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1. Park JW, Namkoong S, Chung J, Jung KE, Oh SA, Cinn YW, Kim MH: A case of eccrine spiradenoma in a patient with neurofibromatosis. Ann Dermatol; 2010 May;22(2):191-3
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  • Neurofibromatosis is a systemic hereditary disorder with varied manifestations in bone, soft tissue, the nervous system and skin.
  • Some benign or malignant tumors such as juvenile xanthogranuloma, pheochromocytoma, and malignant melanoma can accompany neurofibromatosis.
  • Eccrine spiradenoma is a benign uncommon neoplasm of skin adnexa.

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  • (PMID = 20548911.001).
  • [ISSN] 2005-3894
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Dermatol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2883423
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Eccrine spiradenoma / Neurofibromatosis
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2. Ababneh K, Al-Khateeb T: Aggressive pregnancy tumor mimicking a malignant neoplasm: a case report. J Contemp Dent Pract; 2009;10(6):E072-8
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  • [Title] Aggressive pregnancy tumor mimicking a malignant neoplasm: a case report.
  • AIM: The aim of this report is to present the management of an aggressive, highly proliferative pregnancy tumor with clinical and radiographic characteristics highly suggestive of a malignant neoplasm.
  • BACKGROUND: Pregnancy tumor is a benign hyperplastic gingival lesion occurring during pregnancy that is indistinguishable from a pyogenic granuloma arising in nonpregnant females, or in males.
  • Advanced alveolar bone loss also was found beneath the lesion.
  • A malignant process was suspected, and an incisional biopsy revealed a pregnancy tumor.
  • SUMMARY: Pregnancy tumor represents an important differential diagnosis of oral masses and can behave in a very aggressive fashion, mimicking a malignant tumor.
  • CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This lesion should always be included in the differential diagnosis of soft tissue masses in a pregnant woman even if the lesion is clinically very aggressive.
  • [MeSH-major] Alveolar Bone Loss / etiology. Gingival Neoplasms / pathology. Gingival Overgrowth / pathology. Granuloma, Pyogenic / pathology. Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic / pathology

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  • (PMID = 20020084.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-3711
  • [Journal-full-title] The journal of contemporary dental practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Contemp Dent Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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3. Bestic JM, Peterson JJ, Bancroft LW: Pediatric FDG PET/CT: Physiologic uptake, normal variants, and benign conditions [corrected]. Radiographics; 2009 Sep-Oct;29(5):1487-500
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  • [Title] Pediatric FDG PET/CT: Physiologic uptake, normal variants, and benign conditions [corrected].
  • Ewing sarcoma family tumors account for approximately 3% of all pediatric cancers, making them the second most common bone malignancies in children and adolescents.
  • Standard imaging evaluation of bone and soft-tissue sarcomas typically consists of conventional radiography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, computed tomography (CT), and bone scintigraphy.
  • It represents a noninvasive means of estimating histologic tumor grade and can be used to detect progression or regression of disease prior to anatomic imaging.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Bone Neoplasms / therapy. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Positron-Emission Tomography / methods. Sarcoma, Ewing / radionuclide imaging. Sarcoma, Ewing / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Female. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Radiopharmaceuticals. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • [Copyright] (c) RSNA, 2009.
  • [CommentIn] Radiographics. 2009 Sep-Oct;29(5):1500-1; discussion 1501 [19764110.001]
  • [ErratumIn] Radiographics. 2010 Jan-Feb;30(1):301
  • (PMID = 19755607.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-1323
  • [Journal-full-title] Radiographics : a review publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiographics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
  • [Number-of-references] 21
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4. Gaeta M, Mazziotti S, Minutoli F, Genitori A, Toscano A, Rodolico C, Blandino A: MR imaging findings of focal myositis: a pseudotumour that may mimic muscle neoplasm. Skeletal Radiol; 2009 Jun;38(6):571-8
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  • [Title] MR imaging findings of focal myositis: a pseudotumour that may mimic muscle neoplasm.
  • Dynamic enhancement pattern corresponded to the type usually seen in benign soft tissue lesions.

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  • (PMID = 19255757.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-2161
  • [Journal-full-title] Skeletal radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Skeletal Radiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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5. Li G, Wu YT, Chen Y, Li TJ, Gao Y, Zhang J, Zhang ZY, Ma XC: Soft-tissue osteoma in the pterygomandibular space: report of a rare case. Dentomaxillofac Radiol; 2009 Jan;38(1):59-62
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  • [Title] Soft-tissue osteoma in the pterygomandibular space: report of a rare case.
  • Osteoma is a slow-growing, benign and uncommon neoplasm located primarily in the region of the maxillofacial skeleton.
  • An extraskeletal soft-tissue osteoma is exceedingly rare.
  • Here, we report a case of soft-tissue osteoma occurring in the pterygomandibular space in a 66-year-old woman.
  • Intraoperatively, the masses were completely surrounded by soft tissues with no attachment to the bone.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiography. Osteoma / radiography. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / radiography

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  • (PMID = 19114426.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-832X
  • [Journal-full-title] Dento maxillo facial radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dentomaxillofac Radiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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6. Puhaindran ME, Healey JH, Athanasian EA: Single ray amputation for tumors of the hand. Clin Orthop Relat Res; 2010 May;468(5):1390-5
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  • The role of this procedure in the management of aggressive benign or malignant hand tumors has been described only in case reports and small case series.
  • The other was treated with radiotherapy alone, as local tumor control would have required a hand amputation.
  • Functional assessment based on the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society staging system showed an average of 27.5 (range, 21-30).
  • [MeSH-major] Amputation / methods. Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Hand / surgery. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Child. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Retrospective Studies. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19655212.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-1132
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical orthopaedics and related research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2853661
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7. Ramos-Font C, Santiago Chinchilla A, Rebollo Aguirre AC, Rodríguez Fernández A, Medina Benítez A, Llamas Elvira JM: [Desmoid tumor of the thoraco-abdominal wall characterized with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/ CT scan. Correlation with magnetic resonance and bone scintigraphy. Review of the literature]. Rev Esp Med Nucl; 2009 Mar-Apr;28(2):70-3
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  • [Title] [Desmoid tumor of the thoraco-abdominal wall characterized with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/ CT scan. Correlation with magnetic resonance and bone scintigraphy. Review of the literature].
  • [Transliterated title] Tumor desmoide de la pared torácico-abdominal. Caracterización con PET-TAC con 18F-fluorodesoxiglucosa y correlación con resonancia magnética y gammagrafía ósea. Revisión de la literatura.
  • Desmoid tumours are uncommon benign tumours but with aggressive behaviour, resulting from the proliferation of well-differentiated fibroblasts.
  • Clinically, they present as a painless firm soft tissue mass.
  • The role of nuclear medicine techniques, such as bone scintigraphy, or more recently FDG-PET, has not been defined in the evaluation of these neoplasms.
  • [MeSH-major] Abdominal Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Abdominal Wall / radionuclide imaging. Bone Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / radionuclide imaging. Fluorine Radioisotopes. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Muscle Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Positron-Emission Tomography. Radiopharmaceuticals. Rectus Abdominis / radionuclide imaging. Ribs / radionuclide imaging. Tomography, X-Ray Computed
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Thoracic Wall / pathology. Thoracic Wall / radiography. Thoracic Wall / radionuclide imaging

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  • (PMID = 19406052.001).
  • [ISSN] 0212-6982
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista española de medicina nuclear
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Esp Med Nucl
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fluorine Radioisotopes; 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
  • [Number-of-references] 22
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8. Landa J, Schwartz LH: Contemporary imaging in sarcoma. Oncologist; 2009 Oct;14(10):1021-38
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  • Sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of >50 subtypes of neoplasm.
  • It is imperative to obtain appropriate imaging of these tumors in order to adequately assess, characterize, and stage bone and soft tissue sarcomas.
  • Newer radiopharmaceuticals, such as (18)F-fluorodeoxythymidine, are being developed to assist in the differentiation between benign and low-grade malignant neoplasms.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / diagnosis. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Positron-Emission Tomography. Radiopharmaceuticals. Sarcoma / diagnosis. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Neoplasm Metastasis / diagnosis. Neoplasm Staging. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19789392.001).
  • [ISSN] 1549-490X
  • [Journal-full-title] The oncologist
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncologist
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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9. Gupta SP, Agarwal A: Intraosseous neurilemmoma of L2 vertebra--a case report. Indian J Pathol Microbiol; 2005 Jul;48(3):367-9
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  • Intraosseous neurilemmoma (schwannoma) is a rare bone tumor with incidence less than 0.2% of all primary bone tumors.
  • It is a benign neoplasm arising from the schwann cells of the nerve sheath.
  • Computed tomograph revealed a large soft tissue component of the tumor mass with thecal sac compression.
  • A computed tomograph assisted needle biopsy revealed the tumor to be neurilemmoma.
  • Subsequently, during decompression, it was possible to shell out tumor from surrounding tissues.
  • Remaining tumor was curettedfrom bone and the cavity packed with autograft.

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  • (PMID = 16761755.001).
  • [ISSN] 0377-4929
  • [Journal-full-title] Indian journal of pathology & microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Indian J Pathol Microbiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Number-of-references] 4
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10. Stacy GS, Dixon LB: Pitfalls in MR image interpretation prompting referrals to an orthopedic oncology clinic. Radiographics; 2007 May-Jun;27(3):805-26; discussion 827-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Patients referred to the authors' hospital for evaluation on suspicion of a bone or soft-tissue malignancy frequently present to the Orthopaedic Oncology Clinic with magnetic resonance (MR) images that show typical features of nonmalignant or nonneoplastic entities.
  • The purpose of this article is to review the benign entities that may be mistaken by the radiologist for a malignancy and thus lead to needless referral to an orthopedic oncologist.
  • Normal hematopoietic marrow and marrow edema due to a stress reaction may mimic a neoplasm at MR imaging, but knowledge of the typical patterns and locations of these features allows an accurate radiologic interpretation.
  • The MR imaging appearance of osteonecrosis, Paget disease, benign bone lesions, and rheumatologic conditions may be confusing; in such circumstances, radiographic findings may help formulate a correct diagnosis.
  • Knowledge of the common locations and appearances of bursae and ganglia is necessary so that radiologists do not misinterpret these benign entities as soft-tissue sarcomas.
  • Soft-tissue trauma and inflammation also may mimic tumors at MR imaging, but a familiarity with the imaging patterns of nonneoplastic change in muscle allows the avoidance of misinterpretation.
  • The radiologist can be especially useful to both the clinician and the patient by recognizing entities that are highly unlikely to represent malignancy and by confidently reporting those entities as benign, thereby sparing the patient an unnecessary trip to the orthopedic oncologist.
  • [MeSH-major] Artifacts. Bone Diseases / diagnosis. Connective Tissue Diseases / diagnosis. Diagnostic Errors / prevention & control. Image Enhancement / methods. Referral and Consultation
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Bone Neoplasms / diagnosis. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Oncology Service, Hospital. Orthopedics. Pain Clinics. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / diagnosis

