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1. Verrey F, Singer D, Ramadan T, Vuille-dit-Bille RN, Mariotta L, Camargo SM: Kidney amino acid transport. Pflugers Arch; 2009 May;458(1):53-60
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  • [Title] Kidney amino acid transport.
  • Near complete reabsorption of filtered amino acids is a main specialized transport function of the kidney proximal tubule.
  • A number of other amino acid transporters expressed in the basolateral membrane of proximal kidney tubule cells subserve either specialized metabolic functions, such as the production of ammonium, or are part of the cellular housekeeping equipment.
  • Some mutations of B(0)AT1 differentially interact with these accessory subunits, providing an explanation for differential intestinal phenotypes among Hartnup patients.
  • The basolateral efflux of numerous amino acids from kidney tubular cells is mediated by heteromeric amino acid transporters that function as obligatory exchangers.
  • [MeSH-major] Amino Acid Transport Systems / metabolism. Amino Acids / metabolism. Kidney / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Acid Transport Systems, Neutral / metabolism. Amino Acid Transport Systems, Neutral / physiology. Animals. Anion Transport Proteins / physiology. Antiporters / physiology. Biological Transport. Humans. Kidney Tubules, Proximal / physiology

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  • (PMID = 19184091.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-2013
  • [Journal-full-title] Pflugers Archiv : European journal of physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pflugers Arch.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Amino Acid Transport Systems; 0 / Amino Acid Transport Systems, Neutral; 0 / Amino Acids; 0 / Anion Transport Proteins; 0 / Antiporters; 0 / SLC26A8 protein, human; 0 / SLC6A19 protein, human
  • [Number-of-references] 60
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2. Zhou Y, Vaidya VS, Brown RP, Zhang J, Rosenzweig BA, Thompson KL, Miller TJ, Bonventre JV, Goering PL: Comparison of kidney injury molecule-1 and other nephrotoxicity biomarkers in urine and kidney following acute exposure to gentamicin, mercury, and chromium. Toxicol Sci; 2008 Jan;101(1):159-70
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  • [Title] Comparison of kidney injury molecule-1 and other nephrotoxicity biomarkers in urine and kidney following acute exposure to gentamicin, mercury, and chromium.
  • Sensitive biomarkers are needed to detect kidney injury at the earliest stages.
  • The objective of this study was to determine whether the appearance of kidney injury molecule-1 (Kim-1) protein ectodomain in urine and kidney injury molecule-1/hepatitis A viral cellular receptor-1 (Kim-1/Havcr1) gene expression in kidney tissue may be more predictive of renal injury after exposure to nephrotoxicants when compared to traditionally used biomarkers.
  • The results showed that increases in urinary Kim-1 and kidney Kim-1/Havcr1 gene expression paralleled the degree of severity of renal histopathology and were detected at lower doses of nephrotoxicants when compared to blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine, and urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG).
  • Urinary Kim-1 and kidney Kim-1/Havcr1 expression appear to be sensitive and tissue-specific biomarkers that will improve detection of early acute kidney injury following exposure to nephrotoxic chemicals and drugs.

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  • (PMID = 17934191.001).
  • [ISSN] 1096-6080
  • [Journal-full-title] Toxicological sciences : an official journal of the Society of Toxicology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Toxicol. Sci.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK 072831; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / ES016723-02; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R37 DK039773; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK 074099; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK072381-04; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK072381; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R33 DK074099; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / R00 ES016723-02; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK 039773; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R21 DK074099; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / R00 ES016723; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK039773; None / None / / R01 DK072381-04
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Cell Adhesion Molecules; 0 / Gentamicins; 0 / Havcr1protein, rat; 0 / Membrane Proteins; 0 / Protein Synthesis Inhibitors; 0R0008Q3JB / Chromium; 63231-63-0 / RNA; 7535-00-4 / Galactosamine; FXS1BY2PGL / Mercury; V956696549 / Acetylglucosamine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS110357; NLM/ PMC2744478
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3. Cindolo L, Berardinelli F, Gidaro S, Schips L: Laparoendoscopic single-site partial nephrectomy without ischemia. J Endourol; 2010 Dec;24(12):1997-2002
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  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) ensures excellent oncologic and functional outcomes in small renal masses.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: From April to September 2009, all consecutive patients with solitary, exophytic, enhancing, small (≤4.0 cm) renal masses and normal contralateral kidney were selected to receive LESS unclamp-NSS.
  • Rigid and articulable instruments were used for dissection, tumor exposure, and excision under normal renal perfusion.
  • RESULTS: Six patients underwent LESS unclamp-NSS (mean operative time, 148 min; mean blood loss, 201 mL; mean renal masses size, 2.1cm).
  • Pathologic examination revealed two clear-cell carcinoma, three benign cysts, and one angiomyolipoma (surgical margin positive).
  • CONCLUSION: LESS unclamp-NSS in selected renal masses is feasible, provides postoperative outcomes overlapping the standard counterpart, and ensures subjective satisfaction.

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  • (PMID = 20964485.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-900X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of endourology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Endourol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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4. Resende L, Guerra J, Santana A, Mil-Homens C, Abreu F, da Costa AG: Influence of dialysis duration and modality on kidney transplant outcomes. Transplant Proc; 2009 Apr;41(3):837-9
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  • [Title] Influence of dialysis duration and modality on kidney transplant outcomes.
  • BACKGROUND: The influence of pretransplantation dialysis on kidney transplant outcomes has been the subject of longstanding interest.
  • Although increased time on dialysis prior to kidney transplantation is associated with decreased graft and patient survivals, analyses of the impact of dialysis modality on kidney allograft outcome have produced conflicting results.
  • OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of dialysis duration and modality on the function and survival of renal allografts.
  • PATIENTS: We retrospectively reviewed the clinical data of 421 adults who received first kidney transplantations from cadaveric heart-beating donors performed in our unit from May 1989 to May 2007.
  • Three hundred seventy-four patients (88.8%) were on hemodialysis (HD) prior to kidney transplantation, including 247 patients (58.7%) on treatment for at least 24 months.
  • Renal function at 3, 12, 60, and 96 months was similar between the 2 groups.
  • No differences were observed in renal function or graft and patient survivals comparing HD or peritoneal dialysis (PD).
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Failure, Chronic / surgery. Kidney Transplantation / physiology. Renal Dialysis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Age Factors. Female. Graft Survival. Humans. Kidney Function Tests. Living Donors. Male. Middle Aged. Postoperative Complications / epidemiology. Retrospective Studies. Sex Characteristics. Survival Analysis. Survivors. Time Factors. Tissue Donors / supply & distribution. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19376365.001).
  • [ISSN] 0041-1345
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplant. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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5. Casas-Aparicio G, Castillo-Martínez L, Orea-Tejeda A, Abasta-Jiménez M, Keirns-Davies C, Rebollar-González V: The effect of successful kidney transplantation on ventricular dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension. Transplant Proc; 2010 Nov;42(9):3524-8
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  • [Title] The effect of successful kidney transplantation on ventricular dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension.
  • BACKGROUND: Heart disease is a frequent complication of chronic kidney disease and the major cause of death in patients on renal replacement therapy.
  • The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of successful kidney transplantation on systolic and diastolic ventricular dysfunction and pulmonary arterial hypertension in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD).
  • METHODS: The study included 35 patients >18 years of age with CKD who had successful kidney transplantations.
  • The LVEF of the entire group increased from 52% to 64% (P < .001) by 12 months after kidney transplant.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Because kidney transplantation led to considerable improvement in left ventricular systolic and diastolic function as well as pulmonary arterial pressure of patients with CKD, optimal treatment for dysfunction and transplant as soon as possible is recommended.
  • [MeSH-major] Hypertension, Pulmonary / etiology. Kidney Failure, Chronic / surgery. Kidney Transplantation. Ventricular Dysfunction, Left / etiology


