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1. Hohenstein B, Kuo MC, Addabbo F, Yasuda K, Ratliff B, Schwarzenberger C, Eckardt KU, Hugo CP, Goligorsky MS: Enhanced progenitor cell recruitment and endothelial repair after selective endothelial injury of the mouse kidney. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol; 2010 Jun;298(6):F1504-14
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  • [Title] Enhanced progenitor cell recruitment and endothelial repair after selective endothelial injury of the mouse kidney.
  • Primary and/or secondary injury of the renal microvascular endothelium is a common finding in various renal diseases.
  • However, these mechanisms have so far not been studied after selective microvascular injury in the kidney.
  • The present study investigated the time course of EPC and HSC stimulation and homing following induction of selective EC injury in the mouse kidney along with various angiogenic factors potentially involved in EC repair and progenitor cell stimulation.
  • Progenitor cells could be first detected in the circulation and the spleen before they selectively homed to the diseased kidney.

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  • (PMID = 20237239.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-1466
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of physiology. Renal physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Physiol. Renal Physiol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK045462; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK-052783; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK-054602; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK-45462
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenic Proteins; 11096-26-7 / Erythropoietin; 147336-22-9 / Green Fluorescent Proteins; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, TIE-2
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2886821
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2. Orr A, Willis S, Holmes M, Britton P, Orr D: Living with a kidney transplant: a qualitative investigation of quality of life. J Health Psychol; 2007 Jul;12(4):653-62
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  • [Title] Living with a kidney transplant: a qualitative investigation of quality of life.
  • Research has shown that transplantation improves quality of life for patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD), although it does not return to pre-kidney failure levels.
  • This study used focus groups to explore the experience of living with a transplanted kidney.
  • These may necessitate constant vigilance, reduced spontaneity and preoccupation with self-care to maintain the kidney's health; being treated differently from others; pressure not to let themselves and others down; and the urge to increase their knowledge about their condition.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Transplantation. Quality of Life. Survivors / psychology

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  • (PMID = 17584816.001).
  • [ISSN] 1359-1053
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of health psychology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Health Psychol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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3. Jovanovic V, Giacomelli L, Sivozhelezov V, Degauque N, Lair D, Soulillou JP, Pechkova E, Nicolini C, Brouard S: AKT1 leader gene and downstream targets are involved in a rat model of kidney allograft tolerance. J Cell Biochem; 2010 Oct 15;111(3):709-19
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  • [Title] AKT1 leader gene and downstream targets are involved in a rat model of kidney allograft tolerance.
  • We previously showed that administration and anti-donor anti-class II serum on the day of transplantation induce tolerance to a kidney allograft in the LEW-1W to LEW-1A strain combination.
  • In this study, we used DNA microarrays to compare gene patterns involved in anti-donor anti-class II tolerated or untreated syngeneic kidney transplants in this strain combination.
  • Through this model, we showed that AKT1 gene, WNT pathway and NO synthesis are strictly connected to each other and may play an important role in kidney tolerance and rejection processes, with AKT1 gene being the center of this complex network of interactions.
  • [MeSH-major] Gene Expression Regulation. Kidney Transplantation / immunology. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt / genetics. Transplantation Tolerance


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4. Wu YL, Wei C, Wang HT: [Effect of tongshenluo capsule on the components of extracellular matrix and their metabolism in kidney of rats with diabetic nephropathy]. Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi; 2007 Apr;27(4):326-30
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  • [Title] [Effect of tongshenluo capsule on the components of extracellular matrix and their metabolism in kidney of rats with diabetic nephropathy].
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of Tongshenluo Capsule (TSL) on the components of extracellular matrix (ECM) and their metabolism in kidney of rats with diabetic nephropathy (DN), and to explore its mechanism of kidney protecting.
  • Levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG) and 24-h urinary micro-content of albumin (24 h mAlb) were determined dynamically; the serum glycosyl hemoglobin (HbA1c)was determined after the last medication; the ultrastructural changes of kidney were observed by transmission electron microscope; the expressions of collagen IV (IV-C), fibronctin (FN), laminin(LN), and the ECM metabolism influencing factors, including MMP-2, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-2), transfer growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) in renal tissue were detected by immunohistological chemistry and image collecting analytical system.
  • CONCLUSION: TSL plays a role of kidney protection by decreasing the ECM components expression and regulate ECM metabolism.

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  • (PMID = 17526172.001).
  • [ISSN] 1003-5370
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhongguo Zhong xi yi jie he za zhi Zhongguo Zhongxiyi jiehe zazhi = Chinese journal of integrated traditional and Western medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi
  • [Language] CHI
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Capsules; 0 / Collagen Type IV; 0 / Drugs, Chinese Herbal; 0 / Fibronectins; 0 / Laminin
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5. Su W, Fang C, Yang HC, Gu Y, Hao CM: [Expression of nestin in human kidney and its clinical significance]. Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi; 2008 May;37(5):309-12
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  • [Title] [Expression of nestin in human kidney and its clinical significance].
  • OBJECTIVE: To study the expression and significance of nestin (a type of cytoskeletal protein) in normal and diseased human kidneys.
  • METHODS: Diseased kidney tissues were obtained from needle biopsies in 32 patients with glomerulonephritis (including 8 cases of membranous glomerulopathy, 3 cases of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, 17 cases of IgA nephropathy with proteinuria and 4 cases of IgA nephropathy without proteinuria).
  • Control kidney tissues were obtained from nephrectomy specimens for renal tumors.
  • The expression of nestin in the control kidney tissues was studied using immunoelectronic microscopy and immunohistochemistry.
  • The expression of nestin in the diseased kidney tissues was detected by immunohistochemistry and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.
  • RESULTS: In normal kidney tissues, nestin was detected at the periphery of glomerular capillary loops.
  • However, the glomerular nestin expression levels in cases of IgA nephropathy with proteinuria, membranous glomerulopathy and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis were significantly lower than those in the normal kidneys and IgA nephropathy without proteinuria.
  • CONCLUSION: Nestin may play an important role in maintaining the normal function of podocytes in human kidney.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Gene Expression Regulation. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Kidney. Kidney Diseases / metabolism. Kidney Diseases / pathology. Kidney Glomerulus / metabolism. Kidney Glomerulus / pathology. Middle Aged. Nestin. Proteinuria / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 18956648.001).
  • [ISSN] 0529-5807
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua bing li xue za zhi = Chinese journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Intermediate Filament Proteins; 0 / NES protein, human; 0 / Nerve Tissue Proteins; 0 / Nestin
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6. Simmons WN, Cocks FH, Zhong P, Preminger G: A composite kidney stone phantom with mechanical properties controllable over the range of human kidney stones. J Mech Behav Biomed Mater; 2010 Jan;3(1):130-3
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  • [Title] A composite kidney stone phantom with mechanical properties controllable over the range of human kidney stones.
  • A novel composite kidney stone phantom has been developed.
  • This stone phantom is producible with mechanical properties mimicking the range of tensile fracture strength and acoustic properties of human kidney stones and is an inorganic/organic composite material, as are natural kidney stones.
  • Diametral compression testing was used to measure tensile fracture strength, which determines the acoustic comminution behavior of kidney stones.
  • Both the tensile fracture strength (controllable from 1 to approximately 5 MPa) and acoustic properties (C(L) = 2700-4400 m/s and C(T)=1600-2300m/s) of these composite phantom stones match those of a wide variety of human kidney stones.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Calculi / physiopathology. Phantoms, Imaging

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  • (PMID = 19878912.001).
  • [ISSN] 1878-0180
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the mechanical behavior of biomedical materials
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Mech Behav Biomed Mater
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK052985; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK052985; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R37 DK052985
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS498637; NLM/ PMC3756310
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7. Nezami N, Tarzamni MK, Argani H, Nourifar M: Doppler ultrasonographic indexes in kidney transplant recipients: its relationship with kidney function. Iran J Kidney Dis; 2007 Oct;1(2):82-7
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  • [Title] Doppler ultrasonographic indexes in kidney transplant recipients: its relationship with kidney function.
  • INTRODUCTION: Doppler ultrasonography (DU) is mostly used for assessment of both graft and native kidneys' vascular status.
  • In this study, correlation between the DU indexes and kidney allograft function was evaluated.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Hospital records of 273 kidney transplant patients (154 men and 119 women) were reviewed.
  • In all cases, DU had been performed 1 month after kidney transplantation.
  • We evaluated the data on the resistive index (RI) and pulsatility index (PI) in the interlobar arteries and renal artery stenosis (RAS), and renal vessels thrombosis were determined.
  • Concurrent serum creatinine and cyclosporine values were assessed in relation to the DU findings.
  • RESULTS: The RI and PI had significant linear correlations with serum creatinine (P = .03 and P = .002, respectively).
  • Also, there were direct linear correlations between the age of the patients and the RI and PI values.
  • Despite this finding, RI and PI were significantly lower in patients with RAS than in the patients with patent renovascular tributary (0.59 +/- 0.15 versus 0.65 +/- 0.11; P = .03 and 1.02 +/- 0.40 versus 1.18 +/- 0.46; P = .049, respectively).
  • There were no associations between serum cyclosporine level or panel reactive antibodies and the RI or PI.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The RI and PI are valuable DU markers for determining the kidney allograft function and the related vascular complications.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Transplantation / ultrasonography. Renal Artery Obstruction / ultrasonography. Thrombosis / ultrasonography


8. Engholm G, Hakulinen T, Gislum M, Tryggvadóttir L, Klint A, Bray F, Storm HH: Trends in the survival of patients diagnosed with kidney or urinary bladder cancer in the Nordic countries 1964-2003 followed up to the end of 2006. Acta Oncol; 2010 Jun;49(5):655-64
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Trends in the survival of patients diagnosed with kidney or urinary bladder cancer in the Nordic countries 1964-2003 followed up to the end of 2006.
  • BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown systematic differences between the Nordic Countries in population-based relative survival following a kidney or urinary bladder cancer diagnosis.
  • RESULTS: The survival following bladder cancer was higher than for kidney cancer and highest for men.
  • Survival increased over the years in all countries, more for kidney cancer than bladder cancer.
  • For Danish kidney cancer patients, the rate of increase over all the years has been lower than in the other countries, especially among women, resulting in a survival in Denmark some 10-20% points lower than elsewhere in 1999-2003.
  • The differences were mainly found in the first year following diagnosis, where a higher excess mortality in Denmark was observed.
  • Survival decreased with higher age at diagnosis.
  • CONCLUSION: The increasing 5-year relative survival in all the Nordic countries for both kidney and bladder cancer are promising, but for kidney cancer a higher percentage detected coincidentally during an imaging investigation for other diseases could play a role.
  • Denmark had the lowest survival, despite their known practice of including benign conditions with invasive bladder cancers.
  • The lower Danish survival after kidney and bladder cancer in the first year after diagnosis could be due to later diagnosis on average, a higher co-morbidity from smoking-related diseases, and perhaps, less adequate cancer treatment and management in Denmark.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Neoplasms / mortality. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Age Distribution. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Denmark / epidemiology. Female. Finland / epidemiology. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Iceland / epidemiology. Incidence. Male. Mass Screening. Middle Aged. Mortality / trends. Neoplasm Staging. Norway / epidemiology. Registries. Risk Factors. Survival Analysis. Survival Rate / trends. Sweden / epidemiology


9. Weiss AS, Smits G, Wiseman AC: Standard criteria donor pancreas donation status is associated with improved kidney transplant outcomes. Clin Transplant; 2009 Sep-Oct;23(5):732-9
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  • [Title] Standard criteria donor pancreas donation status is associated with improved kidney transplant outcomes.
  • BACKGROUND: Organ donor characteristics can be used to predict outcomes in kidney transplantation.
  • We hypothesized that pancreas donation status could reflect organ quality and be predictive of kidney graft outcomes following Standard Criteria Donor (SCD) kidney transplantation.
  • METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of deceased donor kidney alone (DD KA) transplants reported to SRTR from 1992 to 2005.
  • Group 1 = kidney alone recipients from pancreas donors (KA, P+) and Group 2 = kidney alone recipients from non-pancreas donors (KA, P-).
  • CONCLUSION: Donor pancreas donation status is an independent predictor of improved outcomes of SCD kidney recipients.
  • Further study of the pancreas organ donor pre-procurement is warranted to optimize not only pancreas utilization but also kidney graft outcomes.
  • [MeSH-major] Graft Rejection / prevention & control. Graft Survival / physiology. Kidney Transplantation. Pancreas Transplantation. Tissue Donors. Tissue and Organ Procurement / standards


10. Duffield JS, Park KM, Hsiao LL, Kelley VR, Scadden DT, Ichimura T, Bonventre JV: Restoration of tubular epithelial cells during repair of the postischemic kidney occurs independently of bone marrow-derived stem cells. J Clin Invest; 2005 Jul;115(7):1743-55
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  • [Title] Restoration of tubular epithelial cells during repair of the postischemic kidney occurs independently of bone marrow-derived stem cells.
  • Ischemia causes kidney tubular cell damage and abnormal renal function.
  • The kidney is capable of morphological restoration of tubules and recovery of function.
  • We studied kidney repair in chimeric mice expressing GFP or bacterial beta-gal or harboring the male Y chromosome exclusively in bone marrow-derived cells.
  • Upon i.v. injection of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells, postischemic functional renal impairment was reduced, but there was no evidence of differentiation of these cells into tubular cells of the kidney.

