[X] Close
You are about to erase all the values you have customized, search history, page format, etc.
Click here to RESET all values       Click here to GO BACK without resetting any value
Items 1 to 21 of about 21
1. König M, Mork J, Hall KS, Osnes T, Meling TR: Multimodal treatment of osteogenic sarcoma of the jaw. Skull Base; 2010 May;20(3):207-12
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Multimodal treatment of osteogenic sarcoma of the jaw.
  • Osteosarcomas (OSs) account for 40 to 60% of primary malignant bone tumors.
  • Investigation showed high-grade OS of the right mandibular coronoid process, affecting the mandibular nerve, middle cranial fossa, internal jugular vein, and internal carotid artery (ICA).
  • True en bloc resection was performed after upfront adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • The ICA was trap-ligated intradurally, whereafter the floor of the middle fossa, including the mandibular nerve and the glenoid fossa, was detached from the skull base in one piece.
  • Subsequently, a hemimandibulectomy, total parotidectomy, ICA sacrifice, and removal of the pterygoid plates and muscles were performed, and the abovementioned structures were removed as a solitary specimen, including the facial nerve branches overlying the tumor.
  • A sural nerve graft was interposed between five major facial nerve branches to reanimate the face.
  • The patient had an uneventful recovery, is able to eat, and has a partial facial nerve palsy.
  • He has no tumor recurrence 26 months after surgery.

  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Neurosurgery. 2008 Oct;63(4):651-60; dicussion 660-1 [18824944.001]
  • [Cites] Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1991 Oct;72(4):444-8 [1923444.001]
  • [Cites] Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1987 Sep;64(3):302-7 [2443891.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 1985 May;62(5):667-72 [3989589.001]
  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 1997 Jan;107(1):56-61 [9001266.001]
  • [Cites] Oral Oncol. 2001 Oct;37(7):545-7 [11564573.001]
  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 1999 Jun;109(6):964-9 [10369291.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Surg. 1980 Oct;140(4):572-6 [6932821.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer B Oral Oncol. 1994 Nov;30B(6):374-6 [7719220.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 1997 Jun;26(3):191-7 [9180229.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 1997 Jun;26(3):198-204 [9180230.001]
  • [Cites] Head Neck. 1997 Sep;19(6):513-23 [9278760.001]
  • [Cites] J Otolaryngol. 2004 Jun;33(3):139-44 [15841989.001]
  • [Cites] Oral Oncol. 2008 Mar;44(3):286-94 [17467326.001]
  • [Cites] Head Neck. 2008 Aug;30(8):1020-6 [18383528.001]
  • (PMID = 21318040.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-0065
  • [Journal-full-title] Skull base : official journal of North American Skull Base Society ... [et al.]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Skull Base
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3037111
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Osteosarcoma / craniofacial surgery / en bloc resection / jaw tumor / tumor of the skull base
  •  go-up   go-down


2. Park YM, Cho JH, Cho JY, Huh JS, Ahn JY: Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the sphenoid sinus presenting as isolated oculomotor nerve palsy. World J Surg Oncol; 2007;5:86

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the sphenoid sinus presenting as isolated oculomotor nerve palsy.
  • Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy is uncommon as an initial presentation of malignant tumors of the sphenoid sinus.
  • Neurological examination revealed complete left oculomotor nerve palsy.
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) demonstrated a homogenous soft-tissue lesion occupying the left sphenoid sinus and invading the left cavernous sinus.
  • The patient underwent transsphenoidal biopsy and the lesion was histologically diagnosed as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell type.
  • Tumor cells were positive for CD20 and negative for CD3.
  • Following six cycles of chemotherapy, the left oculomotor nerve palsy that had been previously observed was completely resolved.
  • CONCLUSION: It is important to recognize that non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the sphenoid sinus can present with isolated oculomotor nerve palsy, although it is extremely rare.
  • The cranial nerve deficits can resolve dramatically after chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / complications. Oculomotor Nerve Diseases / etiology. Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms / complications. Sphenoid Sinus

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Neurochirurgie. 2002 Dec;48(6):522-6 [12595809.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2002 Jan 24;346(4):235-42 [11807147.001]
  • [Cites] Acta Neurol Belg. 2000 Jun;100(2):103-6 [10934562.001]
  • [Cites] Neurosurgery. 2000 May;46(5):1084-91; discussion 1091-2 [10807240.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Ophthalmol. 2000 Feb;129(2):256-8 [10682985.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 2006 Feb;76(3):299-306 [16163447.001]
  • [Cites] Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1999 May;120(5):730-6 [10229601.001]
  • [Cites] Laryngoscope. 1997 Dec;107(12 Pt 1):1590-5 [9396670.001]
  • [Cites] Radiology. 1997 Aug;204(2):431-5 [9240531.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Otolaryngol Chir Cervicofac. 1995;112(6):298-302 [8561414.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1995 Mar 15;75(6):1281-91 [7882278.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 1993 Apr;102(4 Pt 1):318-21 [8476174.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Clin Oncol. 1992 Jun;15(3):222-5 [1590274.001]
  • [Cites] No Shinkei Geka. 1992 Mar;20(3):283-7 [1557180.001]
  • [Cites] Radiology. 1988 Jun;167(3):803-8 [3363145.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1985 Feb;11(2):357-64 [3882644.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Clin Pathol. 1984 Jun;81(6):721-7 [6547270.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1980 Nov 1;46(9):1925-31 [7427898.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1972 Jan;29(1):252-60 [5007387.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Treat Rev. 2003 Feb;29(1):11-9 [12633576.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1978 Aug;42(2):406-16 [679145.001]
  • (PMID = 17683562.001).
  • [ISSN] 1477-7819
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1950883
  • [General-notes] NLM/ Original DateCompleted: 20070828
  •  go-up   go-down