6. Canales MT, Kasiske BL, Rosenberg ME: Transplant tourism: Outcomes of United States residents who undergo kidney transplantation overseas. Transplantation; 2006 Dec 27;82(12):1658-61
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  • [Title] Transplant tourism: Outcomes of United States residents who undergo kidney transplantation overseas.
  • BACKGROUND: Although international commerce in kidney transplantation is a reality, little is known about U.S. residents who travel abroad for kidney transplantation.
  • METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcomes of patients who were evaluated at the University of Minnesota Medical Center or Hennepin County Medical Center, but then surreptitiously underwent kidney transplantation overseas.
  • RESULTS: We identified 10 patients who underwent kidney transplantation outside the United States between September 16, 2002 and June 30, 2006 and then returned for care in our programs.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Kidney function and graft survival were generally good after surreptitious overseas kidney transplantation.
  • [MeSH-major] Graft Survival. Kidney Transplantation. Travel


7. Mosconi G, Panicali L, Persici E, Conte D, Cappuccilli ML, Cuna V, Capelli I, Todeschini P, D'Arcangelo GL, Stefoni S: Native kidney function after renal transplantation combined with other solid organs in preemptive patients. Transplant Proc; 2010 May;42(4):1017-20
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  • [Title] Native kidney function after renal transplantation combined with other solid organs in preemptive patients.
  • Kidney transplantations combined with other solid organs are progressively increasing in number.
  • There are no guidelines regarding the nephrologic indications for combined transplantations, namely liver-kidney (LKT), or heart-kidney (HKT), in preemptive patients with chronic kidney failure who are not on regular dialysis therapy.
  • The objective of this study was to assess the functional contribution of the native kidneys after preemptive kidney transplantation combined with other solid organs.
  • From 2004, 9 patients (aged 50.3 +/- 8.5 years) with chronic kidney failure (creatinine 2.5 +/- 1.0 mg/dL) caused by polycystic kidney disease (n = 4), vascular nephropathy (n = 2), interstitial nephropathy (n = 1), glomerulonephritis (n = 1), or end-stage kidney disease (n = 1), underwent combined transplantations (8 LKT, 1 HKT).
  • A scintigraphic functional study (Tc-99DMSA or Tc-99mMAG3), was performed at 4 +/- 3 months after transplantation to evaluate the functional contribution of both the native kidneys and the graft.
  • At the time of scintigraphy, renal function in all patients was 1.3 +/- 0.3 mg/dL.
  • The functional contribution of the transplanted kidneys was on average 77 +/- 18%.
  • At follow-up after 36 months, patient and kidney survivals were 100%.
  • The study confirmed a high risk of loss of native kidney function in the presence of organic nephropathy.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Transplantation / physiology. Organ Transplantation / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Creatinine / blood. Female. Glomerular Filtration Rate. Heart Transplantation / physiology. Humans. Kidney Diseases / classification. Kidney Diseases / surgery. Kidney Failure, Chronic / surgery. Kidney Function Tests. Liver Transplantation / physiology. Male. Middle Aged. Polycystic Kidney Diseases / surgery

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  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • (PMID = 20534213.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-2623
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplant. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine
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8. Jiang JC, Li CG, Liang QQ, Bian Q, Zhou Q, Cui XJ, Huang M, Liu QG, Lu S, Zhou CJ, Shi Q, Wang YJ: [Establishment of a rat model of cervical syndrome with kidney deficiency]. Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao; 2008 Oct;6(10):1034-9
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  • [Title] [Establishment of a rat model of cervical syndrome with kidney deficiency].
  • OBJECTIVE: To establish a rat model of cervical syndrome (CS) with kidney deficiency.
  • METHODS: A group of 30 three-month-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into normal control group, CS group and CS with kidney deficiency group (combined group), with 10 rats in each group.
  • Rats in the normal control group received no treatment, rats in the CS group underwent only resection of cervical muscles and ligaments as unbalanced dynamic and static animal model, and rats in combined group underwent resection of both cervical muscles and ovaries as kidney deficiency model.
  • Kidney deficiency was determined by observing the morphologic changes of uterus and appendages, detecting the weight of uterus and appendages and the content of serum estradiol (E(2)).
  • CONCLUSION: The rat model of CS with kidney deficiency is established.
  • Kidney deficiency can aggravate cervical intervertebral disc degeneration.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Female. Kidney Diseases. Ovariectomy. Random Allocation. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley

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  • (PMID = 18847538.001).
  • [ISSN] 1672-1977
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhong xi yi jie he xue bao = Journal of Chinese integrative medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
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9. El-Agroudy AE, Sabry AA, Wafa EW, Neamatalla AH, Ismail AM, Mohsen T, Khalil AA, Shokeir AA, Ghoneim MA: Long-term follow-up of living kidney donors: a longitudinal study. BJU Int; 2007 Dec;100(6):1351-5
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  • [Title] Long-term follow-up of living kidney donors: a longitudinal study.
  • OBJECTIVE: To analyse retrospectively the general health status and renal and cardiovascular consequences of living-related kidney donation, as the long-term effects of unilateral nephrectomy for kidney donation are of particular interest with the currently increasing practice of living-donor transplantation.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Living-related kidney donors (1400) who had donated their kidneys between 1976 and 2002 were asked to attend a dedicated donor follow-up clinic starting in 2004.
  • We attempted to contact all donors to determine the long-term outcome of their remaining kidney.
  • All kidney donors who responded had a detailed assessment, and were questioned about rehabilitation and their feelings on donating a kidney.
  • [MeSH-major] Health Status. Kidney. Living Donors. Nephrectomy / adverse effects. Tissue and Organ Harvesting / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 17941927.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-410X
  • [Journal-full-title] BJU international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BJU Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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10. Kestenbaum B, Rudser KD, de Boer IH, Peralta CA, Fried LF, Shlipak MG, Palmas W, Stehman-Breen C, Siscovick DS: Differences in kidney function and incident hypertension: the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis. Ann Intern Med; 2008 Apr 1;148(7):501-8
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  • [Title] Differences in kidney function and incident hypertension: the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.
  • BACKGROUND: Kidney disease and hypertension commonly coexist, yet the direction of their association is still debated.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether early kidney dysfunction, measured by serum cystatin C levels and urinary albumin excretion, predates hypertension in adults without clinically recognized kidney or cardiovascular disease.
  • PARTICIPANTS: 2767 MESA participants without prevalent hypertension, cardiovascular disease, or clinically recognized kidney disease (an estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min per 1.73 m2 or microalbuminuria).
  • LIMITATIONS: Unmeasured characteristics may have confounded observed associations of kidney markers with hypertension.
  • CONCLUSION: Differences in kidney function, indicated by cystatin C levels, are associated with incident hypertension among individuals without clinical kidney or cardiovascular disease.
  • These population-based findings complement experimental work implicating early kidney damage in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension.