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  • [Copyright] (c) RSNA, 2007.
  • (PMID = 17495294.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-1323
  • [Journal-full-title] Radiographics : a review publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiographics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 52
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11. Edwards PC, Fantasia JE, Saini T, Rosenberg TJ, Sachs SA, Ruggiero S: Clinically aggressive central giant cell granulomas in two patients with neurofibromatosis 1. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod; 2006 Dec;102(6):765-72
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clinically aggressive central giant cell granulomas in two patients with neurofibromatosis 1.
  • BACKGROUND: Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder caused by a spectrum of mutations affecting the Nf1 gene.
  • Affected patients develop benign and malignant tumors at an increased frequency.
  • Clinical findings include multiple cutaneous café-au-lait pigmentations, neurofibromas, axillary freckling, optic gliomas, benign iris hamartomas (Lisch nodules), scoliosis, and poorly defined soft tissue lesions of the skeleton.
  • Kerl first reported an association of NF1 with multiple central giant cell granulomas (CGCGs) of the jaws.
  • Compared to normal bone, the Nf1-haploinsufficient bone in a patient with NF1 may be less able to remodel in response to as of yet unidentified stimuli (e.g. excessive mechanical stress and/or vascular fragility), and consequently may be more susceptible to developing CGCG-like lesions.
  • Alternatively, the CGCG in NF1 patients could represent a true neoplasm, resulting from additional, as of yet unidentified, genetic alterations to Nf1-haploinsufficient bone.
  • [MeSH-major] Granuloma, Giant Cell / complications. Jaw Diseases / complications. Neurofibromatosis 1 / complications


12. Weber K, Damron TA, Frassica FJ, Sim FH: Malignant bone tumors. Instr Course Lect; 2008;57:673-88
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  • [Title] Malignant bone tumors.
  • Malignant bone tumors represent a small percentage of cancers nationwide and also are much less common than malignant soft-tissue tumors.
  • The most common primary malignant bone tumors, osteosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma, occur in childhood.
  • The primary symptom of a patient with a malignant bone tumor is pain, which often occurs at rest or at night.
  • Knowledge of specific tumor characteristics and treatment options for osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, chondrosarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, chordoma, and adamantinoma is important.
  • Secondary sarcomas can occur in previously benign bone lesions and require aggressive treatment.
  • Specific techniques are available for the resection of malignant bone tumors from the upper extremities, lower extremities, pelvis, and spine.
  • The care of patients with primary malignant bone tumors requires a multidisciplinary approach to treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms. Orthopedic Procedures / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Global Health. Humans. Morbidity. Neoplasm Staging / methods. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 18399615.001).
  • [ISSN] 0065-6895
  • [Journal-full-title] Instructional course lectures
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Instr Course Lect
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 42
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13. Miettinen M, Finnell V, Fetsch JF: Ossifying fibromyxoid tumor of soft parts--a clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical study of 104 cases with long-term follow-up and a critical review of the literature. Am J Surg Pathol; 2008 Jul;32(7):996-1005
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  • [Title] Ossifying fibromyxoid tumor of soft parts--a clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical study of 104 cases with long-term follow-up and a critical review of the literature.
  • Ossifying fibromyxoid tumor (OFT) is a unique soft tissue tumor of uncertain histogenesis.
  • The majority of reported cases (approximately 220) have pursued a benign clinical course.
  • However, recent literature has emphasized the existence of morphologically atypical and clinically malignant examples of this tumor and proposed guidelines for assessment of biologic potential.
  • Herein, OFT was strictly defined as a tumor with lobular architecture, predominantly epithelioid cell morphology, a low level of atypia, corded and trabecular growth patterns, moderate amounts of myxocollagenous matrix, and often, focal peripheral metaplastic bone formation.
  • The tumor size ranged from 0.7 to 17 cm (median, 3 cm).
  • Tumor cell nuclei typically contained small, distinct nucleoli, and necrosis was infrequent (11/104).
  • A mitotic rate of >2 mitotic figures/50 HPFs was a risk factor for local recurrence, but necrosis, tumor size, the presence of satellite nodules, and positive margins were not.
  • [MeSH-major] Fibroma, Ossifying / pathology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Cell Nucleus / pathology. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Mitosis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. S100 Proteins / analysis

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  • (PMID = 18469710.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-0979
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / S100 Proteins
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14. Henry CJ, Brewer WG Jr, Whitley EM, Tyler JW, Ogilvie GK, Norris A, Fox LE, Morrison WB, Hammer A, Vail DM, Berg J, Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG): Canine digital tumors: a veterinary cooperative oncology group retrospective study of 64 dogs. J Vet Intern Med; 2005 Sep-Oct;19(5):720-4
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  • Risk factors examined included age, weight, sex, tumor site (hindlimb or forelimb), local tumor (T) stage, metastases, tumor type, and treatment modality.
  • Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) accounted for 33 (51.6%) of the tumors.
  • Other diagnoses included malignant melanoma (MM) (n = 10; 15.6%), osteosarcoma (OSA) (n = 4; 6.3%), hemangiopericytoma (n = 3; 4.7%), benign soft tissue tumors (n = 5; 7.8%), and malignant soft tissue tumors (n = 9; 14%).
  • None of the patient variables assessed, including age, sex, tumor type, site, and stage, had a significant impact on ST.
  • On the basis of these findings, early surgical intervention is advised for the treatment of dogs with digital tumors, regardless of tumor type or the presence of metastatic disease.


15. Ogütcen-Toller M, Sener I, Kasap V, Cakir-Ozkan N: Maxillary myxoma: surgical treatment and reconstruction with buccal fat pad flap: a case report. J Contemp Dent Pract; 2006 Feb 15;7(1):107-16
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  • Myxoma is a benign tumor that arises from mesenchymal tissue and is found less commonly in the bone than in soft tissue.
  • The buccal fat pad (BFP) is a lobulated mass of fatty tissue in the oromaxillofacial region, which has long been a source of grafts in facial augmentation.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / transplantation. Maxillary Neoplasms / surgery. Myxoma / surgery. Oral Surgical Procedures / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Bone Substitutes. Bone Transplantation. Cheek. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Oroantral Fistula / surgery. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures. Surgical Flaps. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 16491153.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-3711
  • [Journal-full-title] The journal of contemporary dental practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Contemp Dent Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bone Substitutes; 0 / OsteoGraf-N
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16. Nguyen QH, Szeto E, Mansberg R, Mansberg V: Paravertebral infection (phlegmon) demonstrated by FDG dual-head coincidence imaging in a patient with multiple malignancies. Clin Nucl Med; 2005 Apr;30(4):241-3
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  • A 66-year-old woman was referred for a bone scan to assess back pain on a background of breast cancer, melanoma, and rheumatic heart disease.
  • The scan appearance was suspicious for a localized soft tissue neoplasm.
  • An FDG coincidence positron emission tomography (PET) study demonstrated a large FDG-avid soft tissue abnormality.
  • Because FDG is not tumor-specific, accumulation in benign lesions may give rise to false-positive results despite a high pretest probability for malignancy.
  • [MeSH-major] Cellulitis / radionuclide imaging. Diagnostic Errors / prevention & control. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Lumbar Vertebrae / radionuclide imaging. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Staphylococcal Infections / radionuclide imaging

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  • (PMID = 15764879.001).
  • [ISSN] 0363-9762
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical nuclear medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Nucl Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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17. Ozcan C, Apaydin FD, Görür K, Apa DD: Peripheral giant cell granuloma of the mandibular condyle presenting as a preauricular mass. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol; 2005 Mar;262(3):178-81
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  • [Title] Peripheral giant cell granuloma of the mandibular condyle presenting as a preauricular mass.
  • Giant cell granuloma (GCG) was first described by Jaffe in 1953.
  • Peripheral GCG (PGCG) is an exophytic soft tissue lesion originating from the periodontal ligament and periosteum.
  • Central GCG (CGCG) is an uncommon benign fibro-osseous lesion generally presenting as an expansible mass with cortical bone defect.
  • The brown tumor of hyperparathyroidism and giant cell tumor must be ruled out because of the microscopic similarities of these lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Ear / pathology. Granuloma, Giant Cell / pathology. Mandibular Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Biopsy, Needle. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 15133683.001).
  • [ISSN] 0937-4477
  • [Journal-full-title] European archives of oto-rhino-laryngology : official journal of the European Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies (EUFOS) : affiliated with the German Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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18. Ahrens WA, Ridenour RV 3rd, Caron BL, Miller DV, Folpe AL: GLUT-1 expression in mesenchymal tumors: an immunohistochemical study of 247 soft tissue and bone neoplasms. Hum Pathol; 2008 Oct;39(10):1519-26
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  • [Title] GLUT-1 expression in mesenchymal tumors: an immunohistochemical study of 247 soft tissue and bone neoplasms.
  • However, GLUT-1 expression has not been systematically examined in other mesenchymal neoplasms.
  • Prompted by a recent report of GLUT-1 expression in epithelioid sarcoma, a tumor not generally felt to show perineurial differentiation, we examined GLUT-1 expression in a wide variety of mesenchymal tumors.
  • Sections from 247 mesenchymal tumors of a variety of histologic subtypes were retrieved from our archives and immunostained for GLUT-1 using heat-induced epitope retrieval and the DAKO ADVANCE detection system (DAKO, Carpinteria, CA).
  • All benign nerve sheath tumors showed a peripheral rim of positive normal perineurial cells, with 2 neurofibromas and 3 schwannomas showing more extensive staining.
  • GLUT-1 expression was also seen in a wide variety of benign and malignant mesenchymal tumors.
  • We conclude that GLUT-1 expression in mesenchymal tumors is by no means specific for perineurial differentiation, but may instead represent upregulation of this protein within hypoxic zones, secondary to upstream activation of proteins such as hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / metabolism. Glucose Transporter Type 1 / metabolism. Mesenchymoma / metabolism. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Cell Count. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Neoplasm Proteins / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 18620729.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-8392
  • [Journal-full-title] Human pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hum. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Glucose Transporter Type 1; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins
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19. Singh J, James SL, Kroon HM, Woertler K, Anderson SE, Jundt G, Davies AM: Tumour and tumour-like lesions of the patella--a multicentre experience. Eur Radiol; 2009 Mar;19(3):701-12
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  • Fifty-nine cases of lesions presenting in the patella were identified after review of the databases of four European bone tumour registries.
  • Of the 59 cases, 46% were non neoplastic, 39% were benign and 15% were malignant.
  • The commonest benign neoplasm was giant cell tumour (GCT) (11 cases).
  • Younger patients were more likely to have a benign neoplasm.
  • Lesions in patients less than 40 years of age included giant cell tumour, chondroblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC), osteomyelitis, osteoid osteoma and solitary bone cyst.
  • There was associated soft tissue extension in gout and malignant lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Giant Cell Tumors / pathology. Patella / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Male. Medical Oncology / methods. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Radiology / methods