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  • (PMID = 16007251.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-9738
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of clinical investigation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Invest.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R37 DK039773; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK 39773; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK 38452; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / P01 DK038452; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK039773
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 0 / enhanced green fluorescent protein; 147336-22-9 / Green Fluorescent Proteins
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1159124
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11. Friedman AL, Peters TG, Jones KW, Boulware LE, Ratner LE: Fatal and nonfatal hemorrhagic complications of living kidney donation. Ann Surg; 2006 Jan;243(1):126-30
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  • [Title] Fatal and nonfatal hemorrhagic complications of living kidney donation.
  • OBJECTIVE: After anecdotal reports of severe hemorrhage from failure of surgical clips to sustain closure of renal artery stumps in live donor nephrectomies were received, this study was designed to identify specific surgical techniques that are associated with an increased risk of failure to control bleeding and might represent opportunities to improve patient safety.
  • BACKGROUND: Preventing complications for living kidney donors must be paramount in addressing end-stage renal failure through living kidney donation.
  • Open and laparoscopic approaches to living kidney donation use several vascular control methods, some of which may be more prone to failure and life-endangering hemorrhage than others.
  • METHODS: To define hemorrhagic complications of living kidney donation, a survey was sent to all 893 surgeon-members of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.
  • Descriptive and bivariate analyses were used to ascertain study participant characteristics, most frequently used vascular control techniques, and incidence of events (death, transfusion, reexploration or conversion to open nephrectomy, or contralateral [remaining kidney] renal failure).
  • Among arterial control problems, 2 resulted in donor death and 2 resulted in renal failure; 19 episodes required transfusion.
  • Locking and standard clips applied to the renal artery were associated with the greatest risks.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Significant hemorrhagic complications occur with living kidney donation in both open and laparoscopic approaches.
  • [MeSH-major] Hemorrhage / etiology. Kidney Transplantation / adverse effects. Living Donors. Nephrectomy / adverse effects. Surgical Instruments / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 16371747.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-4932
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1449959
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12. Shoji T, Ishimura E, Nishizawa Y: Body fat measurement in chronic kidney disease: implications in research and clinical practice. Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens; 2007 Nov;16(6):572-6
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  • [Title] Body fat measurement in chronic kidney disease: implications in research and clinical practice.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The paradoxical and inverse association between body mass index and mortality risk in patients with end-stage renal disease has raised a question of whether an increased fat mass is good or bad for patients with chronic kidney disease.
  • The purpose of this review is to update the concept on body fat in patients with chronic kidney disease.
  • Following the initiation of dialysis, chronic kidney disease patients gain body weight due mainly to increased fat mass.
  • In predialysis chronic kidney disease, there is also an inverse association between body mass index and mortality risk.
  • The metabolic syndrome and a high body mass index are independent predictors for development of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease, respectively.
  • In diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease, however, a high initial body mass index is associated with a slower decline in glomerular filtration rate.
  • SUMMARY: The impacts of fat mass on survival and renal function appear to vary depending upon the absence or presence, and stages of chronic kidney disease.
  • Further research is required for optimal nutritional management and improved outcomes of patients with chronic kidney disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue. Kidney Failure, Chronic / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Anthropometry. Humans. Kidney Function Tests. Predictive Value of Tests. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 18089973.001).
  • [ISSN] 1062-4821
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in nephrology and hypertension
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Opin. Nephrol. Hypertens.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 25
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13. de Klerk M, Zuidema WC, Ijzermans JN, Weimar W: On chain lengths, domino-paired and unbalanced altruistic kidney donations. Clin Transpl; 2009;:247-52
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  • [Title] On chain lengths, domino-paired and unbalanced altruistic kidney donations.
  • Kidney transplantations with living related and unrelated donors are the optimal option for patients with end-stage renal disease.
  • For patients with a willing--but blood-type or HLA incompatible donor--a living-donor kidney exchange program could be an opportunity.
  • In Asia, the United States and Europe, kidney exchange programs were developed under different conditions, with different exchange algorithms, and with different match results.
  • The easiest way to organize a living-donor kidney exchange program is to enlist national or regional cooperation, initiated by an independent organization that is already responsible for the allocation of deceased donor organs.
  • For incompatible donor-recipient pairs who have been unsuccessful in finding suitable matches in an exchange program, domino-paired kidney transplantations triggered by Good Samaritan donors is the next alternative.
  • If no Good Samaritan donors are available, an unbalanced kidney paired-exchange program with compatible and incompatible pairs is another strategy that merits future development.
  • [MeSH-major] Altruism. Kidney Transplantation / statistics & numerical data. Living Donors / psychology

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  • (PMID = 20524290.001).
  • [ISSN] 0890-9016
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical transplants
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Transpl
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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14. Gao S, Manns BJ, Culleton BF, Tonelli M, Quan H, Crowshoe L, Ghali WA, Svenson LW, Hemmelgarn BR, Alberta Kidney Disease Network: Prevalence of chronic kidney disease and survival among aboriginal people. J Am Soc Nephrol; 2007 Nov;18(11):2953-9
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  • [Title] Prevalence of chronic kidney disease and survival among aboriginal people.
  • Globally, it is known that the incidence of end-stage renal disease is higher among Aboriginals, but it is unknown whether this is due to an increased prevalence of chronic kidney disease or other unidentified factors.
  • We studied 658,664 people of non-First Nations and 14,989 people of First Nations and found that the age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of chronic kidney disease was significantly higher among those of non-First Nations compared to those of First Nations (67.5 versus 59.5 per 1000 population; P < 0.0001).
  • However, severe chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 ml/min per 1.73 m2) was almost two-fold higher among people of First Nations (P < 0.0001).
  • Cox proportional hazards models suggested that compared to people of non-First Nations, those of First Nations with chronic kidney disease had a 77% increased risk of death after adjusting for age, gender, diabetes and baseline eGFR.
  • In conclusion, whether the higher incidence of end-stage renal disease among people of First Nations is due to suboptimal management of chronic kidney disease and its associated comorbidities, more rapid loss of kidney function, or other unidentified factors remains to be determined.
  • [MeSH-major] Indians, North American / statistics & numerical data. Kidney Diseases / ethnology. Kidney Diseases / mortality


15. Fearnley C, Wakeley PR, Gallego-Beltran J, Dalley C, Williamson S, Gaudie C, Woodward MJ: The development of a real-time PCR to detect pathogenic Leptospira species in kidney tissue. Res Vet Sci; 2008 Aug;85(1):8-16
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  • [Title] The development of a real-time PCR to detect pathogenic Leptospira species in kidney tissue.
  • To assess the suitability of these PCR methods for diagnosis, a trial was performed on kidneys taken from adult pigs with evidence of leptospiral infection, primarily a history of reproductive disease and serological evidence of exposure to pathogenic leptospires (n=180) and aborted pig foetuses (n=24).
  • In a subsidiary experiment, the 'pathogenic' PCR was used to analyse kidney samples from rodents (n=7) collected as part of vermin control in a zoo, with show animals with high microagglutination titres to Leptospira species, and five were positive.
  • Fifteen PCR amplicons from 1 mouse, 2 rat and 14 pig kidney samples, were selected at random from positive PCRs (n=30) and sequenced.
  • The only successful culture was from this mouse kidney and the isolate was confirmed to be L. inadai by classical serology.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney / microbiology. Leptospira / isolation & purification. Leptospirosis / veterinary. Polymerase Chain Reaction / veterinary. Swine Diseases / microbiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Kidney Diseases / microbiology. Kidney Diseases / veterinary. Swine. Temperature

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  • (PMID = 17961617.001).
  • [ISSN] 0034-5288
  • [Journal-full-title] Research in veterinary science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Res. Vet. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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16. Harirforoosh S, Jamali F: Effect of inflammation on kidney function and pharmacokinetics of COX-2 selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs rofecoxib and meloxicam. J Appl Toxicol; 2008 Oct;28(7):829-38
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effect of inflammation on kidney function and pharmacokinetics of COX-2 selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs rofecoxib and meloxicam.
  • We studied (a) the effects of inflammation on the renal function and pharmacokinetics of rofecoxib and meloxicam;.
  • (b) whether inflammation could exacerbate reduced electrolytes excretion changes observed with NSAIDs; and (c) the influence of inflammation on distribution of these drugs into the kidney.
  • The ratios of the kidney:plasma concentrations were not significantly altered by inflammation following either drug.
  • Inflammation altered kidney function, demonstrated by increases in BUN and plasma creatinine.
  • Since we have observed similar patterns of the effect of NSAIDs on kidney under healthy and inflammatory conditions, one may conclude that inflammation does not exacerbate the adverse effect.
  • [MeSH-major] Arthritis, Experimental / physiopathology. Arthritis, Rheumatoid / physiopathology. Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors / pharmacokinetics. Kidney / metabolism. Kidney / physiopathology. Lactones / pharmacokinetics. Sulfones / pharmacokinetics. Thiazines / pharmacokinetics. Thiazoles / pharmacokinetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Animals. Area Under Curve. Kidney Function Tests. Male. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley

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  • (PMID = 18344196.001).
  • [ISSN] 0260-437X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of applied toxicology : JAT
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Appl Toxicol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors; 0 / Lactones; 0 / Sulfones; 0 / Thiazines; 0 / Thiazoles; 0QTW8Z7MCR / rofecoxib; 71125-38-7 / meloxicam
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17. Reisaeter AV, Røislien J, Henriksen T, Irgens LM, Hartmann A: Pregnancy and birth after kidney donation: the Norwegian experience. Am J Transplant; 2009 Apr;9(4):820-4
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  • [Title] Pregnancy and birth after kidney donation: the Norwegian experience.
  • Reports on pregnancies in kidney donors are scarce.
  • Linkage with the Norwegian Renal Registry provided data on pregnancies of kidney donors 1967-2002.
  • A random sample from the Medical Birth Registry was control group, as was pregnancies in kidney donors prior to donation.
  • No differences were observed in the occurrence of adverse pregnancy outcome in kidney donors and in the general population in unadjusted analysis.
  • Our finding of more frequent preeclampsia in pregnancies after kidney donation in the secondary analysis must be interpreted with caution, as the number of events was low.


18. Girgin C, Sezer A, Sahin O, Oder M, Dinçel C: Giant renal calculus in a solitary functioning kidney. Urol Int; 2007;78(1):91-2
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  • [Title] Giant renal calculus in a solitary functioning kidney.
  • We report a case of giant renal calculus 230 x 140 mm in size and weighing 1,350 g in a solitary functioning kidney treated by nephrolithotomy.
  • A giant renal calculus in his right kidney and atrophic nonfunctioning left kidney was diagnosed by ultrasonography, IVP and CT scan.
  • This case is the largest and the heaviest stone reported in the literature in a solitary functioning kidney.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Calculi
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnosis, Differential. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Nephrostomy, Percutaneous. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Urodynamics

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  • (PMID = 17192742.001).
  • [ISSN] 0042-1138
  • [Journal-full-title] Urologia internationalis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urol. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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19. Go AS, Lo JC: Epidemiology of non-dialysis-requiring chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease. Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens; 2006 May;15(3):296-302
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  • [Title] Epidemiology of non-dialysis-requiring chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review recent literature about the relationship between non-dialysis-requiring chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease as well as possible explanatory factors.
  • This risk is not linearly associated with level of kidney function.
  • Chronic kidney disease is associated with a larger burden of traditional vascular risk factors but is also linked to abnormalities in a variety of nontraditional pathways such as dysregulation of mineral metabolism and arterial calcification, vessel stiffness and endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance, inflammation, malnutrition, and anemia, among others.
  • Other novel kidney-specific proteins (e.g. renalase) may play direct mediating roles.
  • The relative contribution of these factors to excess cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease remains unclear.
  • SUMMARY: Recent evidence demonstrates the importance of non-dialysis-requiring chronic kidney disease as a potent predictor of cardiovascular disease and its complications.
  • Randomized trials should be performed to determine whether modification of traditional and nontraditional risk factors can reduce incident cardiovascular disease as well as which interventions can optimize treatment outcomes in persons with chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Cardiovascular Diseases / epidemiology. Kidney Diseases / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Chronic Disease. Glomerular Filtration Rate. Humans. Renal Dialysis. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 16609298.001).
  • [ISSN] 1062-4821
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in nephrology and hypertension
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Opin. Nephrol. Hypertens.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 67
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20. Mashiach R, Davidovits M, Eisenstein B, Kidron D, Kovo M, Shalev J, Merlob P, Vardimon D, Efrat Z, Meizner I: Fetal hyperechogenic kidney with normal amniotic fluid volume: a diagnostic dilemma. Prenat Diagn; 2005 Jul;25(7):553-8
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  • [Title] Fetal hyperechogenic kidney with normal amniotic fluid volume: a diagnostic dilemma.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine the prognostic value of sonographically detected fetal hyperechogenic kidneys with normal amniotic fluid volume.
  • METHODS: Seven cases of hyperechogenic fetal kidneys were identified by sonography over a 7-year period (1996--2002).
  • Increased renal echogenicity was diagnosed when the renal parenchyma was of greater echogenicity than adjacent liver tissue.
  • RESULTS: Three of the live-born infants had autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and one had autosomal recessive polycystic kidney.
  • In the remainder, autopsy study revealed multifocal renal dysplasia in two cases and normal kidneys in one.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Increased renal echogenicity with normal amniotic fluid volume in a fetus without other anomalies is a difficult diagnostic dilemma.
  • Although it is usually indicative of renal parenchymal disease with possible renal failure after birth or in early childhood, in some cases, it represents a normal variant. .
  • [MeSH-major] Polycystic Kidney Diseases / ultrasonography. Ultrasonography, Prenatal
  • [MeSH-minor] Amniotic Fluid / ultrasonography. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Infant, Newborn. Predictive Value of Tests. Pregnancy. Pregnancy Trimester, Second. Pregnancy Trimester, Third

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  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
  • [CommentIn] Prenat Diagn. 2006 Feb;26(2):190-1 [16470574.001]
  • (PMID = 16032764.001).
  • [ISSN] 0197-3851
  • [Journal-full-title] Prenatal diagnosis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prenat. Diagn.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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21. Hansberry MR, Whittier WL, Krause MW: The elderly patient with chronic kidney disease. Adv Chronic Kidney Dis; 2005 Jan;12(1):71-7
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  • [Title] The elderly patient with chronic kidney disease.
  • The elderly are a fast growing population in the United States, and they have a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease.
  • The elderly are particularly susceptible to kidney damage from age-related declines in glomerular filtration as well as kidney damage from chronic disease states such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, glomerular, and tubulointerstitial disorders.
  • A significant number of elderly individuals are reaching end-stage renal disease that require renal replacement therapy.
  • This expanding population provides a challenge for health-care providers because the elderly are often referred late to a nephrologist, have a shortened survival on renal replacement therapy as compared with younger individuals, and suffer from more comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease, malnutrition, and hearing and visual disabilities.
  • The elderly also have difficulties with dialysis vascular access and often are not candidates for renal transplantation.
  • Despite these obstacles, age alone is not a justification for withholding diagnostic or therapeutic interventions, because many elderly individuals have an improvement in their quality of life and social support once their kidney disease is identified and treated.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Failure, Chronic / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Age Factors. Aged. Disease Susceptibility / epidemiology. Humans. Prevalence. Renal Replacement Therapy / utilization. Risk Factors. United States / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 15719336.001).
  • [ISSN] 1548-5595
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in chronic kidney disease
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv Chronic Kidney Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 54
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22. Ruppar TM, Russell CL: Medication adherence in successful kidney transplant recipients. Prog Transplant; 2009 Jun;19(2):167-72
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  • [Title] Medication adherence in successful kidney transplant recipients.
  • OBJECTIVE: To explore the medication-taking behavior of successful kidney transplant recipients and determine what behaviors were common among this group.
  • METHODS: Open-ended interviews were conducted by telephone with 19 individuals who had successfully maintained a transplanted kidney for 25 years or more.
  • RESULTS: Four themes emerged as participants described the behaviors they developed to adhere successfully to the immunosuppressive medication required for maintaining their transplanted kidneys.
  • Kidney transplant recipients identified the importance of developing and maintaining medication-taking skills and routines on medication adherence.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Interventions focusing on medication-taking skills, habit formation, and resources for problem solving may improve immunosuppressive medication adherence and clinical outcomes in kidney transplant recipients.