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  • (PMID = 18378946.001).
  • [ISSN] 1539-3704
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of internal medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Intern. Med.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HC / N01-HC-95162; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HC / N01-HC-95163; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / N01HC95169; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HC / N01-HC-95159; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / KL2 RR025015-01; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HC / N01-HC-95165; United States / NCATS NIH HHS / TR / TL1 TR000422; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HC / N01-HC-95169; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HC / N01-HC-95164; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / N01HC95165; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / N01HC95159; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HC / N01-HC-95160; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / K23 DK63274-01; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / KL2 RR025015; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HC / N01-HC-95161; United States / NCATS NIH HHS / TR / UL1 TR000423; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / K23 DK063274
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CST3 protein, human; 0 / Cystatin C; 0 / Cystatins; AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS267500; NLM/ PMC3044648
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11. Ranganathan N, Ranganathan P, Friedman EA, Joseph A, Delano B, Goldfarb DS, Tam P, Rao AV, Anteyi E, Musso CG: Pilot study of probiotic dietary supplementation for promoting healthy kidney function in patients with chronic kidney disease. Adv Ther; 2010 Sep;27(9):634-47
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  • [Title] Pilot study of probiotic dietary supplementation for promoting healthy kidney function in patients with chronic kidney disease.
  • INTRODUCTION: Uremic syndrome consists of nitrogenous waste retention, deficiency in kidney-derived hormones, and reduced acid excretion, and, if untreated, may progress to coma and eventual death.
  • Previous experience suggests that oral administration of a probiotic formulation of selected microbial strains may extend renoprotection via intraintestinal extraction of toxic waste solutes in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD)stages 3 and 4.
  • [MeSH-major] Probiotics. Renal Insufficiency, Chronic / therapy. Uremia / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Argentina. Canada. Creatinine / analysis. Dietary Supplements / standards. Disease Progression. Double-Blind Method. Female. Humans. Kidney Function Tests. Male. Middle Aged. Nigeria. Pilot Projects. Protective Agents / pharmacokinetics. Quality of Life. Self Report. Treatment Outcome. United States. Uric Acid / analysis. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20721651.001).
  • [ISSN] 1865-8652
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Protective Agents; 268B43MJ25 / Uric Acid; AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine
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12. Veroux M, Corona D, Giuffrida G, Gagliano M, Vizcarra D, Tallarita T, Zerbo D, Giaquinta A, Sorbello M, Macarone M, Veroux P: Sirolimus-based immunosuppression in kidney transplantation for type 2 diabetic nephropathy. Urol Int; 2010;84(3):301-4
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  • [Title] Sirolimus-based immunosuppression in kidney transplantation for type 2 diabetic nephropathy.
  • INTRODUCTION: Kidney transplantation is the best replacement therapy of type 2 diabetic patients and recently similar graft and patient survival between diabetic and nondiabetic recipients has been reported.
  • We present our experience with sirolimus-based immunosuppression in a population of 24 type 2 diabetic patients who underwent a kidney transplantation.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January 2001 to December 2006, 396 kidney transplantations were performed.
  • Twenty-four patients had type 2 diabetes mellitus as a cause of end-stage renal disease.
  • A slightly better kidney functionality was observed in group B patients.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Sirolimus-based immunosuppression is safe and efficacious in type 2 diabetic patients who underwent a kidney transplantation, allowing a better glucose metabolism control.
  • [MeSH-major] Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / complications. Diabetic Nephropathies / etiology. Diabetic Nephropathies / surgery. Immunosuppression. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Kidney Transplantation. Sirolimus / therapeutic use


13. Wilson C, Idziaszczyk S, Parry L, Guy C, Griffiths DF, Lazda E, Bayne RA, Smith AJ, Sampson JR, Cheadle JP: A mouse model of tuberous sclerosis 1 showing background specific early post-natal mortality and metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Hum Mol Genet; 2005 Jul 1;14(13):1839-50
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  • [Title] A mouse model of tuberous sclerosis 1 showing background specific early post-natal mortality and metastatic renal cell carcinoma.
  • Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in either the TSC1 or the TSC2 genes and characterized by the development of benign hamartomatous growths in multiple organ systems.
  • Forty-four percent (7/16) of Tsc1+/- mice on a C3H background developed macroscopically visible renal lesions as early as 3-6 months, increasing to 95% (37/39) by 15-18 months.
  • Renal lesions progressed from cysts through cystadenomas to solid carcinomas.
  • Eighty percent (16/20) of Tsc1+/- mice on a Balb/c background exhibited solid renal cell carcinomas (RCC) by 15-18 months and in 41%, RCCs were > or = 5 mm, resulting in grossly deformed kidneys.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / genetics. Kidney Neoplasms / genetics. Tuberous Sclerosis / genetics. Tumor Suppressor Proteins / genetics


14. Liu SK, Yan C, Wu LL, Pan Y: [Study strategies for neurobiology mechanism of "kidney storing will and responding to fear"]. Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao; 2010 Feb;8(2):106-10
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  • [Title] [Study strategies for neurobiology mechanism of "kidney storing will and responding to fear"].
  • The theory of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) deems that kidney essence is the material basis of formation, development and function of the brain and it maintains human being's psychomotility and behavior.
  • Moreover, kidney essence is the material basis of emotional activity.
  • The emotion theory in TCM deems that kidney stores will and responds to fear.
  • Combining the TCM theory with the modern psychological theory on stress, and from the points of views of the emotion regulation, the formation, consolidation, extraction and extinction of fear memory, and the plasticity of amygdala-hippocampus-prefrontal cortex nervous pathway, as well as the results of pharmacological studies of prescriptions and herbs for invigorating the kidney, the authors explained in this article the pathological mechanisms of kidney deficiency due to attack of fear, and revealed the material basis, the action modes, and the neurobiological mechanisms of the kidney in controlling and regulating emotional activity.
  • [MeSH-major] Fear / physiology. Kidney / physiology. Medicine, Chinese Traditional. Stress, Psychological

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  • (PMID = 20141730.001).
  • [ISSN] 1672-1977
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhong xi yi jie he xue bao = Journal of Chinese integrative medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
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15. Temmar M, Liabeuf S, Renard C, Czernichow S, Esper NE, Shahapuni I, Presne C, Makdassi R, Andrejak M, Tribouilloy C, Galan P, Safar ME, Choukroun G, Massy Z: Pulse wave velocity and vascular calcification at different stages of chronic kidney disease. J Hypertens; 2010 Jan;28(1):163-9
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  • [Title] Pulse wave velocity and vascular calcification at different stages of chronic kidney disease.
  • BACKGROUND: Increased arterial stiffness and vascular calcification have been recognized as important predictors of cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease.
  • METHOD: In order to examine the precise temporal link between aortic stiffness and cardiovascular risk at the earliest stages of chronic kidney disease, we studied a cohort of 150 patients with chronic kidney disease (52 stage 2/3 patients, 51 stage 4/5 patients and 47 stage 5D patients).
  • RESULTS: Regardless of the disease stage, patients with chronic kidney disease had higher adjusted pulse wave velocity than controls with preserved renal function (14.6 +/- 3.8 vs. 10.7 +/- 1.7 m/s, respectively; P < 0.0001).
  • Regarding aortic calcification, there was a gradual but significant rise in later chronic kidney disease stages.
  • CONCLUSION: We found that both vascular stiffness and vascular calcification appear early in patients with chronic kidney disease, but only vascular calcification worsens as the disease progresses.
  • The increase of vascular stiffness in adult patients with chronic kidney disease seems to be more related to age, systolic blood pressure, diabetes and vascular calcification than to uremic toxicity.
  • [MeSH-major] Aorta, Abdominal / pathology. Aorta, Thoracic / pathology. Blood Circulation / physiology. Blood Pressure / physiology. Calcinosis / pathology. Kidney Failure, Chronic / pathology

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  • (PMID = 19927012.001).
  • [ISSN] 1473-5598
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of hypertension
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Hypertens.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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16. Andratschke N, Schnaiter A, Weber WA, Cai L, Schill S, Wiedenmann N, Schwaiger M, Molls M, Nieder C: Preclinical evaluation of erythropoietin administration in a model of radiation-induced kidney dysfunction. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2006 Apr 1;64(5):1513-8
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  • [Title] Preclinical evaluation of erythropoietin administration in a model of radiation-induced kidney dysfunction.
  • PURPOSE: To test whether the clinically available growth factor erythropoietin (EPO) influences radiation-induced normal-tissue damage in a model of kidney dysfunction.
  • METHODS: Animal experiments were conducted to test the role of EPO administration in a C3H mouse model of unilateral kidney irradiation with 6, 8, and 10 Gy and to assess the effects of 2 different dose levels of EPO.
  • The kidney function was assessed before radiotherapy, as well as 19, 25, 31, and 37 weeks thereafter by means of (99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinat scans (static scintigraphy).
  • RESULTS: Concomitant EPO administration significantly increased the degree of radiation-induced kidney dysfunction.
  • CONCLUSION: Administration of growth factors concomitant to radiotherapy might modify the development of kidney dysfunction.
  • Although insulin-like growth factor-1 has previously been shown to protect the kidney, such an effect could not be demonstrated for EPO.
  • [MeSH-major] Erythropoietin / adverse effects. Kidney / radiation effects. Radiation Injuries, Experimental / prevention & control. Radiation Tolerance / drug effects