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  • [ErratumIn] Eur Radiol. 2010 Mar;20(3):763. Jundt, G [added]
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  • (PMID = 18815789.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-1084
  • [Journal-full-title] European radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Radiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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20. Dobashi Y, Suzuki S, Sato E, Hamada Y, Yanagawa T, Ooi A: EGFR-dependent and independent activation of Akt/mTOR cascade in bone and soft tissue tumors. Mod Pathol; 2009 Oct;22(10):1328-40
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  • [Title] EGFR-dependent and independent activation of Akt/mTOR cascade in bone and soft tissue tumors.
  • To gain the insight into the involvement of signaling mediated by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the phenotype and biological profiles of tumors and tumor-like lesions of the bone and soft tissue, we analyzed the expression and phosphorylation (activation) of mTOR and its correlation with the status of upstream and downstream modulator proteins Akt, p70S6-kinase (S6K), and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), which we refer to collectively as mTOR cassette proteins.
  • Immunohistochemical analysis of 140 cases showed activation of Akt in 55% (61% in malignant and 27% in benign), and mTOR expression in 61% (66% in malignant and 39% in benign).
  • The preponderance of mTOR activation was found in tumors of peripheral nerve sheath (malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and schwannoma), skeletal muscle origin (rhabdomyosarcoma), and in those exhibiting epithelial nature (chordoma and synovial sarcoma).
  • We conclude that mTOR-mediated signaling proteins function not only in the proliferation of the tumor cells, but also in the differentiation and/or maintenance of morphological phenotypes in tumors of rhabdomyoblastic and nerve sheath cell origin.
  • Overall, these results suggest that inhibitors of mTOR cassette may be useful as novel components of combined chemotherapy for a defined subset of bone and soft tissue sarcomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing / analysis. Bone Neoplasms / enzymology. Phosphoproteins / analysis. Protein Kinases / analysis. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt / analysis. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / analysis. Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases, 70-kDa / analysis. Signal Transduction. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / enzymology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Proliferation. Enzyme Activation. Humans. Immunoblotting. Immunohistochemistry. Mutation. Neoplasm Staging. Phosphorylation. Prognosis. TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases

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  • (PMID = 19648884.001).
  • [ISSN] 1530-0285
  • [Journal-full-title] Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mod. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing; 0 / EIF4EBP1 protein, human; 0 / Phosphoproteins; EC 2.7.- / Protein Kinases; EC 2.7.1.1 / MTOR protein, human; EC 2.7.1.1 / TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / EGFR protein, human; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor; EC 2.7.11.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt; EC 2.7.11.1 / Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases, 70-kDa
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21. Hatori M, Watanabe M, Kotake H, Kokubun S: Chondrosarcoma of the ring finger: a case report and review of the literature. Tohoku J Exp Med; 2006 Mar;208(3):275-81
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  • Enchondromas are the most common benign cartilaginous bone tumors arising in the medullary cavity of the small bones of the hand.
  • The findings of cortical irregular thickening by plain radiography and computed tomography and soft tissue extension by magnetic resonance imaging suggested the tumor was chondrosarcoma rather than a common enchondroma.
  • Thorough curettage and artificial bone grafting was performed because of the age of the patient, his senile dementia and the strong desire of the patient and his family.
  • Histological examination revealed that the tumor was composed of polygonal cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm proliferating in the chondromatous matrix with partially myxoid changes.
  • Nuclear irregularity, binucleated cells, bone permeation and encasement were observed and the tumor was diagnosed as grade 2 chondrosarcoma.
  • The tumor recurred five months after surgery.
  • In conclusion, details of radiological as well as pathological findings are essential for differential diagnosis between benign enchondroma and chondrosarcoma in the hand.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Chondrosarcoma / pathology. Fingers / pathology. Review Literature as Topic
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged, 80 and over. Chondroma / diagnosis. Diagnosis, Differential. Disease-Free Survival. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Time Factors. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16498237.001).
  • [ISSN] 0040-8727
  • [Journal-full-title] The Tohoku journal of experimental medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tohoku J. Exp. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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22. Wallace MJ, Ross M: Bone lymphangiomatosis: treatment with percutaneous cementoplasty. Spine (Phila Pa 1976); 2005 Jun 15;30(12):E336-9
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  • [Title] Bone lymphangiomatosis: treatment with percutaneous cementoplasty.
  • OBJECTIVES: Disseminated lymphangiomatosis is a rare disorder that can produce clinical manifestation secondary to soft tissue, visceral and bone involvement.
  • The overall prognosis of this disorder is usually poor, and the current treatment options for its sequelae are limited and only palliative.
  • In this report, we present the use of cementoplasty in the percutaneous treatment of a sacral lymphangiomatous bone lesion producing severe pain.
  • SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Disseminated lymphangiomatosis is a rare disorder that can produce clinical manifestation secondary to soft tissue, visceral, and bone involvement.
  • Computed tomography guided osteoplasty injecting acrylic bone cement into the lesion resulted in almost immediate reduction in pain.
  • The injection of bone cement into the sacral lesion was then monitored by intermittent CT imaging.
  • CONCLUSION: The case presented demonstrates the feasibility and efficacy of computed tomography-guided cementoplasty used to palliate unusual causes of benign osteolytic bone lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Cements / therapeutic use. Lymphangioma / therapy. Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures. Orthopedic Procedures / methods. Sacrum / pathology. Spinal Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Osteolysis / parasitology. Osteolysis / surgery. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 15959357.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-1159
  • [Journal-full-title] Spine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Spine
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bone Cements
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23. Koyuncu BO, Zeytinoğlu M, Unal T, Zeytinoğlu B: Myofibroma of the gingiva: report of a case. J Clin Pediatr Dent; 2010;34(3):253-7
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  • Myofibroma is a benign mesenchymal neoplasm composed of myofibroblasts which has been described with different synonyms since the first report in 1951.
  • It occurs most commonly as a solitary lesion of soft tissue, skin, or bone in infancy.
  • Awareness and recognition of this benign tumor is important to establish the correct diagnosis and avoid morbidity of unnecessary aggressive therapy.
  • The tumor showed rapid increase in size and clinical features suggestive of malignancy.
  • However on histopathologic evaluation it was diagnosed as a benign neoplasm, and this diagnosis was supported by immunohistochemical markers.

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  • (PMID = 20578664.001).
  • [ISSN] 1053-4628
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of clinical pediatric dentistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Pediatr Dent
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Actins; 0 / Desmin; 0 / S100 Proteins; 0 / Vimentin
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24. Brisse H, Orbach D, Klijanienko J, Fréneaux P, Neuenschwander S: Imaging and diagnostic strategy of soft tissue tumors in children. Eur Radiol; 2006 May;16(5):1147-64
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  • [Title] Imaging and diagnostic strategy of soft tissue tumors in children.
  • The diagnosis of a soft tissue mass in children is a common clinical situation.
  • Most of the lesions are benign and can be treated conservatively or by non-mutilating surgery.
  • Nevertheless, the possibility of a malignant soft tissue tumor must be systematically considered.
  • The most frequent benign soft tissue lesions in children are vascular lesions, fibrous and fibrohistiocytic tumors and pseudotumors, whereas rhabdomyosarcomas account for 50% of all soft tissue sarcomas.
  • A child presenting an atypical soft tissue mass should be managed by a multidisciplinary centre, and primary resection must be proscribed until a definite diagnosis has been established.
  • The role of imaging is essential either to confirm the benign nature of the mass or to give arguments to perform a diagnostic biopsy.
  • [MeSH-major] Diagnostic Imaging. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Age Factors. Child. Child, Preschool. Decision Trees. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Neoplasm Staging

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  • (PMID = 16411083.001).
  • [ISSN] 0938-7994
  • [Journal-full-title] European radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Radiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Number-of-references] 108
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25. Van Dyck P, Vanhoenacker FM, Vogel J, Venstermans C, Kroon HM, Gielen J, Parizel PM, Bloem JL, De Schepper AM: Prevalence, extension and characteristics of fluid-fluid levels in bone and soft tissue tumors. Eur Radiol; 2006 Dec;16(12):2644-51
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  • [Title] Prevalence, extension and characteristics of fluid-fluid levels in bone and soft tissue tumors.
  • The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence, extension and signal characteristics of fluid-fluid levels in a large series of 700 bone and 700 soft tissue tumors.
  • Out of a multi-institutional database, MRI of 700 consecutive patients with a bone tumor and MRI of 700 consecutive patients with a soft tissue neoplasm were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of fluid-fluid levels.
  • Of 700 patients with a bone tumor, 19 (10 male and 9 female; mean age, 29 years) presented with a fluid-fluid level (prevalence 2.7%).
  • Diagnoses included aneurysmal bone cyst (ten cases), fibrous dysplasia (two cases), osteoblastoma (one case), simple bone cyst (one case), telangiectatic osteosarcoma (one case), "brown tumor" (one case), chondroblastoma (one case) and giant cell tumor (two cases).
  • Of 700 patients with a soft tissue tumor, 20 (9 males and 11 females; mean age, 34 years) presented with a fluid-fluid level (prevalence 2.9%).
  • Diagnoses included cavernous hemangioma (12 cases), synovial sarcoma (3 cases), angiosarcoma (1 case), aneurysmal bone cyst of soft tissue (1 case), myxofibrosarcoma (1 case) and high-grade sarcoma "not otherwise specified" (2 cases).
  • In our series, the largest reported in the literature to the best of our knowledge, the presence of fluid-fluid levels is a rare finding with a prevalence of 2.7 and 2.9% in bone and soft tissue tumors, respectively.
  • Fluid-fluid levels remain a non-specific finding and can occur in a wide range of bone and soft tissue tumors, both benign and malignant.
  • Therefore, they cannot be considered diagnostic of any particular type of tumor, and the diagnosis should be made on the basis of other radiological and clinical findings.
  • [MeSH-major] Body Fluids / metabolism. Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16612549.001).
  • [ISSN] 0938-7994
  • [Journal-full-title] European radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Radiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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26. Toy PC, White JR, Scarborough MT, Enneking WF, Gibbs CP: Distal femoral osteoarticular allografts: long-term survival, but frequent complications. Clin Orthop Relat Res; 2010 Nov;468(11):2914-23
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  • METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 26 patients who had osteoarticular allograft reconstruction of the distal femur after resection of a malignant or aggressive benign tumor of bone.
  • Lacking the benefit of improved soft tissue attachments inherent in other anatomic sites, we believe this option is most appropriate for restoring bone stock in young patients with expectations of long-term survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Transplantation / adverse effects. Femoral Neoplasms / surgery. Femur / surgery. Graft Survival
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Amputation. Child. Female. Humans. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Limb Salvage. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Neoplasm Staging. Recovery of Function. Reoperation. Retrospective Studies. Time Factors. Transplantation, Homologous. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20645036.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-1132
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical orthopaedics and related research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2947705
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27. Dobashi Y, Watanabe H, Matsubara M, Yanagawa T, Raz A, Shimamiya T, Ooi A: Autocrine motility factor/glucose-6-phosphate isomerase is a possible predictor of metastasis in bone and soft tissue tumours. J Pathol; 2006 Jan;208(1):44-53
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  • [Title] Autocrine motility factor/glucose-6-phosphate isomerase is a possible predictor of metastasis in bone and soft tissue tumours.
  • In order to assess the involvement of autocrine motility factor (AMF) in mesenchymal tumours, AMF protein and mRNA expression was analysed in tumours, tumour-like lesions, and other lesions of bone and soft tissue.
  • Chordoid, chondroid, and muscular tumours revealed higher immunoreactivity in both benign and malignant tumours.
  • Generally, malignant tumours revealed higher expression of AMF than benign tumours of the same histopathological lineage, except for dermatofibroma/dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans.
  • This secreted AMF presumably enhances their cell motility through an autocrine effect and eventually causes increased metastatic potential.
  • Collectively, AMF was observed in a wide spectrum of lesions of mesenchymal tissue, supporting the notion that it is involved in various cellular functions, including proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, and metastasis.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / metabolism. Glucose-6-Phosphate / metabolism. Glucose-6-Phosphate Isomerase / analysis. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. Humans. Immunoblotting / methods. Immunohistochemistry / methods. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Proteins / analysis. Proteasome Inhibitors. RNA, Messenger / analysis. RNA, Neoplasm / analysis. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction / methods

