[X] Close
You are about to erase all the values you have customized, search history, page format, etc.
Click here to RESET all values       Click here to GO BACK without resetting any value
Items 1 to 13 of about 13
1. Sawazaki H, Okasyo K, Takahashi T, Taki Y, Takeuchi H: [Squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder presenting with spontanenous intraperitoneal bladder rupture: a case report]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2008 Dec;54(12):779-82
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder presenting with spontanenous intraperitoneal bladder rupture: a case report].
  • On computed tomography (CT) gastrointestinal perforation was denied and irregular thickness of the bladder wall was pointed out.
  • Cystography was performed, but bladder rupture was not confirmed.
  • Post-cystogram-CT revealed the leakage of contrast material in the peritoneal cavity from the urinary bladder.
  • Spontaneous intraperitoneal bladder rupture was diagnosed.
  • Abdominal organs were normal when explored, but a small perforation was found on the vault of the bladder and primary closure was performed.
  • Postoperatively, cystoscopy was performed again after the medication with antibiotics.
  • Histological examination of specimens revealed squamous cell carcinoma.
  • On abdominal CT, invasive bladder carcinoma, left hydronephrosis and hydroureter were pointed out.
  • Considering her age, general health status and prognosis, only right ureterocutaneostomy was performed.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / complications. Urinary Bladder Diseases / etiology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / complications


2. Yosry A: Schistosomiasis and neoplasia. Contrib Microbiol; 2006;13:81-100
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • There is sufficient evidence that S. hematobium, the predominant etiologic agent for urinary schistosomiasis, is carcinogenic to humans leading to squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder, a relatively uncommon vesical cancer in nonendemic areas.
  • There is limited evidence suggesting that S. japonicum is possibly carcinogenic to humans leading to colorectal cancer and is a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma formation.
  • There is inadequate evidence for the carcinogenicity of S. mansoni in humans. S. mansoni may still be linked to hepatocellular carcinoma through potentiating the effects of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus on the liver.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Endemic Diseases. Humans

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Schistosomiasis.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16627960.001).
  • [ISSN] 1420-9519
  • [Journal-full-title] Contributions to microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Contrib Microbiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Number-of-references] 143
  •  go-up   go-down


3. Brown M: Parasites as aetiological agents in chronic diseases. Epidemiological associations and potential mechanisms of pathogenesis. Parasite Immunol; 2009 Nov;31(11):653-5
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Parasites as aetiological agents in chronic diseases. Epidemiological associations and potential mechanisms of pathogenesis.
  • Examples include Schistosoma mansoni infection leading to portal hypertension, Schistosoma haematobium infection leading to obstructive uropathy and squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder, Clonorchis sinensis leading to cholangiocarcinoma, and Taenia solium infection leading to epilepsy.
  • Imprecise case definitions, and the lack of good animal models, are limitations to the evidence for a causal role of parasitic infection in these diseases.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Humans. Immunity. Parasites / pathogenicity. Virulence

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Coping with Chronic Illness.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Parasitic Diseases.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19825104.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-3024
  • [Journal-full-title] Parasite immunology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Parasite Immunol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Editorial
  • [Publication-country] England
  •  go-up   go-down


Advertisement
4. De Santis M, Bachner M: New developments in first- and second-line chemotherapy for transitional cell, squamous cell and adenocarcinoma of the bladder. Curr Opin Urol; 2007 Sep;17(5):363-8
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] New developments in first- and second-line chemotherapy for transitional cell, squamous cell and adenocarcinoma of the bladder.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the systemic treatment, patient selection and treatment outcome of transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, focusing on advances and findings within the last year.
  • RECENT FINDINGS: Cisplatin-based chemotherapy is considered to be the standard treatment for transitional cell carcinoma.
  • Patient selection for cisplatin, newer drugs or alternative combinations is crucial.
  • Only few data are available on the systemic treatment of squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma.
  • Complete resection seems to be more important than chemotherapy in the rare cases of adenocarcinoma of the urinary tract.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / drug therapy. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bladder Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17762632.001).
  • [ISSN] 0963-0643
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
  • [Number-of-references] 58
  •  go-up   go-down