3. Kellie SJ, Koopmans P, Earl J, Nath C, Roebuck D, Uges DR, De Graaf SS: Increasing the dosage of vincristine: a clinical and pharmacokinetic study of continuous-infusion vincristine in children with central nervous system tumors. Cancer; 2004 Jun 15;100(12):2637-43
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VINCRISTINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Increasing the dosage of vincristine: a clinical and pharmacokinetic study of continuous-infusion vincristine in children with central nervous system tumors.
  • BACKGROUND: Vincristine (VCR) is widely used to treat patients with malignant disease; among the patients treated with VCR are children with brain tumors.
  • The diagnoses included intrinsic pontine glioma (n = 4), ependymoma (n = 5), astrocytoma (n = 3), medulloblastoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET; n = 2), ganglioglioma (n = 1), and choroid plexus carcinoma (n = 1).
  • Treatment included cyclophosphamide 65 mg/kg administered intravenously over 1 hour on Day 1, a bolus of VCR 1.5 mg/m(2) administered intravenously on Day 2, and VCR 0.5 mg/m(2) per 24 hours administered via continuous intravenous infusion on Days 2-5.
  • Fifteen patients received 2 courses of treatment at 21-28-day intervals, and a total of 31 treatment courses were administered.
  • However, only 1 of 31 courses was associated with Grade III toxicity, and no Grade IV toxicity (e.g., cranial nerve palsy, ileus, inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, seizures, hallucinations, etc.) was noted.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Continuous infusion of VCR after a conventional bolus dose plus cyclophosphamide for children with tumors of the central nervous system did not result in significant neurotoxicity and appeared to be a safe strategy for achieving increased systemic exposure.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Vincristine / administration & dosage. Vincristine / pharmacokinetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Humans. Infant. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Brain Tumors.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Childhood Brain Tumors.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright 2004 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 15197807.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide
  •  go-up   go-down


Advertisement
4. Varma AK, Muller PJ: Cranial neuropathies after intracranial Photofrin-photodynamic therapy for malignant supratentorial gliomas-a report on 3 cases. Surg Neurol; 2008 Aug;70(2):190-3
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Peripheral Nerve Disorders.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cranial neuropathies after intracranial Photofrin-photodynamic therapy for malignant supratentorial gliomas-a report on 3 cases.
  • BACKGROUND: In an RCT of PDT in the treatment of malignant gliomas, 3 patients developed cranial neuropathies after photoillumination.
  • We are aware of no previous reports on cranial neuropathy after intracranial PDT.
  • METHODS: In a cohort of 80 patients, there were 41 men and 39 women; 47 were newly diagnosed and 33 had recurrent tumors.
  • All patients underwent surgical tumor extirpation.
  • There were 77 malignant gliomas, 2 meningiomas, and 1 metastatic tumor.
  • The tumor locations were as follows: 39 frontal, 25 temporal, 12 parietal, and 4 occipital.
  • Of the 25 patients with temporal lobe tumors, 18 received PDT.
  • RESULTS: Three of the 18 patients with temporal lobe tumors developed cranial neuropathies after PDT.
  • This complication was not seen in any other patient with tumors in the frontal, parietal, or occipital regions, or patients with temporal lobe tumors who did not receive PDT.
  • The first patient developed seventh nerve paresis and hypoesthesia in fifth nerve distribution, which resolved only partially.
  • The second patient developed a seventh nerve paresis that resolved completely.
  • The third patient developed transient neuralgic pain in the trigeminal nerve distribution.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Cranial neuropathies could be the result of photoillumination of fifth and seventh cranial nerves during PDT of the temporal fossa.
  • [MeSH-major] Cranial Nerve Diseases / chemically induced. Dihematoporphyrin Ether / adverse effects. Glioma / drug therapy. Peripheral Nervous System Diseases / chemically induced. Photochemotherapy / adverse effects. Supratentorial Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / adverse effects. Cranial Fossa, Middle / pathology. Facial Nerve / anatomy & histology. Facial Nerve / drug effects. Facial Nerve / physiopathology. Facial Nerve Diseases / chemically induced. Facial Nerve Diseases / metabolism. Facial Nerve Diseases / physiopathology. Female. Humans. Light / adverse effects. Male. Middle Aged. Photic Stimulation / adverse effects. Preoperative Care / standards. Temporal Lobe / pathology. Temporal Lobe / physiopathology. Trigeminal Nerve / anatomy & histology. Trigeminal Nerve / drug effects. Trigeminal Nerve / physiopathology. Trigeminal Nerve Diseases / chemically induced. Trigeminal Nerve Diseases / metabolism. Trigeminal Nerve Diseases / physiopathology

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17976702.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-3019
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgical neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg Neurol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 97067-70-4 / Dihematoporphyrin Ether
  •  go-up   go-down


5. Beauchesne P, Mosnier JF, Schmitt T, Brunon J: Malignant nerve sheath tumor of the right cerebral peduncle: case report. Neurosurgery; 2004 Feb;54(2):500-3; discussion 503-4

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Malignant nerve sheath tumor of the right cerebral peduncle: case report.
  • Usually, these tumors are benign.
  • Primary malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumors are extremely rare, with only five documented cases in the international literature.
  • We report one case of a primary malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumor occurring in the right cerebral peduncle of a 35-year-old man.
  • INTERVENTION: Unlike the five cases previously reported, this is the first time a stereotactic biopsy has been performed, and this is the only patient who responded to cranial radiation therapy for approximately 2 years.
  • When the tumor recurred, a systemic chemotherapy treatment was prescribed.
  • No positive response was seen, and the patient died 29 months after the initial diagnosis.
  • CONCLUSION: An accurate diagnosis and planned aggressive treatment seem to be the key elements in the management of the disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Stem Neoplasms / pathology. Mesencephalon / pathology. Myelin Sheath / pathology. Neurilemmoma / pathology