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2005 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.
  • (PMID = 16294294.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3417
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-51714
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / Proteasome Inhibitors; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / RNA, Neoplasm; 56-73-5 / Glucose-6-Phosphate; EC 5.3.1.9 / Glucose-6-Phosphate Isomerase
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28. Mathur SR, Gupta R, Seith A, Agarwala S, Subramanian S, Gupta SD: Aspiration cytology of mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall in an infant: a case report. Acta Cytol; 2010 Jan-Feb;54(1):63-5
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  • [Title] Aspiration cytology of mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall in an infant: a case report.
  • BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall is an extremely uncommon lesion of infants.
  • Radiologic features simulate a malignant neoplasm; however, pathologic examination demonstrates an admixture of fibroblasts, benign cartilage and woven bone.
  • Radiologic investigation demonstrated lytic destruction of the right 7th, 8th and 9th ribs with a large soft tissue mass.
  • A cytologic diagnosis of a benign chondroid, possibly hamartomatous lesion was given, which was confirmed as mesenchymal hamartoma on histopathologic examination.
  • CONCLUSION: Mesenchymal hamartoma is a rare chest wall lesion that can be diagnosed on cytology, provided that the cytopathologist is aware of this uncommon entity and appreciates the benign cytologic features.

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  • (PMID = 20306991.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-5547
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta cytologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Cytol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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29. Studart-Soares EC, Costa FW, Sousa FB, Alves AP, Osterne RL: Oral lipomas in a Brazilian population: a 10-year study and analysis of 450 cases reported in the literature. Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal; 2010 Sep;15(5):e691-6
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  • OBJECTIVES: Lipomas are common benign mesenchymal neoplasms that rarely occur in the oral cavity and correspond to less than 4.4% of all benign oral soft tissue tumors.
  • Age, gender, tumor location, clinical findings, duration, histological subtypes, and treatment outcome were recorded.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Lipomas continue to be an uncommon neoplasm of the oral cavity.
  • Radiography is a valuable tool due to the possible occurrence of bone involvement.

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  • (PMID = 20383107.001).
  • [ISSN] 1698-6946
  • [Journal-full-title] Medicina oral, patología oral y cirugía bucal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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30. Micheli A, Trapani S, Brizzi I, Campanacci D, Resti M, de Martino M: Myositis ossificans circumscripta: a paediatric case and review of the literature. Eur J Pediatr; 2009 May;168(5):523-9
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  • Myositis ossificans circumscripta (MOC), characterised by non-neoplastic heterotopic bone formation in soft tissue and skeletal muscle, is rare in children.
  • At onset, it is difficult to distinguish MOC from a musculoskeletal infection or neoplasm, particularly in absence of trauma, and a biopsy is frequently required.
  • Our case study confirms the good prognosis of MOC and underlines how this benign condition should be considered in children presenting a tender and painful soft-tissue swelling.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone and Bones. Musculoskeletal Diseases. Myositis Ossificans / diagnosis. Myositis Ossificans / physiopathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Anti-Inflammatory Agents / therapeutic use. Biopsy. Child. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Lymphadenitis / diagnosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Muscle, Skeletal / metabolism. Muscle, Skeletal / pathology. Necrosis / pathology. Osteoblasts / metabolism. Sarcoma / pathology. Soft Tissue Injuries / diagnosis. Soft Tissue Injuries / metabolism. Soft Tissue Injuries / pathology

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  • (PMID = 19130083.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-1076
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Pediatr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 35
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31. Unlu HH, Songu M, Ovali GY, Nese N: Inverted papilloma with new bone formation: report of three cases. Am J Rhinol; 2007 Sep-Oct;21(5):607-10
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  • [Title] Inverted papilloma with new bone formation: report of three cases.
  • BACKGROUND: An inverted papilloma (IP) is a benign sinonasal tumor of ectodermal origin, which is locally aggressive and destructive, tends to recur if incompletely removed, and has significant malignant potential.
  • On CT scan, the appearance of an IP is variable and nonspecific but most commonly it appears to have soft tissue density.
  • The association of IPs and new bone formation is extremely rare; to the best of our knowledge, only one case has been reported in the literature to date.
  • METHODS: We report three cases with existence of bony mass surrounded by polypoid soft tissue diagnosed as IP histopathologically.
  • RESULTS: The nature, shape, and location of the bony mass were not in concordance with trapped bone, with tumoral calcifications, or with osteoma.
  • CONCLUSION: We propose that with regard to the three cases presented here, new bone formation may be associated with IP pathologically.
  • We also believe that additional investigations are required to characterize the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in neoplasm-induced osteogenesis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Papilloma, Inverted / pathology. Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Bone and Bones / pathology. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Osteogenesis. Osteoma / pathology. Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures / methods. Time Factors. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / methods

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  • (PMID = 17999798.001).
  • [ISSN] 1050-6586
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of rhinology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Rhinol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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32. Lin TM, Chang HW, Wang KH, Kao AP, Chang CC, Wen CH, Lai CS, Lin SD: Isolation and identification of mesenchymal stem cells from human lipoma tissue. Biochem Biophys Res Commun; 2007 Oct 5;361(4):883-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Isolation and identification of mesenchymal stem cells from human lipoma tissue.
  • Lipoma is a benign neoplasm of normal fat cells that appears as a soft, movable swelling, often with a slight yellowish coloration.
  • Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that have been isolated from bone marrow, blood, and other adult tissues including adipose tissue have the potential to be useful candidates for therapy.
  • No literature had reported about stem cells from lipoma tissue.
  • Here, a new cell culture method is described and utilized to greatly accelerate the growth rate and prolong the lifespan of lipoma-derived MSCs.
  • Cells produced in early cultures display characteristics similar to those previously reported for multipotential stem cells, including a high frequency of anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and a lack of gap junctional intercellular communication in cell types with serpiginous morphology.
  • [MeSH-major] Lipoma / pathology. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells / cytology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adipogenesis. Cell Culture Techniques. Cell Division. Cell Lineage. Cell Proliferation. Chondrogenesis. Gap Junctions / metabolism. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Osteogenesis

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  • (PMID = 17679141.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-291X
  • [Journal-full-title] Biochemical and biophysical research communications
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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33. Merriman DJ, Deavers MT, Czerniak BA, Lin PP: Massive desmoplastic fibroblastoma with scapular invasion. Orthopedics; 2010 Aug;33(8)
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  • Desmoplastic fibroblastoma is a rare benign tumor usually associated with a favorable outcome.
  • The tumor is characterized by fibroblastic cells that are sparsely distributed in a collagenous and fibromyxoid background.
  • The growth of this tumor is generally indolent, and most tumors are small, subcutaneous lesions.
  • Invasion and destruction of bone are distinctly uncommon features.This article describes an unusual case of desmoplastic fibroblastoma that presented with a massive 23-cm tumor.
  • The tumor was also unique for its infiltration and destruction of the scapula.
  • The aggressive clinical features prompted the original physicians to administer chemotherapy, but the tumor exhibited no response to systemic treatment.
  • The invasiveness of the tumor and its large size are distinctly unusual for desmoplastic fibroblastomas.
  • Following surgical excision, the patient has remained continuously disease free for >5 years, which is in keeping with the intrinsically benign nature of the tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Fibroma, Desmoplastic / pathology. Scapula / pathology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Combined Modality Therapy. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Young Adult

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.
  • [CommentIn] Orthopedics. 2011 Nov;34(11):836-7; author reply 837 [22050246.001]
  • (PMID = 20704102.001).
  • [ISSN] 1938-2367
  • [Journal-full-title] Orthopedics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Orthopedics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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34. Rau T, Soeder S, Olk A, Aigner T: Parosteal lipoma of the thigh with cartilaginous and osseous differentiation: an osteochondrolipoma. Ann Diagn Pathol; 2006 Oct;10(5):279-82
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Lipomas are very common benign soft tissue neoplasms.
  • Mature cartilage and bone arising in a lipoma is a rare event and is mostly associated with a parosteal localization of the neoplasm.
  • We describe a new case of osteochondrolipoma showing not only major adipocytic differentiation but also areas of fibrocytic and cartilaginous cell differentiation and bone formation (both endochondral and membranous).
  • The occurrence of at least 4 distinct directions of mesenchymal cell differentiation within a benign neoplasia underlines the concept of multilineage differentiation of pluripotent mesenchymal stem cells.
  • Such a multidirectional potential was recently well established in vitro in stem cells present in adult adipocytic tissue.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone and Bones / pathology. Cartilage / pathology. Lipoma / pathology. Periosteum / pathology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adipocytes / pathology. Aged. Cell Differentiation. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / pathology. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Male. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells / pathology. Ossification, Heterotopic / pathology. Thigh