5. Kassouf W, Spiess PE, Siefker-Radtke A, Swanson D, Grossman HB, Kamat AM, Munsell MF, Guo CC, Czerniak BA, Dinney CP: Outcome and patterns of recurrence of nonbilharzial pure squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder: a contemporary review of The University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center experience. Cancer; 2007 Aug 15;110(4):764-9
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Outcome and patterns of recurrence of nonbilharzial pure squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder: a contemporary review of The University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center experience.
  • BACKGROUND: Nonbilharzial squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the bladder is a rare entity in the Western hemisphere.
  • History of superficial transitional cell carcinoma that differentiated into pure SCC (P = .035; hazards ratio [HR] of 3.73) and treatment by radical cystectomy (P = .002; HR of 0.19) were associated with RFS.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In select patients with resectable disease, radical cystectomy remains the mainstay of therapy for pure SCC of the bladder.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / therapy. Combined Modality Therapy. Cystectomy / methods. Drug Therapy / methods. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy / methods. Survival Rate. Texas. Treatment Outcome


6. Raghavan D: Progress in the chemotherapy of metastatic cancer of the urinary tract. Cancer; 2003 Apr 15;97(8 Suppl):2050-5
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Progress in the chemotherapy of metastatic cancer of the urinary tract.
  • Cytotoxic chemotherapy has an evolving role in the management of metastatic cancer of the bladder and urinary tract.
  • The most responsive of these tumors are transitional cell carcinomas.
  • Standard single agents (e.g., methotrexate, doxorubicin, mitomycin, ifosfamide, vinblastine, and cisplatin) have produced objective response rates of 15-25% and combination chemotherapy has resulted in objective regression in 40-75% of cases.
  • Traditional cytotoxic regimens have been ineffective in the management of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder.
  • Because historically controlled comparisons may introduce errors from case selection bias, stage migration, differences in duration of follow-up, and the evolution of supportive care, it is essential to validate the role of new agents in well structured, randomized clinical trials.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Adenocarcinoma / mortality. Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / secondary. Humans. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Metastatic cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bladder Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright 2003 American Cancer Society
  • (PMID = 12673696.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 46
  •  go-up   go-down


7. Shokeir AA: Squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder: pathology, diagnosis and treatment. BJU Int; 2004 Jan;93(2):216-20
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder: pathology, diagnosis and treatment.
  • Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) can occur in both nonbilharzial and bilharzial bladders; the two subtypes differ in epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinicopathological features.
  • The nonbilharzial type occurs in Western countries and represents < 5% of all vesical tumours; it occurs most often in the seventh decade with a slight male predominance.
  • Bladder carcinogenesis is probably related to bacterial and viral infections, commonly associated with bilharzial infestation rather than the parasite itself.
  • The presentation is often with irritative bladder symptoms and haematuria, and many patients present at an advanced stage, although most tumours are of low and moderate grades.
  • Early detection improves the therapeutic yield and prevention is possible by combining snail control and mass therapy of the infested rural population by oral antibilharzial drugs.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / pathology


8. Naranmandura H, Ibata K, Suzuki KT: Toxicity of dimethylmonothioarsinic acid toward human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Chem Res Toxicol; 2007 Aug;20(8):1120-5
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Toxicity of dimethylmonothioarsinic acid toward human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells.
  • Chronic ingestion of arsenic-contaminated drinking water induces skin lesions and urinary bladder cancer in humans.
  • It is now recognized that thioarsenicals such as dimethylmonothioarsinic acid (DMMTA (V)) are commonly excreted in the urine of humans and animals and that the production of DMMTA (V) may be a risk factor for the development of the diseases caused by arsenic.
  • The toxicity of DMMTA (V) was compared with that of related nonthiolated arsenicals with respect to cell viability, uptake ability, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell cycle progression of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells, arsenate (iAs (V)), arsenite (iAs (III)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA (V)), and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA (III)) being used as reference nonthiolated arsenicals.
  • Exposure of DMMTA (V) to cells for 24 h induced cell cycle perturbation.
  • [MeSH-major] Arsenic Poisoning. Arsenicals / adverse effects. Cacodylic Acid / analogs & derivatives. Cell Cycle / drug effects. Skin Neoplasms / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Division. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Survival / drug effects. Cell Survival / physiology. G1 Phase. Humans. Lethal Dose 50. Oxidation-Reduction. Reactive Oxygen Species / metabolism. S Phase. Time Factors