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 14744297.001).
  • [ISSN] 0148-396X
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurgery
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


6. Frazier JL, Lee J, Thomale UW, Noggle JC, Cohen KJ, Jallo GI: Treatment of diffuse intrinsic brainstem gliomas: failed approaches and future strategies. J Neurosurg Pediatr; 2009 Apr;3(4):259-69
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment of diffuse intrinsic brainstem gliomas: failed approaches and future strategies.
  • Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas constitute ~ 60-75% of tumors found within the pediatric brainstem.
  • These malignant lesions present with rapidly progressive symptoms such as cranial nerve, long tract, or cerebellar dysfunctions.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging is usually sufficient to establish the diagnosis and obviates the need for surgical biopsy in most cases.
  • Standard therapy involves radiotherapy, which produces transient neurological improvement with a progression-free survival benefit, but provides no improvement in overall survival.
  • Clinical trials have been conducted to assess the efficacy of chemotherapeutic and biological agents in the treatment of diffuse pontine gliomas.
  • In this review, the authors discuss recent studies in which systemic therapy was administered prior to, concomitantly with, or after radiotherapy.
  • For future perspective, the discussion includes a rationale for stereotactic biopsies as well as possible therapeutic options of local chemotherapy in these lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Stem Neoplasms / drug therapy. Brain Stem Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Glioma / drug therapy. Glioma / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Drug Delivery Systems. Humans. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Rats. Treatment Failure

  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [CommentIn] J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2010 Jan;5(1):140-1; author reply 141-2 [20043750.001]
  • (PMID = 19338403.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0707
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery. Pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Neurosurg Pediatr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 130
  •  go-up   go-down


7. Ozduman K, Wollmann G, Piepmeier JM, van den Pol AN: Systemic vesicular stomatitis virus selectively destroys multifocal glioma and metastatic carcinoma in brain. J Neurosci; 2008 Feb 20;28(8):1882-93
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Metastatic tumors and malignant gliomas make up the majority of cancers in the brain.
  • This replication-competent virus, the glioma-adapted vesicular stomatis virus strain VSVrp30a, was used for in vivo tests with the underlying view that infection of tumor cells will lead to an increase in the number of viruses subsequently released to kill additional tumor cells.
  • Intravenous injection of VSVrp30a expressing a green fluorescent protein reporter, rapidly targeted and destroyed multiple types of human and mouse tumors implanted in the mouse brain, including glioblastoma and mammary tumors.
  • When tumors were implanted both in the brain and peripherally, emulating systemic cancer metastasis, tumors inside and outside the brain were simultaneously infected.
  • Intranasal inoculation, leading to olfactory nerve transport of the virus into the brain, selectively infected and killed olfactory bulb tumors.
  • Neither control cortical wounds nor transplanted normal mouse or human cells were targeted, indicating viral tumor selectivity.
  • Control viruses, including pseudorabies, adeno-associated, or replication-deficient VSV, did not infect the brain tumor.
  • Confocal laser time-lapse imaging through a cranial window showed that intravenous VSV infects the tumor at multiple sites and kills migrating tumor cells.
  • Disrupted tumor vasculature, suggested by dye leakage, may be the port of entry for intravenously delivered VSV.
  • Quantitative PCR analysis of how VSVrp30a selectively infected tumor cells suggested multiple mechanisms, including cell surface binding and internalization.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / pathology. Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Glioma / pathology. Glioma / secondary. Vesiculovirus
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Carcinoma / drug therapy. Carcinoma / pathology. Carcinoma / secondary. Cell Line, Tumor. Cells, Cultured. Humans. Mice. Mice, Nude. Mice, SCID. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays / methods

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Glioma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Brain Tumors.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18287505.001).
  • [ISSN] 1529-2401
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / A1/NS48854; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA124737
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  •  go-up   go-down


8. Mrugala MM, Batchelor TT, Plotkin SR: Peripheral and cranial nerve sheath tumors. Curr Opin Neurol; 2005 Oct;18(5):604-10
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Peripheral and cranial nerve sheath tumors.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The intention of the authors is to provide the reader with an overview of the recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of nerve sheath tumors.
  • Vestibular schwannomas, neurogenetic syndromes such as schwannomatosis and multiple isolated neurofibromas, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors are covered in this review.
  • New insights into the biology of peripheral nerve tumor development and growth, including expression of vascular endothelial growth factor by vestibular schwannomas and the role of Notch signaling in malignant transformation of benign neurofibromas have been described.
  • Diagnostic criteria for schwannomatosis, a recently described condition, are being developed.
  • SUMMARY: Peripheral nerve tumors are classified according to the specific features of cellular differentiation.
  • The most common types include schwannoma and neurofibroma.
  • These tumors can occur sporadically or as manifestations of genetic syndromes such as neurofibromatosis types 1 and 2 or schwannomatosis.
  • The majority of peripheral nerve tumors are benign but malignant transformation does occur.
  • Metastatic tumors can also affect peripheral nerves.
  • Positron emission tomography is a useful technique in the presurgical differentiation between benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.
  • Treatment is directed towards symptomatic control.
  • Surgery, radiation and, in rare instances, chemotherapy are the major treatment modalities employed.
  • [MeSH-major] Cranial Nerve Neoplasms. Nerve Sheath Neoplasms / diagnosis. Nerve Sheath Neoplasms / therapy. Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16155448.001).
  • [ISSN] 1350-7540
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Opin. Neurol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 33
  •  go-up   go-down