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  • (PMID = 19588667.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-9248
  • [Journal-full-title] Progress in transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prog Transplant
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U24 CA092656; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R24 CA092656; United States / NINR NIH HHS / NR / P30 NR003979; United States / NINR NIH HHS / NR / P30 NR003979-15; None / None / / P30 NR003979-15
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS266536; NLM/ PMC3071038
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23. Lorenz M, Regele H, Schillinger M, Kletzmayr J, Haidbauer B, Derfler K, Druml W, Böhmig GA: Peritransplant immunoadsorption: a strategy enabling transplantation in highly sensitized crossmatch-positive cadaveric kidney allograft recipients. Transplantation; 2005 Mar 27;79(6):696-701
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Peritransplant immunoadsorption: a strategy enabling transplantation in highly sensitized crossmatch-positive cadaveric kidney allograft recipients.
  • BACKGROUND: Kidney transplant recipients with a current positive complement-dependent cytotoxicity crossmatch (CDCXM) are at high risk for hyperacute rejection and graft loss.
  • In this analysis, we evaluated effectiveness of peritransplant IA as an anti-humoral strategy to overcome a current positive CDCXM in presensitized renal allograft recipients.
  • METHODS: Between 1999 and 2003, 40 high risk cadaveric kidney allograft recipients (median CDC panel reactive antibody [PRA] level, 77%; number of retransplants, n = 38) were subjected to peritransplant IA with protein A (one pretransplant IA session followed by a course of repeat posttransplant IA sessions) in addition to preemptive antilymphocyte antibody therapy.
  • CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate that peritransplant IA enables successful cadaveric kidney transplantation in the context of a positive CDCXM.
  • [MeSH-major] Graft Survival / immunology. Histocompatibility Testing. Immunosorbents / immunology. Kidney Transplantation / immunology


24. Schukfeh N, Kuebler JF, Schirg E, Petersen C, Ure BM, Glüer S: Dysplastic kidney and not renal agenesis is the commonly associated anomaly in infants with seminal vesicle cyst. BJU Int; 2009 Mar;103(6):816-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Dysplastic kidney and not renal agenesis is the commonly associated anomaly in infants with seminal vesicle cyst.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the association of seminal vesicle cyst (SVC) and renal anomaly in young children correlates with previously reported cases of SVCs in adolescent and adult patients, as congenital SVCs, although rare, are frequently described in association with ipsilateral renal agenesis, mainly in adolescent and adult patients, whereas reports on SVCs in younger children are sparse.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: We report on nine infants (median age 4 months) with congenital SVCs, all of them associated with ipsilateral dysplastic kidneys.
  • All patients had ultrasonography of the renal system and voiding cysto-urethrography.
  • RESULTS: The SVCs were found incidentally during ultrasonography for the renal anomaly.
  • Three patients had dysplastic and six had multicystic dysplastic kidneys.
  • In previous reported adult cases of SVCs the most common associated renal anomaly was agenesis of the ipsilateral kidney (25 of 44 cases), whereas only one case of dysplastic kidney was reported.
  • CONCLUSION: As the appearance of renal agenesis might result from a former congenital dysplastic kidney, our findings indicate that cases of ipsilateral renal agenesis in adult patients with congenital SVCs might represent former dysplastic or multicystic dysplastic kidney.
  • [MeSH-major] Cysts / etiology. Genital Diseases, Male / etiology. Kidney / abnormalities. Multicystic Dysplastic Kidney / complications. Seminal Vesicles

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  • (PMID = 19040535.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-410X
  • [Journal-full-title] BJU international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BJU Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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25. Jeha GS, Tatevian N, Heptulla RA: Congenital hypothyroidism in association with Caroli's disease and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease: patient report. J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab; 2005 Mar;18(3):315-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Congenital hypothyroidism in association with Caroli's disease and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease: patient report.
  • Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is an important renal disease of childhood.
  • Congenital hypothyroidism has been associated with glomerulocystic kidney disease, but to date no association has been made with ARPKD.
  • [MeSH-major] Caroli Disease / complications. Caroli Disease / genetics. Congenital Hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism / etiology. Polycystic Kidney, Autosomal Recessive / complications. Polycystic Kidney, Autosomal Recessive / genetics


26. Häcker A, Chauhan S, Peters K, Hildenbrand R, Marlinghaus E, Alken P, Michel MS: Multiple high-intensity focused ultrasound probes for kidney-tissue ablation. J Endourol; 2005 Oct;19(8):1036-40
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Multiple high-intensity focused ultrasound probes for kidney-tissue ablation.
  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To investigate kidney-tissue ablation by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) using multiple and single probes.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ultrasound beams (1.75 MHz) produced by a piezoceramic element (focal distance 80 mm) were focused at the center of renal parenchyma.
  • Lesion dimensions were examined in perfused and unperfused ex vivo porcine kidneys at different power levels (40, 60, and 80 W) and treatment times (4, 6, and 8 seconds).
  • Lesions in perfused kidneys were smaller than those in unperfused kidneys.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Ex vivo, kidney-tissue ablation by means of multiple HIFU probes offers significant advantages over single HIFU probes in respect of lesion size and formation.

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  • (PMID = 16253077.001).
  • [ISSN] 0892-7790
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of endourology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Endourol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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27. Langer R, Tóth A, Máthé Z, Remport A, Járay J, Kahan BD: [Lymphocele and kidney transplantation]. Orv Hetil; 2007 Aug 5;148(31):1475-80
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Lymphocele and kidney transplantation].
  • INTRODUCTION: Lymphocele is a special complication following kidney transplantation.
  • The authors examined the factors associated with an increased occurrence of clinically significant perinephric fluid collections and/or lymphoceles among sirolimus-treated renal transplant recipients.
  • In both subgroups the serum creatinine levels were elevated at the time of diagnosis from a nadir of 179.5 +/- 141.7 to 359.9 +/- 259.6 mmol/l (Group III, sirolimus treated) and from 222.6 +/- 205.9 to 383.7 +/- 255.2 mmol/l (Group IV, sirolimus free).
  • Despite an Influenza A + Chlamydia pneumonia and acute rejection which was followed by a GI bleeding and stomach resection he fully recovered and is doing well with an excellent kidney function a year after.
  • [MeSH-major] Immunosuppressive Agents / adverse effects. Kidney Transplantation / adverse effects. Lymphocele / etiology

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  • (PMID = 17656338.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6002
  • [Journal-full-title] Orvosi hetilap
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Orv Hetil
  • [Language] hun
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Hungary
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 83HN0GTJ6D / Cyclosporine; MRK240IY2L / Azathioprine; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; W36ZG6FT64 / Sirolimus
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28. Yaqoob MM: Acidosis and progression of chronic kidney disease. Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens; 2010 Sep;19(5):489-92
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Acidosis and progression of chronic kidney disease.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Chronic kidney disease progressively impairs the ability of kidneys to excrete hydrogen ions owing to the reduced capacity of the kidney to synthesize ammonia resulting in metabolic acidosis.
  • There is good experimental evidence that metabolic acidosis contributes to protein energy wasting disorder and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD).
  • RECENT FINDINGS: Three recent publications have confirmed the experimental evidence and the only randomized controlled study of its kind has suggested that the correction of acidosis by sodium bicarbonate in patients with advanced CKD is associated with attenuation of the rate of decline of renal function, reduction in the incidence of end stage renal disease and improvement of nutritional parameters.
  • SUMMARY: In light of these recent studies, it appears that this cheap and simple strategy, which is in line with current renal recommendations, has the potential of translating into significant economic, quality of life and clinical outcome benefits in an expanding pool of patients with CKD.
  • [MeSH-major] Acidosis / complications. Kidney Diseases / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Disease Progression. Glomerular Filtration Rate. Humans. Kidney / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 20539229.001).
  • [ISSN] 1473-6543
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in nephrology and hypertension
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Opin. Nephrol. Hypertens.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
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29. Ishibe S, Cantley LG: Epithelial-mesenchymal-epithelial cycling in kidney repair. Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens; 2008 Jul;17(4):379-85
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Epithelial-mesenchymal-epithelial cycling in kidney repair.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Tubule repair following acute kidney injury involves epithelial de-differentiation followed by cell migration and proliferation and eventual re-differentiation.
  • RECENT FINDINGS: Epithelial de-differentiation after kidney injury or in epithelial culture systems is controlled by secreted factors such as transforming growth factor beta and hepatocyte growth factor as well as cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions.
  • SUMMARY: This review focuses on the underlying molecular mechanism of epithelial de-differentiation and re-differentiation in tubule repair in vivo and formation in vitro, thus giving insight into possible strategies for improving recovery following acute kidney injury and preventing progression to chronic kidney disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Epithelium / physiology. Kidney / physiology. Mesoderm / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Differentiation / physiology. Humans. Kidney Diseases / pathology. Kidney Diseases / physiopathology. Kidney Tubules / growth & development. Kidney Tubules / physiology. Wnt Proteins / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 18660674.001).
  • [ISSN] 1062-4821
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in nephrology and hypertension
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Opin. Nephrol. Hypertens.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Wnt Proteins
  • [Number-of-references] 58
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30. Yen M, Huang JJ, Teng HL: Education for patients with chronic kidney disease in Taiwan: a prospective repeated measures study. J Clin Nurs; 2008 Nov;17(21):2927-34
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Education for patients with chronic kidney disease in Taiwan: a prospective repeated measures study.
  • AIM: To investigate the physical, knowledge and quality of life outcomes of an educational intervention for patients with early stage chronic kidney disease.
  • BACKGROUND: A comprehensive predialysis education care team can be effective in slowing the progression of chronic kidney disease.
  • A predialysis, team-delivered educational intervention covering renal function health care, dietary management of renal function and the effects of Chinese herb medication on renal function was designed and implemented.
  • Study outcomes included physical indicators, knowledge (renal function protection, use of Chinese herbs and renal function and diet) and quality of life.
  • The primary indicator of renal function, glomerular filtration rate, remained stable throughout the 12 months of follow-up, despite the relatively older mean age of study participants.
  • CONCLUSION: A predialysis education care team can provide effective disease-specific knowledge and may help retard deterioration of renal function in persons with early-stage chronic kidney disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Diseases / physiopathology. Patient Education as Topic

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  • (PMID = 19012761.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2702
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical nursing
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Nurs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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31. Caixeta A, Mehran R: Evidence-based management of patients undergoing PCI: contrast-induced acute kidney injury. Catheter Cardiovasc Interv; 2010 Mar 1;75 Suppl 1:S15-20
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Evidence-based management of patients undergoing PCI: contrast-induced acute kidney injury.
  • Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) is one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired acute kidney injury.
  • CI-AKI is highly prevalent in patients with well-known risk factors, including older age, chronic renal insufficiency, congestive heart failure, and diabetes.
  • [MeSH-major] Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary. Contrast Media / adverse effects. Kidney Diseases / prevention & control. Radiography, Interventional / adverse effects

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 20333702.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-726X
  • [Journal-full-title] Catheterization and cardiovascular interventions : official journal of the Society for Cardiac Angiography & Interventions
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Catheter Cardiovasc Interv
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Contrast Media; 0 / Protective Agents; 8MDF5V39QO / Sodium Bicarbonate; INU8H2KAWG / Fenoldopam; VTD58H1Z2X / Dopamine; WYQ7N0BPYC / Acetylcysteine
  • [Number-of-references] 47
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32. Sato S, Mukai Y, Yamate J, Kato J, Kurasaki M, Hatai A, Sagai M: Effect of polyphenol-containing azuki bean (Vigna angularis) extract on blood pressure elevation and macrophage infiltration in the heart and kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rats. Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol; 2008 Jan;35(1):43-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effect of polyphenol-containing azuki bean (Vigna angularis) extract on blood pressure elevation and macrophage infiltration in the heart and kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rats.
  • 1. Hypertension is a major risk factor for myocardial infarction and renal damage, and it has also been shown to have pro-inflammatory actions that increase the formation of reactive oxygen species.
  • Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of polyphenol-containing azuki bean extract (ABE) on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and macrophage infiltration in the heart and kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR).
  • Tail SBP and macrophage kinetics in the heart and kidney were examined.
  • 4. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-stimulated superoxide (O2-) production was enhanced in the kidney and heart in SHR and WKY rats compared with levels in the absence of NADH or NADPH.
  • The NADPH-stimulated superoxide (O2-) levels in the kidney in untreated SHR was significantly higher than that in untreated WKY rats.
  • 5. In immunohistochemical analyses, the number of macrophages in the heart and in the glomeruli and tubulointerstitium of the kidney was significantly higher in ABE-untreated SHR than in ABE-untreated WKY rats.
  • There were significant positive correlations between SBP and the number of ED1-positive macrophages in the heart and tubulointerstitial and glomerular areas of the kidney in WKY rats and SHR.
  • 6. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that ABE attenuates the elevation of SBP and macrophage infiltration in the heart, as well as in the glomeruli and tubulointerstitium of the kidney, in our SHR model.
  • [MeSH-major] Antihypertensive Agents / pharmacology. Blood Pressure / drug effects. Fabaceae. Flavonoids / pharmacology. Heart / drug effects. Hypertension / drug therapy. Kidney / drug effects. Macrophages / drug effects. Phenols / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 18047626.001).
  • [ISSN] 1440-1681
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical and experimental pharmacology & physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Exp. Pharmacol. Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antihypertensive Agents; 0 / Flavonoids; 0 / Phenols; 0 / Plant Extracts; 0 / Polyphenols; 0 / Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances; 0U46U6E8UK / NAD; 11062-77-4 / Superoxides
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33. Cozzolino M, Malindretos P: The role of vitamin D receptor activation in chronic kidney disease. Hippokratia; 2010 Jan;14(1):7-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The role of vitamin D receptor activation in chronic kidney disease.
  • Observational data indicate that there is a close inter-relationship between progressive renal dysfunction in patients with chronic kidney disease cardiovascular disease and mortality.
  • Continuously evidence indicates that deficiencies in vitamin D receptor activation represents one of key players in adversely affecting cardiovascular health, as well as inducing to secondary hyperparathyroidism in chromic kidney disease patients.

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  • (PMID = 20411052.001).
  • [ISSN] 1790-8019
  • [Journal-full-title] Hippokratia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hippokratia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2843577
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; cardiovascular disease / haemodialysis / vitamin D
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34. Danovitch GM, Delmonico FL: The prohibition of kidney sales and organ markets should remain. Curr Opin Organ Transplant; 2008 Aug;13(4):386-94
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The prohibition of kidney sales and organ markets should remain.
  • RECENT FINDINGS: In 'natural experiments' performed in developing countries the outcome for kidney vendors, in terms of both their medical and psychosocial health, has been shown to be poor.
  • SUMMARY: Commercialization of living kidney donation does not serve the interests of the donors, endangers the health of recipients, and undermines the healthy development of the international transplant endeavor.
  • [MeSH-major] Financing, Organized / legislation & jurisprudence. Government Regulation. Health Policy / economics. Kidney Transplantation / economics. Living Donors / legislation & jurisprudence. Tissue and Organ Procurement / economics
  • [MeSH-minor] Altruism. Cost-Benefit Analysis. Crime / prevention & control. Gift Giving. Health Care Costs. Health Services Accessibility / economics. Health Services Accessibility / legislation & jurisprudence. Health Services Needs and Demand / economics. Health Services Needs and Demand / legislation & jurisprudence. Humans. Motivation. Organizational Objectives. Public Opinion. Renal Dialysis / economics. Risk Assessment. United States. Waiting Lists

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  • (PMID = 18685334.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-7013
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in organ transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Organ Transplant
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 37
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35. Bang H, Vupputuri S, Shoham DA, Klemmer PJ, Falk RJ, Mazumdar M, Gipson D, Colindres RE, Kshirsagar AV: SCreening for Occult REnal Disease (SCORED): a simple prediction model for chronic kidney disease. Arch Intern Med; 2007 Feb 26;167(4):374-81
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] SCreening for Occult REnal Disease (SCORED): a simple prediction model for chronic kidney disease.
  • BACKGROUND: Despite the wide availability and low cost of serum creatinine measurement, at-risk populations are not routinely tested for chronic kidney disease (CKD).
  • METHODS: We used a cross-sectional analysis of a nationally representative, population-based survey to develop a system, SCORED (SCreening for Occult REnal Disease), that uses routinely available demographic and medical information to identify individuals with an increased likelihood of CKD.
  • Chronic kidney disease was defined as a glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2).
  • CONCLUSION: This scoring system, weighted toward common variables associated with CKD, may be a useful tool to identify individuals with a high likelihood of occult kidney disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Creatinine / blood. Kidney Failure, Chronic / diagnosis. Mass Screening / methods. Models, Biological. Population Surveillance


