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1. Kruse AJ, Bottenberg MJ, Tosserams J, Slangen B, van Marion AM, van Trappen PO: The absence of high-risk HPV combined with specific p53 and p16INK4a expression patterns points to the HPV-independent pathway as the causative agent for vulvar squamous cell carcinoma and its precursor simplex VIN in a young patient. Int J Gynecol Pathol; 2008 Oct;27(4):591-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The absence of high-risk HPV combined with specific p53 and p16INK4a expression patterns points to the HPV-independent pathway as the causative agent for vulvar squamous cell carcinoma and its precursor simplex VIN in a young patient.
  • Simplex vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) is an important precursor of vulvar invasive squamous cell carcinoma and characteristically occurs in postmenopausal women.
  • In this report, the absence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) combined with specific p53 and p16INK4a expression patterns points to the HPV-independent pathway as the causative agent for vulvar squamous cell carcinoma in a 28-year-old woman.
  • Its precursor simplex VIN was initially interpreted as eczema.
  • Although simplex VIN has a predilection for postmenopausal women, it can occur in young patients.
  • The development of invasive vulvar squamous cell carcinoma underlines the importance of including simplex VIN in the differential diagnosis of vulvar lesions, even at a young age.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16 / biosynthesis. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / biosynthesis. Vulvar Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 18753959.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-7151
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of gynecological pathology : official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Pathologists
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Gynecol. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16; 0 / DNA, Viral; 0 / TP53 protein, human; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
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2. Albers SE, Taylor G, Huyer D, Oliver G, Krafchik BR: Vulvitis circumscripta plasmacellularis mimicking child abuse. J Am Acad Dermatol; 2000 Jun;42(6):1078-80
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The primary diagnostic concern was sexual abuse.
  • VCP may also mimic lichen sclerosus, extramammary Paget's disease, pemphigus vulgaris, fixed drug eruption, squamous cell carcinoma, candidiasis, allergic contact dermatitis, and herpes simplex infection.
  • [MeSH-major] Child Abuse, Sexual / diagnosis. Vulvitis / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy. Child. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Vulva / pathology

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  • (PMID = 10827417.001).
  • [ISSN] 0190-9622
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Acad. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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3. Ponticelli C, Passerini P: Gastrointestinal complications in renal transplant recipients. Transpl Int; 2005 Jun;18(6):643-50
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Gastrointestinal complications in renal transplant recipients.
  • Gastrointestinal complications are frequent in renal transplant recipients and can include oral lesions, esophagitis, peptic ulcer, diarrhea, colon disorders and malignancy.
  • Oral lesions may be caused by drugs such as cyclosporine and sirolimus, by virus or fungal infections.
  • Other gastroduodenal disorders are caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex infection.
  • Diarrhea is a frequent disorder which may be caused by pathogen microorganisms or by immunosuppressive agents.
  • The differential diagnosis may be difficult.
  • Colon cancer, anal carcinoma, and EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders are particularly frequent in transplant recipients.

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  • (PMID = 15910287.001).
  • [ISSN] 0934-0874
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplant international : official journal of the European Society for Organ Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transpl. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Number-of-references] 68
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4. Fleming J: Current treatments for hepatitis. J Infus Nurs; 2002 Nov-Dec;25(6):379-82
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Common viral agents known to cause inflammation of the liver (hepatitis) are hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV).
  • Some other viral agents that can cause hepatitis are Epstein Barr virus, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus.
  • Some patients infected with these viral agents progress to develop chronic viral hepatitis.
  • In addition to being a leading cause of chronic hepatitis, HCV is most frequently associated with liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-minor] Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. Fluid Therapy. Health Personnel. Humans. Immunoglobulins, Intravenous / therapeutic use. Infection Control. Liver Transplantation. Mass Screening. Occupational Diseases / diagnosis. Occupational Diseases / epidemiology. Occupational Diseases / therapy. Primary Prevention. Risk Factors. United States / epidemiology. Vaccination

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  • (PMID = 12464795.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-1458
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of infusion nursing : the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Infus Nurs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Immunoglobulins, Intravenous
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5. Buechner SA: Common skin disorders of the penis. BJU Int; 2002 Sep;90(5):498-506
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Diseases of the male genitalia range from infectious lesions to inflammatory and neoplastic conditions, including many genital manifestations of more general skin diseases.
  • This review highlights the clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of the most common dermatoses of the male genitalia.
  • Herpes simplex virus infection is the commonest infectious cause of genital ulceration, with evidence that many infections are asymptomatic.
  • The most common causal agents for condyloma acuminatum are low-risk HPV 6 and 11; high-risk HPV types 16 and 18 are associated with premalignant and malignant lesions.
  • Imiquimod, a new topical immunotherapeutic agent, which induces interferon and other cytokines, has the potential to be a first-line therapy for genital warts.
  • Oral ivermectin, a highly active antiparasitic drug, is likely to be the treatment of choice, but until approval is granted it should be reserved for special forms of scabies.
  • Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in situ, e.g. erythroplasia of Queyrat and Bowen's disease, cannot be excluded clinically; their apparent clinical benignity may lead to lengthy periods of misdiagnosis and biopsy is required to confirm the diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-minor] Balanitis / diagnosis. Balanitis / therapy. Humans. Male. Mite Infestations / diagnosis. Mite Infestations / therapy. Penile Neoplasms / diagnosis. Penile Neoplasms / therapy. Skin Diseases, Parasitic / diagnosis. Skin Diseases, Parasitic / therapy. Skin Diseases, Viral / diagnosis. Skin Diseases, Viral / therapy