9. Fridley JS, Chamoun RB, Whitehead WE, Curry DJ, Luerssen TG, Adesina A, Jea A: Malignant rhabdoid tumor of the spine in an infant: case report and review of the literature. Pediatr Neurosurg; 2009;45(3):237-43
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Malignant rhabdoid tumor of the spine in an infant: case report and review of the literature.
  • Malignant rhabdoid tumors of the spine are rare pediatric neoplasms that have a poor prognosis.
  • The histological, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical features are essential elements used in their diagnosis.
  • We report the case of a malignant rhabdoid tumor of the cervical spine in a 13-month-old infant.
  • Tumor cells were vimentin positive with prominent nucleoli indented by eosinophilic cytoplasmic inclusions containing intermediate filaments.
  • Despite chemotherapy, she developed worsening leptomeningeal dissemination, lower cranial nerve dysfunction, and hydrocephalus that did not respond to CSF diversion.
  • She died 4 months after initial diagnosis.
  • We review the literature on spinal malignant rhabdoid tumor and discuss the nomenclature, pathology, radiology, treatment, and outcomes of this rare entity.
  • [MeSH-major] Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Rhabdoid Tumor / pathology. Spinal Neoplasms / pathology

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Rhabdoid tumor.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - MRI Scans.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 19521139.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-0305
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Neurosurg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Number-of-references] 30
  •  go-up   go-down


10. Zhi K, Ren W, Zhou H, Wen Y, Zhang Y: Management of parapharyngeal-space tumors. J Oral Maxillofac Surg; 2009 Jun;67(6):1239-44
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Throat Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Management of parapharyngeal-space tumors.
  • PURPOSE: This study evaluated parapharyngeal-space (PPS) tumors in regard to clinical pathological features, preoperative assessment, surgical approaches, perioperative complications, and patterns of recurrence.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of patients with PPS tumors referred to the stomatological hospitals of Sichuan University and Xi'an Jiaotong University between 1990 and 2004.
  • RESULTS: Beginning in 1990 and ending in 2004, 162 patients with PPS tumors were evaluated in our unit.
  • All cases were evaluated with at least a computed tomography scan.
  • The most common class of lesion was salivary-gland neoplasm, accounting for 74 cases (45.68%).
  • The next most common group of tumors was neurogenic, representing 68 cases (41.98%).
  • Only 22 patients (13.58%) presented with malignant disease.
  • Twenty patients with malignant disease underwent adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy.
  • Two patients suffered local failure, and 4 patients developed distant metastasis during the observation period.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Surgery is the mainstay treatment for PPS tumors.
  • Surgical approaches were dictated by size of the tumor, its location, its relationship to the great vessels, and suspicion of malignancy.
  • The most common approach was transcervical-transparotid for benign tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / surgery. Pharyngeal Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenoma, Pleomorphic / surgery. Adult. Biopsy, Fine-Needle. Carcinoma / secondary. Carcinoma / surgery. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cranial Nerve Diseases / etiology. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Angiography. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Neck Muscles / surgery. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Parotid Gland / surgery. Postoperative Complications. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Salivary Gland Neoplasms / surgery. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [CommentIn] J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2010 May;68(5):1209-11; author reply 1212 [20403530.001]
  • (PMID = 19446210.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-5053
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery : official journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Oral Maxillofac. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


11. Vedrine PO, Thariat J, Merrot O, Percodani J, Dufour X, Choussy O, Toussaint B, Dassonville O, Klossek JM, Santini J, Jankowski R: Primary cancer of the sphenoid sinus--a GETTEC study. Head Neck; 2009 Mar;31(3):388-97
Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Sinus cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: Primary involvement of the sphenoid sinus occurs in 2% of all paranasal sinus tumors and is associated with dismal prognosis.
  • Charts were reviewed for patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related parameters.
  • RESULTS: Cranial neuropathies were present in 12 patients.
  • Pathologic findings included adenoid cystic carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, lymphoma, squamous cell carcinoma, sarcoma, neuroendocrine carcinoma, melanoma, and malignant hemangiopericytoma.
  • Radiotherapy was performed in 18 patients and chemotherapy in 12.
  • On multivariate analysis, cranial neuropathy was associated with worse locoregional control and survival.
  • Surgery was rarely complete because of advanced stages at presentation, but it yielded better outcomes than other treatments without surgery in non lymphoma-cases.
  • Cranial neuropathies indicate a worse prognosis.
  • Surgery, including debulking surgery, may be preferred to combined modality treatments without surgery.
  • Highly conformal radiotherapy (adjuvant or definitive) should be encouraged and optimized with concurrent chemotherapy in advanced stages.
  • Aggressive multidisciplinary management including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy should be encouraged and adapted on histology and tumor extensions.
  • [MeSH-major] Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms / mortality. Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms / therapy. Sphenoid Sinus / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Carcinoma / mortality. Carcinoma / pathology. Carcinoma / therapy. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cranial Nerve Diseases / complications. Diagnostic Imaging. Female. Humans. Lymphoma, B-Cell / mortality. Lymphoma, B-Cell / pathology. Lymphoma, B-Cell / therapy. Male. Melanoma / mortality. Melanoma / pathology. Melanoma / therapy. Meningioma / mortality. Meningioma / pathology. Meningioma / therapy. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Plasmacytoma / mortality. Plasmacytoma / pathology. Plasmacytoma / therapy. Preoperative Care. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Radiotherapy, Conformal

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18972425.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0347
  • [Journal-full-title] Head & neck
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Head Neck
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