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  • [ErratumIn] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2006 Jul 1;65(3):960. Schnaitera, Andrea [corrected to Schnaiter, Andrea]; Caia, Lu [corrected to Cai, Lu]
  • (PMID = 16580501.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 11096-26-7 / Erythropoietin; 494JNQ8L28 / Technetium Tc 99m Dimercaptosuccinic Acid; 64FS3BFH5W / Epoetin Alfa
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17. Feltes CM, Van Eyk J, Rabb H: Distant-organ changes after acute kidney injury. Nephron Physiol; 2008;109(4):p80-4
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  • [Title] Distant-organ changes after acute kidney injury.
  • Acute kidney injury (AKI) contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality in both adults and children.
  • Leukocyte trafficking, cytokine expression, cell adhesion-molecule expression and membrane ion and water-channel expression in distant organs are deranged after kidney injury.
  • The responses to oxidative stress after AKI are also altered, suggesting complex mechanisms of crosstalk between the injured kidney and distant organs.
  • [MeSH-major] Acute Kidney Injury / complications. Acute Kidney Injury / immunology. Cytokines / immunology. Models, Immunological. Multiple Organ Failure / complications. Multiple Organ Failure / immunology. Neutrophil Activation / immunology


18. Alie TM, Vrljicak PJ, Myburgh DB, Gupta IR: Microinjection and electroporation of embryonic kidney explants: an improved method. Kidney Int; 2007 Jul;72(1):121-5
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  • [Title] Microinjection and electroporation of embryonic kidney explants: an improved method.
  • Embryonic kidney explants are routinely used to study the molecular regulation of kidney development.
  • In this study, we show that a high voltage with a short pulse time is preferable for mouse kidney explants.
  • We suggest that our described conditions will make microinjection and electroporation a more effective method to study gene function in the developing mouse kidney.
  • [MeSH-major] Electroporation / methods. Kidney / embryology. Microinjections / methods

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  • (PMID = 17495853.001).
  • [ISSN] 0085-2538
  • [Journal-full-title] Kidney international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Kidney Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 147336-22-9 / Green Fluorescent Proteins; EC 3.2.1.23 / beta-Galactosidase
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19. Costa MG, Garcia VD, Leirias MM, Santos SR, Oliveira DM: Urgency priority in kidney transplantation in Rio Grande do Sul. Transplant Proc; 2007 Mar;39(2):381-2
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  • [Title] Urgency priority in kidney transplantation in Rio Grande do Sul.
  • In 2002, it was established a system of urgency priority for kidney transplantations in cases with no vascular or peritoneal access for dialysis.
  • We reviewed cases of urgency priority request for kidney transplantation addressed to the CNCDO from May 2002 to August 2005.
  • Within this period the CNCDO received 35 urgency priority requests for kidney transplantation (mean, 1 every 1.2 months).
  • Among the 31 accepted, 26 (83%) had the transplantation performed in an average time of 19.6 days (range, 1-90), representing only 3.2% of all cadaveric kidney transplantations during that period.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Transplantation / statistics & numerical data. Tissue and Organ Procurement / statistics & numerical data. Waiting Lists

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  • (PMID = 17362736.001).
  • [ISSN] 0041-1345
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplant. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Ahmadnia H, Shamsa A, Yarmohammadi A, Darabi M, Asl Zare M: Kidney transplantation in older adults: does age affect graft survival? Urol J; 2005;2(2):93-6
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  • [Title] Kidney transplantation in older adults: does age affect graft survival?
  • INTRODUCTION: There is a paucity of data on long-term patient and graft survival in the older kidney recipients.
  • Our aim was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of kidney transplantation in patients aged 50 years and older and compare them with outcomes in younger recipients.
  • Patients who had received a cadaveric kidney allograft were excluded from the study.
  • CONCLUSION: Kidney transplantation should be considered in patients older than 50 years, since the graft survival rate is acceptable in this population, and early mortality and complications in this group are not different than those of younger recipients.
  • Although older patients have a shorter life expectancy, they benefit from renal transplantation in ways similar to younger kidney transplant recipients.

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  • (PMID = 17629878.001).
  • [ISSN] 1735-1308
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urol J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Iran
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21. Posadas MA, Yang V, Ho B, Omer M, Batlle D: Acute renal failure and severe hypertension from a page kidney post-transplant biopsy. ScientificWorldJournal; 2010;10:1539-42
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  • [Title] Acute renal failure and severe hypertension from a page kidney post-transplant biopsy.
  • Page kidney refers to a clinical picture characterized by acute onset of hypertension due to external compression of the kidneys from hematoma, tumor, lymphocele, or urinoma.
  • Hypertension is believed to result from renin-angiotensin-aldosterone activation triggered by renal hypoperfusion and microvascular ischemia.
  • Renal failure, in addition to hypertension, may occur in the setting of a single functional kidney or a diseased contralateral kidney.
  • We report a case of a patient who had a transplant kidney biopsy complicated by a subcapsular perinephric hematoma.
  • The patient presented with an acute increase in blood pressure and a rapid rise in serum creatinine following a transplant kidney routine biopsy.
  • Early recognition and rapid intervention are needed in order to correct hypertension and reverse acute renal failure in Page kidney occurring in renal transplant recipients.
  • [MeSH-major] Acute Kidney Injury / physiopathology. Hematoma / physiopathology. Hypertension / physiopathology. Kidney Transplantation / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 20694451.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-744X
  • [Journal-full-title] TheScientificWorldJournal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] ScientificWorldJournal
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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22. Kinsey GR, Sharma R, Huang L, Li L, Vergis AL, Ye H, Ju ST, Okusa MD: Regulatory T cells suppress innate immunity in kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury. J Am Soc Nephrol; 2009 Aug;20(8):1744-53
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  • [Title] Regulatory T cells suppress innate immunity in kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury.
  • Both innate and adaptive mechanisms participate in the pathogenesis of kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), but the role of regulatory immune mechanisms is unknown.
  • We hypothesized that the anti-inflammatory effects of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) protect against renal IRI.
  • Partial depletion of Tregs with an anti-CD25 mAb potentiated kidney damage induced by IRI.
  • Reducing the number of Tregs resulted in more neutrophils, macrophages, and innate cytokine transcription in the kidney after IRI but did not affect CD4(+) T cells or B cells.
  • FoxP3(+) Treg-deficient mice accumulated a greater number of inflammatory leukocytes after renal IRI than mice containing Tregs.
  • To confirm that a lack of Tregs potentiated renal injury, we co-transferred isolated Tregs and Scurfy lymph node cells; Treg repletion significantly attenuated IRI-induced renal injury and leukocyte accumulation.
  • Furthermore, although adoptive transfer of wild-type Tregs into RAG-1 knockout mice was sufficient to prevent kidney IRI, transfer of IL-10-deficient Tregs was not.
  • Taken together, these results demonstrate that Tregs modulate injury after kidney IRI through IL-10-mediated suppression of the innate immune system.

