[X] Close
You are about to erase all the values you have customized, search history, page format, etc.
Click here to RESET all values       Click here to GO BACK without resetting any value
Items 1 to 20 of about 20
1. Shih CS, Hale GA, Gronewold L, Tong X, Laningham FH, Gilger EA, Srivastava DK, Kun LE, Gajjar A, Fouladi M: High-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue for children with recurrent malignant brain tumors. Cancer; 2008 Mar 15;112(6):1345-53
Faculty of 1000. commentaries/discussion - See the articles recommended by F1000Prime's Faculty of more than 8,000 leading experts in Biology and Medicine. (subscription/membership/fee required).

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] High-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue for children with recurrent malignant brain tumors.
  • BACKGROUND: High-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) with autologous stem cell rescue (ASCR) has been reported to be effective in treating children with recurrent central nervous system (CNS) malignancies.
  • METHODS: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicities of HDCT and ASCR, the medical records of 27 children with recurrent CNS malignancies who received such therapy at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital between 1989 and 2004 were reviewed.
  • Diagnoses included medulloblastoma (13 patients), primitive neuroectodermal tumor (3 patients), pineoblastoma (2 patients), atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (2 patients), ependymoma (3 patients), anaplastic astrocytoma (2 patients), and glioblastoma multiforme (2 patients).
  • Among the 6 long-term survivors (5 with M0 disease and 1 with M3 disease at diagnosis), 5 received both radiotherapy and HDCT as part of their salvage regimen; 4 were aged<3 years at diagnosis and had received chemotherapy only as part of frontline therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Brain Neoplasms / therapy. Stem Cell Transplantation
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Ependymoma / diagnosis. Ependymoma / therapy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Glioblastoma / diagnosis. Humans. Infant. Male. Medulloblastoma / pathology. Medulloblastoma / therapy. Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive / diagnosis. Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive / therapy. Pinealoma / pathology. Pinealoma / therapy. Retrospective Studies. Rhabdoid Tumor / pathology. Rhabdoid Tumor / therapy. Salvage Therapy. Survival Rate. Transplantation, Autologous. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Brain Tumors.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Childhood Brain Tumors.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov. clinical trials - ClinicalTrials.gov .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2008 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 18224664.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R25 CA023944; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 21765
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


2. de Bont JM, Packer RJ, Michiels EM, den Boer ML, Pieters R: Biological background of pediatric medulloblastoma and ependymoma: a review from a translational research perspective. Neuro Oncol; 2008 Dec;10(6):1040-60
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Biological background of pediatric medulloblastoma and ependymoma: a review from a translational research perspective.
  • Survival rates of pediatric brain tumor patients have significantly improved over the years due to developments in diagnostic techniques, neurosurgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and supportive care.
  • However, brain tumors are still an important cause of cancer-related deaths in children.
  • Prognosis is still highly dependent on clinical characteristics, such as the age of the patient, tumor type, stage, and localization, but increased knowledge about the genetic and biological features of these tumors is being obtained and might be useful to further improve outcome for these patients.
  • It has become clear that the deregulation of signaling pathways essential in brain development, for example, sonic hedgehog (SHH), Wnt, and Notch pathways, plays an important role in pathogenesis and biological behavior, especially for medulloblastomas.
  • More recently, data have become available about the cells of origin of brain tumors and the possible existence of brain tumor stem cells.
  • Newly developed array-based techniques for studying gene expression, protein expression, copy number aberrations, and epigenetic events have led to the identification of other potentially important biological abnormalities in pediatric medulloblastomas and ependymomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / genetics. Ependymoma / genetics. Medulloblastoma / genetics