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  • (PMID = 16979520.001).
  • [ISSN] 1092-9134
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of diagnostic pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Diagn Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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35. Kurugoglu S, Adaletli I, Mihmanli I, Kanberoglu K: Lumbosacral osseous tumors in children. Eur J Radiol; 2008 Feb;65(2):257-69
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  • A wide variety of benign and malignant neoplasms in children involve the lumbosacral region.
  • When a solitary lesion of the lower spine occurs, tumors or tumor-like lesions represent an important group of entities for diagnostic consideration.
  • Roentgenograms, which demonstrate bone deviations, should be used as an initial examination.
  • The results should direct further imaging studies, such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and bone scintigraphy.
  • MRI shows soft-tissue masses and medullary infiltration better than any other radiological modality.
  • Although imaging features, especially of benign lesions, may yield a high percentage of accurate diagnoses, in cases with radiological findings highly suggestive of malignancy, a specific diagnosis cannot always be made, and histopathological findings are essential to achieve the diagnosis that will guide the therapy.
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Contrast Media. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neoplasm Metastasis / diagnosis. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 17498904.001).
  • [ISSN] 0720-048X
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Radiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Contrast Media
  • [Number-of-references] 46
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36. Naka N, Joyama S, Tsukamoto Y, Yoshioka K, Hashimoto N, Ujiiye T, Hayashi T, Kawase M, Mano M, Ishiguro S, Myoui A, Ueda T, Yoshikawa H, Araki N, Itoh K: Quantification of SSX mRNA expression in human bone and soft tissue tumors using nucleic acid sequence-based amplification. J Mol Diagn; 2005 May;7(2):187-97
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  • [Title] Quantification of SSX mRNA expression in human bone and soft tissue tumors using nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.
  • We have developed a competitive nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay to analyze SSX mRNA expression in 211 bone and soft tissue tumors.
  • The copy numbers of SSX mRNA per mug of total RNA in tumor tissues were widely distributed, ranging logarithmically from 0.6 to 6.6.
  • We found that malignant tumors showed significantly higher expression of SSX mRNA than benign tumors (P < 0.0001).
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / genetics. Neoplasm Proteins / genetics. RNA, Messenger / analysis. Repressor Proteins / genetics. Self-Sustained Sequence Replication. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Animals. COS Cells. Child. Female. Gene Expression. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. RNA, Neoplasm / analysis. RNA, Neoplasm / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 15858142.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-1578
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of molecular diagnostics : JMD
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Mol Diagn
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / RNA, Neoplasm; 0 / Repressor Proteins; 164289-47-8 / synovial sarcoma X breakpoint proteins
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1867521
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37. Börüban S, Sancak T, Yildiz Y, Sağlik Y: Embolization of benign and malignant bone and soft tissue tumors of the extremities. Diagn Interv Radiol; 2007 Sep;13(3):164-71
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  • [Title] Embolization of benign and malignant bone and soft tissue tumors of the extremities.
  • PURPOSE: To reveal the effectiveness and reliability of preoperative, curative, and palliative embolization of benign and malignant bone and soft tissue tumors of the extremities.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Diagnostic angiography was performed on 35 patients (14 females, 40%; 21 males, 60%) between 6 and 70 years of age (mean, 32 years) who were referred to our digital subtraction angiography (DSA) unit between March 2000 and March 2004, and had extremity bone or soft tissue tumors.
  • CONCLUSION: Pre-operative, palliative, and curative selective/superselective intra-arterial embolization is an effective and potentially developing method for benign and malignant, hypervascularized bone and soft tissue tumors of the extremities, when it is performed by an experienced team with proper embolizing agents.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / epidemiology. Bone Neoplasms / therapy. Embolization, Therapeutic / utilization
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Child. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Turkey / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 17846993.001).
  • [ISSN] 1305-3825
  • [Journal-full-title] Diagnostic and interventional radiology (Ankara, Turkey)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Diagn Interv Radiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Turkey
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38. Riddle ND, Yamauchi H, Caracciolo JT, Cheong D, Khakpour N, Bui MM: Giant cell tumor of the anterior rib masquerading as a breast mass: a case report and review of current literature. Cases J; 2010;3:51
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  • [Title] Giant cell tumor of the anterior rib masquerading as a breast mass: a case report and review of current literature.
  • INTRODUCTION: Giant cell tumor (GCT) is an aggressive, but usually benign bone neoplasm most commonly arising in the metaphysis/epiphyses of long bones.
  • While they are categorized as benign tumors, they can be locally aggressive and clinically have metastatic potential.
  • The most common locations of this tumor include the distal femur, proximal tibia, and distal radius.
  • Further evaluation revealed the mass to be an expansile rib lesion with extraosseous soft tissue invasion.
  • CONCLUSION: The histological features of bland mononuclear and multinucleated giant cells along with the lack of any additional mesenchymal elements led to the diagnosis of giant cell tumor.
  • Resection of tumor was performed.

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  • (PMID = 20205847.001).
  • [ISSN] 1757-1626
  • [Journal-full-title] Cases journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cases J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2825505
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39. Ayadi-Kaddour A, Ben Slama S, Braham E, Abid L, Ismail O, Smati B, Djilani H, El Mezni F: [Desmoplastic fibroma of the rib: two case reports]. Ann Pathol; 2005 Oct;25(5):398-401
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  • [Transliterated title] Le fibrome desmoplastique de la côte: à propos de deux observations.
  • Desmoplastic fibroma is a very rare primary tumor of bone, closely related to aggressive fibromatosis of soft tissue.
  • Although considered a benign lesion, it can be very aggressive locally and has a high rate of local recurrence after incomplete surgical excision.
  • Histological examination after surgical resection revealed that the tumor consisted of spindle cells with small, elongated nuclei in a background of numerous collagen fibers and infiltrating lamellar bone.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Fibroma, Desmoplastic / pathology. Ribs / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Collagen / analysis. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Fibroblasts / pathology. Humans. Lung / pathology. Lung / surgery. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Proteins / analysis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Pneumonectomy. Thoracic Wall / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16498294.001).
  • [ISSN] 0242-6498
  • [Journal-full-title] Annales de pathologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Pathol
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 9007-34-5 / Collagen
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40. Bahamonde L, Catalan J: Bone tumors around the knee: risks and benefits of arthroscopic procedures. Arthroscopy; 2006 May;22(5):558-64
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  • [Title] Bone tumors around the knee: risks and benefits of arthroscopic procedures.
  • Although most primary bone tumors and soft tissue tumors arise around the knee joint, many patients with tumoral conditions attribute their symptoms to traumatic events.
  • Arthroscopy is the preferred method for diagnosis and treatment of knee joint disease, but even a minimally invasive procedure may have adverse consequences in the presence of an unsuspected neoplasm.
  • In addition, arthroscopy is a useful adjunct during surgical treatment of patients with certain juxta-articular benign bone tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Arthroscopy. Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Knee Joint
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy. Humans. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / diagnosis. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 16651168.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-3231
  • [Journal-full-title] Arthroscopy : the journal of arthroscopic & related surgery : official publication of the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the International Arthroscopy Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arthroscopy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 29
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41. Liu QY, Chen JY, Liang BL, Li HG, Gao M, Lin XF: [Imaging manifestations and pathologic features of soft tissue desmoid-type fibromatosis]. Ai Zheng; 2008 Dec;27(12):1287-92
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  • [Title] [Imaging manifestations and pathologic features of soft tissue desmoid-type fibromatosis].
  • BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: Soft tissue desmoid-type fibromatosis is a type of benign, infiltrative tumors which are rarely seen.
  • This study was to analyze CT and MR manifestations and pathologic features of soft tissue desmoid-type fibromatosis to improve its diagnostic accuracy.
  • METHODS: A total of 34 soft tissue desmoid-type fibromatosis from 29 patients, including 20 primary and 14 recurrent tumors were analyzed.
  • Of the 34 tumors, 31(91.2%) had an ill-defined or partially ill-defined margin, 31(91.2%) had a lobulated or irregular contour, 17(50.0%) had neurovascular involvement, 15(44.1%) had bone involvement, 23(67.6%) had extra-compartmental extension.
  • Histologic analysis revealed that the tumor was composed of spindle cells and collagen bundles, with a variable amount of intermingled collagen surrounding the spindle cells.
  • Nuclear atypia was not seen,and occasional mitoses were present in the tumor cells.
  • CONCLUSION: The characteristic manifestations of CT or MR images of desmoid-type fibromatosis provide important evidence to discriminate benign and malignant soft tissue tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Extremities / radiography. Fibromatosis, Aggressive / diagnosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / diagnosis. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Image Enhancement. Infant. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Retrospective Studies. Thoracic Wall / pathology. Thoracic Wall / radiography. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19079995.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Ai zheng = Aizheng = Chinese journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ai Zheng
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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42. Mosquera JM, Fletcher CD: Expanding the spectrum of malignant progression in solitary fibrous tumors: a study of 8 cases with a discrete anaplastic component--is this dedifferentiated SFT? Am J Surg Pathol; 2009 Sep;33(9):1314-21
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  • Dedifferentiation is a well recognized, if sometimes controversial, form of tumor progression in certain types of soft tissue and bone sarcoma, and confers a worse prognosis when compared with the low-grade counterpart.
  • To date, dedifferentiation has not been described in solitary fibrous tumor (SFT).
  • Two cases were intrathoracic, 2 were located in the deep soft tissue of thigh, and single cases were located in the omentum, scalp, retroperitoneum, and abdominal wall.
  • In addition to typical features of benign-appearing SFT there was an abrupt transition to nondistinctive high-grade sarcoma in all cases.
  • The latter included epithelioid, round cell, and/or spindle cell components with increased mitotic activity, necrosis, and cystic degeneration.
  • One patient with an 11.5 cm intrathoracic tumor is alive with disease at 58 months after recurrence and metastasis.
  • Our results demonstrate that dedifferentiation in SFT, comparable with that in other low grade/intermediate soft-tissue tumors, poses a higher risk of tumor recurrence and/or metastasis, most notably in large and deep-seated tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Cell Dedifferentiation. Disease Progression. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology. Solitary Fibrous Tumors / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Anaplasia / genetics. Anaplasia / pathology. Antigens, CD34 / metabolism. Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Chromosome Aberrations. Comparative Genomic Hybridization. DNA, Neoplasm / analysis. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Proteins / metabolism. Sarcoma / genetics. Sarcoma / metabolism. Sarcoma / secondary. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19718788.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-0979
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD34; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / P16 protein, human; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
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43. Basu S, Baghel NS, Puri A, Shet T, Merchant NH: 18 F-FDG avid lesion due to coexistent fibrous dysplasia in a child of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma: source of false positive FDG-PET. J Cancer Res Ther; 2010 Jan-Mar;6(1):92-4
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  • With increasing use of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) in the current oncological practice, there is a growing body of evidence of false positive scans due to various benign conditions.
  • The scan was extended up to foot in view of the fact that a prior bone scan had shown a focal uptake in the similar location.
  • A histopathological diagnosis was sought for and the lesion was subsequently proven to be fibrous dysplasia by histopathology of the bone piece obtained from the right tibial lesion by J needle biopsy.
  • The present case is a useful addition to the current body of literature of false positive 18 F-FDG-PET study due to a benign skeletal pathology and underscores the importance of high index of suspicion and careful clinicoradiopathologic correlation, whenever one comes across such an unusual PET finding.
  • [MeSH-major] Fibrous Dysplasia of Bone / radionuclide imaging. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Radiopharmaceuticals. Rhabdomyosarcoma, Embryonal / radionuclide imaging. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. False Positive Reactions. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Metastasis / pathology. Positron-Emission Tomography. Tibia / pathology