12. Holzmeister R, Schindler C, Aichholzer M, Pichler J, Trenkler J, Spiegl K, Hammer J: [Intracerebrally localized sarcoma NOS--an interdisciplinary challenge]. Strahlenther Onkol; 2007 Jun;183(6):338-43
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Brain Tumors.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Intracerebrally localized sarcoma NOS--an interdisciplinary challenge].
  • [Transliterated title] Intrazerebral lokalisiertes Sarkom NOS--eine interdisziplinäre Herausforderung.
  • BACKGROUND: In the literature, surveys of malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumors are very rare (Table 1).
  • Therapeutic guidelines do not exist.
  • CASE REPORT: A 28-year-old female patient presented with a tumor in the postcentral region of the left parietal lobe (Figures 1 and 2).
  • The specimen could not be categorized into a common tumor entity and was classified as sarcoma NOS.
  • Due to the rapid tumor growth irradiation with CT-aided treatment planning (Figure 6) has been started immediately afterwards.
  • RESULT: 2 weeks after treatment, the patient presented with a noticeable tumor regression (magnetic resonance imaging; Figures 7 to 9).
  • She developed pulmonary metastases.
  • A partial remission could be achieved by systemic chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSION: In cases of intracerebrally localized sarcomas NOS, the earliest possible start of radiotherapy after surgery seems useful because of the noticed radiosensitivity of these tumors.
  • In regard of the local control, this tumor entity shows a documented excellent response to radiotherapy.
  • Interdisciplinary cooperation is mandatory to enhance the diagnostic process, the treatment decisions, and the results.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Cranial Irradiation. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / radiotherapy. Neurofibrosarcoma / radiotherapy. Parietal Lobe. Patient Care Team
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Combined Modality Therapy. Cooperative Behavior. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / radiotherapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Radiotherapy Planning, Computer-Assisted. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retreatment

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17520189.001).
  • [ISSN] 0179-7158
  • [Journal-full-title] Strahlentherapie und Onkologie : Organ der Deutschen Röntgengesellschaft ... [et al]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Strahlenther Onkol
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  •  go-up   go-down


13. Chen ML, McComb JG, Krieger MD: Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors of the central nervous system: management and outcomes. Neurosurg Focus; 2005 Jun 15;18(6A):E8

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors of the central nervous system: management and outcomes.
  • OBJECT: Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (ATRTs) represent a relatively newly categorized neoplastic entity.
  • They commonly present in childhood, and have a rapidly progressive clinical course with a survival time of less than 1 year.
  • Treatment regimens have been nonuniform.
  • In this retrospective review of patients with ATRTs who were treated at the authors' institution according to a uniform protocol, the goal was to assess the efficacy of the treatment and its outcome.
  • Signs and symptoms began, on average, a little more than 1 month before diagnosis and included the following: headache (36%), nausea and vomiting (46%), lethargy (18%), seizures (27%), cranial nerve findings (46%), ataxia (18%), long tract findings (18%), and hydrocephalus (46%).
  • Tumor location was cortical in four patients, in the pineal region in four, in the posterior fossa in two, and spinal in one.
  • In one patient disseminated disease was revealed on the initial imaging study; seven patients had disseminated tumor subsequently.
  • Treatment consisted of chemotherapy in 11 patients, chemotherapy and local radiation in five, and chemotherapy and craniospinal radiation in three.
  • The mean time to death was 24 months, and ranged from 2 to 67 months.
  • The median time to progression was 3.5 months.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors are malignant lesions with rapid progression.
  • Further study is necessary to determine the efficacy of therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Central Nervous System Neoplasms / therapy. Rhabdoid Tumor / therapy. Teratoma / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Infant. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Male. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16048294.001).
  • [ISSN] 1092-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgical focus
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurg Focus
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