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Ependymoma.
  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Medulloblastoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Brain Tumors.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Childhood Brain Tumors.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Mod Pathol. 2000 May;13(5):548-53 [10824927.001]
  • [Cites] J Med Genet. 2000 Jul;37(7):501-9 [10882752.001]
  • [Cites] Genes Dev. 2000 Aug 1;14(15):1837-51 [10921899.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 2000 Aug;121(1):67-72 [10958944.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 2000 Sep;93(3):437-48 [10969942.001]
  • [Cites] J Biol Chem. 2000 Sep 15;275(37):28341-4 [10884376.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2000 Sep 20;89(5):395-402 [11008200.001]
  • [Cites] Physiol Genomics. 1999 Aug 31;1(2):83-91 [11015565.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 2000 Sep 21;19(40):4604-10 [11030149.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Neurosci. 2000 Nov;3(11):1091-7 [11036265.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2000 Nov 9;343(19):1350-4 [11070098.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 2000 Sep;121(2):223-7 [11063814.001]
  • [Cites] J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 2000 Oct;59(10):857-65 [11079775.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 2000 Oct 1;122(1):18-25 [11104027.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Pathol. 2000 Dec;53(6):313-9 [11193050.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Dev Pathol. 2001 Jan-Feb;4(1):23-31 [11200487.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2000 Dec;102(4):203-209 [11154805.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2001 Jan 15;61(2):513-6 [11212243.001]
  • [Cites] Cell Mol Life Sci. 1999 Oct 30;56(5-6):523-37 [11212302.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Pathol. 2001 Mar;158(3):1137-43 [11238062.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2001 Mar 15;91(6):803-8 [11275983.001]
  • [Cites] Brain Pathol. 2001 Apr;11(2):133-43 [11303789.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 2001 May;94(5):799-805 [11354413.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2001 Aug 1;93(3):445-9 [11433413.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 2001 Jun 28;20(29):3857-68 [11439349.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Pathol. 2001 Aug;54(4):227-9 [11477136.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2001 Aug 1;19(15):3470-6 [11481352.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 2001 Aug;7(8):2425-33 [11489822.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 2001 Aug 16;20(36):5033-42 [11526488.001]
  • [Cites] Acta Neuropathol. 2001 Sep;102(3):271-7 [11585252.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2001 Oct 1;61(19):7039-43 [11585731.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 2001 Oct 1;130(1):79-83 [11672779.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 2001 Nov;131(1):1-12 [11734311.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer. 2002 Jan;38(1):83-91 [11750844.001]
  • [Cites] Brain Pathol. 2002 Jan;12(1):36-44 [11770900.001]
  • [Cites] Nature. 2002 Jan 24;415(6870):436-42 [11807556.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 2002 Feb 21;21(9):1461-8 [11857089.001]
  • [Cites] Neuro Oncol. 2002 Apr;4(2):115-22 [11916503.001]
  • [Cites] Genes Dev. 2002 Apr 1;16(7):846-58 [11937492.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Pathol. 2002 Dec;161(6):2133-41 [12466129.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 2002 Oct 15;138(2):107-10 [12505253.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2003 Jan 1;63(1):140-8 [12517790.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 2003 Jan 30;22(4):632-6 [12555076.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2003 Jan 13;88(1):109-14 [12556968.001]
  • [Cites] Semin Cell Dev Biol. 2003 Apr;14(2):113-9 [12651094.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2003 Apr 15;21(8):1581-91 [12697884.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 2004 Apr 22;23(19):3444-53 [15064731.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 2004 Feb;149(1):44-52 [15104282.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2004 Jul 1;110(4):542-9 [15122586.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2004 May 1;64(9):3103-11 [15126347.001]
  • [Cites] J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 2004 May;63(5):441-9 [15198123.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Surg Pathol. 2004 Jul;28(7):914-20 [15223962.001]
  • [Cites] Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Jul 20;101(29):10833-8 [15249678.001]
  • [Cites] Oncol Rep. 2004 Sep;12(3):663-6 [15289853.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Cell. 2004 Sep;6(3):229-40 [15380514.001]
  • [Cites] Neuropathol Appl Neurobiol. 2004 Oct;30(5):532-9 [15488029.001]
  • [Cites] Neurosci Lett. 2004 Nov 11;370(2-3):180-5 [15488319.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 1988 Feb;30(2):289-93 [3342386.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Dis Child. 1988 Sep;63(9):1012-5 [3178262.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 1989 Oct 15;44(4):579-81 [2793229.001]
  • [Cites] Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 1989 Nov;1(2):139-47 [2487154.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1991 Sep 1;51(17):4721-3 [1873817.001]
  • [Cites] Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1991 Sep 1;88(17):7825-9 [1679237.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 1992 Feb;58(2):109-20 [1551072.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 1992 Mar;59(1):12-9 [1313329.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Neurosurg. 1991-1992;17(2):57-65 [1815730.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Neurosurg. 1999 Jul;31(1):27-32 [10545819.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Cell. 1999 Oct;4(4):487-98 [10549281.001]
  • [Cites] Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2000 Jan;27(1):44-51 [10564585.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 1999 Dec;81(7):1150-4 [10584875.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 1999 Dec;115(2):96-9 [10598140.001]
  • [Cites] Pathology. 1999 Nov;31(4):337-44 [10643003.001]
  • [Cites] Neurosurgery. 1996 Jul;39(1):135-40 [8805149.001]
  • [Cites] Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 1996 Jul;16(3):196-203 [8814453.001]
  • [Cites] Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 1996 Sep;17(1):37-44 [8889505.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 1996 Oct 1;91(1):13-27 [8908162.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1997 Mar 1;57(5):842-5 [9041183.001]
  • [Cites] Dev Neurosci. 1997;19(1):27-32 [9078430.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1997 Jun 1;57(11):2085-8 [9187099.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1997 Jul 1;57(13):2581-5 [9205058.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 1997;76(2):141-5 [9231911.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 1997 Jul 17;15(3):361-6 [9233770.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1997 Aug 1;57(15):3272-80 [9242460.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 1997 Aug;97(1):25-31 [9242214.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 1997 Aug;97(1):39-53 [9242217.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1997 Aug 15;57(16):3526-31 [9270024.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 1997 Sep;97(2):125-34 [9283596.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1997 Sep 15;57(18):4042-7 [9307291.001]
  • [Cites] J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 1997 Oct;56(10):1142-6 [9329458.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 1998 Jan 15;100(2):169-75 [9428364.001]
  • [Cites] J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1998 Jan-Feb;20(1):18-25 [9482408.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1998 Mar 1;58(5):896-9 [9500446.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Pathol. 1999 Aug;52(8):555-68 [10645224.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Pathol. 2000 Feb;156(2):433-7 [10666372.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Oncol. 2000 Mar;16(3):577-84 [10675492.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2000 Mar;18(5):1027-35 [10694553.001]
  • [Cites] Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2000 May;28(1):77-81 [10738305.001]
  • [Cites] J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 2000 Mar;59(3):229-40 [10744061.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2004 Nov 1;64(21):7787-93 [15520184.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2004 Nov 1;64(21):7794-800 [15520185.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer. 2004 Nov;40(16):2525-32 [15519529.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 2004 Nov 15;10(22):7613-20 [15569993.001]
  • [Cites] In Vivo. 2004 Nov-Dec;18(6):713-8 [15646811.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2005 Jan 31;92(2):359-65 [15655550.001]
  • [Cites] Neuro Oncol. 2005 Jan;7(1):20-31 [15701279.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2002 Mar 18;86(6):929-39 [11953826.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2002 May;126(5):540-4 [11958658.001]
  • [Cites] J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2002 Mar-Apr;24(3):205-10 [11990307.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2002 May 1;53(1):52-7 [12007941.001]
  • [Cites] J Pathol. 2002 Jun;197(2):238-44 [12015749.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Genet. 2002 Jun;31(2):210-5 [12021785.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Rev Genet. 2002 Jun;3(6):415-28 [12042769.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 2002 Jun;8(6):1822-30 [12060623.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Genet. 2002 Jul;31(3):306-10 [12068298.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2002 Jul 1;62(13):3794-7 [12097291.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 2002 May;57(3):201-14 [12125983.001]
  • [Cites] J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2002 Jun-Jul;24(5):337-42 [12142780.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 2002 Jul;58(3):255-70 [12187959.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2002 Sep 10;101(2):198-201 [12209999.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 2002 Jul 15;136(2):121-5 [12237235.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 2002 Sep;59(2):143-9 [12241107.001]