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Epidermoid Carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Arsenic.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Skin Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DIMETHYLARSENIC ACID .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17630711.001).
  • [ISSN] 0893-228X
  • [Journal-full-title] Chemical research in toxicology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chem. Res. Toxicol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Arsenicals; 0 / Reactive Oxygen Species; 0 / dimethylmonothioarsinic acid; AJ2HL7EU8K / Cacodylic Acid
  •  go-up   go-down


9. Shigehara K, Kitagawa Y, Nakashima T, Shimamura M: Squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder: a patient treated successfully with a new combined chemotherapy regimen, intraarterial nedaplatin and pirarubicin plus intravenous methotrexate and vincristine. Int J Clin Oncol; 2006 Aug;11(4):329-31
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder: a patient treated successfully with a new combined chemotherapy regimen, intraarterial nedaplatin and pirarubicin plus intravenous methotrexate and vincristine.
  • We report a case of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the bladder treated successfully with intraarterial chemotherapy using nedaplatin.
  • Cystoscopic examination showed tumors on the anterior bladder wall.
  • Computed tomography (CT) scans and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed extravesical invasion of the tumors, and a clinical diagnosis of T3bN0M0 was made.
  • After two courses of the chemotherapy, CT scans and MRI demonstrated no tumor in the bladder.
  • Transurethral bladder-wall biopsy was performed in November 2004, and histopathological examination of the specimen revealed no definite tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Doxorubicin / analogs & derivatives. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Organoplatinum Compounds / administration & dosage. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy. Vincristine / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Drug Administration Routes. Female. Humans. Infusions, Intra-Arterial. Injections, Intravenous. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neoplasm Invasiveness / diagnostic imaging. Remission Induction / methods. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Carcinoma, Squamous Cell.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bladder Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DOXORUBICIN .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VINCRISTINE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHOTREXATE .
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Nihon Hinyokika Gakkai Zasshi. 2004 Jul;95(5):711-7 [15354717.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Chemother Pharmacol. 1992;31(3):187-92 [1334448.001]
  • [Cites] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho. 2004 Apr;31(4):561-5 [15114700.001]
  • [Cites] Nihon Jibiinkoka Gakkai Kaiho. 2004 Nov;107(11):990-7 [15624504.001]
  • [Cites] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho. 1992 May;19(5):695-701 [1580643.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Urol. 2000 Jan;37(1):85-9 [10671791.001]
  • [Cites] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho. 1992 Apr;19(4):483-8 [1558398.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1995 Nov;154(5):1704-9 [7563327.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Chemother Pharmacol. 1990;26(6):393-6 [2171794.001]
  • [Cites] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho. 1992 Jun;19(6):871-7 [1605665.001]
  • (PMID = 16937309.001).
  • [ISSN] 1341-9625
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8UQ3W6JXAN / nedaplatin; D58G680W0G / pirarubicin; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
  •  go-up   go-down


10. Murta-Nascimento C, Schmitz-Dräger BJ, Zeegers MP, Steineck G, Kogevinas M, Real FX, Malats N: Epidemiology of urinary bladder cancer: from tumor development to patient's death. World J Urol; 2007 Jun;25(3):285-95
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Epidemiology of urinary bladder cancer: from tumor development to patient's death.
  • Urinary bladder cancer (UBC) ranks ninth in worldwide cancer incidence.
  • We review the main established/proposed factors, both environmental and genetic, associated with bladder cancer etiology and prognosis.
  • Evaluation and consensus of both the contribution of each factor in bladder cancer burden and the appropriateness of the available evidences was done during an ad hoc meeting held during the 18th Congress of the European Society for Urological Research.
  • Phenacetin, chlornaphazine and cyclophosphamide also increase the risk of bladder cancer.
  • Chronic infection by Schistosoma haematobium is a cause of squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder.
  • NAT2 slow acetylator and GSTM1 null genotypes are associated with an increased risk of this cancer.
  • More research is needed regarding the effect of complex etiological factors in bladder carcinogenesis.
  • Subgroup analysis according to stage, grade, and molecular features may help in identifying specific etiological and prognostic factors involved in different bladder cancer progression pathways.
  • [MeSH-major] Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / epidemiology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Diet. Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions. Environmental Exposure / adverse effects. Female. Genetic Predisposition to Disease. Humans. Male. Occupational Exposure / adverse effects. Prognosis. Risk Factors. Sex Factors. Smoking / adverse effects