14. Kim L, Glantz MJ: Neoplastic meningitis. Curr Treat Options Oncol; 2001 Dec;2(6):517-27
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Meningitis.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The frequency of neoplastic meningitis is increasing because of heightened clinical suspicion, improved neuroimaging techniques, and longer survival in patients with extraneural cancer Longer survival allows residual tumor cells within central nervous system sanctuary sites time to become symptomatic.
  • Affected patients may present with cerebral, cranial nerve, or spinal signs and symptoms, depending on the specific sites of central nervous system (CNS) involvement.
  • As a result, the standard diagnostic test for neoplastic meningitis remains the cytologic identification of malignant cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).
  • Although CSF cytology is useful, malignant cells are not detected in as many as one third of patients who have compelling clinical or radiographic evidence of neoplastic meningitis.
  • Novel assays are being tested that may enhance the early identification of malignant cells in CSF.
  • Currently, the diagnosis occurs generally after the onset of neurologic manifestations and heralds a rapidly fatal course for most patients.
  • By the time symptoms appear, most tumors have disseminated widely within the CNS, due to cortical irritation, compression of nervous system structures, or obstruction of CSF flow.
  • At this stage surgery, cranial irradiation, and chemotherapy are rarely, if ever, curative.
  • The goals of treatment are to improve or to stabilize the neurologic status of patients and to prolong survival.
  • If only symptomatic areas are treated, reseeding of the neuraxis with tumor cells will occur.
  • Therefore, intrathecal chemotherapy remains a mainstay of therapy.
  • Currently, four therapeutic agents are available for intrathecal treatment: methotrexate, ara-C, sustained-release ara-C (DepoCyt; Chiron Therapeutics, San Francisco, CA), and thiotepa.
  • Unfortunately, intrathecal chemotherapy does not treat bulky disease in the subarachnoid space, and often is slow to stabilize progressive neurologic deficits.
  • For these reasons, radiation therapy to sites of symptomatic disease and sites of bulky disease on imaging studies is recommended.
  • Alternative approaches (which offer less toxicity, enhanced therapeutic effect, and prolonged survival) are being investigated.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / pathology. Meningitis / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma / blood. Carcinoma / cerebrospinal fluid. Carcinoma / secondary. Combined Modality Therapy. Cranial Irradiation. Diagnostic Imaging. Epidemiologic Methods. Glioma / pathology. Humans. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Palliative Care. Risk Factors. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Brain Tumors.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1994 Sep 1;54(17):4710-4 [8062269.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1993 Nov;11(11):2186-93 [8229133.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Treat Rep. 1982 Dec;66(12):2105-6 [6958367.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1995 Jun 15;75(12):2919-31 [7773943.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer Clin Oncol. 1987 Jan;23(1):1-4 [3297711.001]
  • [Cites] J Natl Cancer Inst. 1988 Oct 5;80(15):1211-6 [3418727.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2001 Aug 15;92(4):856-62 [11550158.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1987 Oct;5(10):1655-62 [3309199.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 1989 Nov;7(4):319-28 [2585028.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Neurol. 1997 Jan;54(1):16-7 [9006407.001]
  • [Cites] J Nucl Med. 1971 Aug;12(8):555-7 [5093427.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 1996 Jun;2(6):963-72 [9816257.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1989 Nov;7(11):1701-9 [2809683.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurol. 1999 Sep;246(9):810-4 [10525979.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 1998 Jun-Jul;38(2-3):225-32 [9696376.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1993 Mar;11(3):561-9 [8445432.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 1991 Feb;54(2):119-23 [2019836.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Med. 1982 Nov;73(5):641-7 [6814249.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Neurol. 1980 Dec;8(6):597-604 [7212647.001]
  • [Cites] Neurology. 2000 Apr 25;54(8):1670-6 [10762512.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1998 Mar 1;82(5):923-30 [9486583.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1995 Jul 15;76(2):232-6 [8625097.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1975 Jul 24;293(4):161-6 [806016.001]
  • [Cites] Neurosurg Focus. 1998 Jun 15;4(6):e4 [17154444.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1986 Jan;46(1):169-74 [2933145.001]
  • [Cites] Neurology. 1994 Aug;44(8):1463-9 [8058150.001]
  • [Cites] Kaohsiung J Med Sci. 1997 Oct;13(10):626-30 [9385779.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1982 Feb 15;49(4):759-72 [6895713.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Neurol. 1996 Jul;53(7):626-32 [8929170.001]
  • [Cites] J Natl Cancer Inst. 1992 Aug 5;84(15):1203-4 [1635089.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Treat Rev. 1999 Apr;25(2):103-19 [10395835.001]
  • [Cites] J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 1992 May;51(3):235-45 [1583530.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 1990 Dec;9(3):225-9 [2086737.001]
  • [Cites] J Cancer Res Clin Oncol. 2001 Jan;127(1):2-8 [11206266.001]
  • [Cites] Invest New Drugs. 1985;3(3):293-6 [4066222.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1998 Apr;16(4):1561-7 [9552066.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1978 Jul;42(1):283-6 [667799.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Neurol. 1995 Jul;38(1):51-7 [7611725.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosurg. 1996 Oct;85(4):648-54 [8814169.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1996 Feb 1;77(3):543-8 [8630963.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Chemother Pharmacol. 1995;36(2):121-4 [7767947.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1999 Oct;17(10):3110-6 [10506606.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 1999 Nov;5(11):3394-402 [10589750.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Nucl Med. 1984;9(3):125-8 [6325197.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 1994;19(3):239-44 [7807174.001]
  • [Cites] Neurology. 1998 Apr;50(4):1173-5 [9566421.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1998 Feb 15;82(4):733-9 [9477107.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Med. 1981 Jul;71(1):26-32 [6264785.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Treat Rep. 1977 Jul;61(4):733-43 [577896.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 1998 Jun-Jul;38(2-3):245-52 [9696379.001]
  • [Cites] Neurology. 1991 Nov;41(11):1765-9 [1944906.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurooncol. 1997 May;32(3):215-23 [9049883.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Oncol. 1996 Oct;7(8):773-86 [8922190.001]
  • [Cites] CA Cancer J Clin. 2001 Jan-Feb;51(1):15-36 [11577478.001]
  • [Cites] J Immunother Emphasis Tumor Immunol. 1993 Jan;13(1):49-54 [8435432.001]
  • (PMID = 12057097.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-2729
  • [Journal-full-title] Current treatment options in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Treat Options Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 63
  •  go-up   go-down


15. Chen L, Mao Y, Chen H, Zhou LF: Diagnosis and management of intracranial malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Neurosurgery; 2008 Apr;62(4):825-32; discussion 832

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Diagnosis and management of intracranial malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.
  • OBJECTIVE: Intracranial malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are rare and generally carry a poor prognosis.
  • We have analyzed our experience with MPNSTs and conducted a review of the literature in an attempt to identify a rational approach to the management of these tumors.
  • METHODS: Eight patients underwent surgical treatment for intracranial MPNSTs during a 10-year period from 1996 to 2005.
  • The general strategy was to perform complete resection whenever possible and to provide adjuvant radiotherapy for residual tumor.
  • Chemotherapy was not used in this group.
  • Total tumor resection was achieved in five patients.
  • At this time, two have been recurrence-free for 3.5 and 5 years, respectively, and the other three patients had a mean postoperative survival of 7 months.
  • There was one case of near total (>90%) and two cases of partial (<90%) tumor removal; the postoperative survival rate was 4, 4, and 2 months, respectively.
  • CONCLUSION: MPNSTs are fast-growing, invasive tumors with rather unsatisfactory outcomes.
  • Total surgical resection seems to be the most effective therapeutic method, and radiotherapy may play a role in local control.
  • [MeSH-major] Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / diagnosis. Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / surgery. Nerve Sheath Neoplasms / diagnosis. Nerve Sheath Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Treatment Outcome

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18496188.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4040
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurgery
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