36. Barbari AG, Masri MA, Stephan AG, El Ghoul B, Rizk S, Mourad N, Kamel GS, Kilani HE, Karam AS: Cyclosporine lymphocyte maximum level monitoring in de novo kidney transplant patients: a prospective study. Exp Clin Transplant; 2006 Jun;4(1):400-5
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  • [Title] Cyclosporine lymphocyte maximum level monitoring in de novo kidney transplant patients: a prospective study.
  • OBJECTIVES: To determine prospectively the temporal variations of cyclosporine-A lymphocyte maximum level, whole blood maximum concentration, and total lymphocyte count in patients with de novo kidney transplantation.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Lymphocyte maximum level, whole blood maximum concentration, and total lymphocyte count were prospectively measured in 35 patients at 1, 2, and 3 months after kidney transplantation.
  • Cyclosporine-A lymphocyte maximum level seems to offer a more reliable alternative than does whole blood maximum concentration for cyclosporine-A monitoring in patients with kidney transplantation.
  • [MeSH-major] Cyclosporine / blood. Immunosuppressive Agents / blood. Kidney Transplantation. Lymphocytes / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 16827634.001).
  • [ISSN] 1304-0855
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental and clinical transplantation : official journal of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp Clin Transplant
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Turkey
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 83HN0GTJ6D / Cyclosporine
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37. van der Mei SF, van Sonderen EL, van Son WJ, de Jong PE, Groothoff JW, van den Heuvel WJ: Social participation after successful kidney transplantation. Disabil Rehabil; 2007 Mar 30;29(6):473-83
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  • [Title] Social participation after successful kidney transplantation.
  • PURPOSE: To explore and describe the degree of social participation after kidney transplantation and to examine associated factors.
  • METHOD: A cross-sectional study on 239 adult patients 1-7.3 years after kidney transplantation was performed via in-home interviews on participation in obligatory activities (i.e., employment, education, household tasks) and leisure activities (volunteer work, assisting others, recreation, sports, clubs/associations, socializing, going out).
  • RESULTS: Kidney transplantation patients had a lower educational level, spent less time on obligatory activities, had part-time jobs more often, and participated less in sports compared to a control group from the general population.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although kidney transplantation patients participate less in employment and sports, they do participate in household tasks, volunteer work, going out, socializing and other leisure activities.
  • [MeSH-major] Activities of Daily Living. Employment. Interpersonal Relations. Kidney Transplantation. Leisure Activities

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  • (PMID = 17364802.001).
  • [ISSN] 0963-8288
  • [Journal-full-title] Disability and rehabilitation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Disabil Rehabil
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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38. Hahn H: Genetics of kidney development: pathogenesis of renal anomalies. Korean J Pediatr; 2010 Jul;53(7):729-34
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  • [Title] Genetics of kidney development: pathogenesis of renal anomalies.
  • Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) account for more than 50% of abdominal masses found in neonates and involve about 0.5% of all pregnancies.
  • CAKUT has a major role in renal failure, and increasing evidence suggests that certain abnormalities predispose to the development of hypertension and cardiovascular disease in adulthood.
  • To understand the pathogenesis of human renal anomalies, understanding the development of kidney is important.
  • Diverse anomalies of the kidney corresponding to defects at a particular stage of development have been documented recently; however, more research is required to understand the molecular networks underlying kidney development, and such an investigation will provide a clue to the therapeutic intervention for CAKUT.

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  • (PMID = 21189947.001).
  • [ISSN] 2092-7258
  • [Journal-full-title] Korean journal of pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Korean J Pediatr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3004483
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Congenital anomalies / Development / Kidney / Urinary tract
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39. Negri AL: Hereditary hypophosphatemias: new genes in the bone-kidney axis. Nephrology (Carlton); 2007 Aug;12(4):317-20
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  • [Title] Hereditary hypophosphatemias: new genes in the bone-kidney axis.
  • Hypophosphatemia due to isolated renal phosphate wasting is a genetically heterogeneous disease.
  • Hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets with hypercalciuria is another rare disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance.
  • The disease was mapped to a 1.6 Mbp region on chromosome 9q34, which contains SLC34A3, the gene encoding the renal sodium-phosphate cotransporter NaPi-IIc.
  • Thus, DMP1 and NaPi-IIc add two new members to the bone-kidney axis proposed since it was discovered that the first phosphatonin, FGF23, was of osteoblastic/osteocyte origin.
  • This provides a mechanism for the skeleton to communicate with the kidney to coordinate the mineralization of extracelular matrix and the renal handling of phosphate.

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  • (PMID = 17635744.001).
  • [ISSN] 1320-5358
  • [Journal-full-title] Nephrology (Carlton, Vic.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nephrology (Carlton)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DMP1 protein, human; 0 / Extracellular Matrix Proteins; 0 / Phosphoproteins; 0 / SLC34A3 protein, human; 0 / Sodium-Phosphate Cotransporter Proteins, Type IIc
  • [Number-of-references] 22
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40. Moody EM, Clemens KK, Storsley L, Waterman A, Parikh CR, Garg AX, Donor Nephrectomy Outcomes Research (Donor) Network: Improving on-line information for potential living kidney donors. Kidney Int; 2007 May;71(10):1062-70
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  • [Title] Improving on-line information for potential living kidney donors.
  • Individuals who consider becoming living kidney donors often search the internet for reliable information before contacting the transplant center.
  • Eighty-six unique websites on living kidney donation were found.
  • [MeSH-major] Information Dissemination. Internet. Kidney Transplantation. Living Donors

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  • (PMID = 17361119.001).
  • [ISSN] 0085-2538
  • [Journal-full-title] Kidney international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Kidney Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / K23-DK064689
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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41. Colović R, Colović N, Grubor N, Radak V, Micev M, Stojković M: [Bilateral angiomyolipoma of the kidney in patient with tuberous sclerosis]. Srp Arh Celok Lek; 2005 Sep-Oct;133(9-10):433-7
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  • [Title] [Bilateral angiomyolipoma of the kidney in patient with tuberous sclerosis].
  • Angiomyolipomas are relatively frequent tumours of the kidney.
  • It is believed that about 10 million people worldwide have such a tumour.
  • Due to the benign nature of angiomyolipomas, surgical treatment and embolisation of the tumours are generally not recommended, unless renal function is endangered, the symptoms are severe, or the kidney in question becomes completely dysfunctional.
  • We present a 24-year-old woman with tuberous sclerosis in whom bilateral kidney tumours were diagnosed 7 years earlier and in whom we carried out a left nephrectomy of a 5300 gram angiomyolipoma, which caused pain and complete loss of function.
  • Although tumourous, the right kidney was functional, so it was left untouched.
  • After an uneventful recovery, a close follow-up was recommended, as well as HLA typing, as it is highly probable that the right kidney will gradually become inadequate or completely dysfunctional, so that haemodialysis and/or kidney transplantation along with nephrectomy will become necessary.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiomyolipoma / complications. Kidney Neoplasms / complications. Tuberous Sclerosis / complications

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  • (PMID = 16640189.001).
  • [ISSN] 0370-8179
  • [Journal-full-title] Srpski arhiv za celokupno lekarstvo
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Srp Arh Celok Lek
  • [Language] srp
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Serbia and Montenegro
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42. Al-Taan OS, Featherstone JM, Rees AM, Young WT, Stephenson TP: Renal cell carcinoma in a horseshoe kidney presenting as an acute, left sided varicocele. Int Urol Nephrol; 2007;39(2):369-71
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  • [Title] Renal cell carcinoma in a horseshoe kidney presenting as an acute, left sided varicocele.
  • We present a rare case of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in a horseshoe kidney presenting as an acute left sided varicocele.
  • A left sided varicocele is a well-described presentation of RCC, usually caused by tumour thrombus extending along the renal vein with resultant testicular vein occlusion.
  • However, in our case a tumour in the lower pole of a horseshoe kidney caused an acute varicocele by direct involvement and occlusion of the testicular vein.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / complications. Kidney / abnormalities. Kidney Neoplasms / complications. Varicocele / etiology


43. Shah SV, Rajapurkar MM: The role of labile iron in kidney disease and treatment with chelation. Hemoglobin; 2009;33(5):378-85
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  • [Title] The role of labile iron in kidney disease and treatment with chelation.
  • There are two major forms of kidney disease: acute renal failure [also referred to as acute kidney injury (AKI)] and chronic kidney disease (CKD).
  • Acute renal failure is an abrupt loss of kidney function within 48 h, whereas CKD is a loss of kidney function greater than 3 months.
  • There is a large amount of experimental evidence for an increase of labile iron in a wide variety of models of kidney disease.
  • These observations suggest that iron chelators may provide a new modality of prevention and treatment of kidney disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Acute Kidney Injury / drug therapy. Acute Kidney Injury / metabolism. Iron / metabolism. Iron Chelating Agents / therapeutic use. Kidney Diseases / drug therapy. Kidney Diseases / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19821781.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-432X
  • [Journal-full-title] Hemoglobin
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hemoglobin
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Iron Chelating Agents; E1UOL152H7 / Iron
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44. Palmer BF: Hypertension management in patients with chronic kidney disease. Curr Hypertens Rep; 2008 Oct;10(5):367-73
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  • [Title] Hypertension management in patients with chronic kidney disease.
  • Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease.
  • The loss of renal function leads to impaired renal autoregulation and renders the kidney vulnerable to the damaging effects of uncontrolled hypertension.
  • Mounting evidence indicates that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers slow the progression of chronic kidney disease through effects beyond lowering blood pressure.
  • Studies are needed to determine whether high doses of the single agent or combination therapy is most effective in providing renal protection.
  • Urinary protein excretion is a useful tool for monitoring and titrating therapy to maximize renal protection.
  • Changes in the serum creatinine concentration and hyperkalemia are complications of antihypertensive therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease that can be successfully managed to allow continued use of renin-angiotensin blockade.
  • [MeSH-major] Hypertension / prevention & control. Renal Insufficiency, Chronic / etiology. Renal Insufficiency, Chronic / prevention & control

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  • (PMID = 18775113.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-3111
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hypertension reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Hypertens. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antihypertensive Agents; EC 3.4.23.15 / Renin
  • [Number-of-references] 40
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45. López Gómez JM: [Management of anemia in chronic kidney disease]. Nefrologia; 2008;28 Suppl 3:63-6
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  • [Title] [Management of anemia in chronic kidney disease].
  • [Transliterated title] Manejo de la anemia en la enfermedad renal cronica.
  • 1. All patients with anemia secondary to CKD should be treated and evaluated for possible treatment, irrespective of underlying disease, associated comorbidity or possibility of kidney replacement therapy.
  • Normalization of Hb levels in CKD is associated with an improvement in health-related quality of life, but without differences in mortality or the rate of loss of kidney function (Strength of Recommendation A).
  • [MeSH-major] Anemia / drug therapy. Anemia / etiology. Kidney Diseases / complications

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  • (PMID = 19018741.001).
  • [ISSN] 0211-6995
  • [Journal-full-title] Nefrología : publicación oficial de la Sociedad Española Nefrologia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nefrologia
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Practice Guideline
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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46. Wołyniec W, Zdrojewski Z, Rutkowski B: [Metabolic acidosis after kidney transplantation]. Przegl Lek; 2005;62(1):68-71
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  • [Title] [Metabolic acidosis after kidney transplantation].
  • Metabolic acidosis is a common complication in patients after kidney transplantation.
  • It is caused by inability of transplanted kidney to regenerate bicarbonate buffer.
  • Although every type of acidosis may be present in these patients, the most frequent are renal tubular acidosis and uremic acidosis.
  • Ketoacidosis due to a post-transplant diabetes mellitus and bicarbonate loss in patients after simultaneous pancreas/kidney transplantation are rarely observed.
  • The proper diagnosis and appropriate treatment with oral supplements are essential.
  • [MeSH-major] Acidosis, Renal Tubular / metabolism. Kidney Transplantation / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 16053226.001).
  • [ISSN] 0033-2240
  • [Journal-full-title] Przegla̧d lekarski
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prz. Lek.
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bicarbonates
  • [Number-of-references] 28
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47. el-Assmy A, el-Nahas AR, Hekal IA, Badran M, Youssef RF, Sheir KZ: Long-term effects of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy on renal function: our experience with 156 patients with solitary kidney. J Urol; 2008 Jun;179(6):2229-32
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  • [Title] Long-term effects of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy on renal function: our experience with 156 patients with solitary kidney.
  • PURPOSE: We studied the long-term impact of shock wave lithotripsy on renal function, stone recurrence and hypertension in patients with a solitary kidney.
  • Patients with a solitary kidney provide a unique opportunity to evaluate any clinically significant change in renal function.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 156 patients with stones in a solitary kidney treated with shock wave lithotripsy monotherapy.
  • Serum creatinine, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, new onset hypertension, calculated glomerular filtration rate, and kidney morphology were determined before and after treatment, and compared by chi-square, paired and unpaired t tests.
  • Renal obstruction caused by steinstrasse after shock wave lithotripsy occurred in 14 (8.9%) patients.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The demonstrated effectiveness, small number of complications at short-term followup, insignificant effect on renal function, blood pressure and relatively small number of recurrences at the long-term followup confirm that shock wave lithotripsy is not only effective but is also safe in the long run.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney / abnormalities. Kidney / physiopathology. Kidney Calculi / physiopathology. Kidney Calculi / therapy. Kidney Failure, Chronic

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  • (PMID = 18423733.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-3792
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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48. Ekiel AM, Pietrzak B, Kamiński P, Dolezych H, Jóźwiak J, Martirosian G: Prevalence of urogenital mycoplasmas and ureaplasmas in women after kidney transplantation. Transplantation; 2009 Mar 27;87(6):848-51
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  • [Title] Prevalence of urogenital mycoplasmas and ureaplasmas in women after kidney transplantation.
  • BACKGROUND: The prevalence of urogenital mycoplasmas and ureaplasmas in kidney transplant and hemodialyzed patients was studied.
  • CONCLUSION: Our observation showed the necessity of careful examination of possible atypical pathogens in diagnostic materials from hemodialyzed and kidney transplant patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Female Urogenital Diseases / epidemiology. Kidney Transplantation / adverse effects. Mycoplasma Infections / epidemiology. Postoperative Complications / microbiology. Ureaplasma Infections / epidemiology


49. Peters J: Secretory and cytosolic (pro)renin in kidney, heart, and adrenal gland. J Mol Med (Berl); 2008 Jun;86(6):711-4
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  • [Title] Secretory and cytosolic (pro)renin in kidney, heart, and adrenal gland.
  • Renin is commonly known as a secretory glycoprotein, which is expressed, stored, and secreted in a regulated manner by the kidney.
  • The rat kidney exclusively expresses secretory renin.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenal Glands / metabolism. Cytosol / metabolism. Kidney / metabolism. Myocardium / metabolism. Renin / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 18368380.001).
  • [ISSN] 0946-2716
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of molecular medicine (Berlin, Germany)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Mol. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.4.23.15 / Renin
  • [Number-of-references] 30
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50. Wesson JA, Ward MD: Role of crystal surface adhesion in kidney stone disease. Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens; 2006 Jul;15(4):386-93
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  • [Title] Role of crystal surface adhesion in kidney stone disease.
  • These studies have produced new insight into the specific chemical interactions that regulate kidney stone formation.
  • SUMMARY: The low adhesion force for calcium oxalate dihydrate predicts a decreased ability of these crystals to aggregate or attach to cells, and correlates with the relative absence of calcium oxalate dihydrate in kidney stones.
  • [MeSH-major] Calcium Oxalate / chemistry. Kidney Calculi / chemistry