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Bladder cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bladder Cancer.
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2004 Jul 1;110(4):598-604 [15122594.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 1980 Apr 19;1(8173):837-40 [6103207.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1994 Mar 15;73(6):1708-15 [8156499.001]
  • [Cites] Br Med J. 1979 Sep 29;2(6193):798 [519209.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 1999 Feb 27;353(9154):703-7 [10073512.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Feb;13(1):83-90 [11899922.001]
  • [Cites] J Natl Cancer Inst. 1980 Apr;64(4):701-13 [6928984.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2001 Dec 15;94(6):903-6 [11745498.001]
  • [Cites] BJU Int. 2002 Aug;90(3):228-39 [12133057.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2001 Sep;93(6):880-7 [11519052.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Mar 1;153(5):411-8 [11226969.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Dec 15;152(12):1145-53 [11130620.001]
  • [Cites] Epidemiology. 1996 Mar;7(2):117-24 [8834549.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2003 Jun 2;88(11):1687-92 [12771981.001]
  • [Cites] J Cancer Res Clin Oncol. 2004 Feb;130(2):99-106 [14648207.001]
  • [Cites] IARC Monogr Eval Carcinog Risks Hum. 2004;84:1-477 [15645577.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1991 Jan 15;51(2):629-31 [1985779.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Environ Health. 1993 May-Jun;48(3):191-8 [8333791.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Epidemiol. 1991 Oct 15;134(8):830-9 [1951278.001]
  • [Cites] Prev Med. 2002 Aug;35(2):114-20 [12200095.001]
  • [Cites] Epidemiology. 2004 May;15(3):357-67 [15097021.001]
  • [Cites] Nephrol Dial Transplant. 1999 Dec;14(12):2892-7 [10570093.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2002 Nov;60(5):913-8 [12429337.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Urol. 1995 Oct;76(4):470-4 [7551884.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1997 Apr 15;79(8):1600-4 [9118045.001]
  • [Cites] Radiat Res. 1990 Sep;123(3):331-44 [2217730.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 1982 Mar;45(3):332-6 [7073930.001]
  • [Cites] Can Med Assoc J. 1974 Nov 16;111(10):1067-70 [4429932.001]
  • [Cites] Anticancer Res. 2002 Nov-Dec;22(6B):3801-4 [12552997.001]
  • [Cites] Jpn J Cancer Res. 1993 Dec;84(12):1223-9 [8294212.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1999 Oct;17(10):3182-7 [10506616.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Epidemiol. 1996 Sep 1;144(5):485-95 [8781464.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1988 Jul 1;48(13):3849-52 [3378220.001]
  • [Cites] IARC Monogr Eval Carcinog Risks Hum. 1991;51:1-513 [1674554.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Epidemiol. 1981 Aug;114(2):178-90 [7304553.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Apr;12(3):231-8 [11405328.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Toxicol. 2001 Oct;75(8):459-64 [11757669.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2002 Mar 10;98(2):274-8 [11857419.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 1986 May 15;37(5):651-7 [3699928.001]
  • [Cites] Pharmacogenetics. 1992 Jun;2(3):128-34 [1306112.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2000 Jul 13;343(2):78-85 [10891514.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 1989 Oct 15;44(4):605-10 [2793232.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2004 Jun 10;110(2):155-69 [15069676.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1992 Apr 1;69(7):1776-90 [1551063.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Sep;15(9):1746-9 [16985040.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Causes Control. 1996 Jan;7(1):95-100 [8850438.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Urol. 1999 Sep;6(9):446-54 [10510890.001]
  • [Cites] Carcinogenesis. 1996 Sep;17(9):1923-9 [8824515.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1989 Nov 1;49(21):6144-8 [2790827.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Urol. 2001 Mar;8(3):106-9 [11260334.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1993 Sep-Oct;2(5):449-52 [8220089.001]
  • [Cites] JAMA. 1978 Jul 28;240(4):349-55 [660869.001]
  • [Cites] J Natl Cancer Inst. 1987 Dec;79(6):1269-79 [3480378.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 1999 Jan 5;80(1):44-6 [9935228.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Epidemiol. 1989 Dec;130(6):1159-63 [2589309.001]
  • [Cites] Epidemiology. 2003 Mar;14(2):183-90 [12606884.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer. 1991;27(4):498-500 [1827729.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1999 Dec 1;86(11):2337-45 [10590376.001]
  • [Cites] J Natl Cancer Inst. 1987 Jul;79(1):103-8 [3474437.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Dec 1;156(11):1002-10 [12446256.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2002 Dec 1;102(4):418-21 [12402313.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Causes Control. 2003 Dec;14(10):907-14 [14750529.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Epidemiol. 1985 Mar;14(1):182-4 [3988434.001]