16. Baiges-Octavio JJ, Huerta-Villanueva M: [Meningeal carcinomatosis]. Rev Neurol; 2000 Dec 16-31;31(12):1237-41

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • INTRODUCTION: Meningeal carcinomatosis is a serious complication of solid tumors, particularly adenocarcinomas of breast, lung and melanoma.
  • OBJECTIVE: In this paper we present a review of the bibliography on this disease, with particular emphasis on etiopathogenic, clinical--especially otoneurophthalmological--diagnostic and therapeutic aspects.
  • The characteristic of the disease is involvement of various levels of the nervous system, including encephalic, cranial or spinal nerve and spinal symptoms.
  • Neuroimaging studies (computerized axial tomography, magnetic resonance and isotope studies of cerebrospinal fluid flow) are necessary to evaluate associated metastases and detect obstruction of cerebrospinal fluid flow.
  • Positive cerebrospinal fluid cytological findings confirm the diagnosis.
  • Treatment should be tailored to the individual according to the clinical condition and nature of the tumour and should combine intrathecal chemotherapy and local radiotherapy, although recent studies have shown good results with systemic chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSION: A high degree of clinical suspicion is necessary for diagnosis of this uncommon disease, with neurological signs show to be present at different levels and the finding of malignant cells in the cerebrospinal fluid for confirmation of the diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / secondary. Meningeal Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Biomarkers, Tumor / cerebrospinal fluid. Cell Movement. Combined Modality Therapy. Cranial Irradiation. Diagnostic Imaging. Humans. Injections, Spinal. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Proteins / cerebrospinal fluid. Prognosis

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 11205566.001).
  • [ISSN] 0210-0010
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista de neurologia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Neurol
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins
  • [Number-of-references] 25
  •  go-up   go-down


17. Huang Q, Wu H, Wang Z, Zhang Z, Jia H: [Diagnosis and treatment of lateral skull base tumors in pediatric]. Lin Chung Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2008 Aug;22(16):734-7

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Diagnosis and treatment of lateral skull base tumors in pediatric].
  • OBJECTIVE: To explore the diagnosis and treatment of lateral skull base tumors in children.
  • METHOD: The clinical data of 8 patients with lateral skull base tumors were reviewed in a retrospective study.
  • One had schwannoma of the trigeminal nerve, one had malignant melanoma, one had fibroma in temporal bone, one had chordoma, two had rhabdomyosarcoma, two had esthesioneuroblastoma.
  • Of 8 patients, one case was treated with chemotherapy.
  • The other 7 cases of benign or malignant tumors underwent surgery in different approaches.
  • Four patients had pre-and postoperative chemotherapy.
  • Three patients received postoperative chemotherapy.
  • One patient of chordoma died 5 months after surgery, the other 7 patients were alive at the time of analysis.
  • One patient developed hoarseness.
  • Two patients developed swallowing obstruction and healed 3-4 months after surgery.
  • CONCLUSION: Tumors in lateral skull base in children were rare, of which malignant tumors were more common compared to benign lesions.
  • Surgery is the first choice of the treatment for lateral skull base tumors.
  • Radiation therapy and chemotherapy could be used for malignant tumors preoperatively and postoperatively.
  • Combined approach of temporal and infratemporal fossa is suitable for the surgery of those tumors involved temporal bone and middle or posterior cranial fossa as well as infratemporal fossa.
  • [MeSH-major] Skull Base Neoplasms / diagnosis. Skull Base Neoplasms / surgery

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18975775.001).
  • [ISSN] 1001-1781
  • [Journal-full-title] Lin chuang er bi yan hou tou jing wai ke za zhi = Journal of clinical otorhinolaryngology, head, and neck surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lin Chung Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  •  go-up   go-down


18. Baussart B, Lepeintre JF, Condette-Auliac S, Dupuy M, Gaillard S: [Primitive intracranial trigeminal nerve germinoma. Case report]. Neurochirurgie; 2007 Feb;53(1):43-6
Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Germinoma.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Primitive intracranial trigeminal nerve germinoma. Case report].
  • [Transliterated title] Localisation trigéminale d'un germinome intracrânien primitif. A propos d'un cas.
  • Radiological analysis showed an enhanced lesion that originated from the cavernous sinus and extended into the Meckel cave, owing to the fifth cranial nerve's course.
  • On the basis of histological analysis and negativity of tumor marker levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (alpha-fetoprotein alpha, human beta-chorionic gonadotropin), a primitive non-secreting intracranial germinoma was diagnosed.
  • Under combined chemotherapy (carboplatine, ifosfamide, etoposide) followed by focal fractionated radiotherapy delivering 40 Gy to the initial tumor volume, the outcome was excellent.
  • Primitive intracranial germinomas are rare malignant tumors involving mainly pineal and hypothalamic regions.
  • We report a case of intracranial trigeminal nerve germinoma.
  • Aspects of diagnosis and treatment are discussed in the light of previous publishing data.
  • [MeSH-major] Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / therapy. Germinoma / therapy. Trigeminal Nerve Diseases / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Cavernous Sinus / pathology. Combined Modality Therapy. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Neurologic Examination. Paresthesia / etiology

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17337016.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-3770
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuro-Chirurgie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurochirurgie
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  •  go-up   go-down