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  • (PMID = 16775453.001).
  • [ISSN] 1062-4821
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in nephrology and hypertension
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Opin. Nephrol. Hypertens.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 2612HC57YE / Calcium Oxalate
  • [Number-of-references] 51
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51. Brown CT, Kooiman G, Sharma DM, Poulsen J, Grange P: Scarless single-port laparoscopic pelvic kidney nephrectomy. J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A; 2010 Nov;20(9):743-6
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  • [Title] Scarless single-port laparoscopic pelvic kidney nephrectomy.
  • INTRODUCTION: We report the first pelvic kidney removal through the umbilicus using a scarless pure single-port technique in a young woman.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: A 27-year-old woman presented with uro-sepsis and acute renal failure secondary to a dilated, chronically infected, nonfunctioning left-sided pelvic kidney with ureteropelvic obstruction causing an obstruction to the right kidney.
  • Definitive treatment involved removal of the diseased pelvic kidney through the umbilicus via a single-port access device (TriPor™; Olympus).
  • [MeSH-major] Acute Kidney Injury / surgery. Kidney Pelvis / surgery. Laparoscopy / methods. Nephrectomy / methods. Ureteral Obstruction / surgery

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  • (PMID = 20874248.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-9034
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of laparoendoscopic & advanced surgical techniques. Part A
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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52. Cassuto JR, Reese PP, Sonnad S, Bloom RD, Levine MH, Olthoff KM, Shaked A, Naji A, Abt P: Wait list death and survival benefit of kidney transplantation among nonrenal transplant recipients. Am J Transplant; 2010 Nov;10(11):2502-11
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  • [Title] Wait list death and survival benefit of kidney transplantation among nonrenal transplant recipients.
  • The disparity between the number of patients waiting for kidney transplantation and the limited supply of kidney allografts has renewed interest in the benefit from kidney transplantation experienced by different groups.
  • This study evaluated kidney transplant survival benefit in prior nonrenal transplant recipients (kidney after liver, KALi; lung, KALu; heart, KAH) compared to primary isolated (KA1) or repeat isolated kidney (KA2) transplant.
  • Following kidney transplant, patient survival was greatest for KA1, similar among KA2, KALi, KAH, and inferior for KALu.
  • Compared to the entire wait list, renal transplantation was associated with a survival benefit among all groups except KALu (p = 0.017; HR = 1.61; CI = 1.09-2.38), where posttransplant survival was inferior to the wait list population.
  • Recipients of KA1 kidney transplantation have the greatest posttransplant survival and compared to the overall kidney wait list, the greatest survival benefit.

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  • [Copyright] ©2010 The Authors Journal compilation©2010 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.
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  • (PMID = 20977641.001).
  • [ISSN] 1600-6143
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Transplant.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / K23 DK078688; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / K23 DK078688-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS235283; NLM/ PMC2966021
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53. Jung JY, Song JH, Li C, Yang CW, Kang TC, Won MH, Jeong YG, Han KH, Choi KB, Lee SH, Kim J: Expression of epidermal growth factor in the developing rat kidney. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol; 2005 Jan;288(1):F227-35
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  • [Title] Expression of epidermal growth factor in the developing rat kidney.
  • Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is important in mammalian renal development.
  • In our study, we investigated the detailed distribution and the time of the first appearance of EGF in developing rat kidney.
  • Kidneys from embryonic 18 (E18)- and 20-day-old (E20) fetuses, postnatal 1 (P1)-, 3 (P3)-, 7 (P7)-, 14 (P14)-, and 21-day-old (P21) pups, and adults were processed for immunohistochemistry and electronmicroscopy.
  • In adult rat kidney, EGF immunoreactivity was found in distal tubule including the thick ascending limb (TAL) and portion 1 of distal convoluted tubule (DCT1), whereas no EGF immunoreactivity was seen in portion 2 of distal convoluted tubule (DCT2) and connecting tubule.
  • In developing kidney, EGF-positive cells first appeared at P3 and were localized in the middle portion of the differentiating TAL of the corticomedullary junction.
  • However, EGF-positive and EGF-negative cells were in the TAL in developing rat kidney.
  • Our results suggest that the expression of EGF in developing kidney plays an important role in the regulation of growth and differentiation of the loop of Henle during kidney development and that this may act in the paracrine mode.
  • [MeSH-major] Epidermal Growth Factor / biosynthesis. Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental / physiology. Kidney / growth & development

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  • (PMID = 15353402.001).
  • [ISSN] 1931-857X
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of physiology. Renal physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Physiol. Renal Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 62229-50-9 / Epidermal Growth Factor; G34N38R2N1 / Bromodeoxyuridine
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54. Grgic I, Wulff H, Eichler I, Flothmann C, Köhler R, Hoyer J: Blockade of T-lymphocyte KCa3.1 and Kv1.3 channels as novel immunosuppression strategy to prevent kidney allograft rejection. Transplant Proc; 2009 Jul-Aug;41(6):2601-6
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  • [Title] Blockade of T-lymphocyte KCa3.1 and Kv1.3 channels as novel immunosuppression strategy to prevent kidney allograft rejection.
  • Currently, there is an unmet clinical need for novel immunosuppressive agents for long-term prevention of kidney transplant rejection as alternatives to the nephrotoxic calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine (CsA).
  • We investigated whether combined blockade of the T-cell K(+) channels K(Ca)3.1 and K(v)1.3, both of which regulate calcium signaling during lymphocyte activation, is effective in prevention of rejection of kidney allografts from Fisher rats to Lewis rats.
  • Kidney sections were stained with periodic acid-Schiff or hematoxylin-eosin and histochemically for markers of macrophages (CD68), T-lymphocytes (CD43), or cytotoxic T-cells (CD8).
  • Thus, selective blockade of T-lymphocyte K(Ca)3.1 and K(v)1.3 channels may represent a novel alternative therapy for prevention of kidney allograft rejection.
  • [MeSH-major] Graft Rejection / prevention & control. Immunosuppression / methods. Intermediate-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels / immunology. Kidney Transplantation / immunology. Kv1.1 Potassium Channel / immunology. T-Lymphocytes / immunology

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  • (PMID = 19715983.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-2623
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplant. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM076063; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM076063; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM076063-04
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cnidarian Venoms; 0 / Intermediate-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels; 0 / Kcnn4 protein, rat; 0 / Pyrazoles; 0 / ShK neurotoxin; 0 / TRAM 34; 147173-20-4 / Kv1.1 Potassium Channel
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS370561; NLM/ PMC3343637
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56. Gerrits JH, van de Wetering J, Drabbels JJ, IJzermans JN, Claas FH, Weimar W, van Besouw NM: Non-HLA T-cell reactivity during the first year after HLA-identical living-related kidney transplantation. Clin Transplant; 2009 Sep-Oct;23(5):740-7
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  • [Title] Non-HLA T-cell reactivity during the first year after HLA-identical living-related kidney transplantation.
  • We wondered whether donor-reactive T-cell responses directed to minor histocompatibility antigens (mHAgs) or other non-HLA antigens also decrease after HLA-identical living-related (LR) kidney transplantation.
  • METHODS: We studied donor-reactive T-cell responses by IFN-gamma and granzyme B (GrB) Elispot assays in 15 HLA-identical LR kidney transplant recipients before, six months and one yr after transplantation.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Donor-reactivity could be detected before and after HLA-identical LR kidney transplantation, but was not related with the number of mHAg mismatches, and did not decrease after transplantation.
  • [MeSH-major] Graft Rejection / immunology. HLA Antigens / immunology. Kidney Transplantation / immunology. Minor Histocompatibility Antigens / immunology. T-Lymphocytes / immunology

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  • (PMID = 19563488.001).
  • [ISSN] 1399-0012
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Transplant
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / HLA Antigens; 0 / Minor Histocompatibility Antigens; 82115-62-6 / Interferon-gamma; EC 3.4.21.- / GZMB protein, human; EC 3.4.21.- / Granzymes
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57. Pascual J, Galeano C, Royuela A, Zamora J: A systematic review on steroid withdrawal between 3 and 6 months after kidney transplantation. Transplantation; 2010 Aug 27;90(4):343-9
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  • [Title] A systematic review on steroid withdrawal between 3 and 6 months after kidney transplantation.
  • BACKGROUND: Steroid withdrawal (SW) after the first posttransplant months in patients receiving a kidney transplant has been recently discouraged in clinical guidelines.
  • METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials assessing SW (beyond the second week after kidney transplantation) was performed.
  • CONCLUSIONS: SW after 3 to 6 months of kidney transplantation is associated with increased rates of acute rejection only if CsA is used but not with tacrolimus.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenal Cortex Hormones / administration & dosage. Kidney Transplantation / immunology

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  • [CommentIn] Transplantation. 2010 Aug 27;90(4):350-2 [20548264.001]
  • [CommentIn] Transplantation. 2011 Mar 15;91(5):e27-8 [21336084.001]
  • [CommentIn] Transplantation. 2011 Mar 15;91(5):e25; author reply e26-7 [21336081.001]
  • (PMID = 20574419.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-6080
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplantation
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenal Cortex Hormones; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 83HN0GTJ6D / Cyclosporine
  • [Number-of-references] 23
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58. Saha SA, Tuttle KR: Influence of glycemic control on the development of diabetic cardiovascular and kidney disease. Cardiol Clin; 2010 Aug;28(3):497-516
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  • [Title] Influence of glycemic control on the development of diabetic cardiovascular and kidney disease.
  • Among the microvascular complications of diabetes, diabetic kidney disease is the most common.
  • This article discusses the various drug classes used to treat diabetes mellitus, and reviews the current clinical evidence linking glycemic control using these drug classes on diabetic kidney and cardiovascular disease.

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  • [Copyright] 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20621253.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-2264
  • [Journal-full-title] Cardiology clinics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cardiol Clin
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biguanides; 0 / Hypoglycemic Agents; 0 / Insulin; 0 / Sulfonylurea Compounds; 0 / Thiazolidinediones; T58MSI464G / Acarbose
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59. Stratta RJ, Sundberg AK, Farney AC, Rohr MS, Hartmann EL, Adams PL: Successful simultaneous kidney-pancreas transplantation from extreme donors. Transplant Proc; 2005 Oct;37(8):3535-7
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  • [Title] Successful simultaneous kidney-pancreas transplantation from extreme donors.
  • RESULTS: From January 2002 through January 2005, we performed 40 simultaneous kidney-pancreas transplants (SKPT) with Thymoglobulin induction, including 9 (22.5%) from EX and 31 from CONV DDs.
  • With a mean follow-up of 16.8 months in the EX DD group, patient and kidney graft survival rates are both 100%, and the pancreas graft survival rate is 89%.
  • With a mean follow-up of 21.7 months in the CONV DD group, patient and kidney graft survival rates are both 93.5% and the pancreas graft survival rate is 77.4%.
  • All patients with surviving grafts exhibited good initial (1 case of delayed kidney graft function in a CONV DD) and stable long-term kidney and pancreas graft function.
  • [MeSH-major] Antilymphocyte Serum / therapeutic use. Kidney Transplantation / physiology. Pancreas Transplantation / physiology. Tissue Donors / statistics & numerical data


60. Dhaun N, Macintyre IM, Melville V, Lilitkarntakul P, Johnston NR, Goddard J, Webb DJ: Blood pressure-independent reduction in proteinuria and arterial stiffness after acute endothelin-a receptor antagonism in chronic kidney disease. Hypertension; 2009 Jul;54(1):113-9
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  • [Title] Blood pressure-independent reduction in proteinuria and arterial stiffness after acute endothelin-a receptor antagonism in chronic kidney disease.
  • Endothelin 1 is implicated in the development and progression of chronic kidney disease and associated cardiovascular disease.
  • We, therefore, studied the effects of selective endothelin-A receptor antagonism with BQ-123 on key independent surrogate markers of cardiovascular risk (blood pressure, proteinuria and renal hemodynamics, arterial stiffness, and endothelial function) in patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease.
  • In a double-blind, randomized crossover study, 22 subjects with proteinuric chronic kidney disease received, on 2 separate occasions, placebo or BQ-123.
  • Blood pressure, pulse wave velocity, flow-mediated dilation, renal blood flow, and glomerular filtration rate were monitored after drug dosing.
  • BQ-123 reduced blood pressure (mean arterial pressure: -7+/-1%; P<0.001 versus placebo) and increased renal blood flow (17+/-4%; P<0.01 versus placebo).
  • Nifedipine matched the blood pressure and renal blood flow changes seen with BQ-123.
  • Selective endothelin-A receptor antagonism reduced blood pressure, proteinuria, and arterial stiffness on top of standard treatment in renal patients.
  • If maintained longer term, selective endothelin-A receptor antagonism may confer cardiovascular and renal benefits in patients with chronic kidney disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Arteries / drug effects. Blood Pressure / drug effects. Kidney Failure, Chronic / drug therapy. Peptides, Cyclic / therapeutic use. Proteinuria / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antihypertensive Agents / administration & dosage. Antihypertensive Agents / therapeutic use. Calcium Channel Blockers / administration & dosage. Calcium Channel Blockers / therapeutic use. Cross-Over Studies. Double-Blind Method. Endothelin Receptor Antagonists. Endothelin-1 / blood. Hemodynamics / drug effects. Hemodynamics / physiology. Humans. Middle Aged. Nifedipine / administration & dosage. Nifedipine / therapeutic use. Renal Circulation / drug effects. Sodium / urine. Treatment Outcome


61. Ix JH, De Boer IH, Peralta CA, Adeney KL, Duprez DA, Jenny NS, Siscovick DS, Kestenbaum BR: Serum phosphorus concentrations and arterial stiffness among individuals with normal kidney function to moderate kidney disease in MESA. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol; 2009 Mar;4(3):609-15
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  • [Title] Serum phosphorus concentrations and arterial stiffness among individuals with normal kidney function to moderate kidney disease in MESA.
  • DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: This study examined the cross-sectional associations of serum phosphorus with ankle brachial index (ABI), pulse pressure, and large and small artery elasticity by radial artery waveform analysis among 1370 individuals (440 with moderate chronic kidney disease) who did not have clinical CVD and participated in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.
  • Participants with phosphorus levels >4 mg/dl had greater than four-fold risk for high ABI compared with participants with phosphate levels <3 mg/dl (relative risk 4.6; 95% confidence interval 1.6 to 13.2; P = 0.01) after adjustment for demographics, traditional CVD risk factors, and kidney function.