  • [Cites] Radiat Res. 1988 Oct;116(1):3-55 [3186929.001]
  • [Cites] J Natl Cancer Inst. 1995 Apr 5;87(7):524-30 [7707439.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1995;84(1):37-41 [7645909.001]
  • [Cites] J Natl Cancer Inst. 1990 Oct 17;82(20):1636-40 [2213906.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Apr 1;151(7):693-702 [10752797.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Esp Urol. 2001 Mar;54(2):131-8 [11341116.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2000 Aug;83(3):412-7 [10917561.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Aug;12(6):551-6 [11519763.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Lett. 1986 Aug;32(2):199-205 [3756846.001]
  • [Cites] Prev Med. 1985 Jan;14(1):92-8 [4034517.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 2005 Aug 20-26;366(9486):649-59 [16112301.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 1996 Jan;73(1):124-7 [8554974.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1985 Aug 1;313(5):292-5 [4010740.001]
  • [Cites] J Chronic Dis. 1978 Jan;31(1):51-6 [641136.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Lett. 2003 Dec 8;202(1):61-9 [14643027.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 1987 Dec 15;40(6):734-40 [3692621.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2001 Jul 1;61(13):5051-6 [11431340.001]
  • [Cites] J Natl Cancer Inst. 1986 Jun;76(6):1025-9 [3458939.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2000 Aug 1;89(3):630-9 [10931463.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2001 Feb 15;91(4):575-9 [11251984.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Nov;14(11 Pt 1):2569-78 [16284380.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Causes Control. 2003 May;14(4):303-10 [12846360.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2003 Oct;170(4 Pt 1):1379-82 [14501773.001]
  • [Cites] Epidemiology. 1994 Mar;5(2):138-46 [8172988.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2003 Nov;170(5):1777-80 [14532774.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Causes Control. 1998 Jan;9(1):83-8 [9486467.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1999 May 6;340(18):1390-7 [10228189.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Epidemiol. 1993 Oct 1;138(7):492-501 [8213753.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1982 Nov;42(11):4784-7 [7127313.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Causes Control. 1996 Nov;7(6):596-604 [8932920.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1988 Apr 21;318(16):1028-32 [3352696.001]
  • [Cites] BJU Int. 2000 Jan;85(2):211-7 [10671869.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 1995 Oct;1(10):1195-202 [9815912.001]
  • [Cites] Pharmacogenetics. 2003 Jun;13(6):349-55 [12777965.001]
  • [Cites] Epidemiology. 2001 Jan;12(1):125-30 [11138807.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 1999 May;53(5):1005-10 [10223497.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2003 Mar 10;104(1):98-103 [12532425.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Lett. 2003 Dec 30;202(2):193-9 [14643449.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 1979 Jun 30;1(8131):1390-3 [87844.001]
  • [Cites] IARC Monogr Eval Carcinog Risks Hum Suppl. 1987;7:1-440 [3482203.001]
  • [Cites] Am Rev Respir Dis. 1977 Aug;116(2):331-3 [889179.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Urol. 1985;11(4):263-6 [4043164.001]
  • [Cites] Nutr Cancer. 1987;9(2-3):143-6 [3562292.001]
  • [Cites] Carcinogenesis. 1997 Apr;18(4):641-4 [9111193.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Intern Med. 2000 Apr 10;160(7):939-44 [10761958.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1988 Feb 1;61(3):622-7 [3338029.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2000 Jan 15;88(2):398-406 [10640974.001]
  • [Cites] Epidemiology. 1991 Mar;2(2):145-8 [1932313.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Epidemiol. 1998 Apr 1;147(7):660-9 [9554605.001]
  • [Cites] Epidemiology. 1998 Jan;9(1):21-8 [9430264.001]
  • [Cites] J Korean Med Sci. 1994 Dec;9(6):482-9 [7786445.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2000 Apr;82(7):1364-9 [10755416.001]
  • [Cites] J Natl Cancer Inst. 1987 Jun;78(6):1119-25 [3473252.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Urol. 1997;32(4):487-93 [9412812.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 1989 Oct 15;44(4):622-8 [2793235.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2004 May 1;109(5):703-9 [14999778.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Causes Control. 1999 Jun;10(3):209-17 [10454066.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Epidemiol. 1986 Oct;124(4):578-89 [3752052.001]