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  • (PMID = 19497969.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-3450
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK62324; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / AR-051203; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK56223; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / R01 AR051203; United States / NIDCR NIH HHS / DE / DE-017579; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK062324; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK056223; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / T32 DK072922; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK58413; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R44 DK058413; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / P01 HL073361; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R41 DK058413
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interleukin-2 Receptor alpha Subunit; 130068-27-8 / Interleukin-10
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2723989
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23. Karner CM, Chirumamilla R, Aoki S, Igarashi P, Wallingford JB, Carroll TJ: Wnt9b signaling regulates planar cell polarity and kidney tubule morphogenesis. Nat Genet; 2009 Jul;41(7):793-9
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  • [Title] Wnt9b signaling regulates planar cell polarity and kidney tubule morphogenesis.
  • Although many vertebrate organs, such as kidneys, lungs and liver, are composed of epithelial tubules, little is known of the mechanisms that establish the length or diameter of these tubules.
  • In the kidney, defects in the establishment or maintenance of tubule diameter are associated with one of the most common inherited human disorders, polycystic kidney disease.
  • Here we show that attenuation of Wnt9b signaling during kidney morphogenesis affects the planar cell polarity of the epithelium and leads to tubules with significantly increased diameter.
  • Although previous studies showed that polarized cell divisions maintain the diameter of postnatal kidney tubules, we find that cell divisions are randomly oriented during embryonic development.


24. Arany I: When less is more: apoptosis during acute kidney injury. Kidney Int; 2008 Aug;74(3):261-2
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  • [Title] When less is more: apoptosis during acute kidney injury.
  • The paper by Ma and Devarajan suggests that the subtle apoptotic events that occur in the distal nephron after acute kidney injury might have a greater than expected impact on the adjacent proximal tubules and kidney function.
  • Understanding these events might facilitate development of therapeutic means to ameliorate acute kidney injury.
  • [MeSH-major] Acute Kidney Injury / pathology. Apoptosis / physiology. Reperfusion Injury / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Humans. Kidney / physiopathology. Kidney Tubules, Proximal / physiopathology. Nephrons / physiopathology

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  • [CommentOn] Kidney Int. 2008 Aug;74(3):310-8 [18480747.001]
  • (PMID = 18626494.001).
  • [ISSN] 1523-1755
  • [Journal-full-title] Kidney international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Kidney Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comment; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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25. Ciancio G, Burke GW 3rd: Alemtuzumab (Campath-1H) in kidney transplantation. Am J Transplant; 2008 Jan;8(1):15-20
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  • [Title] Alemtuzumab (Campath-1H) in kidney transplantation.
  • Kidney transplantation has become the treatment of choice for both the quality of life and survival in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD).
  • However, the immunosuppressive regimen which allows optimal kidney transplant outcome remains elusive.
  • One of the more promising induction agents, Alemtuzumab, was introduced to kidney transplantation by Calne in the late 1990s with low dose cyclosporine A monotherapy, with the hope of establishing 'prope' or near tolerance.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antibodies, Neoplasm / therapeutic use. Graft Rejection / prevention & control. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Kidney Transplantation

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  • (PMID = 18093269.001).
  • [ISSN] 1600-6143
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antibodies, Neoplasm; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 3A189DH42V / alemtuzumab
  • [Number-of-references] 41
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26. Gómez-Ferrer Lozano A, Navarro Antón JA, Mola Arizo MJ, Polo i Peris AC: [Erythrocytosis related with hydronephrosis in a horseshoe kidney]. Actas Urol Esp; 2005 Apr;29(4):414-5
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  • [Title] [Erythrocytosis related with hydronephrosis in a horseshoe kidney].
  • We report a case of a man with erythrocytosis secondary to hydronephrosis in a right horseshoe kidney.
  • Following nephrectomy of the right kidney erythrocyte count returned to normal values.
  • Secondary polyglobulia may be due to increased erythropoietine values and has been related in some patients with renal diseases such as hydronephrosis, but very rarely in association with hydronephrotic horseshoe kidney.
  • [MeSH-major] Hydronephrosis / complications. Kidney / abnormalities. Polycythemia / etiology

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  • (PMID = 15981431.001).
  • [ISSN] 0210-4806
  • [Journal-full-title] Actas urologicas espanolas
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Actas Urol Esp
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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27. Rao PS, Ojo A: The alphabet soup of kidney transplantation: SCD, DCD, ECD--fundamentals for the practicing nephrologist. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol; 2009 Nov;4(11):1827-31
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  • [Title] The alphabet soup of kidney transplantation: SCD, DCD, ECD--fundamentals for the practicing nephrologist.
  • There is significant variability in the quality of deceased-donor kidneys that are used for transplantation.
  • The quality of the donor kidney has a direct effect on important clinical outcomes such as acute rejection, delayed graft function, and patient and allograft survival.
  • Expanded-criteria donors (ECDs) refer to older kidney donors (> or =60 yr) or donors who are aged 50 to 59 yr and have two of the following three features: Hypertension, terminal serum creatinine >1.5 mg/dl, or death from cerebrovascular accident.
  • By definition, ECD kidneys have a 70% greater likelihood of failure compared with one from a 35-yr-old male donor who died from a motor vehicle accident.
  • An ECD kidney transplant recipient has a projected average added-life-years of 5.1 yr compared with 10 yr for a kidney recipient from a standard-criteria donor.
  • Kidney transplantation from DCD seems to have similar allograft and patient survival compared with kidney from donation after brain death; however DCD transplantation has a 42 to 51% risk for delayed graft function (need for at least one dialysis treatment during the first week after transplantation) compared with 24% in an standard-criteria donor kidney transplant.
  • Familiarity with the comprehensive allocation rules governing different categories of deceased-donor kidneys by the nephrologists and dialysis team providers is essential to maximizing patient autonomy and to improve the outcomes of kidney transplantation.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Transplantation. Nephrology. Tissue Donors. Tissue and Organ Procurement


28. Tahvanainen E, Tahvanainen P, Kääriäinen H, Höckerstedt K: Polycystic liver and kidney diseases. Ann Med; 2005;37(8):546-55
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  • [Title] Polycystic liver and kidney diseases.
  • There have been remarkable advances in research on polycystic liver and kidney diseases recently, covering cloning of new genes, refining disease classifications, and advances in understanding more about the molecular pathology of these diseases.
  • Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary disease affecting kidneys.
  • It affects 1/400 to 1/1000 live births and accounts for 5% of the end stage renal disease in the United States and Europe, and is caused by gene defects in the PKD1 or PKD2 genes.
  • Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) belongs to a group of congenital hepatorenal fibrocystic syndromes.
  • [MeSH-major] Cysts / genetics. Liver Diseases / genetics. Polycystic Kidney Diseases / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnosis, Differential. Genetic Markers. Humans. Membrane Proteins / genetics. Proteins / genetics. TRPP Cation Channels

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  • (PMID = 16338757.001).
  • [ISSN] 0785-3890
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Sweden
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Genetic Markers; 0 / Membrane Proteins; 0 / Proteins; 0 / SEC63 protein, human; 0 / TRPP Cation Channels; 0 / polycystic kidney disease 1 protein; 0 / polycystic kidney disease 2 protein
  • [Number-of-references] 95
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29. Cohen EP, Pais P, Moulder JE: Chronic kidney disease after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Semin Nephrol; 2010 Nov;30(6):627-34
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  • [Title] Chronic kidney disease after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
  • Acute and chronic kidney diseases occur after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
  • Recent estimates show that near 15% of subjects undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation will develop chronic kidney disease, which is a complication rate that can affect outcome and reduce survival.
  • Investigation of the causes of chronic kidney disease is needed, as are ways to prevent, mitigate, and treat it.