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  • (PMID = 20479556.001).
  • [ISSN] 1998-4138
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cancer research and therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Cancer Res Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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44. Fritz MA, Sade B, Bauer TW, Wood BG, Lee JH: Benign fibrous histiocytoma of the pterygopalatine fossa with intracranial extension. Acta Neurochir (Wien); 2006 Jan;148(1):73-6; discussion 76
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  • [Title] Benign fibrous histiocytoma of the pterygopalatine fossa with intracranial extension.
  • Despite the histologic absence of nuclear pleomorphism, the tumor rapidly recurred after complete surgical resection.
  • The aggressive nature of our patient's tumor confirms previous observations that an aggressive radiographic appearance has prognostic value when dealing with skeletal and soft tissue tumors.
  • In the subset of fibrous histiocytomas that invade bone, however adjunctive treatment with radiation and or chemotherapy may be appropriate.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain / pathology. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Palate, Hard. Skull Base Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Fatal Outcome. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness

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  • (PMID = 16200478.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6268
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta neurochirurgica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Neurochir (Wien)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Austria
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45. Levi PA Jr, Kim DM, Harsfield SL, Jacobson ER: Squamous cell carcinoma presenting as an endodontic-periodontic lesion. J Periodontol; 2005 Oct;76(10):1798-804
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  • [Title] Squamous cell carcinoma presenting as an endodontic-periodontic lesion.
  • We report a case of invasive squamous cell carcinoma that presented as a benign endodontic-periodontic lesion with a 7-mm periodontal pocket on tooth #15 in a 40-year-old, non-smoking woman.
  • A periodontal flap surgical procedure was performed on teeth #13 to #15, and as there was bone erosion into the maxillary sinus, a biopsy of the soft tissue was submitted to the local hospital for histological analysis.
  • RESULTS: The biopsied lesion was diagnosed as invasive, moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with focal spindle and clear cell differentiation (grade II to III of IV).
  • Bone invasion was also identified.
  • The patient remained free of tumor for 5 years after the initial presentation.
  • This case report emphasizes the important role of dental professionals, especially periodontists and endodontists, of being aware that squamous cell carcinoma may manifest itself clinically and/or radiographically as a common periodontal or endodontic lesion.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Gingival Neoplasms / pathology. Maxillary Neoplasms / pathology. Periodontal Cyst / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Maxillary Sinus Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16253104.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3492
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of periodontology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Periodontol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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46. Boneschi V, Parafioriti A, Armiraglio E, Gaiani F, Brambilla L: Primary giant cell tumor of soft tissue of the groin - a case of 46 years duration. J Cutan Pathol; 2009 Oct;36 Suppl 1:20-4
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  • [Title] Primary giant cell tumor of soft tissue of the groin - a case of 46 years duration.
  • BACKGROUND: Soft tissue giant cell tumor (GCT-ST) of low malignant potential is an uncommon neoplasm, considered the soft tissue counterpart of giant cell tumor of bone.
  • Histologically, this tumor is characterized by a mixture of uniformly scattered osteoclast-like multinucleated giant cells intimately admixed with short fascicles of spindled cells.
  • Complete excision with negative surgical margins is associated with a benign clinical course in most cases.
  • RESULTS: Histologically, the tumor was characterized by a multinodular growth pattern with osteoclast-like multinucleated giant cells admixed with spindle cells partially arranged in a storiform pattern, fibrosis and foci of haemorrhage and mature bone.
  • CONCLUSION: GCT-ST is a rare neoplasm characterized by benign clinical course if excised adequately, as shown by our case of exceptionally long duration.
  • Emphasis is placed on the importance of differential diagnosis with other giant cell-rich soft tissue neoplasms because clinical behaviour, prognosis and treatment significantly differ.
  • [MeSH-major] Giant Cell Tumors / pathology. Groin / pathology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 19222697.001).
  • [ISSN] 1600-0560
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cutaneous pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cutan. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic; 0 / CD68 antigen, human
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47. Lehnhardt M, Daigeler A, Homann HH, Hauser J, Langer S, Steinsträsser L, Soimaru C, Puls A, Steinau HU: [Importance of specialized centers in diagnosis and treatment of extremity-soft tissue sarcomas. Review of 603 cases]. Chirurg; 2009 Apr;80(4):341-7
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  • [Title] [Importance of specialized centers in diagnosis and treatment of extremity-soft tissue sarcomas. Review of 603 cases].
  • Correct histopathologic diagnosis is essential for adequate treatment of soft tissue sarcomas.
  • Due to the disorder's rarity, multitude of subgroups, sometimes varying histopathologic appearance, and occasionally inadequate biopsy specimens, diagnosis and grading are challenging.
  • The records of 603 patients with soft tissue tumors of the extremities were reviewed concerning mismatches in primary and definite diagnoses relating to entity, evaluation of primary or recurrent tumor specimens, and the diagnosing pathology institution.
  • For optimal treatment of soft tissue sarcomas, we suggest obtaining expert second opinion to ensure adequate surgical therapy and precise indications for radiation and chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Cancer Care Facilities. Extremities / surgery. Hospitals, Special. Hospitals, University. Sarcoma / diagnosis. Sarcoma / surgery. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / diagnosis. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Combined Modality Therapy. Diagnostic Errors. Female. Germany. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / diagnosis. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / pathology. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / surgery. Humans. Leiomyosarcoma / diagnosis. Leiomyosarcoma / pathology. Leiomyosarcoma / surgery. Liposarcoma / diagnosis. Liposarcoma / pathology. Liposarcoma / surgery. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Nerve Sheath Neoplasms / diagnosis. Nerve Sheath Neoplasms / pathology. Nerve Sheath Neoplasms / surgery. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Referral and Consultation. Retrospective Studies. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 18523742.001).
  • [ISSN] 1433-0385
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Chirurg; Zeitschrift fur alle Gebiete der operativen Medizen
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chirurg
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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48. Horvai AE, Kramer MJ, Garcia JJ, O'Donnell RJ: Distribution and prognostic significance of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression in giant-cell tumor of bone. Mod Pathol; 2008 Apr;21(4):423-30
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  • [Title] Distribution and prognostic significance of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression in giant-cell tumor of bone.
  • Giant-cell tumor of bone is considered a benign, locally aggressive and rarely metastasizing neoplasm of bone.
  • However, recent evidence suggests that activity of the telomerase enzyme complex correlates with recurrence in giant-cell tumor, although the subset of cells with telomerase activity in these heterogeneous tumors has not been defined.
  • In the present study, we investigated whether immunostaining for human telomerase reverse transcriptase, a component of the telomerase complex, correlates with outcome in giant-cell tumor and the distribution of telomerase reverse transcriptase staining in these tumors.
  • We analyzed 58 cases of giant-cell tumor for the presence and pattern of telomerase reverse transcriptase immunostaining, presence of soft tissue involvement and the type of initial surgery, and correlated these findings with recurrence-free survival and metastasis-free survival.
  • Furthermore, positive telomerase reverse transcriptase immunohistochemistry correlated with recurrence-free survival (P=0.02), whereas the presence of soft tissue extension (P=0.3) and the type of initial surgery (P=0.2) did not.
  • Only soft-tissue extension significantly correlated with metastasis-free survival (P=0.003).
  • Therefore, telomerase reverse transcriptase expression may predict recurrence in giant-cell tumor insofar as positive immunostaining correlates with shorter recurrence-free survival and may be a useful prognostic marker to stratify patients to more aggressive treatment protocols.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Bone Neoplasms / enzymology. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone / enzymology. Telomerase / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 18204433.001).
  • [ISSN] 0893-3952
  • [Journal-full-title] Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mod. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; EC 2.7.7.49 / TERT protein, human; EC 2.7.7.49 / Telomerase
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49. Jeon DG, Lee SY, Kim JW: Bone primary sarcomas undergone unplanned intralesional procedures - the possibility of limb salvage and their oncologic results. J Surg Oncol; 2006 Dec 1;94(7):592-8
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  • [Title] Bone primary sarcomas undergone unplanned intralesional procedures - the possibility of limb salvage and their oncologic results.
  • BACKGROUND: It is quite rare but some primary sarcomas of the bone can be misdiagnosed as benign and be treated using intralesional procedures.
  • An unplanned surgical excision occurs when tumors are removed without the appropriate preoperative evaluation and consideration for the need to obtain tumor-free margins.
  • Residual tumor tissue as a result of unplanned excision of soft tissue sarcoma is a risk factor for local recurrence.
  • There were 22 (88%) cases of osteosarcomas, 2 (8%) MFH of bone and 1 (4%) adamantinoma.
  • Limb salvage procedures are worthwhile in cases whose initial radiographic findings simulate benign lesions, showing favorable response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Limb Salvage. Osteosarcoma / surgery. Sarcoma / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Curettage. Female. Humans. Lower Extremity / surgery. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / mortality. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / surgery. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome


50. Zafatayeff-Hasbani S, Ducou Le Pointe H, Josset P, Damsin JP, Montagne JP: Intra-articular recurrence of benign chondroblastoma with articular involvement at initial presentation--a case report. Eur J Pediatr Surg; 2006 Aug;16(4):291-3
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  • [Title] Intra-articular recurrence of benign chondroblastoma with articular involvement at initial presentation--a case report.
  • Intra-articular and soft tissue recurrence occurred after treatment consisting of curettage and bone grafting.
  • Although the incidence of local intraosseous recurrence of chondroblastoma is relatively high, intra-articular and soft tissue implantation is rare and is usually due to intra-articular spillage during surgery.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Chondrosarcoma / pathology. Tibia
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Curettage. Epiphyses / pathology. Humans. Knee Joint. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Neoplasm Seeding. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16981100.001).
  • [ISSN] 0939-7248
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of pediatric surgery : official journal of Austrian Association of Pediatric Surgery ... [et al] = Zeitschrift für Kinderchirurgie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Pediatr Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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51. Weber KL, Peabody T, Frassica FJ, Mott MP, Parsons TW 3rd: Tumors for the general orthopedist: how to save your patients and practice. Instr Course Lect; 2010;59:579-91
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  • It is likely that most orthopaedic surgeons will see a patient with a benign or malignant musculoskeletal tumor sometime during their career.
  • However, because of the rarity of these entities, many surgeons may benefit from a review of how to evaluate a patient with a bone lesion or soft-tissue mass.
  • A logical approach is necessary in evaluating imaging studies as well as in the workup of children and adults with a possible tumor.
  • If the treatment algorithms lead to a conclusive diagnosis of a benign bone tumor, benign soft-tissue mass, or metastatic bone disease, the orthopaedic surgeon may choose to definitively treat the patient.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / diagnosis. Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Cysts / diagnosis. Joint Diseases / pathology. Orthopedics. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 20415407.001).
  • [ISSN] 0065-6895
  • [Journal-full-title] Instructional course lectures
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Instr Course Lect
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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52. Rehders A, Stoecklein NH, Poremba C, Alexander A, Knoefel WT, Peiper M: Reexcision of soft tissue sarcoma: sufficient local control but increased rate of metastasis. World J Surg; 2009 Dec;33(12):2599-605
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  • [Title] Reexcision of soft tissue sarcoma: sufficient local control but increased rate of metastasis.
  • BACKGROUND: Assuming a benign tumor, soft tissue sarcomas are often treated by inadequate resection.
  • Therefore, it was our goal to evaluate the results of this treatment with particular respect to residual tumor.
  • The assessed endpoints were local recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and tumor-related mortality.
  • Residual tumor was detected in 43 patients (31%) and was significantly associated with reduced relapse-free and overall survival.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Despite an incomplete initial resection, reexcision enables local control similar to that in patients without residual tumor.
  • Still, these patients have a worse prognosis owing to an increased rate of distant metastasis; therefore, patients with soft tissue masses of unknown identity should be transferred to centers that specialize in treating sarcomas for adequate initial resection.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Neoplasm, Residual / surgery. Sarcoma / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Reoperation. Survival Analysis. Young Adult