  • [Cites] Oncologist. 2003;8(6):541-52 [14657533.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Epidemiol. 2003;18(7):659-64 [12952139.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 1985 Jun 15;35(6):703-6 [4008097.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1989 Mar;141(3):527-8 [2918585.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Lett. 2002 Mar 28;177(2):173-9 [11825664.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Epidemiol. 1985 Jan;121(1):37-48 [3964991.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1981 Nov;126(5):691-2 [7053069.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002 Nov;11(11):1292-7 [12433705.001]
  • [Cites] World J Urol. 2004 Feb;21(6):382-91 [14648102.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Hum Genet. 2006 Mar;78(3):464-79 [16465622.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Mar;15(3):536-42 [16537713.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1980 Mar 6;302(10):537-41 [7351887.001]
  • [Cites] Acta Oncol. 1995;34(6):741-8 [7576740.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1996 Sep 1;56(17):3915-25 [8752158.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 1988 Jul 15;42(1):17-22 [3391705.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Epidemiol. 1984 Apr;119(4):510-5 [6711540.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Radiol. 1986 Jan;59(697):45-51 [3947807.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2003 Sep 15;89(6):1096-101 [12966432.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Causes Control. 1997 May;8(3):444-72 [9498904.001]
  • [Cites] Acta Oncol. 1989;28(5):631-6 [2686724.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Urol. 1976 Dec;48(6):442 [1009327.001]
  • [Cites] IARC Monogr Eval Carcinog Risks Hum. 1994;61:1-241 [7715068.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1997 Dec;6(12):1039-42 [9419400.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2001 Nov 2;85(9):1311-6 [11720466.001]
  • [Cites] J Natl Cancer Inst. 1994 Nov 2;86(21):1600-8 [7932824.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2002 Jul 1;100(1):82-5 [12115591.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2002 Aug 1;100(4):414-8 [12115522.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Epidemiol. 1982 Sep;11(3):212-7 [7129735.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Toxicol. 1996;71(1-2):123-6 [9010594.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Causes Control. 2000 Dec;11(10):925-31 [11142527.001]
  • [Cites] Science. 1980 Mar 14;207(4436):1214-6 [7355283.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Causes Control. 1992 Jan;3(1):57-62 [1536914.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 1999 Jun 19;353(9170):2111-5 [10382695.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Epidemiol. 1986 Jun;123(6):1033-42 [3706274.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Rev Microbiol. 2004 Jan;2(1):12-3 [15035004.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 1982 Oct 16;2(8303):842-5 [6126711.001]
  • [Cites] Urol Int. 1987;42(5):368-74 [3433584.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2002 Jan 1;97(1):96-101 [11774249.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1991 Jan 15;67(2):536-40 [1985746.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2002 Dec 1;95(11):2316-23 [12436437.001]
  • [Cites] J Natl Cancer Inst. 1997 Oct 1;89(19):1453-7 [9326915.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2000 Apr 15;86(2):289-94 [10738259.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Jan 1;153(1):38-41 [11159145.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1975 May;113(5):629-35 [1127804.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1998 Nov;7(11):1049-50 [9829715.001]
  • [Cites] BMJ. 2000 Jun 17;320(7250):1642-6 [10856067.001]
  • [Cites] Nutr Cancer. 1997;29(2):163-8 [9427981.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1996 Mar;5(3):161-6 [8833615.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 1983 Nov 15;32(5):577-82 [6642755.001]
  • [Cites] Mutat Res. 2003 May 15;526(1-2):93-125 [12714187.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2004 Aug;13(8):1337-41 [15298955.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1984 Apr;131(4):650-4 [6708176.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer. 2006 Jul;42(10):1448-54 [16740387.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Oncol. 2003;14 Suppl 5:v61-118 [14684501.001]
  • [Cites] J Natl Cancer Inst. 1989 May 10;81(10):803-8 [2716074.001]
  • [Cites] Epidemiology. 2001 May;12(3):327-38 [11338313.001]
  • [Cites] Epidemiology. 2001 Nov;12(6):690-4 [11679798.001]
  • [Cites] Epidemiology. 1996 Jul;7(4):358-62 [8793360.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Ind Med. 1990 Aug;47(8):544-52 [2393635.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 1970 Mar 15;5(2):266-72 [5449166.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2005 Feb 20;113(5):761-8 [15499621.001]
  • (PMID = 17530260.001).
  • [ISSN] 0724-4983
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Number-of-references] 187
  •  go-up   go-down