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  • [Copyright] Published by Elsevier Inc.
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  • (PMID = 21146127.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-4488
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in nephrology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Nephrol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / U19 AI067734; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / 1U19AI067734
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS249843; NLM/ PMC3005300
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30. Kim SS, Park HJ, Han J, Gwak SJ, Park MH, Song KW, Rhee YH, Min Chung H, Kim BS: Improvement of kidney failure with fetal kidney precursor cell transplantation. Transplantation; 2007 May 15;83(9):1249-58
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  • [Title] Improvement of kidney failure with fetal kidney precursor cell transplantation.
  • BACKGROUND: Current therapies for end-stage renal disease have severe limitations.
  • Dialysis is only a temporary treatment and does not restore kidney function.
  • Here, we show that the transplantation of fetal kidney precursor cells reconstitutes kidney tissues, reduces uremic symptoms, and provides life-saving metabolic support in kidney failure animal models.
  • METHODS: Kidney failure was surgically induced by resecting kidneys, leaving approximately 1/6 of the total kidney mass (5/6 nephrectomy).
  • Fetal kidney precursor cells were isolated from metanephroi of E17.5 rat fetuses using collagenase/dispase digestion.
  • Five weeks after the nephrectomy procedure, isolated fetal kidney precursor cells were transplanted under the kidney capsule of rats using fibrin gel matrix.
  • The cell transplantation into the kidneys of kidney failure-induced rats resulted in kidney tissue reconstitution and the transplanted cells were observed in the reconstitution region of the kidneys as evidenced by the presence of fluorescently labeled cells.
  • In addition, biochemical parameters from serum and urine samples showed improved kidney functions compared with non-treated group without severe immune response after ten weeks.
  • CONCLUSION: Transplanting fetal kidney precursor cells showed the potential for the partial augmentation of kidney structure and function in the treatment of kidney failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Embryonic Stem Cells / transplantation. Renal Insufficiency / physiopathology. Renal Insufficiency / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Membrane. Disease Models, Animal. Disease Progression. Disease Susceptibility. Glomerulosclerosis, Focal Segmental / pathology. Glomerulosclerosis, Focal Segmental / physiopathology. Graft Rejection / etiology. Hypertrophy. Kidney / pathology. Kidney / physiopathology. Kidney Glomerulus / pathology. Kidney Glomerulus / physiopathology. Nephrectomy. Phenotype. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Regeneration. Survival Analysis. Uremia / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 17496543.001).
  • [ISSN] 0041-1337
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplantation
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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31. Schaeffner ES, Födinger M, Kramar R, Frei U, Hörl WH, Sunder-Plassmann G, Winkelmayer WC: Prognostic associations between lipid markers and outcomes in kidney transplant recipients. Am J Kidney Dis; 2006 Mar;47(3):509-17
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  • [Title] Prognostic associations between lipid markers and outcomes in kidney transplant recipients.
  • BACKGROUND: Hyperlipidemia is highly prevalent in kidney transplant recipients, but the prognostic significance for mortality and allograft survival in these patients has not been established sufficiently.
  • METHODS: We prospectively enrolled 733 kidney transplant recipients between 1996 and 1998.
  • Using multivariate proportional hazard regression, independent relations of fasting plasma triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels to risk for death from any cause and risk for kidney allograft loss were examined.
  • RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 6.1 years, 154 patients died and 260 kidney allografts were lost.
  • Further analysis of associations between high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol categories and patient mortality or kidney allograft loss did not show associations.
  • CONCLUSION: Elevated levels of TC or its subfractions and elevated TG levels are not associated with increased risk for patient mortality or allograft loss in these kidney transplant recipients.
  • [MeSH-major] Cholesterol / blood. Graft Survival. Kidney Transplantation

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  • (PMID = 16490631.001).
  • [ISSN] 1523-6838
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Kidney Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Triglycerides; 97C5T2UQ7J / Cholesterol
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32. Paleologo G, Abdelkawy H, Barsotti M, Basha A, Bernabini G, Bianchi A, Caprio F, Emad A, Grassi G, Nerucci B, Tregnaghi C, Rizzo G, Donadio C: Kidney dimensions at sonography are correlated with glomerular filtration rate in renal transplant recipients and in kidney donors. Transplant Proc; 2007 Jul-Aug;39(6):1779-81
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  • [Title] Kidney dimensions at sonography are correlated with glomerular filtration rate in renal transplant recipients and in kidney donors.
  • The gold standard to assess renal function is the measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR).
  • For practical reasons, renal function is often evaluated from serum creatinine (S Cr) or cystatin C (S Cys), and GFR is predicted from SCr.
  • Ultrasound scanning of the kidneys is used only to evaluate renal morphology.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between sonographic renal dimensions and GFR in renal transplant recipients and in kidney donors.
  • GFR was also predicted using the Cockcroft and Gault (CG) formula and with the simplified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formula.
  • Length, width, and depth of kidneys and renal sinus were measured using renal sonography.
  • Among sonographic measurements, kidney length showed the best correlation with GFR.
  • In either case, the correlation of kidney length with GFR was greater than that of S Cr or S Cys, and similar to that of CG or MDRD GFR.
  • Accuracy of kidney length as an indicator of GFR impairment was not statistically different from laboratory tests.
  • In conclusion, renal dimensions at sonography closely correlated with GFR.
  • Thus, renal sonography can give information also on the function of the renal graft and of the remaining kidney of living donors.
  • [MeSH-major] Glomerular Filtration Rate. Kidney / anatomy & histology. Kidney / physiology. Kidney Transplantation / physiology. Tissue Donors

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  • (PMID = 17692610.001).
  • [ISSN] 0041-1345
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplant. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / CST3 protein, human; 0 / Cystatin C; 0 / Cystatins; AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine
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33. Zhuang WL, Wu YM, Ge SY, Mei CL: [Detection of differentially expressed genes in human autosomal dominant polycystic kidney tissue]. Zhonghua Yi Xue Yi Chuan Xue Za Zhi; 2005 Dec;22(6):705-8
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  • [Title] [Detection of differentially expressed genes in human autosomal dominant polycystic kidney tissue].
  • OBJECTIVE: To detect the differentially expressed genes in human polycystic kidney by cDNA microarray.
  • Both mRNAs isolated from polycystic kidney tissue and normal kidney tissue were reversely transcribed to cDNAs with the incorporation of fluorescent dUTP (Cy5-dUTP and Cy3-dUTP) for preparing the hybridization probes.
  • RESULTS: The result indicated that the expressions of 263 genes were up regulated while the expressions of 94 genes were down regulated in the polycystic kidney tissue among the 8398 target genes.
  • Three hundred and fifty-seven differentially expressed genes with different functions were revealed in the polycystic kidney tissue, which may play some roles in the progression of polycystic kidney.
  • [MeSH-major] Gene Expression Profiling. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis / methods. Polycystic Kidney, Autosomal Dominant / genetics

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  • (PMID = 16331579.001).
  • [ISSN] 1003-9406
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua yi xue yi chuan xue za zhi = Zhonghua yixue yichuanxue zazhi = Chinese journal of medical genetics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Yi Xue Yi Chuan Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carbocyanines; 0 / DNA, Complementary; 0 / Fluorescent Dyes; 0 / cyanine dye 3; 0 / cyanine dye 5; 67763-96-6 / Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
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34. Otsuka M, Ambiru S, Uryuhara K, Herman P, Talpe S, Dehoux JP, Jamar F, Gianello P: Early biological and immune response to semi-identical liver or kidney allograft in miniature swine. Transpl Int; 2005 Jan;18(1):78-88
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  • [Title] Early biological and immune response to semi-identical liver or kidney allograft in miniature swine.
  • In inbred miniature swine, semi-identical liver allograft recipients survive up to 3 months without immunosuppression, whereas similarly mismatched kidney allografts are uniformly rejected within 2 weeks.
  • SLA(d/d) pigs (MGH, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA) received liver or kidney allograft from heterozygous SLA(c/d) miniature swine.
  • Kidney allografts were uniformly rejected within 2 weeks, whereas liver allografts survived for up to 87 days.
  • After both liver and kidney transplantation, the peripheral lymphocyte count decreased during the first week concomitantly to a significant elevation of plasma cortisol level.
  • Early decrease of peripheral platelet count was observed after liver but not renal transplantation.
  • Up-regulation of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was observed during the first postoperative week in semi-identical liver allografts and IFN-gamma as well as IL-10 in kidney allografts.
  • In liver recipients, labelled autologous lymphocytes accumulated in the liver graft and native spleen, whereas after renal allograft, lymphocytes accumulated in the native spleen and liver but never in the kidney allograft.
  • Specific cellular anti-donor unresponsiveness was observed from the first post-transplant day in both liver and kidney recipients, while the humoral anti-donor response remained intact.
  • In semi-identical liver allograft, recipient rejection is milder and slower than in similarly matched kidney allograft.
  • The rapid, nonspecific accumulation of recipient lymphocytes in the liver allograft but not in kidney allograft might also play a role in the different survival time in this model.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Transplantation / physiology. Liver Transplantation / physiology