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  • [ErratumIn] World J Surg. 2010 Aug;34(8):1991
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  • (PMID = 19838751.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-2323
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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53. Mangal N, Sharma VK, Verma N, Agarwal AK, Sharma SP, Aneja S: Ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology in the diagnosis of retroperitoneal masses: A study of 85 cases. J Cytol; 2009 Jul;26(3):97-101
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  • OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to evaluate the reliability of ultrasonography (USG)-guided fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) in distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions in the retroperitoneum, and to correlate the diagnosis by cytology of retroperitoneal masses with the results obtained by histology.
  • RESULTS: Out of 85 cases, 32 were of kidney, 27 of lymph nodes, 24 of retroperitoneal soft tissues, and two were of the adrenals.
  • In the kidney, the maximum number of cases were of renal cell carcinoma (12-38%), followed by Wilm's tumor (6-19%), pyonephrosis (5-16%), renal cyst (4), angiomyolipoma (2), cortical pseudotumor (2), and tuberculosis (1).
  • Among the 24 soft tissue tumors in the study, seven (29%) were malignant and 17 (71%) were benign (lipoma being the most common benign neoplasm).
  • Two cases for which the histopathological results were inconsistent with the FNAC diagnoses, were of renal cell carcinoma, which had been diagnosed as renal cysts on cytology.

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  • (PMID = 21938165.001).
  • [ISSN] 0970-9371
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cytology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Cytol
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3168018
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Ultrasound / fine needle aspiration cytology / retroperitoneum
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54. Ozalp T, Yercan H, Okçu G, Ozdemir O, Coskunol E, Bégué T, Calli I: [Giant-cell tumor of the hand: midterm results in five patients]. Rev Chir Orthop Reparatrice Appar Mot; 2007 Dec;93(8):842-7
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  • [Title] [Giant-cell tumor of the hand: midterm results in five patients].
  • [Transliterated title] Tumeur à cellules géantes de la main: résultats du traitement: 5 cas au recul moyen de 7, 8 ans.
  • PURPOSE OF THE STUDY: Giant-cell bone tumors are benign but have great potential for recurrence.
  • We examined the characteristic features of giant-cell tumors of the hand and analyzed the pertinence of surgical treatment.
  • We noted complications, consequences of recurrence and later operations on the same tumor site in five cases.
  • CASE REPORTS: Five patients treated between 1973 and 2000 for giant-cell tumors involving the hand bones were reviewed retrospectively.
  • The surgical procedure was curettage for two, curettage with bone graft for two and amputation for one.
  • Amputation of the forearm was required for one recurrence affecting soft tissue.
  • In all six episodes of recurrent tumor were treated.
  • DISCUSSION: Treatment of giant-cell tumors involving the hand bones is designed to eradicate the tumor and also protect hand function while keeping in mind the aggressive nature of these benign tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Giant Cell Tumors / surgery. Hand Bones / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Amputation. Bone Transplantation. Curettage. Female. Finger Phalanges / surgery. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Retrospective Studies. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / surgery. Thumb / surgery. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18166957.001).
  • [ISSN] 0035-1040
  • [Journal-full-title] Revue de chirurgie orthopédique et réparatrice de l'appareil moteur
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Chir Orthop Reparatrice Appar Mot
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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55. Al-Otaibi M, Lach B, Al Shail E: December 2004: one-year-old girl with aggressive skull tumor. Brain Pathol; 2005 Apr;15(2):171-3
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  • [Title] December 2004: one-year-old girl with aggressive skull tumor.
  • December 2004. Twelve-month old girl presented with recurrent subcutaneous lesion in the left parietal region, one year after excision of a "benign" tumor.
  • An MRI demonstrated left temporo-parietal skull tumor infiltrating the soft tissue, surrounding craniotomy flap, and extending to the brain parenchyma.
  • Biopsy revealed biphasic neoplasm displaying nests of poorly differentiated neuroblastic cells positive for synaptophysin and pigmented cuboidal epithelioid cell positive for keratins, epithelial membrane antigen and MHB-45.
  • Interestingly, cell with the neuroblastic immunophenotype displayed 80% nuclear MIB-1 reactivity indicating that the aggressiveness of the neoplasm was confined mostly to this pattern of differentiation.
  • The overall histological features are consistent with a rare malignant variant of a melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Neuroectodermal Tumor, Melanotic / pathology. Parietal Bone / pathology. Skull Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Diagnosis, Differential. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Infant. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / secondary. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 15912891.001).
  • [ISSN] 1015-6305
  • [Journal-full-title] Brain pathology (Zurich, Switzerland)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Brain Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Letter
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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56. Murphey MD: World Health Organization classification of bone and soft tissue tumors: modifications and implications for radiologists. Semin Musculoskelet Radiol; 2007 Sep;11(3):201-14
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  • [Title] World Health Organization classification of bone and soft tissue tumors: modifications and implications for radiologists.
  • The working group of the World Health Organization (WHO) for classification of tumors of soft tissue and bone met in 2002.
  • The consensus of this conference led to modifications in the nomenclature primarily for soft tissue neoplasm, leaving osseous tumors largely unaltered.
  • The WHO suggested replacement of the term MALIGNANT FIBROUS HISTIOCYTOMA (MFH) with undifferentiated high-grade pleomorphic sarcoma and combining myxoid and round cell liposarcoma under the umbrella of myxoid liposarcoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / classification. Diagnostic Imaging. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / classification. World Health Organization
  • [MeSH-minor] Fibrosarcoma / classification. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / classification. Humans. Liposarcoma / classification. Terminology as Topic


57. Behzatoğlu K, Durak H, Canberk S, Aydin O, Huq GE, Oznur M, Ozyalvaçli G, Yildiz P: Giant cell tumor-like lesion of the urinary bladder: a report of two cases and literature review; giant cell tumor or undifferentiated carcinoma? Diagn Pathol; 2009;4:48
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  • [Title] Giant cell tumor-like lesion of the urinary bladder: a report of two cases and literature review; giant cell tumor or undifferentiated carcinoma?
  • Giant cell tumor, excluding its prototype in bone, is usually a benign but local aggressive neoplasm originating from tendon sheath or soft tissue.
  • Giant cell tumors in visceral organs usually accompany epithelial tumors and the clinical behavior of giant cell tumor in urinary bladder is similar to its bone counterpart.
  • Here, we report two cases of giant cell tumor located in urinary bladder in comparison with nine reported cases in the English literature.
  • One of the two cases we present had no concurrent urothelial tumor at the time of diagnosis but had a history of a low grade noninvasive urothelial carcinoma with three recurrences.
  • The histology of these two cases was similar to the giant cell tumor of bone and composed of oval to spindle mononuclear cells with evenly spaced osteoclast-like giant cells.
  • Immunohistochemical expression of vimentin, CD68, LCA, and smooth muscle actin in mononuclear cells supported a mesenchymal origin with histiocytic lineage.
  • The histologic and immunohistochemical properties in our cases as well as their clinical courses were consistent with a giant cell tumor.
  • Consequently, tumors in urinary bladder showing features of giant cell tumor of bone may also be considered and termed "giant cell tumor".

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  • (PMID = 20043822.001).
  • [ISSN] 1746-1596
  • [Journal-full-title] Diagnostic pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Diagn Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2811699
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58. Yu H, Li H, Wang CF, Zhu XZ: [Low-grade central osteosarcoma: a clinicopathologic analysis of nine cases]. Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi; 2010 Nov;39(11):762-6
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  • Radiologic examination showed mixed lytic/blastic lesions with soft tissue shadow in 5 cases and associated periosteal reaction in 3 cases.
  • The spindly tumor cells showed mild degree of nuclear pleomorphism, with occasional mitotic figures demonstrated in all of the 9 cases.
  • The newly formed neoplastic woven bone did not have any osteoblastic rimming.
  • Parallel arrays of woven bone were seen in 6 cases.
  • The tumor cells permeated adjoining pre-existing bony trabeculae and bone marrow in all cases.
  • Three cases also showed soft tissue involvement.
  • CONCLUSIONS: LGCOS often posses important diagnostic pitfalls due to the relatively bland-looking tumor cell morphology and associated large woven or longitudinal seams of lamellar-like bone.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Osteosarcoma / pathology. Thigh
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Fibrous Dysplasia of Bone / pathology. Fibula / radiography. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / pathology. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Reoperation. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 21215168.001).
  • [ISSN] 0529-5807
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua bing li xue za zhi = Chinese journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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59. Marshall AE, Martin SE, Agaram NP, Chen JH, Horn EM, Douglas-Akinwande AC, Hattab EM: A 61-year-old woman with osteomalacia and a thoracic spine lesion. Brain Pathol; 2010 Mar;20(2):499-502
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  • Phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor, mixed connective tissue variant (PMT-MCT) is a rare, largely benign, mesenchymal neoplasm almost invariably associated with oncogenic osteomalacia.
  • It is generally found in the soft tissue and bone of the extremities.
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Middle Aged. Neoplasms, Complex and Mixed / complications. Neoplasms, Complex and Mixed / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Complex and Mixed / pathology. Neoplasms, Connective Tissue / complications. Neoplasms, Connective Tissue / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Connective Tissue / pathology

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  • (PMID = 20438469.001).
  • [ISSN] 1750-3639
  • [Journal-full-title] Brain pathology (Zurich, Switzerland)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Brain Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Letter
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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60. Rubin BP, Fletcher CD, Inwards C, Montag AG, Peabody T, Qualman SJ, Rosenberg AE, Weiss S, Krausz T, College of American Pathologists: Protocol for the examination of specimens from patients with soft tissue tumors of intermediate malignant potential, malignant soft tissue tumors, and benign/locally aggressive and malignant bone tumors. Arch Pathol Lab Med; 2006 Nov;130(11):1616-29
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  • [Title] Protocol for the examination of specimens from patients with soft tissue tumors of intermediate malignant potential, malignant soft tissue tumors, and benign/locally aggressive and malignant bone tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Neoplasm Metastasis / pathology. Neoplasm Staging