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  • (PMID = 19211667.001).
  • [ISSN] 1555-905X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin J Am Soc Nephrol
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / N01HC95169; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HC / N01-HC-95165; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HC / N01-HC-95169; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / N01HC95165; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / N01HC95159
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 27YLU75U4W / Phosphorus
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2653665
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62. Berger A, Preiser W, Kachel HG, Stürmer M, Doerr HW: HBV reactivation after kidney transplantation. J Clin Virol; 2005 Feb;32(2):162-5
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  • [Title] HBV reactivation after kidney transplantation.
  • In this study, we reviewed the virologic laboratory records from kidney recipients.
  • Out of 1512 patients, 228 had been diagnosed with resolved HBV infection (anti-HBc positive, HBsAg negative) but normal liver enzyme levels prior to kidney transplantation.
  • Reappearance of HBsAg after kidney transplantation was observed in two (0.9%) of those patients, which may be attributed to reactivation of a latent infection or to a new HBV infection.
  • Periodic follow-up of HBV serology for early diagnosis of reactivation is highly recommended in transplant recipients.
  • [MeSH-major] Hepatitis B / virology. Hepatitis B Surface Antigens / blood. Hepatitis B virus / physiology. Kidney Transplantation / adverse effects. Virus Activation

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  • (PMID = 15653420.001).
  • [ISSN] 1386-6532
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical virology : the official publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Virol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hepatitis B Surface Antigens
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63. Genberg H, Hansson A, Wernerson A, Wennberg L, Tydén G: Pharmacodynamics of rituximab in kidney allotransplantation. Am J Transplant; 2006 Oct;6(10):2418-28
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  • [Title] Pharmacodynamics of rituximab in kidney allotransplantation.
  • The anti-CD20 antibody rituximab has recently gained interest as a B-cell depleting agent in renal transplantation.
  • However, little is known about the pharmacodynamics of rituximab in renal transplant recipients.
  • We have therefore studied the effect of single-dose rituximab in combination with conventional triple immunosuppressive therapy on the B-cell population in peripheral blood as well as in tissues.
  • A total of 49 renal transplant recipients received single-dose rituximab, as induction therapy (n = 36) or as anti-rejection therapy (n = 13).
  • We counted B cells in peripheral blood and performed immunohistochemical staining on lymph nodes and kidney transplant tissue samples to assess the prevalence of B cells.
  • In all but 6 patients (88%) complete depletion of B cells in peripheral blood was achieved.
  • The immunohistochemical staining showed a complete elimination of B cells in kidney tissue and a reduction of B cells in lymph nodes.
  • In conclusion, single-dose rituximab in kidney transplant recipients evokes a long-term elimination of B cells in peripheral blood as well as within the kidney transplant.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / pharmacokinetics. Graft Rejection / drug therapy. Immunologic Factors / pharmacokinetics. Kidney Transplantation / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16925569.001).
  • [ISSN] 1600-6135
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ClinicalTrials.gov/ NCT00255593
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived; 0 / Antigens, CD19; 0 / Antigens, CD20; 0 / Immunologic Factors; 4F4X42SYQ6 / Rituximab
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64. Montagner J, Michelon T, Fontanelle B, Oliveira A, Silveira J, Schroeder R, Neumann J, Keitel E, Alexandre CO: BKV-infection in kidney graft dysfunction. Braz J Infect Dis; 2010 Mar-Apr;14(2):170-4
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  • [Title] BKV-infection in kidney graft dysfunction.
  • INTRODUCTION: BKV nephropathy (BKN) causes kidney graft loss, whose specific diagnosis is invasive and might be predicted by the early detection of active viral infection.
  • OBJECTIVE: Determine the BKV-infection prevalence in late kidney graft dysfunction by urinary decoy cell (DC) and viral DNA detection in urine (viruria) and blood (viremia; active infection).
  • METHODS: Kidney recipients with >1 month follow-up and creatinine >1.5 mg/dL and/or recent increasing >20% (n = 120) had their urine and blood tested for BKV by semi-nested PCR, DC searching, and graft biopsy.
  • Diagnosis efficacy of DC and viruria were compared to viremia.
  • Intense viruria was the single predictive test for active infection (3+; LR = 2.8).1,6-4,9 CONCLUSION: DC, BKV-viruria and -viremia are commun findings under late kidney graft dysfunction.
  • [MeSH-major] BK Virus / isolation & purification. Kidney Transplantation / adverse effects. Polyomavirus Infections / diagnosis. Primary Graft Dysfunction / virology. Tumor Virus Infections / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 20563444.001).
  • [ISSN] 1678-4391
  • [Journal-full-title] The Brazilian journal of infectious diseases : an official publication of the Brazilian Society of Infectious Diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Braz J Infect Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Viral
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65. Szeto CC, Kwan BC, Lai KB, Lai FM, Chow KM, Wang G, Luk CC, Li PK: Urinary expression of kidney injury markers in renal transplant recipients. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol; 2010 Dec;5(12):2329-37
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  • [Title] Urinary expression of kidney injury markers in renal transplant recipients.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The outcome of renal transplantation after an episode of acute rejection is difficult to predict, even with an allograft biopsy.
  • We examined whether urinary expression of specific biomarker mRNA could be used as a noninvasive prognostic marker in kidney transplant recipients.
  • DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: We studied 63 kidney transplant recipients who require graft biopsy because of progressive worsening of kidney function.
  • The mRNA of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), IL-18, surfactant protein-C, and S100 calcium-binding proteins A8 and A9 in urinary sediment were quantified.
  • After followed for an average of 39.7 ± 21.1 months, the rate of renal function decline significantly correlated with urinary KIM-1 expression (r = -0.434, P = 0.0004) but not other target genes.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In kidney allograft recipients, urinary KIM-1 expression provides prognostic information in relation to the rate of renal function decline, irrespective of the kidney pathology.
  • [MeSH-major] Acute Kidney Injury / urine. Biomarkers / urine. Kidney Transplantation

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  • (PMID = 20671224.001).
  • [ISSN] 1555-905X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin J Am Soc Nephrol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Acute-Phase Proteins; 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Calgranulin A; 0 / HAVCR1 protein, human; 0 / Interleukin-18; 0 / LCN2 protein, human; 0 / Lipocalins; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins; 0 / Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein C; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Receptors, Virus; 0 / SFTPC protein, human
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2994096
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66. Moudouni SM, Lakmichi A, Tligui M, Rafii A, Tchala K, Haab F, Gattegno B, Thibault P, Doublet JD: Renal cell carcinoma of native kidney in renal transplant recipients. BJU Int; 2006 Aug;98(2):298-302
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  • [Title] Renal cell carcinoma of native kidney in renal transplant recipients.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence, prognosis and possible risk factors of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) of the native kidney in renal transplant recipients.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively re-examined the follow-up data of 373 consecutive renal transplant recipients at our institution between August 1993 and September 2004.
  • We collected the data of all de novo RCC of the native kidney in the current analysis.
  • RESULTS: Of the 373 patients examined, 12 tumours of the native kidney were diagnosed in 10 individuals.
  • The mean ages at transplantation and diagnosis were 33 and 45.8 years, respectively.
  • Among the renal ultrasonograms there were two false-negative results.
  • The mean tumour size was 21 mm.
  • Among the 12 kidney malignancies, there were five conventional RCCs and seven papillary RCCs.
  • One of the 10 patients died, from progression of metastases 6 years after diagnosis.
  • One patient had a local recurrence 2 years after diagnosis.
  • CONCLUSIONS: There appears to be a greater risk of RCC of the native kidney in patients with end-stage renal disease.
  • The present results suggest that an annual examination of the native kidney before and after renal transplantation is essential.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / etiology. Kidney Failure, Chronic / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / etiology. Kidney Transplantation. Postoperative Complications / etiology


67. Chang MY, Ong AC: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: recent advances in pathogenesis and treatment. Nephron Physiol; 2008;108(1):p1-7
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  • [Title] Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: recent advances in pathogenesis and treatment.
  • Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common genetic disorder affecting 1 in 1,000 people in the general population and accounts for up to 10% of all patients on renal replacement therapy.
  • Numerous fluid-filled epithelial cysts arise from different nephron segments as spherical dilatations or small out-pouchings, enlarge progressively and eventually become disconnected from the rest of the renal tubule.
  • The development of cysts is accompanied by destruction of the renal parenchyma, interstitial fibrosis, cellular infiltration and loss of functional nephrons.
  • ADPKD is not only a kidney disease but also a systemic disorder associated with intracranial arterial aneurysms, cardiac valvular defects, colonic diverticulosis and cyst formation in other organs such as the liver, spleen and pancreas.
  • The identification of PKD1 and PKD2 together with the drive to elucidate the functions of their encoded proteins, polycystin-1 (PC1) and polycystin-2 (PC2), has led to an explosion of clinical and scientific interest in this common disorder.
  • [MeSH-major] Polycystic Kidney, Autosomal Dominant / etiology. Polycystic Kidney, Autosomal Dominant / therapy


68. Jasuja D, Mor MK, Hartwig KC, Palevsky PM, Fine MJ, Weisbord SD: Provider knowledge of contrast-induced acute kidney injury. Am J Med Sci; 2009 Oct;338(4):280-6
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  • [Title] Provider knowledge of contrast-induced acute kidney injury.
  • BACKGROUND: Although past research has elucidated the principal risk factors and efficacy of preventive interventions for contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CIAKI), provider awareness of this empiric evidence base is largely unknown.
  • RESULTS: Of the 87 participating providers, nearly all (n = 85; 98%) recognized chronic kidney disease and intravascular volume depletion as risk factors.
  • [MeSH-major] Contrast Media / adverse effects. Health Personnel / psychology. Kidney / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 19641454.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-2990
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of the medical sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Med. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / K24 AI001769
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Contrast Media
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69. Stasević Z, Gorgieva GS, Vasić S, Ristić S, Djukanović L, Lezaić V: High prevalence of kidney disease in two rural communities in Kosovo and Metohia. Ren Fail; 2010 Jun;32(5):541-6
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  • [Title] High prevalence of kidney disease in two rural communities in Kosovo and Metohia.
  • A systematic survey was carried out in an enclave in Kosovo and Metohia, with the aim of assessing the prevalence of kidney diseases.
  • Persons with any detected disorder indicating kidney disease were invited for additional examination of kidney function.
  • Glomerular filtration rate (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formula) below 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) was found in 5.2% of subjects.
  • Kidney ultrasound examination detected reduced length of right and left kidneys in 38 and 24 persons, respectively.
  • Cysts were also a frequent finding, but polycystic kidney, hydronephrosis, and kidney stones were found in about 2% each.
  • The analysis of data obtained by the present examination and available medical documentation revealed kidney and urinary tract diseases in 98 persons: 52 patients with already known disease and 46 patients detected in the survey.
  • Out of them in 22 patients diagnosis of kidney disease could not be established during the survey but laboratory analyses indicated that they might suffer from tubulointerstitial disease: 14 had tubular dysfunctions, 8 of them low-grade proteinuria, and 12 had a positive family history for kidney disease.
  • In the enclave of Velika Hoca and Orahovac the prevalence of kidney disease was 7.0% indicating that these communities might be placed among those with a high prevalence of kidney disease in Serbia.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Diseases / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 20486835.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-6049
  • [Journal-full-title] Renal failure
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ren Fail
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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70. Sulejmanagić H, Sulejmanagić N, Prohić S, Secić S, Miseljić S: Dental treatment of patients with kidney diseases-review. Bosn J Basic Med Sci; 2005 Feb;5(1):52-6
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  • [Title] Dental treatment of patients with kidney diseases-review.
  • In their practice every dentist is brought into a situation to treat patients with grossly impaired kidney function.
  • Kidney diseases, whether acute or acquired, imply a number of body dysfunctions such as prolonged bleeding, high blood pressure, infection tendency etc. which, in turn, pose a threat involving serious complications in cases of dental interventions in these patients.
  • The aim of this article is to provide a review of current dental practice in patients with kidney disease.
  • This implies dental intervention and preparations of patients with chronic renal disease, nephritic syndrome, patients on dialysis, and patients with kidney transplants.
  • Certainly, cooperation between the dentist and nephrologist is an imperative for the appropriate dental treatment of patients with grossly impaired renal function.

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  • (PMID = 15771603.001).
  • [ISSN] 1512-8601
  • [Journal-full-title] Bosnian journal of basic medical sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bosn J Basic Med Sci
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • [Number-of-references] 12
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71. Perkins BA, Ficociello LH, Roshan B, Warram JH, Krolewski AS: In patients with type 1 diabetes and new-onset microalbuminuria the development of advanced chronic kidney disease may not require progression to proteinuria. Kidney Int; 2010 Jan;77(1):57-64
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  • [Title] In patients with type 1 diabetes and new-onset microalbuminuria the development of advanced chronic kidney disease may not require progression to proteinuria.
  • We sought to study new-onset microalbuminuria, its progression, and the decline of renal function in patients with type 1 diabetes.
  • Using a cohort of 109 patients who developed new-onset microalbuminuria in the first 4 years following enrollment in the 1st Joslin Kidney Study, we simultaneously tracked the change in their renal function and urinary albumin excretion.
  • Of these, 79 patients were followed for an average of 12 years after microalbuminuria onset, wherein their glomerular filtration rate was estimated by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study formula and compared with their microalbuminuria and proteinuria.
  • Only 12 of the 23 patients who progressed to advanced (stage 3-5) chronic kidney disease developed proteinuria, which, in general, did not precede but accompanied the progression to advanced chronic kidney disease.
  • Thus, we found that one-third of patients with type 1 diabetes developed advanced chronic kidney disease relatively soon after the onset of microalbuminuria and this was not conditional on the presence of proteinuria.
  • Contrary to the existing concept of early nephropathy in type 1 diabetes, less emphasis should be placed on the mechanisms of progression to proteinuria and more placed on mechanisms initiating and promoting the early decline of renal function that eventually progresses to advanced chronic kidney disease.


72. Neuhofer W, Pittrow D: Endothelin receptor selectivity in chronic kidney disease: rationale and review of recent evidence. Eur J Clin Invest; 2009 Jun;39 Suppl 2:50-67
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  • [Title] Endothelin receptor selectivity in chronic kidney disease: rationale and review of recent evidence.
  • In addition to its substantial contribution to normal renal function, a large body of evidence suggests that derangement of the renal ET system is involved in the initiation and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in diabetes, hypertension and glomerulonephritis.
  • Recent literature on the role of the renal ET system in the healthy kidney was reviewed.
  • ET-1 acts primarily as an autocrine or paracrine factor in the kidney.
  • In normal physiology, ET-1 promotes diuresis and natriuresis by local production and action through ET(B) receptors in the renal medulla.
  • [MeSH-major] Endothelin Receptor Antagonists. Endothelin-1 / physiology. Kidney Failure, Chronic / physiopathology

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  • [ErratumIn] Eur J Clin Invest. 2009 Jul;39(7):630
  • (PMID = 19335747.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2362
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of clinical investigation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Clin. Invest.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antihypertensive Agents; 0 / Endothelin A Receptor Antagonists; 0 / Endothelin B Receptor Antagonists; 0 / Endothelin Receptor Antagonists; 0 / Endothelin-1; 0 / Receptors, Endothelin
  • [Number-of-references] 125
  • [General-notes] NLM/ Original DateCompleted: 20090407
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73. Kim YW, Park BS, Ryu CH, Park SJ, Kang SW, Kim YH, Song IS, Shon JH: Allopurinol-induced aplastic anemia in a patient with chronic kidney disease. Clin Nephrol; 2009 Feb;71(2):203-6
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  • [Title] Allopurinol-induced aplastic anemia in a patient with chronic kidney disease.
  • We report an unusual case of aplastic anemia associated with allopurinol therapy for hyperuricemia in a patient with chronic kidney disease.
  • A 37-year-old female patient diagnosed with Stage III chronic kidney disease was admitted with pancytopenia.
  • These results suggested a diagnosis of aplastic anemia.
  • [MeSH-major] Allopurinol / adverse effects. Anemia, Aplastic / chemically induced. Enzyme Inhibitors / adverse effects. Kidney Failure, Chronic / complications


74. Peces R, Peces C, Pérez-Dueñas V, Cuesta-López E, Azorín S, Selgas R: Rapamycin reduces kidney volume and delays the loss of renal function in a patient with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease. NDT Plus; 2009 Apr;2(2):133-5
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  • [Title] Rapamycin reduces kidney volume and delays the loss of renal function in a patient with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.
  • This is the first report of a case of a reduction in kidney volume and preservation of renal function in a patient with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) receiving rapamycin.
  • A 42-year-old man with ADPKD and a severe persistent bleeding from his solitary left kidney was successfully treated with tranexamic acid (TXA).
  • He also received low-dose rapamycin for 8 months, and this was associated with a 23.5% reduction in kidney volume, improvement and stabilization of renal function, and normalization of haemoglobin levels.
  • When treatment with rapamycin was interrupted, renal function deteriorated within an 8-month period and haemodialysis (HD) became necessary.
  • Kidney volume increased at once, and life-threatening bleeding prompted a nephrectomy 4 months after the onset of HD.
  • These data suggest that the reduction in kidney volume and preservation of renal function with rapamycin could be the result of the antiangiogenic, antiproliferative effects of rapamycin.