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  • (PMID = 15612988.001).
  • [ISSN] 0934-0874
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplant international : official journal of the European Society for Organ Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transpl. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cytokines; 0 / DNA Primers; 0 / RNA, Messenger
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35. Lin F: Stem cells in kidney regeneration following acute renal injury. Pediatr Res; 2006 Apr;59(4 Pt 2):74R-8R
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  • [Title] Stem cells in kidney regeneration following acute renal injury.
  • Acute renal failure has 50-80% mortality.
  • Stem cells offer an exciting potential for kidney regeneration.
  • This review discusses pathogenesis of acute renal failure resulting from ischemia-reperfusion injury and the role of stem cells in reversing or mitigating this disorder.
  • Specifically, the issues of differentiation of kidney cells from embryonic stem cells and bone marrow stem cells, and whether adult kidney stem/progenitor cells exist in the postnatal kidney are discussed.
  • Evidence to support the conclusion that intra-renal cells, including surviving tubular epithelial cells and potential renal stem/progenitor cells, are the main source for renal regeneration is provided.
  • Future research in selecting the type(s) of stem cells and optimizing the dose, frequency and route of administration of the cells will be fundamental in successful cell replacement therapy in acute renal failure.
  • Methods for enhancing endogenous renal cell proliferation and differentiation for renal repair continue to be important research directions.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney / physiopathology. Regeneration. Stem Cells / cytology
  • [MeSH-minor] Bone Marrow Cells / cytology. Cell Differentiation. Humans. Renal Insufficiency / physiopathology. Renal Insufficiency / therapy

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  • (PMID = 16549552.001).
  • [ISSN] 0031-3998
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / K08 DK062839; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK66535
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 48
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36. Masoumi A, Reed-Gitomer B, Kelleher C, Schrier RW: Potential pharmacological interventions in polycystic kidney disease. Drugs; 2007;67(17):2495-510
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  • [Title] Potential pharmacological interventions in polycystic kidney disease.
  • Polycystic kidney diseases (autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive) are progressive renal tubular cystic diseases, which are characterised by cyst expansion and loss of normal kidney structure and function.
  • Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common life- threatening, hereditary disease.
  • Early diagnosis and treatment of hypertension with inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and its potential protective effect on left ventricular hypertrophy has been one of the major therapeutic goals to decrease cardiac complications and contribute to improved prognosis of the disease.
  • Because of activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, the use of sirolimus (rapamycin) an mTOR inhibitor, markedly reduced cyst formation and decreased polycystic kidney size in several animal models.
  • Caspase inhibitors have been shown to decrease cytogenesis and renal failure in rats with cystic disease.
  • Cystic fluid secretion results in cyst enlargement and somatostatin analogues have been shown to decrease renal cyst progression in patients with ADPKD.
  • [MeSH-major] Polycystic Kidney Diseases / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 18034588.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-6667
  • [Journal-full-title] Drugs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / U01 DK624
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Number-of-references] 190
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37. Longenecker CT, Scherzer R, Bacchetti P, Lewis CE, Grunfeld C, Shlipak MG: HIV viremia and changes in kidney function. AIDS; 2009 Jun 1;23(9):1089-96
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  • [Title] HIV viremia and changes in kidney function.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of HIV infection on longitudinal changes in kidney function and to identify independent predictors of kidney function changes in HIV-infected individuals.
  • CONCLUSION: Compared with controls, HIV-infected persons were more likely both to have clinical decline and clinical improvement in kidney function during 5 years of follow-up.
  • The extent of viremic control had a strong association with longitudinal changes in kidney function.

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  • (PMID = 19352136.001).
  • [ISSN] 1473-5571
  • [Journal-full-title] AIDS (London, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AIDS
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01-HL-74814; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK057508-01S1; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000083-38S30468; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK057508; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01-RR00083; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL074814-07; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK057508-01; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000083-380468; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000083-40S10468; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000083-430512; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000865; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000036; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL074814-04; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000083-38S20468; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000083-420512; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL074814-06; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK057508-03S1; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000054; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01-RR00052; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK057508-03S2; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000052; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL074814-05; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000051; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01-RR00051; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01-RR00036; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL074814; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK057508-02; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000083-400468; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01-HL-53359; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01-RR00636; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000083-390468; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01-RR00054; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000083; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK057508-03; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01-DK-57508
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cystatin C
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS492632; NLM/ PMC3725756
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38. Goldstein SL, Devarajan P: Progression from acute kidney injury to chronic kidney disease: a pediatric perspective. Adv Chronic Kidney Dis; 2008 Jul;15(3):278-83
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  • [Title] Progression from acute kidney injury to chronic kidney disease: a pediatric perspective.
  • Although emerging evidence indicates that the incidence of both acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children is rising and the etiologies are dramatically changing, relatively little is currently known regarding the potential for transition from AKI to CKD.
  • These include neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, liver-type fatty acid-binding protein, and kidney injury molecule-1.

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  • (PMID = 18565478.001).
  • [ISSN] 1548-5609
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in chronic kidney disease
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv Chronic Kidney Dis
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK069749-04; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK069749-04; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R21 DK070163-02; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK069749; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R21 DK070163
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers
  • [Number-of-references] 54
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS57871; NLM/ PMC2481383
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39. Doctor RB, Serkova NJ, Hasebroock KM, Zafar I, Edelstein CL: Distinct patterns of kidney and liver cyst growth in pkd2(WS25/-) mice. Nephrol Dial Transplant; 2010 Nov;25(11):3496-504
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  • [Title] Distinct patterns of kidney and liver cyst growth in pkd2(WS25/-) mice.
  • BACKGROUND: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common genetic disease that results in the development of cystic kidneys and liver.
  • Providing the foundation for future long-term studies, the present work documents distinct patterns of long-term cyst growth in the kidneys and liver of male and female pkd2(WS25/-) mice.
  • METHODS: Gravimetric measurements documented the progression of kidney and liver growth in male and female pkd2(WS25/-) mice over 12 months.
  • A fast imaging with steady-state precision-magnetic resonance imaging (FISP-MRI) technique to measure kidney and liver organ and cyst volumes was optimized and validated.
  • RESULTS: Male and female pkd2(WS25/-) mice had significant increases in kidney weights after 4 months of age.
  • The progression of kidney growth was minimal after 4 months of age.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Pkd2(WS25/-) mice are a genetic mouse model that recapitulates the early phenotypic characteristics of human ADPKD kidney cystogenesis.