  • [Cites] Neuro Oncol. 2002 Oct;4(4):278-99 [12356358.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 2002 Oct;8(10):3054-64 [12374672.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2002 Oct 15;62(20):5906-11 [12384556.001]
  • [Cites] Genes Dev. 2005 Nov 15;19(22):2656-67 [16260494.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2005 Dec 1;23(34):8853-62 [16314645.001]
  • [Cites] Histopathology. 2005 Dec;47(6):631-7 [16324202.001]
  • [Cites] Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2006 Mar;45(3):290-303 [16320246.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2006 Jan 15;66(2):673-81 [16423996.001]
  • [Cites] J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 2006 Feb;65(2):176-86 [16462208.001]
  • [Cites] Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2006 Apr;45(4):401-10 [16419060.001]
  • [Cites] J Pathol. 2006 Mar;208(4):554-63 [16400626.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2006 Mar 1;66(5):2666-72 [16510586.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2006 May 1;46(5):604-13 [16086408.001]
  • [Cites] Cell Cycle. 2006 Feb;5(4):363-5 [16479172.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 2006 Apr 1;12(7 Pt 1):2070-9 [16609018.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 2006 Apr 1;166(1):74-81 [16616114.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2006 Apr 20;24(12):1924-31 [16567768.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 2006 May;78(1):41-6 [16575538.001]
  • [Cites] Neuropathology. 2006 Jun;26(3):170-7 [16771171.001]
  • [Cites] Mod Pathol. 2006 Jul;19(7):958-62 [16648869.001]
  • [Cites] J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 2006 Jun;65(6):549-61 [16783165.001]
  • [Cites] Histopathology. 2006 Jul;49(1):92-3 [16842254.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2006 Sep 1;24(25):4202-8 [16943538.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Pathol. 2003 Jun;162(6):1763-9 [12759234.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 2003 Jul 15;144(2):134-42 [12850376.001]
  • [Cites] Neoplasia. 2003 May-Jun;5(3):198-204 [12869303.001]
  • [Cites] Proteomics. 2003 Sep;3(9):1781-800 [12973738.001]
  • [Cites] Mod Pathol. 2003 Oct;16(10):980-91 [14559980.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Pathol. 2003 Nov;163(5):1721-7 [14578171.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Genet. 2003 Nov;35(3):197-8 [14593398.001]
  • [Cites] Neuropathol Appl Neurobiol. 2003 Dec;29(6):574-83 [14636164.001]
  • [Cites] Development. 2004 Jan;131(1):217-28 [14660435.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 2003 Dec 15;9(17):6401-9 [14695141.001]
  • [Cites] Development. 2004 Feb;131(4):903-13 [14757642.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 2004 Feb;100(2 Suppl Pediatrics):187-93 [14758948.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 2004 Jan;66(1-2):111-6 [15015776.001]
  • [Cites] Nature. 2004 Mar 18;428(6980):337-41 [15029199.001]
  • [Cites] Pathol Oncol Res. 2004;10(1):17-21 [15029256.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 2004 Mar-Apr;67(1-2):159-65 [15072463.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 2004 Apr 12;23(16):2950-66 [15077156.001]
  • [Cites] Carcinogenesis. 2004 May;25(5):661-8 [14688019.001]
  • [Cites] J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 2007 Jun;66(6):505-16 [17549010.001]
  • [Cites] Neuro Oncol. 2007 Jul;9(3):298-307 [17522332.001]
  • [Cites] Brain Pathol. 2007 Jul;17(3):282-96 [17465989.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2007 Jul 16;97(2):267-74 [17579622.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet Oncol. 2007 Aug;8(8):696-705 [17644039.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 2007 Aug 16;26(38):5662-8 [17334394.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 2007 Nov;85(2):111-22 [17522785.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 1992 Jul 15;61(2):193-6 [1638502.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1992 Jul-Sep;9(3):223-35 [1525001.001]
  • [Cites] Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 1992 Nov;5(4):348-56 [1283324.001]
  • [Cites] Neurosurgery. 1993 Aug;33(2):301-5; discussion 305-6 [8396224.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 1993 Sep;69(2):146-52 [8402555.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1994 Jan 1;54(1):45-7 [8261460.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 1993 Nov;71(1):40-9 [8275451.001]
  • [Cites] Mayo Clin Proc. 1994 Apr;69(4):359-65 [8170180.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 1994 Mar;73(1):46-52 [8174073.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1994 Nov 1;54(21):5649-51 [7923211.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 1994 Nov;78(1):1-6 [7987794.001]
  • [Cites] Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1994 Dec 20;91(26):12867-71 [7809137.001]
  • [Cites] Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1995 Jun 6;92(12):5709-13 [7777574.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 1995 Jun;81(2):125-34 [7621408.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Pathol Lab Med. 1995 Aug;119(8):734-43 [7646332.001]
  • [Cites] Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 1995 Oct;14(2):85-96 [8527398.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 1996 Feb;27(2):111-5 [8699232.001]
  • [Cites] Adv Cancer Res. 1996;68:109-82 [8712067.001]
  • [Cites] Intern Med. 1996 Apr;35(4):285-9 [8739783.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2005 Feb 1;65(3):703-7 [15705863.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2005 Feb 1;65(3):919-24 [15705891.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2005 Mar 10;352(10):978-86 [15758008.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Pathol. 2005 Apr;166(4):1153-62 [15793295.001]
  • [Cites] Curr Cancer Drug Targets. 2005 Jun;5(4):273-83 [15975048.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 2005 Jun;73(2):101-8 [15981098.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2005 Jul 1;65(13):5607-19 [15994933.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 2005 Jul 1;11(13):4707-16 [16000565.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 2005 Jul 1;11(13):4733-40 [16000568.001]
  • [Cites] Neuropathol Appl Neurobiol. 2005 Aug;31(4):422-8 [16008826.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Lett. 2005 Sep 8;227(1):75-81 [16051033.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Oncol. 2005 Sep;27(3):617-26 [16077909.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2005 Oct 20;117(1):82-9 [15880586.001]
  • [Cites] Exp Cell Res. 2005 Sep 10;309(1):12-23 [15963498.001]
  • [Cites] Vet Pathol. 2005 Sep;42(5):550-8 [16145201.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Clin Pathol. 2005 Oct;124(4):543-9 [16146813.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Cell. 2005 Oct;8(4):323-35 [16226707.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2005 Nov 1;23(31):7951-7 [16258095.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2006 Jan 15;118(2):346-52 [16049974.001]
  • [Cites] Genes Dev. 2008 Mar 15;22(6):770-85 [18347096.001]
  • [Cites] Surg Neurol. 1998 Mar;49(3):290-4 [9508117.001]
  • [Cites] Acta Neuropathol. 1998 Mar;95(3):291-6 [9542595.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1998 May 1;58(9):1798-803 [9581815.001]
  • [Cites] Science. 1998 Sep 4;281(5382):1509-12 [9727977.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1998 Sep 1;58(17):3932-41 [9731505.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 1997 Mar;3(3):473-8 [9815707.001]
  • [Cites] Neuron. 1999 Jan;22(1):103-14 [10027293.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 1999 Apr;79(11-12):1843-7 [10206302.001]
  • [Cites] Neurosci Lett. 1999 Mar 26;263(2-3):173-6 [10213163.001]
  • [Cites] Histopathology. 1999 Apr;34(4):331-41 [10231401.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 1999 Apr 22;18(16):2607-15 [10353604.001]
  • [Cites] J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1999 May-Jun;21(3):203-11 [10363853.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1999 Jul 15;86(2):331-9 [10421270.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Pathol. 1999 Aug;155(2):627-32 [10433955.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 1999 Sep 9;82(6):810-6 [10446446.001]
  • [Cites] Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 1999 Mar;24(3):230-7 [10451703.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 1999 Aug;113(1):1-8 [10459338.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Hum Genet. 1999 Nov;65(5):1342-8 [10521299.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 2006 Sep;79(3):221-7 [16598417.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 2006 Oct 1;170(1):40-7 [16965953.001]
  • [Cites] BMC Cancer. 2006;6:223 [16968546.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Exp Metastasis. 2006;23(1):55-63 [16826429.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer. 2006 Nov;42(17):2996-3003 [16996732.001]
  • [Cites] Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2007 Jan;46(1):53-66 [17044047.001]
  • [Cites] Brain Pathol. 2006 Oct;16(4):304-10 [17107600.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2006 Nov 20;24(33):5223-33 [17114655.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 2006 Nov 23;25(55):7267-73 [16878160.001]
  • [Cites] Indian J Pathol Microbiol. 2006 Oct;49(4):535-9 [17183845.001]
  • [Cites] Cell Cycle. 2006 Nov;5(22):2666-70 [17172831.001]
  • [Cites] Acta Neuropathol. 2007 Mar;113(3):325-37 [17265049.001]
  • [Cites] Neuro Oncol. 2007 Apr;9(2):135-44 [17329407.001]
  • [Cites] Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2001 Sep;32(1):59-66 [11477662.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 2007 Apr 5;26(16):2308-17 [17016438.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 2007 May;83(1):17-29 [17206475.001]
  • [Cites] Nucleic Acids Res. 2007;35(7):e51 [17344319.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2007 Jul 15;121(2):284-91 [17373666.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2008 Aug 1;123(3):594-600 [18478565.001]
  • [Cites] Neuro Oncol. 2008 Oct;10(5):648-60 [18577562.001]
  • (PMID = 18676356.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-8517
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuro-oncology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 246
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2719002
  •  go-up   go-down