6. Domínguez Alcón L, Pita Fernández L, Carretero L: [Herpes simple esophagitis in immunocompetent adult]. Rev Esp Enferm Dig; 2009 May;101(5):368-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Herpes simple esophagitis in immunocompetent adult].
  • [Transliterated title] Esofagitis herpetica por herpes simple en adulto inmunocompetente.
  • [MeSH-major] Esophagitis / virology. Herpes Simplex / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Biopsy. Carcinoma / diagnosis. Deglutition Disorders / drug therapy. Deglutition Disorders / etiology. Diagnosis, Differential. Esophageal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Esophagoscopy. Humans. Immunocompetence. Male. Ulcer / diagnosis. Ulcer / etiology

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  • [SummaryForPatientsIn] Rev Esp Enferm Dig. 2009 May;101(5):367 [19998550.001]
  • (PMID = 19527084.001).
  • [ISSN] 1130-0108
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista española de enfermedades digestivas : organo oficial de la Sociedad Española de Patología Digestiva
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Esp Enferm Dig
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Letter
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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7. Tan HH, Goh CL: Viral infections affecting the skin in organ transplant recipients: epidemiology and current management strategies. Am J Clin Dermatol; 2006;7(1):13-29
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Viral infections affecting the skin in organ transplant recipients: epidemiology and current management strategies.
  • Viral skin infections are common findings in organ transplant recipients.
  • The most important etiological agents are the group of human herpesviruses (HHV), human papillomaviruses (HPV), and molluscum contagiosum virus.
  • HHV that are important in this group of patients are herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2, varicella-zoster virus (VZV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), HHV-6 and -7, and HHV-8, which causes Kaposi sarcoma (KS).
  • The most common manifestations of HSV infection in organ transplant recipients are mucocutaneous lesions of the oropharynx or genital regions.
  • Acyclovir resistance may arise although the majority of acyclovir-resistant strains have been isolated from AIDS patients and not organ transplant recipients.
  • In organ transplant recipients, recurrent herpes zoster can occur.
  • CMV infection occurs in 20-60% of all transplant recipients.
  • The present gold standard for treatment is ganciclovir, but newer drugs such as valganciclovir appear promising.
  • EBV is responsible for some cases of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder, which represents the greatest risk of serious EBV disease in transplant recipients.
  • HHV-6 and HHV-7 are two relatively newly discovered viruses and, at present, the body of information concerning these two agents is still fairly limited.
  • Iatrogenic KS is seen in solid-organ transplant recipients, with a prevalence of 0.5-5% depending on the patient's country of origin.
  • HPV is ubiquitous, and organ transplant recipients may never totally clear HPV infections, which are the most frequently recurring infections in renal transplant recipients.
  • HPV infection in transplant recipients is important because of its link to the development of certain skin cancers, in particular, squamous cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / administration & dosage. Organ Transplantation. Skin Diseases, Viral / diagnosis. Skin Diseases, Viral / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] 2-Aminopurine / administration & dosage. 2-Aminopurine / analogs & derivatives. Acyclovir / administration & dosage. Acyclovir / analogs & derivatives. Cytomegalovirus Infections / diagnosis. Cytomegalovirus Infections / drug therapy. Cytosine / administration & dosage. Cytosine / analogs & derivatives. Drug Administration Schedule. Epstein-Barr Virus Infections / diagnosis. Epstein-Barr Virus Infections / drug therapy. Foscarnet / administration & dosage. Herpes Zoster / diagnosis. Herpes Zoster / drug therapy. Herpesviridae Infections / diagnosis. Herpesviridae Infections / drug therapy. Humans. Immunocompromised Host. Molluscum Contagiosum / diagnosis. Molluscum Contagiosum / drug therapy. Organophosphonates / administration & dosage. Papillomavirus Infections / diagnosis. Papillomavirus Infections / drug therapy. Trifluridine / administration & dosage. Valine / administration & dosage. Valine / analogs & derivatives

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  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Famciclovir .
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  • (PMID = 16489840.001).
  • [ISSN] 1175-0561
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of clinical dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Clin Dermatol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Organophosphonates; 104227-87-4 / famciclovir; 364P9RVW4X / Foscarnet; 452-06-2 / 2-Aminopurine; 8J337D1HZY / Cytosine; HG18B9YRS7 / Valine; JIL713Q00N / cidofovir; MZ1IW7Q79D / valacyclovir; RMW9V5RW38 / Trifluridine; X4HES1O11F / Acyclovir
  • [Number-of-references] 124
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8. Asghar AH, Mahmood H, Faheem M, Rizvi S, Khan KA, Irfan J: Porocarcinoma: a rare sweat gland malignancy. J Coll Physicians Surg Pak; 2009 Jun;19(6):389-90
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • It has also been described as malignant hidroacanthoma simplex, sweat gland carcinoma, malignant intra-epidermal eccrine poroma, eccrine poroepithelioma, dysplastic poroma, malignant syringo acanthoma and porocarcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Acrospiroma / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Cisplatin / therapeutic use. Doxorubicin / therapeutic use. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Sweat Gland Neoplasms / diagnosis. Sweat Gland Neoplasms / drug therapy. Sweat Gland Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 19486582.001).
  • [ISSN] 1022-386X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons--Pakistan : JCPSP
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Coll Physicians Surg Pak
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Pakistan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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