range, 0-83) with desmoid tumours (46 extra-abdominal, 21 abdominal, 13 intra-abdominal) were tested for oestrogen receptors alpha and beta, progesterone and androgen receptors, and somatostatin, in addition to HER2, cathepsin D, Ki-67, and c-KIT by immunohistochemistry.
  • Positive staining for the androgen receptor was found in six extra-abdominal cases.
  • Staining for oestrogen receptor beta was positive in four extra-abdominal, two abdominal, and one intra-abdominal case.
  • Staining for somatostatin was positive in six extra-abdominal, two abdominal, and one intra-abdominal case, and staining for cathepsin D was positive in all cases.
  • Positive staining for Ki-67 was found in 14 extra-abdominal, three abdominal, and three intra-abdominal cases.
  • C-KIT was detectable in one abdominal case only.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The data from this immunohistochemical study show that the published effects of antioestrogens and imatinib mesylate in the treatment of aggressive fibromatoses may not be attributable to oestrogen receptor alpha or c-KIT expression.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / metabolism. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Abdominal Neoplasms / chemistry. Abdominal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Abdominal Neoplasms / pathology. Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Cathepsin D / analysis. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Ki-67 Antigen / analysis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Proteins / analysis. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit / analysis. Receptors, Androgen / analysis. Receptors, Estrogen / analysis. Receptors, Progesterone / analysis. Somatostatin / analysis

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  • (PMID = 16254103.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-9746
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Ki-67 Antigen; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / Receptors, Androgen; 0 / Receptors, Estrogen; 0 / Receptors, Progesterone; 51110-01-1 / Somatostatin; EC 2.7.10.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit; EC 3.4.23.5 / Cathepsin D
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1770757
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29. Nishida Y, Tsukushi S, Shido Y, Wasa J, Ishiguro N, Yamada Y: Successful treatment with meloxicam, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, of patients with extra-abdominal desmoid tumors: a pilot study. J Clin Oncol; 2010 Feb 20;28(6):e107-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Successful treatment with meloxicam, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, of patients with extra-abdominal desmoid tumors: a pilot study.
  • [MeSH-major] Cyclooxygenase 2 / chemistry. Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / drug therapy. Thiazines / therapeutic use. Thiazoles / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 20026797.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Letter
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors; 0 / Thiazines; 0 / Thiazoles; 71125-38-7 / meloxicam; EC 1.14.99.1 / Cyclooxygenase 2
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