3. Nicholson HS, Kretschmar CS, Krailo M, Bernstein M, Kadota R, Fort D, Friedman H, Harris MB, Tedeschi-Blok N, Mazewski C, Sato J, Reaman GH: Phase 2 study of temozolomide in children and adolescents with recurrent central nervous system tumors: a report from the Children's Oncology Group. Cancer; 2007 Oct 1;110(7):1542-50
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DACARBAZINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: Effective chemotherapy is lacking for most types of central nervous system (CNS) tumors in children.
  • Temozolomide, an agent with activity against adult brain tumors, was investigated in children and adolescents with recurrent CNS tumors.
  • No responses were observed in patients with ependymoma, brain-stem glioma, or other CNS tumors.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although overall objective responses were limited, further exploration of temozolomide may be warranted in children with medulloblastoma and other PNETs, or in patients with low-grade astrocytoma, perhaps in a setting of less pretreatment than the patients in the current study, or in the context of multiagent therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Dacarbazine / analogs & derivatives. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Adolescent. Adult. Astrocytoma / drug therapy. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / drug therapy. Child. Child, Preschool. Drug Administration Schedule. Ependymoma / drug therapy. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Medulloblastoma / drug therapy. Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive / drug therapy. Treatment Outcome


Advertisement
4. Lafay-Cousin L, Strother D: Current treatment approaches for infants with malignant central nervous system tumors. Oncologist; 2009 Apr;14(4):433-44
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Brain Tumors.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Current treatment approaches for infants with malignant central nervous system tumors.
  • The management of brain tumors in very young children remains a challenge for neuro-oncologists in large part because of the greater vulnerability of the developing brain to treatment-related toxicity.
  • Nearly three decades of infant brain tumor clinical trials have led to significant progress in the delineation of prognostic factors and improvements in outcome.
  • Innovative strategies that employ high-dose chemotherapy, intrathecal chemotherapy, modified focal irradiation, or combinations of these have been used to delay or avoid the use of conventional craniospinal irradiation in order to minimize the risk for deleterious neurocognitive impairment in survivors.
  • This review covers the most recent therapeutic advances for the most common histological subtypes of malignant infant brain tumors: medulloblastoma, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor, ependymoma, atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor, choroid plexus carcinoma, and high-grade glioma.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma / therapy. Cerebellar Neoplasms / therapy. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Choroid Plexus Neoplasms / therapy. Clinical Trials as Topic. Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic. Ependymoma / therapy. Evidence-Based Medicine. Glioma / therapy. Humans. Infant. Medulloblastoma / therapy. Meta-Analysis as Topic. Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive / therapy. Prognosis. Radiotherapy Dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Rhabdoid Tumor / therapy. Stem Cell Transplantation. Supratentorial Neoplasms / therapy

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19342475.001).
  • [ISSN] 1549-490X
  • [Journal-full-title] The oncologist
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncologist
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 116
  •  go-up   go-down


5. Zacharoulis S, Levy A, Chi SN, Gardner S, Rosenblum M, Miller DC, Dunkel I, Diez B, Sposto R, Ji L, Asgharzadeh S, Hukin J, Belasco J, Dubowy R, Kellie S, Termuhlen A, Finlay J: Outcome for young children newly diagnosed with ependymoma, treated with intensive induction chemotherapy followed by myeloablative chemotherapy and autologous stem cell rescue. Pediatr Blood Cancer; 2007 Jul;49(1):34-40
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHOTREXATE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Outcome for young children newly diagnosed with ependymoma, treated with intensive induction chemotherapy followed by myeloablative chemotherapy and autologous stem cell rescue.
  • BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy of an intensive chemotherapy induction regimen followed by myeloablative chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell rescue (AHSCR) in children with newly diagnosed ependymoma.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-nine children less than 10 years of age at diagnosis of ependymoma were enrolled on the "Head Start" studies.
  • Twenty-four patients with localized disease received an induction regimen including five cycles of chemotherapy (cisplatin, vincristine, etoposide cyclophosphamide, and high dose methotrexate for patients with metastatic disease).
  • Following induction, individuals without evidence of disease proceeded to marrow-ablative chemotherapy (thiotepa, carboplatin, and etoposide) with AHSCR.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The use of an intensive induction chemotherapy regimen including myeloablative chemotherapy followed by AHSCR in newly diagnosed young children with ependymoma is not superior to other previously reported chemotherapeutic strategies.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / therapy. Ependymoma / therapy. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
  • [MeSH-minor] Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Child. Child, Preschool. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Disease-Free Survival. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Infant. Male. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy. Thiotepa / administration & dosage. Transplantation, Autologous. Treatment Outcome. Vincristine / administration & dosage

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Ependymoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Brain Tumors.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Childhood Brain Tumors.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ETOPOSIDE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CARBOPLATIN .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. THIO-TEPA .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VINCRISTINE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16874765.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-5009
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric blood & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Blood Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; 905Z5W3GKH / Thiotepa; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
  •  go-up   go-down


6. Wolff JE, Finlay JL: High-dose chemotherapy in childhood brain tumors. Onkologie; 2004 Jun;27(3):239-45
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Medicines and Children.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] High-dose chemotherapy in childhood brain tumors.
  • Early attempts to use high-dose chemotherapy technology in order to improve the effect of nitrosourea on high-grade gliomas resulted in minimal benefit as well as in severe toxicity.
  • Since then, other drugs have been applied in conjunction with either autologous bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells, including thiotepa, etoposide, melphalan, cyclophosphamide, and busulfan.
  • The data suggest benefit in recurrent primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET), in newly diagnosed young children with PNET and possibly in young children with newly diagnosed ependymoma, as a strategy not only to improve tumor-free survival but also to avoid exposure of the young brain to irradiation.
  • In other tumors such as recurrent ependymoma and newly diagnosed or recurrent brain stem glioma, high-dose chemotherapy remains ineffective.
  • New protocols under evaluation include new agents, multiple cycles of high-dose chemotherapy and allogeneic transplantation as immunotherapeutic approach.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Drug Therapy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy / methods. Ependymoma / drug therapy. Ependymoma / surgery. Glioma / drug therapy. Glioma / surgery. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Medulloblastoma / drug therapy. Medulloblastoma / surgery. Neuroectodermal Tumors / drug therapy. Neuroectodermal Tumors / surgery. Practice Patterns, Physicians'

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Brain Tumors.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cancer Chemotherapy.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Childhood Brain Tumors.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright 2004 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg
  • (PMID = 15249712.001).
  • [ISSN] 0378-584X
  • [Journal-full-title] Onkologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Onkologie
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 65
  •  go-up   go-down


7. Dallorso S, Dini G, Ladenstein R, Cama A, Milanaccio C, Barra S, Cappelli B, Garrè ML, EBMT-PDWP: Evolving role of myeloablative chemotherapy in the treatment of childhood brain tumours. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2005 Mar;35 Suppl 1:S31-4

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Evolving role of myeloablative chemotherapy in the treatment of childhood brain tumours.
  • Primary brain tumours, a heterogeneous group of cancer that constitute the second most common cancer in childhood, were historically treated with neurosurgical resection and radiation therapy.
  • Chemotherapy has proven to be beneficial for some histological types, which has since led to exploration of the role of high-dose chemotherapy and haematopoietic stem cell rescue.
  • The use of myeloablative therapy (MAT) has been investigated to improve the rate of long-term DFS, as well as to reduce and delay in the youngest children the use of the craniospinal irradiation associated with unacceptable late effects.
  • Ependymoma and brain stem tumours, for which the available data discourage the use of MAT, are excluded.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cerebellar Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Male. Prognosis. Treatment Outcome

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15812527.001).
  • [ISSN] 0268-3369
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 24
  •  go-up   go-down


8. Beaty O 3rd, Berg S, Blaney S, Malogolowkin M, Krailo M, Knight R, Schaiquevich P, Stewart C, Chen Z, Nelson M, Voss S, Ivy SP, Adamson PC: A phase II trial and pharmacokinetic study of oxaliplatin in children with refractory solid tumors: a Children's Oncology Group study. Pediatr Blood Cancer; 2010 Sep;55(3):440-5
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: Platinating agents are used in the treatment of a spectrum of childhood cancers.
  • A phase 2 study was performed to estimate the response rate to single agent oxaliplatin in patients with refractory pediatric solid tumors, and to further describe the toxicities and pharmacokinetics of the drug in this population.
  • Histologies included: Ewing sarcoma/peripheral PNET, osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, neuroblastoma, high and low grade astrocytoma, brain stem glioma, ependymoma, hepatoblastoma and selected rare tumors.
  • Only one objective response was observed, a partial response in a 6-year-old child with ependymoma.
  • Five subjects completed 17 treatment cycles.