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  • (PMID = 25949309.001).
  • [ISSN] 1753-0784
  • [Journal-full-title] NDT plus
  • [ISO-abbreviation] NDT Plus
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4421355
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; ADPKD / mTOR / rapamycin / renal function / volume change
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75. Lee M, Partridge NC: Parathyroid hormone signaling in bone and kidney. Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens; 2009 Jul;18(4):298-302
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  • [Title] Parathyroid hormone signaling in bone and kidney.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Parathyroid hormone (PTH) maintains a physiological balance of calcium and phosphate concentrations by binding to its receptor on the plasma membrane of cells in bone and kidney.
  • Here, we will review the recent advancements regarding PTH signaling in bone and kidney.
  • In kidney, sodium-hydrogen exchanger regulatory factor 1, originally known for its role in the retention of NaPi-IIa at the apical membrane, was shown to have multiple roles in PTH signaling, both as a mediator and regulator.
  • SUMMARY: PTH activates a number of different signaling pathways by binding to a single receptor in bone and kidney.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone and Bones / metabolism. Kidney / metabolism. Parathyroid Hormone / physiology. Signal Transduction / physiology

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  • (PMID = 19395963.001).
  • [ISSN] 1473-6543
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in nephrology and hypertension
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Opin. Nephrol. Hypertens.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK47420
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Parathyroid Hormone; 0 / Phosphoproteins; 0 / Receptor, Parathyroid Hormone, Type 1; 0 / Sodium-Hydrogen Antiporter; 0 / sodium-hydrogen exchanger regulatory factor; EC 2.7.11.11 / Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases; EC 2.7.11.13 / Protein Kinase C; SY7Q814VUP / Calcium
  • [Number-of-references] 58
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76. Gerosa C, Fanni D, Nemolato S, Locci A, Marinelli V, Cabras T, Messana I, Castagnola M, Monga G, Fanos V, Faa G: Thymosin beta-10 expression in developing human kidney. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med; 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 3:125-8
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  • [Title] Thymosin beta-10 expression in developing human kidney.
  • The report that the Tβ10 gene is expressed at high levels in embryonic human brain as well in human kidney induced us to study Tβ10 reactivity in the preterm kidney in order to verify, at tissue level, the expression of this peptide during renal embryogenesis.
  • To this end, we analyzed, using immunocytochemistry, the expression of Tβ10 in samples of human kidney obtained, at autopsy, from 8 fetuses, 12 preterm infants, ranging from 25 to 36 weeks of gestation and 3 at term newborns.
  • Tβ10 immunoreactivity was detected in 20 out of 22 kidneys examined, and was mainly localized in proximal and distal tubular structures, in the cytoplasm and occasionally in the nuclei of ductal cells.
  • In 13 kidneys, we also observed immunostaining for Tβ10 inside the "comma-shaped bodies" and the "S-shaped bodies" during active glomerulogenesis.
  • Our data show, for the first time, the expression of Tβ10 in the human kidney during the initial phases of its physiological development, mainly restricted in the proximal and the distal tubuli.
  • Further studies are needed in order to better characterize the role of Tβ10 in kidney embryogenesis.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney / embryology. Kidney / metabolism. Thymosin / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 20836742.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-4954
  • [Journal-full-title] The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Matern. Fetal. Neonatal. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 61512-21-8 / Thymosin; 87397-91-9 / thymosin beta(10)
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77. Zukowski M, Bohatyrewicz R, Biernawska J, Kotfis K, Zegan M, Knap R, Janeczek M, Zietek Z: Risk factors for septic complications in kidney transplant recipients. Transplant Proc; 2009 Oct;41(8):3043-5
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  • [Title] Risk factors for septic complications in kidney transplant recipients.
  • INTRODUCTION: Septic complications following kidney transplantation are a leading cause of therapeutic failure.
  • An early diagnosis may protect the recipient from the severe consequences of sepsis.
  • We sought to determine the risk factors influencing the occurrence of septic complications among kidney transplant recipients.
  • Recipient data included age, gender, period of prior hemodialysis, panel reactive antibodies, cold ischemia time, and cause of renal insufficiency.
  • The 232 kidney recipients were examined for occurrence of septic complications including septicemia, pneumonia, peritonitis, or graft infection.
  • RESULTS: Kidney transplants from donors with MAP < 70 mm Hg and SVRI < 1200 dyne x s/cm(5) x m(2) showed a significantly higher occurrence of septic complications in recipients (P < .05) where mortality rate was also significantly greater (P < .01).
  • CONCLUSIONS: MAP < 70 mm Hg and SVRI < 1200 dyne x s/cm(5) x m(2) among organ donors predicted greater occurrence of septic complications and increased mortality among kidney transplant recipients.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Transplantation / physiology. Sepsis / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Blood Pressure / physiology. Brain Death. Cadaver. Cause of Death. Central Venous Pressure / physiology. Child. Female. Heart Rate. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Renal Dialysis. Risk Factors. Shock, Septic / epidemiology. Tissue Donors. Vascular Resistance. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19857672.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-2623
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplant. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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78. Li L, Okusa MD: Macrophages, dendritic cells, and kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury. Semin Nephrol; 2010 May;30(3):268-77
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  • [Title] Macrophages, dendritic cells, and kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury.
  • Dendritic cells and macrophages are critical early initiators of innate immunity in the kidney and orchestrate inflammation subsequent to ischemia-reperfusion injury.
  • They are the most abundant leukocytes present in the kidney, and they represent a heterogeneous population of cells that are capable of inducing sterile inflammation after reperfusion directly through the production of proinflammatory cytokines and other soluble inflammatory mediators or indirectly through activation of effector T lymphocytes and natural killer T cells.
  • In addition, recent studies have indicated that kidney and immune cell micro-RNAs control gene expression and have the ability to regulate the initial inflammatory response to injury.
  • Although dendritic cells and macrophages contribute to both innate and adaptive immunity and to injury and repair, this review focuses on the initial innate response to kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury.

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  • (PMID = 20620671.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-4488
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in nephrology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Nephrol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK062324-08; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK062324-07; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK056223-08; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK085259; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01DK56223; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK062324; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK056223; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01DK62324; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK056223-08; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK062324-07; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK062324-08
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS188223; NLM/ PMC2904394
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79. Sanchez-Niño MD, Benito-Martin A, Gonçalves S, Sanz AB, Ucero AC, Izquierdo MC, Ramos AM, Berzal S, Selgas R, Ruiz-Ortega M, Egido J, Ortiz A: TNF superfamily: a growing saga of kidney injury modulators. Mediators Inflamm; 2010;2010
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  • [Title] TNF superfamily: a growing saga of kidney injury modulators.
  • Members of the TNF superfamily participate in kidney disease.
  • Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and Fas ligand regulate renal cell survival and inflammation, and therapeutic targeting improves the outcome of experimental renal injury.
  • In vivo TWEAK promotes postnephrectomy compensatory renal cell proliferation in a noninflammatory milieu.
  • However, in the inflammatory milieu of acute kidney injury, TWEAK promotes tubular cell death and inflammation.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney / injuries. Tumor Necrosis Factors / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 20953353.001).
  • [ISSN] 1466-1861
  • [Journal-full-title] Mediators of inflammation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mediators Inflamm.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Fas Ligand Protein; 0 / TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factors
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2952810
  •  go-up   go-down


80. Bansal N, Hsu CY: Long-term outcomes of patients with chronic kidney disease. Nat Clin Pract Nephrol; 2008 Oct;4(10):532-3
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  • [Title] Long-term outcomes of patients with chronic kidney disease.
  • This Practice Point commentary discusses a recent paper by Menon et al. that described the natural history of a cohort of nondiabetic patients with stage 2-4 chronic kidney disease (CKD) who had been recruited from nephrology practices and screened for entry into the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) trial.
  • Kidney failure was the most common outcome during long-term follow-up among these patients and there was a low competing risk of death, findings in contrast to observations in other cohorts of patients with CKD.
  • Patients with lower glomerular filtration rate and greater proteinuria at baseline were at increased risk for both kidney failure and death, but kidney failure remained more likely than death in all glomerular filtration rate subgroups.
  • Nephrologists should not rely on CKD staging alone to direct management of or risk-stratify patients with CKD, but should also consider the etiology and rate of progression of kidney disease, patient age and cardiovascular disease risk factors.

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  • [CommentOn] Kidney Int. 2008 Jun;73(11):1310-5 [18337713.001]
  • (PMID = 18695707.001).
  • [ISSN] 1745-8331
  • [Journal-full-title] Nature clinical practice. Nephrology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nat Clin Pract Nephrol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / K23 DK088865
  • [Publication-type] Comment; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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81. Pecoits-Filho R: Dietary protein intake and kidney disease in Western diet. Contrib Nephrol; 2007;155:102-12
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  • [Title] Dietary protein intake and kidney disease in Western diet.
  • Components of the diet related to changes in eating habits that characterize the modern Western world are important factors in the increasingly high prevalence of chronic disease, including obesity, diabetes, hypertension and as a consequence, chronic kidney disease.
  • Unfortunately, very few clinical studies focused on diet-based strategies of prevention of kidney disorders.
  • Furthermore, this review will propose that the concept that protein restricted diets decrease the risk of developing kidney disease in the general population is not supported by the scientific literature.
  • Indeed, preliminary studies showing a positive effect of relatively high protein diets on risk factors for chronic kidney disease (particularly on obesity, hypertension and diabetes) point to the need for future studies addressing diets that could prevent the increasingly high prevalence of kidney disease in the Western world.
  • On the other hand, there is a potential role for protein restriction in patients with established kidney disease, particularly in patients with significant decrease in glomerular filtration rate.
  • The exact protective action of protein restriction in patients with established renal disease needs further analysis, taking into account the more broad effects of protein restriction (lower phosphate, acidosis, uric acid) and a more current definition of malnutrition.
  • [MeSH-major] Diet / ethnology. Diet, Protein-Restricted. Dietary Proteins. Kidney Diseases / prevention & control

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  • (PMID = 17369718.001).
  • [ISSN] 0302-5144
  • [Journal-full-title] Contributions to nephrology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Contrib Nephrol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dietary Proteins
  • [Number-of-references] 41
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82. Stratta RJ, Sundberg AK, Rohr MS, Farney AC, Hartmann EL, Roskopf JA, Iskandar SS, Hairston G, Kiger DF, Gautreaux MD, Anderson TK, Adams PL: Optimal use of older donors and recipients in kidney transplantation. Surgery; 2006 Mar;139(3):324-33
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  • [Title] Optimal use of older donors and recipients in kidney transplantation.
  • BACKGROUND: The aging donor and recipient population have led to new challenges in kidney transplantation.
  • The purpose of this study was to review retrospectively our single center experience in deceased-donor kidney transplantation, with respect to donor and recipient age.
  • METHODS: From October 1, 2001, through February 20, 2004, we performed 144 deceased-donor kidney transplantations, which included 37 procedures (26%) in recipients > or =60 years old and 107 procedures (74%) in recipients 19 to 59 years old.
  • ECD kidneys were used by matching estimated renal functional mass to recipient size (body mass index, <25 kg/m(2)), which included the use of dual kidney transplantations (n = 9).
  • ECD kidney recipients were further selected on the basis of age >40 years and low immunologic risk.
  • In recipients > or =60 years old, 23 recipients (62%) received kidney transplants from ECDs compared with 34 kidney transplants from ECDs (32%; P < .001) in recipients who were <60 years old.
  • Kidney graft survival rates were 84% in both recipient groups.
  • CONCLUSION: By the matching of nephron mass with recipient size and avoiding the use of ECD kidneys in recipients with a high immunologic risk, short-term outcomes that are comparable with standard criteria donor kidneys in younger patients can be achieved with either older donors or recipients, regardless of age.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Transplantation. Patient Selection. Tissue Donors


83. Lora CM, Daviglus ML, Kusek JW, Porter A, Ricardo AC, Go AS, Lash JP: Chronic kidney disease in United States Hispanics: a growing public health problem. Ethn Dis; 2009;19(4):466-72
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  • [Title] Chronic kidney disease in United States Hispanics: a growing public health problem.
  • The incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Hispanics is higher than non-Hispanic Whites and Hispanics with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk for kidney failure.