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  • [CommentIn] Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2007 May;131(5):680-1; author reply 681-2 [17488149.001]
  • (PMID = 17076523.001).
  • [ISSN] 1543-2165
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of pathology & laboratory medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Practice Guideline
  • [Publication-country] United States
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61. McGough RL, Rutledge J, Lewis VO, Lin PP, Yasko AW: Impact severity of local recurrence in giant cell tumor of bone. Clin Orthop Relat Res; 2005 Sep;438:116-22
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  • [Title] Impact severity of local recurrence in giant cell tumor of bone.
  • We retrospectively reviewed 183 consecutive patients diagnosed with giant cell tumor at the three most common sites (distal femur, proximal tibia, and distal radius) to determine the pattern of local tumor recurrence and the impact severity of the recurrence on adjacent joint function.
  • The primary tumor was treated in all patients with intralesional excision of tumor by curettage.
  • The intrainstitutional recurrences were salvaged by a repeat curettage (n = 12) or en bloc osteoarticular resection (n = 10) for bone recurrences and wide local excision for soft tissue recurrence (n = 1).
  • The prereferral recurrences were salvaged by a repeat curettage (n = 7) and en bloc osteoarticular resection (n = 15) for bone recurrences.
  • Incomplete initial surgery, a delay in diagnosis of the recurrence of greater than 6 months, and subchondral recurrence of tumor were contributing factors in the failure to salvage the joint.
  • Despite its benign histology, giant cell tumor of bone is an aggressive tumor that demands meticulous attention to surgical detail and close postoperative surveillance for successful local tumor control and durable, joint-preserving function.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local

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  • (PMID = 16131879.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-921X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical orthopaedics and related research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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62. Alrahwan D, Staerkel G, Gong Y: Fine needle aspiration cytology of a metastatic duct carcinoma of the prostate: a case report. Acta Cytol; 2006 Jul-Aug;50(4):469-72
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  • Without proper clinical information, a fine needle aspiration (FNA) diagnosis of metastatic PDC can be challenging as this tumor can morphologically mimic adenocarcinomas from other sites.
  • CASE: An 85-year-old man presented with a large, destructive pelvic bone lesion with soft tissue extension.
  • He had undergone a prostatectomy 30 years earlier for "benign prostatic hypertrophy" but had no known history of malignancy.
  • The aspirates were hypercellular and composed of numerous monolayered or folded cohesive sheets of tumor cells with minimal cytologic atypia.
  • The tumor cells had abundant, clear cytoplasm, evenly spaced nuclei, finely granular chromatin, inconspicuous nucleoli and occasional mitotic figures.
  • Cell block sections revealed tumor cells forming tubulopapillary architecture lined with tall columnar cells with focal nuclear pseudostratification, reminiscent of uterine endometrial carcinoma.
  • Positive immunoreactivity for prostate-specific antigen and prostatic acid phosphatase confirmed the tumor's prostatic origin.
  • CONCLUSION: Because of the rarity and nonspecific cytomorphologic characteristics of this tumor, clinical history, radiologic findings and a high index of suspicion in conjunction with ancillary studies are important in achieving a correct FNA diagnosis of metastatic PDC.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged, 80 and over. Biopsy, Fine-Needle. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Metastasis. Pelvic Bones / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16901017.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-5547
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta cytologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Cytol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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63. Yamaguchi T, Watanabe-Ishiiwa H, Suzuki S, Igarashi Y, Ueda Y: Incipient chordoma: a report of two cases of early-stage chordoma arising from benign notochordal cell tumors. Mod Pathol; 2005 Jul;18(7):1005-10
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  • [Title] Incipient chordoma: a report of two cases of early-stage chordoma arising from benign notochordal cell tumors.
  • Chordomas are rare malignant bone tumors primarily involving both ends of the axial skeleton that present as destructive bone lesions with a large soft tissue mass.
  • However, recent studies suggest the possibility that chordomas arise from benign notochordal cell tumors.
  • The intraosseous lesions consisted of both benign notochordal cell tumor and incipient chordoma.
  • In addition, two other small benign notochordal cell tumors were found at a different level in case 1.
  • It is conceivable that pre-existing intraosseous benign notochordal cell tumors transform into incipient chordoma and then extend through the cortex into the surrounding soft tissue.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / complications. Coccyx. Fatal Outcome. Humans. Liver Neoplasms / complications. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Notochord / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / complications

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  • (PMID = 15803192.001).
  • [ISSN] 0893-3952
  • [Journal-full-title] Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mod. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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64. Klenke FM, Merkle T, Fellenberg J, Abdollahi A, Huber PE, Gebhard MM, Ewerbeck V, Sckell A: A novel model for the investigation of orthotopically growing primary and secondary bone tumours using intravital microscopy. Lab Anim; 2005 Oct;39(4):377-83
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  • [Title] A novel model for the investigation of orthotopically growing primary and secondary bone tumours using intravital microscopy.
  • Here is reported the development of an experimental model using intravital microscopy as a tool to orthotopically investigate malignant bone tumours.
  • Although up to 85% of the most frequently occurring malignant solid tumours, such as lung and prostate carcinomas, metastasize into the bone, and despite the knowledge that a tumour's course may be altered by its surrounding tissue, there is no adequate experimental model available enabling the investigation of orthotopically grown bone tumours in vivo.
  • Intravital microscopy is an internationally accepted experimental method, used in various acute and chronic animal models, that enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of the angiogenesis, microcirculation, growth behaviour, etc. of various benign and malignant tissues.
  • Additionally, tissue samples can be taken after termination of the in vivo experiments for further ex vivo investigation (histology, immunohistochemistry, molecular biology, etc.
  • Histological assessment confirmed the data obtained in vivo, showing typical tumour growth with infiltration of the surrounding osseous and soft tissues.
  • This novel model serves as a valuable tool in understanding the biology of primary and secondary bone tumours in physiological and pathophysiological situations, with implications for the most areas of tumour therapy such as chemotherapy, radiation and antiangiogenesis.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / pathology. Osteosarcoma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Male. Mice. Mice, SCID. Microscopy, Fluorescence. Microscopy, Video. Neoplasm Transplantation. Neovascularization, Pathologic / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16197704.001).
  • [ISSN] 0023-6772
  • [Journal-full-title] Laboratory animals
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lab. Anim.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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65. Folk GS, Williams SB, Foss RB, Fanburg-Smith JC: Oral and maxillofacial sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma: report of five cases. Head Neck Pathol; 2007 Sep;1(1):13-20
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  • Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) has distinctive morphology and occurs mainly in deep soft tissue of adult extremities.
  • The OMF Pathology Department Registry was searched for cases coded from 1990 to the present as "SEF," "fibrosarcoma not otherwise specified" or "neoplasm of uncertain histiogenesis."
  • Tumor location included the infra-temporal fossa, buccal mucosa (recurrence extending into bone), anterior mandible (intraosseous primary, focally extending into soft tissue), and left parotid and submandibular gland (with metaplastic bone) regions.
  • Tumor sizes ranged from 1.0 to 5.7 cm, median 3.5 cm.
  • The spindled to primarily epithelioid tumor cells formed moderately cellular sheets and cords of irregularly contoured medium to large, round to oval, occasionally overlapping nuclei, indistinct nucleoli, wispy eosinophilic (retracting) cytoplasm, and distinctive cytoplasmic borders, embedded in osteoid-like stroma.
  • Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for vimentin, 1 case focally for CD34, whereas all cases were negative for S100 protein, keratins, EMA, desmin, and SMA.
  • OMFRSEF occur in adults in various locations, but with a common propensity to involve bone; there is recurrent potential and morbidity with higher grade lesions.
  • The differential diagnosis for these tumors in this site includes sclerosing carcinoma, Ewing/PNET, osteosarcoma, osteoblastoma, and benign and malignant myoepithelial salivary gland tumors.
  • The collagen, focal spindle cell features, HPC-like vasculature, and weak focal CD34 reactivity in one case might have raised a possible relationship between OMFRSEF and low grade malignant solitary fibrous tumor, but the intraosseous propensity, epithelioid features and relative lack of CD34 make this a distinctive entity.
  • [MeSH-major] Facial Bones / pathology. Fibrosarcoma / pathology. Maxilla / pathology. Mouth Neoplasms / pathology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Apoptosis. Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Diagnosis, Differential. Epithelioid Cells / metabolism. Epithelioid Cells / pathology. Female. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / diagnosis. Humans. Leiomyoma / diagnosis. Male. Middle Aged. Sclerosis. Solitary Fibrous Tumors / diagnosis. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20614275.001).
  • [ISSN] 1936-0568
  • [Journal-full-title] Head and neck pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Head Neck Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2807507
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Maxillofacial / Oral / Sarcoma / Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma
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66. Buchner M, Bernd L, Zahlten-Hinguranage A, Sabo D: [Bone and soft-tissue tumors of the foot and ankle]. Chirurg; 2005 Apr;76(4):391-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Bone and soft-tissue tumors of the foot and ankle].
  • BACKGROUND: This study reports the epidemiology of bone and soft-tissue tumors of the foot and ankle, presents therapy strategies, and evaluates mid-term clinicofunctional outcome after surgery for malignant tumors.
  • METHODS: Two hundred four patients with tumors of the foot and ankle were analyzed (163 benign and 41 malignant).
  • RESULTS: The most frequent tumors were exostosis, bone cyst, and osteoid osteoma for benign tumors and metastases and chondrosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma for malignant tumors.
  • In more than 90% of the benign tumors, local resection could be carried out, whereas in malignant tumors, ablative procedures and arthrodeses were almost as common as limb- and joint-sparing techniques.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Joint / surgery. Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Foot / surgery. Foot Diseases / surgery. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Amputation. Arthrodesis. Bone Transplantation. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Fracture Fixation, Internal. Fractures, Spontaneous / diagnosis. Fractures, Spontaneous / surgery. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 15526178.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-4722
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Chirurg; Zeitschrift fur alle Gebiete der operativen Medizen
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chirurg
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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67. Balke M, Streitbuerger A, Budny T, Henrichs M, Gosheger G, Hardes J: Treatment and outcome of giant cell tumors of the pelvis. Acta Orthop; 2009 Oct;80(5):590-6
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  • [Title] Treatment and outcome of giant cell tumors of the pelvis.
  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Giant cell tumors (GCTs) of bone rarely affect the pelvis.
  • METHODS: 20 patients with histologically benign GCT of the pelvis were included in this study.
  • RESULTS: 1 patient with a pubic tumor developed a local recurrence 1 year after intralesional resection and additional curettage of the margins.
  • The recurrence presented as a small soft tissue mass within the scar tissue of the gluteal muscles and was treated by resection.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / surgery. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone / surgery. Pelvic Bones
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Bone Cements. Bone Transplantation. Curettage. Embolization, Therapeutic / methods. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Ilium / pathology. Ilium / surgery. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / prevention & control. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19916695.001).
  • [ISSN] 1745-3682
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta orthopaedica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Orthop
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bone Cements
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2823344
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