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cancer Chemotherapy.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cancer in Children.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 20658614.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-5017
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric blood & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Blood Cancer
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10CA98413; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10CA98543; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA098413; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA098543-08; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA098543; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA098413-08
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 04ZR38536J / oxaliplatin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS218622; NLM/ PMC4665115
  •  go-up   go-down


9. Thorarinsdottir HK, Rood B, Kamani N, Lafond D, Perez-Albuerne E, Loechelt B, Packer RJ, MacDonald TJ: Outcome for children &lt;4 years of age with malignant central nervous system tumors treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell rescue. Pediatr Blood Cancer; 2007 Mar;48(3):278-84
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VINCRISTINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Outcome for children <4 years of age with malignant central nervous system tumors treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell rescue.
  • In an attempt to delay or obviate radiation therapy (XRT) and improve outcome, our institution has treated children <4 yo with newly diagnosed malignant CNS tumors with high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and autologous stem cell rescue (ASCR) followed by selective XRT.
  • PROCEDURE: Fifteen children (age 4-38 months) with malignant CNS tumors have completed treatment with HDC/ASCR.
  • All patients received three cycles of induction chemotherapy (cisplatin 3.5 mg/kg- day 0, cyclophosphamide 60 mg/kg- day 1 and 2, etoposide 2.5 mg/kg- day 0-2, vincristine 0.05 mg/kg, day 0, 7, 14) followed by three cycles of HDC (carboplatin 17 mg/kg and thiotepa 6 mg/kg, day 0 and 1) with ASCR.
  • Histology included five medulloblastomas, four primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET), five malignant gliomas, and one ependymoma.
  • Outcome and treatment toxicities were evaluated by retrospective chart review.
  • RESULTS: Median follow-up time of the 15 patients is 22 months (range 8-82 months).
  • There was no treatment mortality.
  • The treatment regimen is relatively well tolerated.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / therapy. Oligodendroglioma / therapy. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation
  • [MeSH-minor] Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Child, Preschool. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Cognition Disorders / etiology. Cranial Irradiation / adverse effects. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Developmental Disabilities / etiology. Disease-Free Survival. Ependymoma / drug therapy. Ependymoma / mortality. Ependymoma / surgery. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Follow-Up Studies. Ganglioglioma / drug therapy. Ganglioglioma / metabolism. Ganglioglioma / radiotherapy. Ganglioglioma / surgery. Glioma / drug therapy. Glioma / mortality. Glioma / radiotherapy. Glioma / surgery. Humans. Infant. Medulloblastoma / drug therapy. Medulloblastoma / mortality. Medulloblastoma / radiotherapy. Medulloblastoma / surgery. Mitotic Index. Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive / drug therapy. Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive / mortality. Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive / radiotherapy. Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive / surgery. Quadriplegia / etiology. Retrospective Studies. Sensation Disorders / etiology. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / drug therapy. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / surgery. Thiotepa / administration & dosage. Transplantation, Autologous. Treatment Outcome. Vincristine / administration & dosage

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Brain Tumors.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Childhood Brain Tumors.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ETOPOSIDE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CARBOPLATIN .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. THIO-TEPA .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 16456857.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-5009
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric blood & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Blood Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; 905Z5W3GKH / Thiotepa; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
  •  go-up   go-down


10. Drabko K, Wiśniewska-Slusarz H, Wójcik B, Choma M, Zaucha-Prazmo A, Kowalczyk JR: [Megachemotherapy followed by autologous haematopoietic stem cell rescue in children with high risk CNS tumours]. Med Wieku Rozwoj; 2005 Jul-Sep;9(3 Pt 2):439-47
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Childhood Brain Tumors.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Megachemotherapy followed by autologous haematopoietic stem cell rescue in children with high risk CNS tumours].
  • AIM: the Lublin bone marrow transplantation unit experience in megachemotherapy followed by autologus haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with high-risk CNS tumours is described.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: 9 patients (8 boys and 1 girl) treated in our department between 1999-2004, with high risk malignant brain tumours were included into the study.
  • Stem cell apheresis from peripheral blood was performed during chemotherapy after surgery.
  • Seven children are alive and well with the median observation time 23 months.
  • CONCLUSION: megachemotherapy followed by stem cell rescue is a safe and feasible procedure in children with malignant brain tumours and may improve results of the treatment in high-risk patients, but these results should be con firmed in larger series of patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Brain Neoplasms / surgery. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Astrocytoma / drug therapy. Astrocytoma / surgery. Child. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Ependymoma / drug therapy. Ependymoma / surgery. Female. Glioblastoma / drug therapy. Glioblastoma / surgery. Glioma / drug therapy. Glioma / surgery. Humans. Male. Medulloblastoma / drug therapy. Medulloblastoma / surgery. Teratoma / drug therapy. Teratoma / surgery. Transplantation, Autologous. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Brain Tumors.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16719156.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Medycyna wieku rozwojowego
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Wieku Rozwoj
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  •  go-up   go-down


11. Hurwitz CA, Strauss LC, Kepner J, Kretschmar C, Harris MB, Friedman H, Kun L, Kadota R: Paclitaxel for the treatment of progressive or recurrent childhood brain tumors: a pediatric oncology phase II study. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2001 Jun-Jul;23(5):277-81
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DEXAMETHASONE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Paclitaxel for the treatment of progressive or recurrent childhood brain tumors: a pediatric oncology phase II study.
  • PURPOSE: To assess the efficacy and define the toxicity of paclitaxel given at a dosage of 350 mg/m2 every 3 weeks as a 24-hour continuous infusion to children with recurrent or progressive primary brain tumors.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Seventy-three eligible patients, ages 4 months to 19 years, with progressive or recurrent primary brain tumors were treated according to a Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) phase II protocol with paclitaxel (POG 9330).
  • Tumor histologic strata included: astrocytoma (n = 4), malignant glioma (n = 13), medulloblastoma (n = 16), brain stem glioma (n = 15), ependymoma (n = 13), and miscellaneous histologies (n = 12).
  • All patients had previous histologic confirmation of a primary intracranial or spinal cord tumor with magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography documentation of unequivocally measurable progressive or recurrent disease.
  • All patients had received previous therapy including surgery, radiation therapy, and/or chemotherapy, but no patient had been previously treated on more than one phase II trial.
  • Patients were allowed to continue therapy for a total of 18 cycles in the absence of progressive disease or unacceptable toxicity.
  • RESULTS: Seventy-five patients were enrolled onto the POG 9330 protocol; two ineligible patients were removed from the study before receiving any therapy.
  • CONCLUSION: Paclitaxel is well tolerated in children with recurrent or progressive brain tumors at this dosage and schedule and may result in short-term disease stabilization in this patient population.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Paclitaxel / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Astrocytoma / drug therapy. Astrocytoma / pathology. Child. Child, Preschool. Dexamethasone / therapeutic use. Disease Progression. Drug Hypersensitivity / prevention & control. Ependymoma / drug therapy. Ependymoma / pathology. Female. Glioma / drug therapy. Glioma / pathology. Humans. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Infant. Infratentorial Neoplasms / drug therapy. Infratentorial Neoplasms / pathology. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Medulloblastoma / drug therapy. Medulloblastoma / pathology. Nausea / chemically induced. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Neutropenia / chemically induced. Remission Induction. Salvage Therapy. Treatment Failure