19. Zhang WC, Zhang L, Wang XD, Wu YS: [Clinical and pathological analysis of malignant carotid body tumor]. Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2008 Aug;43(8):591-5
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Clinical and pathological analysis of malignant carotid body tumor].
  • OBJECTIVE: To summarize the clinical, pathological and prognosis character of malignant carotid body tumor and explore its methods of diagnosis and treatment.
  • METHODS: The data of clinic, pathology, treatment and follow-up of nine patients with malignant carotid body tumor in Tianjin Cancer Hospital from February 1982 to June 2006 were analyzed retrospectively.
  • Shamblin classification: one case was type II, eight cases were type III.
  • Seven cases were diagnosed as carotid body tumor.
  • All the patients were performed wide excision of tumor and surrounding tissue.
  • After operation, eight cases had 13 cranial nerve deficits, they were: two cerchnus, four glossal deviation, three Horner syndrome and one drop of oral corner, one choking cough.
  • Pathologic diagnosis included nine malignant carotid body tumors, two with capsule, seven without capsule, one cervical and one lung metastasis.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Malignant carotid body tumor is rare in clinic, and often invade the carotid and cranial nerve, the diagnosis of malignant tumor should base on occurring extensive invasion of adjacent organs and metastasis; Wide surgical excision should be selected early, radiotherapy is effective, the effect of chemotherapy is uncertainty.
  • [MeSH-major] Carotid Body Tumor / pathology. Carotid Body Tumor / surgery. Head and Neck Neoplasms / pathology. Head and Neck Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Cranial Nerves / pathology. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Carotid Body Tumor.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18959263.001).
  • [ISSN] 1673-0860
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua er bi yan hou tou jing wai ke za zhi = Chinese journal of otorhinolaryngology head and neck surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  •  go-up   go-down


20. Selesnick SH, Burt BM: Regional spread of nonneurogenic tumors to the skull base via the facial nerve. Otol Neurotol; 2003 Mar;24(2):326-33
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. GADOLINIUM, ELEMENTAL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Regional spread of nonneurogenic tumors to the skull base via the facial nerve.
  • OBJECTIVE: This study examined the clinical and pathologic features of regional spread of nonneurogenic neoplastic disease to the intratemporal segments of the facial nerve.
  • PATIENTS: Six patients with neoplastic disease of nonneurogenic origin involving segments of the facial nerve within the temporal bone.
  • Five patients received adjuvant radiation, and two received adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy.
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Histopathology, site of primary tumor, intratemporal location of regional spread along the facial nerve, degree of facial paralysis, and presence of residual disease.
  • Perineural spread was histologically found in all cases of malignant disease.
  • In addition, one case of benign pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland that circumferentially involved an intratemporal segment of the facial nerve was reported.
  • Four patients had unresectable malignant disease, and two died despite multimodality therapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The facial nerve provides a route for the spread of neoplastic disease into the temporal bone, and perineural invasion is an important mechanism of invasion and motility of malignant disease.
  • Nonneurogenic intratemporal tumors of the facial nerve are a rare but significant cause of facial paralysis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / pathology. Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / pathology. Facial Nerve / pathology. Parotid Neoplasms / pathology. Skull Base Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Child. Female. Gadolinium. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology. Radiopharmaceuticals. Retrospective Studies

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 12621352.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-7129
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; AU0V1LM3JT / Gadolinium
  •  go-up   go-down


21. Turowski B, Zanella FE: Interventional neuroradiology of the head and neck. Neuroimaging Clin N Am; 2003 Aug;13(3):619-45
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head and Neck Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Vascular interventions are important and helpful for treatment of various pathologies of the head and neck.
  • Interventional neuroradiology of the head and neck includes image-guided biopsies, vessel occlusion, and local chemotherapy.
  • Knowledge of anatomy, functional relationships between intra- and extracranial vessels, and pathology are the basis for therapeutic success.
  • Neuroradiologic imaging, especially CT and MR imaging, and appropriate analysis of angiographic findings help ensure indication for treatment and plan an intervention.
  • Indications for image-guided biopsies are preverterbal fluid-collections, spinal and paraspinal inflammations and abscesses, deep cervical malignancies, vertebral body, and skull base tumors.
  • Special care should be taken to preserve critical structures in this region, including spinal nerve roots, cervical plexus, main peripheral nerves, and vessels.
  • Indications for vessel occlusion are emergency situations to stop bleeding in vascular lesions (traumatic, malformation, or tumors) by reduction of pressure, preoperative reduction of blood flow to minimize the surgical risk, palliative occlusion of feeding vessels to produce tumor necrosis, or potential curative (or presurgical) occlusion of vascular malformations.
  • Examples of these interventions are: a hemangioma of the hard palate, a juvenile angiofibroma, a hemangiopericytoma, a malignant meningioma, a malignant fibrous histiocytoma, and a glomus tumor.
  • Effective treatment of vascular malformations, such as AV fistulas or angiomas, needs exact occlusion of the fistula or the angiomatous nidus, which is demonstrated in the case of an AV angioma of the base of the tongue.
  • Chemotherapy with local intra-arterial cisplatin combined with intravenous administration of sodium thiosulfate as antidote is indicated as an adjuvant modality in a multimodal regimen of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma or as palliative treatment of recurrent and otherwise untreatable malignant tumors of the head and neck.
  • Palliative treatment of a bleeding oropharyngeal cancer is another example of interventional treatment.
  • Selective treatment, either occluding or pharmacologic, may be preoperative, palliative, or curative.
  • The objective is reduction of surgical risk, improvement of quality of life, or curative therapy of a lesion.
  • Thus, the interventional treatment should not be associated with morbidity or mortality.
  • Major complications, such as cerebral stroke, blindness, or cranial nerve palsies, can result from application of inappropriate techniques or poor evaluation of angiographic findings and should be avoided in the majority of cases.
  • These include inflammation, necrosis, and nerve damage.
  • The benefits, risks, and expected damages of neuroradiologic interventions must be balanced during the informed consent procedure with the patient.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiography. Head and Neck Neoplasms / therapy. Neuroradiography. Radiology, Interventional

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 14631695.001).
  • [ISSN] 1052-5149
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuroimaging clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuroimaging Clin. N. Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 40
  •  go-up   go-down






Advertisement