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  • (PMID = 20073150.001).
  • [ISSN] 1049-510X
  • [Journal-full-title] Ethnicity & disease
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ethn Dis
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK072231-05S2; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / 5U01DK60980; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK072231; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK072231-05; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK072231-03S1; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK072231-04; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK060980; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK072231-03; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK072231-07; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK072231-02; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK072231-03S1; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK072231-03; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK072231-04S1; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK072231-04S1; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK072231-06; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R56 DK072231; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK72231; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR013987; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK072231-02; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK072231-05; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK072231-04; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK072231-05S1; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK072231-07; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK072231-06A1; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R56 DK072231-06; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK072231-01; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK072231-05S1; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK072231-06A1; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK072231-05S2
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 76
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS316436; NLM/ PMC3587111
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84. Okamoto M, Suzuki T, Fujiki M, Nobori S, Ushigome H, Sakamoto S, Yoshimura N: The consequences for live kidney donors with preexisting glucose intolerance without diabetic complication: analysis at a single Japanese center. Transplantation; 2010 Jun 15;89(11):1391-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The consequences for live kidney donors with preexisting glucose intolerance without diabetic complication: analysis at a single Japanese center.
  • BACKGROUND: Because of lack of deceased donors in Japan, there has been a need to expand the eligibility criteria for live kidney donation.
  • To assess the indications for live kidney donation in glucose intolerance (GI), we analyzed perioperative complications associated with donor nephrectomies performed at our institution and followed up the long-term consequences.
  • METHODS: The 444 live kidney donors were divided into two groups based on the results of the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test: a GI group (n=71) who showed a diabetic (n=27) or impaired glucose tolerance (n=44) pattern, and a non-GI group (n=373) who showed a normal oral glucose tolerance test pattern.
  • Perioperative complications, longterm survival rate, and frequencies of hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and renal dysfunction in long term were compared in each group.
  • None of the patients in the diabetes mellitus group had developed severe diabetic complications or end-stage renal disease at a mean follow-up point of 88+/-71 (range, 14-225) months.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that individuals who have GI without diabetic complication may be able to donate their kidney safely with little surgical complication and little major morbidity if strict evaluation is performed before transplant.
  • [MeSH-major] Glucose Intolerance / epidemiology. Kidney Transplantation / physiology. Living Donors. Nephrectomy. Tissue and Organ Procurement / statistics & numerical data


85. Kestenbaum B, Belozeroff V: Mineral metabolism disturbances in patients with chronic kidney disease. Eur J Clin Invest; 2007 Aug;37(8):607-22
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Mineral metabolism disturbances in patients with chronic kidney disease.
  • BACKGROUND: Kidney disease, especially chronic kidney disease (CKD), is a worldwide public health problem with serious adverse health consequences for affected individuals.
  • Secondary hyperparathyroidism, a disorder characterized by elevated serum parathyroid hormone levels, and alteration of calcium and phosphorus homeostasis are common metabolic complications of CKD that may impact cardiovascular health.
  • RESULTS: Mineral metabolism disturbances begin early during the course of chronic kidney disease, and are associated with cardiovascular disease and mortality in observational studies.
  • Vascular calcification is one plausible mechanism connecting renal-related mineral metabolism with cardiovascular risk.
  • CONCLUSIONS: There exists a potential to improve outcomes for patients with CKD through increased awareness of the Bone Metabolism and Disease guidelines set forth by the National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative.
  • [MeSH-major] Calcium / metabolism. Cardiovascular Diseases / etiology. Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary / etiology. Kidney Failure, Chronic / complications. Parathyroid Hormone / secretion. Phosphorus / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Calcinosis / etiology. Female. Humans. Male. Renal Dialysis. Risk Factors. Vitamin D / analogs & derivatives. Vitamin D / blood. Vitamin D / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 17635571.001).
  • [ISSN] 0014-2972
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of clinical investigation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Clin. Invest.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Parathyroid Hormone; 1406-16-2 / Vitamin D; 27YLU75U4W / Phosphorus; SY7Q814VUP / Calcium
  • [Number-of-references] 137
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86. Hanratty R, Chonchol M, Miriam Dickinson L, Beaty BL, Estacio RO, Mackenzie TD, Hurley LP, Linas SL, Steiner JF, Havranek EP: Incident chronic kidney disease and the rate of kidney function decline in individuals with hypertension. Nephrol Dial Transplant; 2010 Mar;25(3):801-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Incident chronic kidney disease and the rate of kidney function decline in individuals with hypertension.
  • BACKGROUND: Little is known about the decline of kidney function in patients with normal kidney function at baseline.
  • Our objectives were to (i) identify predictors of incident chronic kidney disease (CKD) and (ii) to estimate rate of decline in kidney function.
  • Rates of incident CKD or in decline of kidney function did not differ by race or ethnicity in this cohort.

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  • (PMID = 19889870.001).
  • [ISSN] 1460-2385
  • [Journal-full-title] Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / U01 HL079160; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / U01 HL079208; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / 1U01 HL079160; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / 1U01 HL079208
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2828608
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87. Cunningham J, Cass A, Anderson K, Snelling P, Devitt J, Preece C, Eris J: Australian nephrologists' attitudes towards living kidney donation. Nephrol Dial Transplant; 2006 May;21(5):1178-83
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Australian nephrologists' attitudes towards living kidney donation.
  • BACKGROUND: The demand for deceased donor kidneys far outweighs the supply.
  • The rate of living kidney donation (LKD) has been steadily increasing world-wide and is associated with excellent outcomes for the recipient.
  • The vast majority (95%) of respondents indicated that they would recommend it to a suitable donor or would themselves (97%) donate a kidney to an immediate family member.
  • However, fewer than half (43%) would recommend LKD to a potential donor, where their relative's end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) had been attributed to diabetes and where there was a strong family history of diabetes.
  • Meeting the growing demand for kidney transplantation will require an increased supply of both live and deceased donor kidneys.
  • [MeSH-major] Attitude of Health Personnel. Kidney Transplantation / psychology. Living Donors. Tissue and Organ Procurement
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Australia. Diabetic Nephropathies / diagnosis. Diabetic Nephropathies / surgery. Female. Health Care Surveys. Humans. Logistic Models. Male. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Nephrectomy / methods. Nephrology / standards. Nephrology / trends. Practice Patterns, Physicians'. Risk Assessment. Surveys and Questionnaires

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  • (PMID = 16490747.001).
  • [ISSN] 0931-0509
  • [Journal-full-title] Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Editorial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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88. Thomas MC, Atkins RC: Blood pressure lowering for the prevention and treatment of diabetic kidney disease. Drugs; 2006;66(17):2213-34
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Blood pressure lowering for the prevention and treatment of diabetic kidney disease.
  • The current pandemic of diabetes mellitus will inevitably be followed by an epidemic of chronic kidney disease.
  • It is anticipated that 25-40% of patients with type 1 diabetes and 5-40% of patients with type 2 diabetes will ultimately develop diabetic kidney disease.
  • Diabetic nephropathy may lead to hypertension through direct actions on renal sodium handling, vascular compliance and vasomotor function.
  • Recent clinical trials also support the utility of blood pressure reduction in the prevention of diabetic kidney disease.
  • In patients with overt nephropathy, blood pressure reduction is associated with reduced urinary albumin excretion and, subsequently, a reduced risk of renal impairment or end stage renal disease.
  • Although there is a clear physiological rationale for blockade of the renin angiotensin system, which is strongly supported by clinical studies, to achieve the optimal lowering of blood pressure, particularly in the setting of established diabetic renal disease, a number of different antihypertensive agents will always be needed.
  • Ultimately, no matter how it is achieved, so long as it is achieved, renal risk can be reduced by agents that lower blood pressure and albuminuria.
  • [MeSH-major] Antihypertensive Agents / therapeutic use. Blood Pressure / drug effects. Diabetes Complications / diagnosis. Diabetes Mellitus / therapy. Diabetic Nephropathies / prevention & control. Hypertension / drug therapy


89. Ibrahim HN, Foley R, Tan L, Rogers T, Bailey RF, Guo H, Gross CR, Matas AJ: Long-term consequences of kidney donation. N Engl J Med; 2009 Jan 29;360(5):459-69
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Long-term consequences of kidney donation.
  • BACKGROUND: The long-term renal consequences of kidney donation by a living donor are attracting increased appropriate interest.
  • The overall evidence suggests that living kidney donors have survival similar to that of nondonors and that their risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is not increased.
  • METHODS: We ascertained the vital status and lifetime risk of ESRD in 3698 kidney donors who donated kidneys during the period from 1963 through 2007; from 2003 through 2007, we also measured the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urinary albumin excretion and assessed the prevalence of hypertension, general health status, and quality of life in 255 donors.
  • RESULTS: The survival of kidney donors was similar to that of controls who were matched for age, sex, and race or ethnic group.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Survival and the risk of ESRD in carefully screened kidney donors appear to be similar to those in the general population.
  • [MeSH-major] Health Status. Kidney Failure, Chronic / epidemiology. Kidney Transplantation. Living Donors. Quality of Life

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  • [Copyright] 2009 Massachusetts Medical Society
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  • (PMID = 19179315.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-4406
  • [Journal-full-title] The New England journal of medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] N. Engl. J. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000400; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / P01 DK013083; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01-RR00400; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / P01DK13083
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS434270; NLM/ PMC3559132
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90. Hou CP, Chiang YJ, Chu SH, Ng KF, Wang HH: Mixed epithelial and stromal tumor of the kidney--a case report. Chang Gung Med J; 2010 Nov-Dec;33(6):693-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Mixed epithelial and stromal tumor of the kidney--a case report.
  • She visited our hospital and a renal echo showed a heterogenous mass on the left kidney.
  • Abdominal computed tomography showed a multicystic tumor, about 7 cm, on the left renal pelvis and the proximal ureter.
  • The tumor was enhanced after contrast injection.
  • Ureteroscopy showed an intraluminal polypoid tumor.
  • Cystic renal cell carcinoma or urothelial carcinoma was suspected preoperatively.
  • The pathology report demonstrated that the tumor was composed of an admixture of stroma and flattened to cuboidal urothelium.
  • The tumor stromal cells expressed both estrogen and progesterone receptors, and no malignant cells were found.
  • There has been no recurrence or deterioration of the patient's renal function since surgery.
  • We suggest keeping in mind the diagnosis of mixed epithelial and stromal tumor of the kidney when encountering perimenopausal women with renal cystic tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasms, Complex and Mixed / pathology

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  • (PMID = 21199615.001).
  • [ISSN] 2309-835X
  • [Journal-full-title] Chang Gung medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chang Gung Med J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China (Republic : 1949- )
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91. Vassalotti JA, Stevens LA, Levey AS: Testing for chronic kidney disease: a position statement from the National Kidney Foundation. Am J Kidney Dis; 2007 Aug;50(2):169-80
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Testing for chronic kidney disease: a position statement from the National Kidney Foundation.
  • Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common in the United States.
  • Major outcomes of CKD include progression to kidney failure, development of complications of impaired kidney function, and increased risk for cardiovascular disease.
  • CKD is usually silent until its late stages, thus many patients with CKD are detected only shortly before the onset of symptomatic kidney failure, when there are few opportunities to prevent adverse outcomes.
  • [MeSH-major] Foundations / standards. Kidney Diseases / blood. Kidney Diseases / urine. Practice Guidelines as Topic

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  • [CommentIn] Am J Kidney Dis. 2008 Jan;51(1):161-2; author reply 162-3 [18155547.001]
  • [CommentIn] Am J Kidney Dis. 2008 Jan;51(1):162; author reply 162-3 [18155548.001]
  • (PMID = 17660017.001).
  • [ISSN] 1523-6838
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Kidney Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 42
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92. Jiang L, Liang Y, Qiu B, Wang F, Duan X, Yang X, Huang W, Wang N: Prevalence of chronic kidney disease in a rural Chinese adult population: the Handan Eye Study. Nephron Clin Pract; 2010;114(4):c295-302
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prevalence of chronic kidney disease in a rural Chinese adult population: the Handan Eye Study.
  • BACKGROUND: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem.
  • Glomerular filtration rate was estimated with the modified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation.
  • CKD was defined by the guidelines proposed by the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative.
  • The associations between age, gender, diabetes, hypertension, and kidney damage were examined.
  • RESULTS: Albuminuria and reduced renal function were detected in 16.8 and 0.4% of subjects, respectively.
  • The age-standardized prevalence of albuminuria, reduced renal function and CKD was 14.9% (95% confidence interval (CI) 13.9-15.9), 0.38% (95% CI 0.21-0.55) and 15.2% (95% CI 14.2-16.2), respectively.
  • Older age was independently associated with reduced renal function.
  • [MeSH-major] Asian Continental Ancestry Group / ethnology. Eye Diseases / ethnology. Kidney Failure, Chronic / diagnosis. Kidney Failure, Chronic / ethnology. Rural Population


93. Hwang YH, Ro H, Choi I, Kim H, Oh KH, Hwang JI, Park MH, Kim S, Yang J, Ahn C: Impact of polymorphisms of TLR4/CD14 and TLR3 on acute rejection in kidney transplantation. Transplantation; 2009 Sep 15;88(5):699-705
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Impact of polymorphisms of TLR4/CD14 and TLR3 on acute rejection in kidney transplantation.
  • We evaluated the possible association between the TLR4/CD14 and TLR3 polymorphisms of donor-recipient pairs, and acute rejection after living donor kidney transplantation.
  • METHODS: TLR4 -1607T/C (rs10759932), -2026A/G (rs1927914); CD14 -159C/T (rs2569190); and TLR3 rs3775290, rs3775291, and rs3775296 were genotyped using DNA samples from 216 donor-recipient pairs of adult living donor kidney transplantation between January 1996 and July 2006.
  • CONCLUSION: These findings suggest the importance of TLR4 in the pathogenesis of acute rejection in kidney transplantation.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD14 / genetics. Kidney Transplantation / methods. Polymorphism, Genetic. Toll-Like Receptor 3 / genetics. Toll-Like Receptor 4 / genetics

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  • (PMID = 19741468.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-6080
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplantation
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD14; 0 / TLR3 protein, human; 0 / TLR4 protein, human; 0 / Toll-Like Receptor 3; 0 / Toll-Like Receptor 4
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94. Tombul ST, Aki FT, Gunay M, Inci K, Hazirolan T, Karcaaltincaba M, Erkan I, Bakkaloglu A, Yasavul U, Bakkaloglu M: Preoperative evaluation of hilar vessel anatomy with 3-D computerized tomography in living kidney donors. Transplant Proc; 2008 Jan-Feb;40(1):47-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Preoperative evaluation of hilar vessel anatomy with 3-D computerized tomography in living kidney donors.
  • OBJECTIVES: Digital subtract angiography is the gold standard for anatomic assessment of renal vasculature for living renal donors.
  • However, multidetector-row computerized tomography (MDCT) is less invasive than digital subtract angiography and provides information of kidney stones and other intra-abdominal organs.
  • In this study, preoperative MDCT angiography results were compared with the peroperative findings to evaluate the accuracy of MDCT for the evaluation of renal anatomy.
  • METHODS: From December 2002 to May 2007, all 60 consecutive living kidney donors were evaluated with MDCT angiography preoperatively.
  • We reported the number and origin of renal arteries, presence of early branching arteries, and any intrinsic renal artery disease.
  • Renal venous anatomy was evaluated for the presence of accessory, retroaortic, and circumaortic veins using venous phase axial images.
  • RESULTS: A total of 67 renal arteries were seen peroperatively in 60 renal units.
  • CONCLUSION: MDCT angiography offers a less invasive, rapid, and accurate preoperative investigation modality for vascular anatomy in living kidney donors.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney. Living Donors. Renal Artery / anatomy & histology. Renal Circulation. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 18261544.001).
  • [ISSN] 0041-1345
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplant. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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95. Vora N, Perrone R, Bianchi DW: Reproductive issues for adults with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Am J Kidney Dis; 2008 Feb;51(2):307-18
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Reproductive issues for adults with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.
  • Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common disorder.
  • Affected women with ADPKD and normal renal function have a high rate of successful uncomplicated pregnancies.
  • Pregnant women with ADPKD with compromised kidney function should be monitored carefully for the development of hypertension and preeclampsia.
  • The diagnosis of ADPKD should always be considered when prenatal sonographic findings of hyperechogenic enlarged kidneys are found.
  • In this setting, a family history and renal sonogram of both parents is indicated.
  • Sequencing of the PKD1 and PKD2 genes is available and can be used for both prenatal and preimplantation genetic diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Infertility, Male / physiopathology. Polycystic Kidney, Autosomal Dominant / physiopathology. Pregnancy Complications / physiopathology. Reproduction
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Age of Onset. Counseling. Cysts / genetics. Female. Fetal Growth Retardation / prevention & control. Genital Diseases, Male / genetics. Humans. Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced / prevention & control. Kidney / ultrasonography. Male. Oligohydramnios / prevention & control. Placental Circulation. Pre-Eclampsia / prevention & control. Pregnancy. Preimplantation Diagnosis. Seminal Vesicles / pathology. Sequence Analysis, DNA. Spermatozoa / abnormalities. TRPP Cation Channels. Ultrasonography, Prenatal


96. Liu KD, Glidden DV: Clinical trials for acute kidney injury: design challenges and possible solutions. Curr Drug Targets; 2009 Dec;10(12):1190-5
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  • [Title] Clinical trials for acute kidney injury: design challenges and possible solutions.
  • Acute kidney injury is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients.
  • Clinical trials for acute kidney injury have been hampered not only by a paucity of appropriate potential therapeutic agents, but also by several clinical trial design challenges.
  • [MeSH-major] Acute Kidney Injury / therapy. Clinical Trials as Topic. Research Design