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Brain Tumors.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Childhood Brain Tumors.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. TAXOL .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 11464982.001).
  • [ISSN] 1077-4114
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA03161; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA07431; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA15525; etc
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
  •  go-up   go-down


12. Sardi I, Cetica V, Massimino M, Buccoliero AM, Giunti L, Genitori L, Aricò M: Promoter methylation and expression analysis of MGMT in advanced pediatric brain tumors. Oncol Rep; 2009 Oct;22(4):773-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DACARBAZINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Promoter methylation and expression analysis of MGMT in advanced pediatric brain tumors.
  • Insufficient response to oral temozolomide (TMZ) in children with brain tumor may depend on the repair-action of inducible O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT).
  • To investigate the clinical relevance of MGMT expression, we analyzed MGMT levels by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, and the methylation of gene promoter in patients with relapsed or refractory brain tumor, enrolled in an off-label trial with oral temozolomide.
  • The drug was administered at the dose of 200 mg/m(2)/day in patients with no prior cranio-spinal irradiation, and 180 mg/m(2)/day in those with previous radiotherapy and/or high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell rescue.
  • Nine patients with recurrent ependymoma (n=3), low grade glioma (n=3), glioblastoma (n=1), relapsed medulloblastoma (n=2) were enrolled in the study.
  • Methylation of MGMT promoter was detected in only one ependymoma sample.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / genetics. DNA Methylation / genetics. DNA Modification Methylases / genetics. DNA Repair Enzymes / genetics. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm / genetics. Promoter Regions, Genetic / genetics. Tumor Suppressor Proteins / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / therapeutic use. Child. Child, Preschool. Dacarbazine / analogs & derivatives. Dacarbazine / therapeutic use. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Infant. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / genetics. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. RNA, Messenger / analysis. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Brain Tumors.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Childhood Brain Tumors.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19724855.001).
  • [ISSN] 1021-335X
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncol. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; 85622-93-1 / temozolomide; EC 2.1.1.- / DNA Modification Methylases; EC 2.1.1.63 / MGMT protein, human; EC 6.5.1.- / DNA Repair Enzymes
  •  go-up   go-down


13. Reddy AT: Advances in biology and treatment of childhood brain tumors. Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep; 2001 Mar;1(2):137-43
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Childhood Brain Tumors.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Advances in biology and treatment of childhood brain tumors.
  • Childhood brain tumors are collectively the most common solid neoplasm and the leading cause of cancer-related death in children.
  • Current treatment is dependent on histology, location, and in some instances, patient age.
  • Advances in treatment have led to improved survival for some patients, but for many the outcome remains dismal despite aggressive treatment.
  • A growing body of work is aimed at improving the outcome for children with brain tumors not only through clinical trials, but also by focusing on the biologic underpinning of these diseases that have been poorly understood.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Brain Damage, Chronic / etiology. Brain Stem. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Child, Preschool. Clinical Trials as Topic. Cranial Irradiation. Craniotomy. Diagnostic Imaging. Disease-Free Survival. Ependymoma / drug therapy. Ependymoma / mortality. Ependymoma / radiotherapy. Ependymoma / surgery. Germinoma / drug therapy. Germinoma / mortality. Germinoma / radiotherapy. Germinoma / surgery. Glioma / drug therapy. Glioma / mortality. Glioma / radiotherapy. Glioma / surgery. Humans. Infant. Medulloblastoma / drug therapy. Medulloblastoma / mortality. Medulloblastoma / radiotherapy. Medulloblastoma / surgery. Neuroectodermal Tumors / drug therapy. Neuroectodermal Tumors / mortality. Neuroectodermal Tumors / radiotherapy. Neuroectodermal Tumors / surgery. Palliative Care. Radiosurgery. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Supratentorial Neoplasms / drug therapy. Supratentorial Neoplasms / mortality. Supratentorial Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Supratentorial Neoplasms / surgery. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Brain Tumors.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] J Neurosci. 1997 Jan 15;17(2):530-42 [8987776.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1990 Jul 1;66(1):6-14 [2354409.001]
  • [Cites] Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1999 Sep 28;96(20):11519-24 [10500209.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 1997 May;86(5):747-54 [9126887.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1999 Mar;17(3):832-45 [10071274.001]
  • [Cites] Anticancer Res. 1999 Jul-Aug;19(4C):3569-74 [10629654.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 1999 Aug;44(1):71-6 [10582672.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2000 Feb 15;88(4):870-5 [10679657.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1999 Dec 1;45(5):1117-26 [10613303.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 1993 Feb;15(2):125-31 [8509817.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1994 Jan 1;28(1):229-45 [8270446.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2000 Mar;18(6):1246-53 [10715294.001]
  • [Cites] Neurosurg Clin N Am. 1990 Jan;1(1):37-48 [2135972.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1996 Feb 1;77(3):555-62 [8630965.001]
  • [Cites] Gene Ther. 2000 May;7(10):867-74 [10845725.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 1999;45(1):61-7 [10728911.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 2000 Feb;92(2):249-54 [10659011.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 1992 Jul;13(3):283-90 [1517804.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 1989 Jun;70(6):853-61 [2715812.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 1989 Jul;7(2):165-77 [2550594.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2000 Jan 15;46(2):287-95 [10661334.001]
  • [Cites] J Biol Chem. 2000 Jan 7;275(1):565-70 [10617652.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1985 Oct 1;56(7):1497-501 [4040799.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 1999 Dec;115(2):96-9 [10598140.001]
  • [Cites] Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1994 Dec 20;91(26):12867-71 [7809137.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 1997 Mar;86(3):446-55 [9046301.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1990 Aug 1;66(3):557-63 [2364367.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1999 Aug 1;45(1):137-45 [10477017.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 1997 May;32(3):235-41 [9049885.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 1999 Aug;44(1):77-83 [10582673.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2000 Feb 1;88(3):685-92 [10649264.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1999 Jul;17(7):2127-36 [10561268.001]
  • [Cites] Childs Nerv Syst. 1998 Oct;14(10):596-601 [9840386.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 1997 Jun;86(6):943-9 [9171172.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1993 Jun 17;328(24):1725-31 [8388548.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 1994 Nov;81(5):690-8 [7931615.001]
  • [Cites] Neurosurgery. 1999 Dec;45(6):1292-7; discussion 1297-8 [10598695.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 1999 Sep;44(2):181-5 [10619503.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1999 Feb 1;59(3):711-9 [9973222.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1997 Sep 1;39(2):419-26 [9308946.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2000 Mar 15;46(5):1171-6 [10725628.001]
  • [Cites] Neurosurgery. 1995 Oct;37(4):655-66; discussion 666-7 [8559293.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 1999 Dec;81(7):1150-4 [10584875.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2000 May 1;88(9):2189-93 [10813733.001]
  • (PMID = 11898509.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-4042
  • [Journal-full-title] Current neurology and neuroscience reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 46
  •  go-up   go-down