11. Zwecker M, Daich A, Blumen N, Zeilig G, Ohry A: Slow ascending myelopathy, tetraplegia, carcinoma of the bladder and amyloidosis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis. Spinal Cord; 2000 May;38(5):327-9
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Slow ascending myelopathy, tetraplegia, carcinoma of the bladder and amyloidosis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis.
  • DESIGN: Case report of a 60-year-old patient suffering from AS, who developed over a period of 39 years a slow ascending myelopathy leading to tetraplegia, squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder and amyloidosis of the small intestine secondary to neuropathic bladder and bowel.
  • Neurogenic bladder and bowel complicated to squamous cell carcinoma and amyloidosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Amyloidosis / complications. Carcinoma / complications. Quadriplegia / etiology. Spinal Cord Diseases / etiology. Spondylitis, Ankylosing / complications. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Intestinal Diseases / drug therapy. Male. Middle Aged. Muscle Hypotonia / etiology. Urinary Bladder, Neurogenic / etiology


12. Shigehara K, Kitagawa Y, Nakashima T, Shimamura M, Katayanagi K, Kurumaya H: [Squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder treated with a new combined chemotherapy regimen, intraarterial nedaplatin and pirarubicin plus intravenous methotrexate and vincristine--second case report in Japan]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2007 Aug;34(8):1319-21
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder treated with a new combined chemotherapy regimen, intraarterial nedaplatin and pirarubicin plus intravenous methotrexate and vincristine--second case report in Japan].
  • We report our second patient treated successfully with a new combined chemotherapy regimen of intra-arterial pirarubicin and nedaplatin plus intravenous methotrexate and vincristine for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the bladder.
  • A 57-year-old man consulted our hospital in September 2005 for treatment of bladder tumors diagnosed in another hospital.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an extravesical invasive tumor on the anterior wall of the bladder, and clinical stage T2bN0M0 was diagnosed.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / drug therapy. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cystectomy. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Doxorubicin / analogs & derivatives. Drug Administration Routes. Humans. Infusions, Intra-Arterial. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Middle Aged. Organoplatinum Compounds / administration & dosage. Remission Induction. Vincristine / administration & dosage

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Carcinoma, Squamous Cell.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bladder Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DOXORUBICIN .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VINCRISTINE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHOTREXATE .
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17687223.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8UQ3W6JXAN / nedaplatin; D58G680W0G / pirarubicin; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate
  •  go-up   go-down


13. Basílio-de-Oliveira CA, Aquino A, Simon EF, Eyer-Silva WA: Concomitant prostatic schistosomiasis and adenocarcinoma: case report and review. Braz J Infect Dis; 2002 Feb;6(1):45-9
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Some of these disorders have long been associated with malignant neoplasia, the most striking association being between disease caused by Schistosoma haematobium, the predominant etiological agent of urinary schistosomiasis, and squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder, a relatively uncommon vesical cancer in non-endemic areas.
  • We also review the medical literature on the association between schistosomiasis and cancer.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Animals. Humans. Male. Prostate / parasitology. Prostate / pathology

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Schistosomiasis.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Prostate Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 11980603.001).
  • [ISSN] 1413-8670
  • [Journal-full-title] The Brazilian journal of infectious diseases : an official publication of the Brazilian Society of Infectious Diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Braz J Infect Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
  • [Number-of-references] 20
  •  go-up   go-down






Advertisement