14. Akay KM, Izci Y, Baysefer A, Atabey C, Kismet E, Timurkaynak E: Surgical outcomes of cerebellar tumors in children. Pediatr Neurosurg; 2004 Sep-Oct;40(5):220-5

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Histopathological diagnoses were as follows: pilocytic astrocytoma (48.2%); medulloblastoma (22.2%); ependymoma (18.5%); fibrillary astrocytoma grade III (3.7%); cystic oligodendroglioma (3.7%), and hemangioblastoma (3.7%).
  • The total removal of pediatric cerebellar tumors without neurological deficit is possible with appropriate microsurgical techniques excluding brain stem invasion.
  • The follow-up periods must be shorter if brain stem invasion exists.
  • Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are the adjuvant therapies according to the pathological diagnosis and the patient's age.
  • [MeSH-major] Astrocytoma / surgery. Cerebellar Neoplasms / surgery. Ependymoma / surgery. Medulloblastoma / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Prognosis. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 15687736.001).
  • [ISSN] 1016-2291
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Neurosurg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  •  go-up   go-down


15. Sasajima T, Takahashi M, Kinouchi H, Suzuki A, Mizoi K: [Therapeutic results of eight patients with intracranial ependymomas]. No To Shinkei; 2003 Mar;55(3):233-40
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Childhood Brain Tumors.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Therapeutic results of eight patients with intracranial ependymomas].
  • The cases included six infratentorial ependymomas, one supratentorial ependymoma and one supratentorial anaplastic ependymoma.
  • The lateral type tumors originated from the lateral part of the fourth ventricle in four cases.
  • The midfloor type tumors originated from the inferior half of the fourth ventricular floor in two cases.
  • The three totally resected tumors were the lateral type tumors.
  • The remaining one case with the lateral type tumor underwent nearly total resection of the tumor, since the tumor involved lower cranial nerves.
  • All patients with the midfloor type tumors underwent incomplete resections of the tumors, because the tumors infiltrated into brain stem.
  • Lower cranial nerve involvement and brain stem invasion implied incomplete resection and had the poor prognosis.
  • The mean survival time of all patients with intracranial ependymomas was 127 months from the time of the initial surgery.
  • The mean survival time of the patients with tumors showing MIB-1 index > or = 10% (n = 4), was 30 months.
  • Two representative children aged less than 3 years with the midfloor type tumors were presented.
  • In a patient treated with conventional radiation and chemotherapy, residual tumor repeatedly enlarged within 12 months despite several resections of the tumor.
  • In contrast, the other patient received multidisciplinary treatment including Linac stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with a marginal dose of 27 Gy in 9 fractions, have been still alive for 45 months after the initial resection.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / surgery. Ependymoma / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Supratentorial Neoplasms / mortality. Supratentorial Neoplasms / surgery. Survival. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Brain Tumors.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 12728504.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-8969
  • [Journal-full-title] Nō to shinkei = Brain and nerve
  • [ISO-abbreviation] No To Shinkei
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  •  go-up   go-down


16. Cohen KJ, Broniscer A, Glod J: Pediatric glial tumors. Curr Treat Options Oncol; 2001 Dec;2(6):529-36
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • In addition, although most adult gliomas are supratentorial in location, in pediatrics infratentorial tumors (posterior fossa and brain stem) predominate.
  • Maximal surgical resection is the mainstay of therapy for both pilocytic astrocytomas and ependymomas.
  • Failure to achieve an optimal resection often results in progression and the need for further therapy for patients with pilocytic astrocytomas, and is ultimately fatal in most children with subtotally resected ependymomas.
  • Surgical resection has no role in the treatment of pontine gliomas.
  • Focal radiation therapy is included routinely in the treatment of ependymomas, and it has been shown to improve event-free survival.
  • This therapy also is used in the treatment of pontine gliomas because radiation treatment appears to slow inevitable tumor progression.
  • Radiation therapy in pilocytic astrocytomas is generally reserved for patients who progress after an initial surgical resection or for those patients with midline tumors; these patients are poor candidates for aggressive surgical resection.
  • The role of chemotherapy in these tumors is in evolution.
  • Chemotherapy for pilocytic astrocytomas, particularly in young children (for whom radiation therapy is avoided), appears to be effective in the treatment of a subset of patients.
  • Up-front chemotherapy is generally reserved for the youngest children who present with ependymoma.
  • In the recurrence setting, chemotherapy has shown some activity, although this approach is never curative.
  • Despite the application of various chemotherapeutics and other biologic agents, none of these therapies has improved the prognosis for patients with the uniformly lethal pontine glioma.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / therapy. Glioma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Astrocytoma / mortality. Astrocytoma / therapy. Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunts. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Cranial Irradiation. Craniotomy. Disease Progression. Ependymoma / mortality. Ependymoma / therapy. Epidemiologic Methods. Humans. Hydrocephalus / etiology. Hydrocephalus / surgery. Infant. Infratentorial Neoplasms / mortality. Infratentorial Neoplasms / therapy. Palliative Care. Pons. Prognosis. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Brain Tumors.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Childhood Brain Tumors.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 2000 Dec;93 Suppl 3:42-6 [11143261.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1977 Aug;40(2):907-15 [890671.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 1997 May;86(5):747-54 [9126887.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Neurosurg. 1998 Apr;28(4):215-22 [9732252.001]
  • [Cites] Med Pediatr Oncol. 1996 Jul;27(1):8-14 [8614396.001]
  • [Cites] Neurosurgery. 1993 Dec;33(6):1026-9; discussion 1029-30 [8133987.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1997 Aug;15(8):2792-9 [9256121.001]
  • [Cites] J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1998 Mar-Apr;20(2):125-30 [9544162.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1993 Sep 30;27(2):197-206 [8407392.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Neurol. 1988 Jan;23 (1):79-85 [3345069.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Neurosurg. 2000 Jan;32(1):24-9 [10765135.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 1995 Apr;82(4):536-47 [7897512.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2001 Jul 15;50(4):929-35 [11429220.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1996 Oct 1;36(3):549-56 [8948338.001]
  • [Cites] Neurosurgery. 1997 Feb;40(2):331-7; discussion 337-8 [9007866.001]
  • [Cites] Neurology. 1995 Oct;45(10):1897-902 [7477989.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Invest. 1998;16(8):588-93 [9844619.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 1990 Nov;73(5):661-7 [2213155.001]
  • [Cites] Radiother Oncol. 1995 Aug;36(2):101-6 [7501807.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1999 Mar 15;43(5):959-64 [10192340.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 1998 Apr;88(4):695-703 [9525716.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1994 Jan 15;28(2):381-6 [8276653.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 1995 Oct;83(4):583-9 [7674005.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1994 Dec 1;331(22):1500-7 [7969301.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1995 Feb 15;75(4):1051-9 [7842408.001]
  • [Cites] Childs Nerv Syst. 2000 Mar;16(3):170-5 [10804053.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Neurosurg. 1998 Jul;29(1):40-5 [9755311.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1993 Apr 15;71(8):2666-74 [8453590.001]
  • [Cites] Neurosurgery. 1997 Apr;40(4):856-60; discussion 860 [9092863.001]
  • (PMID = 12057098.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-2729
  • [Journal-full-title] Current treatment options in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Treat Options Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 30
  •  go-up   go-down


17. Docking KM, Ward EC, Murdoch BE: Language outcomes subsequent to treatment of brainstem tumour in childhood. NeuroRehabilitation; 2005;20(2):107-24
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Language outcomes subsequent to treatment of brainstem tumour in childhood.
  • While the occurrence and management of brainstem tumours in children would not traditionally indicate potential direct structural impact on classical language centres, recent theories have implicated some involvement of the brainstem in a functional language and cognitive neural loop between the cerebellum and the cerebral hemispheres.
  • Thus, the present paper explored the impact of treatment for brainstem tumour on the general and high-level language abilities of six children treated for brainstem tumour, in addition to phonological awareness skills.
  • Group analysis revealed that children treated for brainstem tumour demonstrated intact language and phonological awareness abilities in comparison to an age- and gender-matched control group.
  • Individual analysis revealed only one of six children treated for brainstem tumour revealed evidence of language disturbances, with an additional child demonstrating an isolated mildly reduced score on one phonological awareness task.
  • Language deficits identified in a child treated with a combination of both radiotherapy and chemotherapy were noted in the high-level language area of lexical generation.
  • Findings highlighted that no overt language disturbances were evident in children treated for brainstem tumour.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Stem Neoplasms / rehabilitation. Language Disorders / rehabilitation. Speech Disorders / rehabilitation
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Astrocytoma / complications. Astrocytoma / rehabilitation. Child. Child, Preschool. Ependymoma / complications. Ependymoma / rehabilitation. Female. Glioma / complications. Glioma / rehabilitation. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male


18. Morota N, Ihara S, Deletis V: Intraoperative neurophysiology for surgery in and around the brainstem: role of brainstem mapping and corticobulbar tract motor-evoked potential monitoring. Childs Nerv Syst; 2010 Apr;26(4):513-21

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Intraoperative neurophysiology for surgery in and around the brainstem: role of brainstem mapping and corticobulbar tract motor-evoked potential monitoring.
  • INTRODUCTION: New advancements of intraoperative neurophysiology for surgery in and around the brainstem have been described.
  • NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES: Brainstem mapping (BSM) is applied to locate cranial nerves and their motor nuclei (CMN) on the floor of the fourth ventricle.
  • DISCUSSION: Each of these procedures bears a specific role: BSM can help avoid direct damage to CMNs on the fourth ventricular floor; CBT-MEP can provide simultaneous feedback on the functional integrity of the CBT and CMN during surgery, eventually leading to "tailored" modifications of the surgical procedure, based upon neurophysiological responses.
  • CONCLUSIONS: CBT-MEP monitoring has less restriction in terms of clinical indications, but a combination of both procedures is essential for functional preservation of CMNs during surgery in and around the brainstem.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Stem / physiopathology. Brain Stem / surgery. Monitoring, Intraoperative / methods. Neurosurgical Procedures / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Brain Mapping / methods. Brain Neoplasms / physiopathology. Brain Neoplasms / surgery. Brain Neoplasms / therapy. Child, Preschool. Ependymoma / physiopathology. Ependymoma / surgery. Ependymoma / therapy. Evoked Potentials, Motor. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Pyramidal Tracts / physiopathology. Pyramidal Tracts / surgery. Rhabdoid Tumor / drug therapy. Rhabdoid Tumor / physiopathology. Rhabdoid Tumor / surgery. Teratoma / drug therapy. Teratoma / physiopathology. Teratoma / surgery

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Adv Tech Stand Neurosurg. 1995;22:261-341 [7495420.001]
  • [Cites] Neurosurgery. 1996 Oct;39(4):787-93; discussion 793-4 [8880774.001]
  • [Cites] Brain. 2001 Sep;124(Pt 9):1866-76 [11522588.001]
  • [Cites] Neurosurgery. 2000 Nov;47(5):1170-6; discussion 1176-7 [11063111.001]
  • [Cites] Childs Nerv Syst. 2002 Jul;18(6-7):264-87 [12172930.001]
  • [Cites] Pediatr Neurosurg. 1996;24(1):24-34 [8817612.001]
  • [Cites] Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2006 May;148(5):499-509; discussion 509 [16374568.001]
  • [Cites] Neurosurgery. 1995 Nov;37(5):922-9; discussion 929-30 [8559341.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 1993 Sep;79(3):393-9 [8360737.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Neurophysiol. 2005 Mar;116(3):588-96 [15721072.001]
  • [Cites] Neurosurgery. 2006 Jun;58(6):1129-43; discussion 1129-43 [16723892.001]
  • [Cites] Childs Nerv Syst. 2008 Nov;24(11):1307-14 [18563419.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2000 Aug;69(2):262-5 [10896707.001]
  • (PMID = 20143075.001).
  • [ISSN] 1433-0350
  • [Journal-full-title] Child's nervous system : ChNS : official journal of the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Childs Nerv Syst
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Number-of-references] 18
  •  go-up   go-down


19. De Sio L, Milano GM, Castellano A, Jenkner A, Fidani P, Dominici C, Donfrancesco A: Temozolomide in resistant or relapsed pediatric solid tumors. Pediatr Blood Cancer; 2006 Jul;47(1):30-6
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The drug was administered at the dose of 215 mg/m2/day x 5 days or 180 mg/m2/day x 5 days in patients with prior craniospinal irradiation (CSI) or autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT).
  • Tumor types were: neuroblastoma (NB; n = 17), medulloblastoma (MB; 8), brain stem glioma (BSG; 8), extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma/peripheral neuroectodermal tumor (EOES; 4), Ewing's sarcoma (ES; 4), anaplastic astrocytoma (AA; 3), rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS; 2), ependymoma (EP; 2), cerebral primitive neuroectodermal tumor (cPNET; 2), hepatocarcinoma (HC; 1), and osteosarcoma (OS; 1).
  • The median survival was 7.8 months (range 1-37) and median time to progression was 3.4 months (range 1-20); these data were significantly correlated with histology and previous nitrosureas administration in multivariate analysis.
  • CONCLUSION: Oral TMZ was well tolerated in children with resistant or relapsed solid tumors and showed activity in NB and CNS tumours refractory to standard chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / therapeutic use. Dacarbazine / analogs & derivatives. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease-Free Survival. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Female. Humans. Male. Survival Analysis

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cancer Chemotherapy.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cancer in Children.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DACARBAZINE .
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • [ErratumIn] Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2006 Oct 15;47(5):647-8
  • (PMID = 16047361.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-5009
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric blood & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Blood Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating; 7GR28W0FJI / Dacarbazine; 85622-93-1 / temozolomide
  •  go-up   go-down


20. Strahlendorf C, Lotocka-Reysner H, Chan G: Successful peripheral blood stem cell harvest on a 5.5-kg infant. J Clin Apher; 2006 Dec;21(4):246-8
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. HEPARIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Successful peripheral blood stem cell harvest on a 5.5-kg infant.
  • [MeSH-major] Leukapheresis. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation
  • [MeSH-minor] Anticoagulants. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Blood Cell Count. Blood Volume. Body Weight. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Brain Neoplasms / surgery. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Citric Acid. Combined Modality Therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Ependymoma / drug therapy. Ependymoma / surgery. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Female. Glucose / analogs & derivatives. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / pharmacology. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization. Heparin. Humans. Infant

  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ETOPOSIDE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. GLUCOSE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CITRIC ACID .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17111418.001).
  • [ISSN] 0733-2459
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical apheresis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Apher
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticoagulants; 13838-07-8 / acid citrate dextrose; 143011-72-7 / Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor; 2968PHW8QP / Citric Acid; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; 9005-49-6 / Heparin; IY9XDZ35W2 / Glucose; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
  •  go-up   go-down






Advertisement