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  • (PMID = 20388629.001).
  • [ISSN] 1460-2385
  • [Journal-full-title] Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK-074835; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / UL1 RR025780; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK074835; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA046934; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK-056851; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK056851
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / TRPP Cation Channels; 0 / polycystic kidney disease 2 protein
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2980992
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40. Collan Y, Hirsimäki P, Aho H, Wuorela M, Sundström J, Tertti R, Metsärinne K: Value of electron microscopy in kidney biopsy diagnosis. Ultrastruct Pathol; 2005 Nov-Dec;29(6):461-8
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  • [Title] Value of electron microscopy in kidney biopsy diagnosis.
  • Kidney biopsy reports given during 2003 were collected from the authors' pathology database.
  • Five tumor samples were not studied with electron microscopy (EM).
  • EM was not performed in 10/24 transplant biopsies, or in 11/82 cases of suspected primary kidney disease.
  • (1) EM was essential for diagnosis, (2) EM contributed to the interpretation and cleared uncertainties, and (3) EM had no influence on the diagnostic process.
  • In transplant biopsies EM influenced the final diagnosis in 86% of cases (category 2).
  • In biopsies performed for primary kidney disease EM was essential for diagnosis in 18.3% clearly contributed in 53.5%, and had no influence on the final diagnosis in 28.2% of cases.
  • Because only about 25% of the EM reports did not have any influence on the diagnostic process, it is recommended that kidney biopsy protocols should include EM in all biopsy cases, or at least tissue should be reserved for EM studies of all cases.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney / ultrastructure. Kidney Diseases / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Biopsy. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Kidney Transplantation / pathology. Male. Microscopy, Electron, Transmission

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  • (PMID = 16316946.001).
  • [ISSN] 0191-3123
  • [Journal-full-title] Ultrastructural pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ultrastruct Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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41. Rodrigo E, Arias M: A practical approach to immune monitoring in kidney transplantation. Minerva Urol Nefrol; 2007 Sep;59(3):337-52
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  • [Title] A practical approach to immune monitoring in kidney transplantation.
  • In the last years, there has been a growing interest in the development of new assays available to monitor kidney transplantation.
  • These assays will permit strategies for the minimization of immunosuppression, for induction of operational tolerance, for an early and noninvasive diagnosis of acute rejection, for prevention of adverse effects of immunosuppressive drugs and for measurement of the net immunosuppressive state.
  • Today, there is not one test that helps us monitor the outcome of kidney recipients safely.
  • Further studies and further developed assays are needed to obtain an adequate immune monitoring strategy in kidney transplantation.
  • Transvivo DTH assay, tetramer staining, quantification of cell proliferation by CFSE labelling, human leukocyte antigen-G determination, phenotyping of recipient immune cells, detection of tolerogeneic dendritic cell precursors, T-cell receptor landscaping and quantification of gene and protein expression need more studies to know their exact role as monitoring markers in kidney transplant patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Transplantation / immunology. Monitoring, Immunologic

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  • (PMID = 17912229.001).
  • [ISSN] 0393-2249
  • [Journal-full-title] Minerva urologica e nefrologica = The Italian journal of urology and nephrology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Minerva Urol Nefrol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Number-of-references] 96
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42. Feyssa E, Jones-Burton C, Ellison G, Philosophe B, Howell C: Racial/ethnic disparity in kidney transplantation outcomes: influence of donor and recipient characteristics. J Natl Med Assoc; 2009 Feb;101(2):111-5
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  • [Title] Racial/ethnic disparity in kidney transplantation outcomes: influence of donor and recipient characteristics.
  • OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the basis for the racial/ethnic disparity in kidney allograft survival.
  • METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of 2130 patients who underwent kidney transplantation between January 1995 and December 2003.
  • Additionally, black recipients were more likely to have a prior kidney transplant (16.7% vs 11.0%) and to have a cadaver kidney donor (74% vs 56.5%).
  • Previous kidney transplantation, cadaveric donor, donor age, recipient employment status, and recipient tobacco use were associated with allograft survival in a Cox proportional hazard model.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Graft survival rate in black kidney transplant recipients is significantly lower than whites, and this disparity can be partially explained by the low rate of live donors and a higher previous transplantation rate in blacks.
  • [MeSH-major] Graft Survival. Healthcare Disparities / statistics & numerical data. Kidney Transplantation / ethnology. Kidney Transplantation / immunology


43. Hirsch S: Prerenal success in chronic kidney disease. Am J Med; 2007 Sep;120(9):754-9
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  • [Title] Prerenal success in chronic kidney disease.
  • Renin-angiotensin system inhibitors and diuretics are commonly prescribed to patients with chronic kidney disease to reduce systemic blood pressure.
  • Several reasons for this reluctance are discussed, including the failure to distinguish between hemodynamic- and parenchymal-mediated changes in kidney function.
  • Finally, recent literature describing harmful effects of increases in serum creatinine in other cohorts is reviewed; these cohorts are sufficiently different from the stable chronic kidney disease patient that the results ought not to be extrapolated.
  • [MeSH-major] Renal Insufficiency, Chronic / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 17765040.001).
  • [ISSN] 1555-7162
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine
  • [Number-of-references] 36
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44. Gheith OA, El-Saadany SA, Abuo Donia SA, Salem YM: Compliance of kidney transplant patients to the recommended lifestyle behaviours: single centre experience. Int J Nurs Pract; 2008 Oct;14(5):398-407
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  • [Title] Compliance of kidney transplant patients to the recommended lifestyle behaviours: single centre experience.
  • Successful management of kidney transplant patients requires lifelong therapeutic regimen.
  • The aim of the study was to identify compliance of kidney transplant patients to the recommended lifestyle behaviours.
  • One hundred adult kidney transplant patients of 6 months duration and more participated in this study regardless of age or sex.
  • A structured questionnaire was developed which included socio-demographic characteristics, the recommended lifestyle behaviours of the kidney transplant patients and the kidney transplant patient's health condition and his results from the laboratory tests.
  • The nurse must provide the kidney transplant patients with the necessary knowledge of the recommended lifestyle behaviours.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Transplantation. Life Style. Patient Compliance

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  • (PMID = 18808541.001).
  • [ISSN] 1440-172X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of nursing practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Nurs Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents
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45. Briet M, Schiffrin EL: Aldosterone: effects on the kidney and cardiovascular system. Nat Rev Nephrol; 2010 May;6(5):261-73
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  • [Title] Aldosterone: effects on the kidney and cardiovascular system.
  • Aldosterone, a steroid hormone with mineralocorticoid activity, is mainly recognized for its action on sodium reabsorption in the distal nephron of the kidney, which is mediated by the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC).
  • Beyond this well-known action, however, aldosterone exerts other effects on the kidney, blood vessels and the heart, which can have pathophysiological consequences, particularly in the presence of a high salt intake.
  • Aldosterone is implicated in renal inflammatory and fibrotic processes, as well as in podocyte injury and mesangial cell proliferation.
  • Small interventional studies in patients with chronic kidney disease have shown promising results, with a significant reduction of proteinuria associated with aldosterone antagonism, but large interventional trials that test the efficacy and safety of mineralocorticoid-receptor antagonists in chronic kidney disease are needed.
  • [MeSH-major] Aldosterone / adverse effects. Aldosterone / pharmacology. Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers / pharmacology. Cardiovascular Diseases / chemically induced. Cardiovascular Diseases / drug therapy. Cardiovascular System / drug effects. Kidney / drug effects. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 20234356.001).
  • [ISSN] 1759-507X
  • [Journal-full-title] Nature reviews. Nephrology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nat Rev Nephrol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] Canada / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / / 37917; Canada / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / / 82790
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers; 0 / Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists; 0 / Sodium Channels; 0 / Sodium, Dietary; 4964P6T9RB / Aldosterone
  • [Number-of-references] 141
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46. Ashrith G, Elayda MA, Wilson JM: Revascularization options in patients with chronic kidney disease. Tex Heart Inst J; 2010;37(1):9-18
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  • [Title] Revascularization options in patients with chronic kidney disease.
  • Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients who have chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease and are undergoing hemodialysis.
  • Chronic kidney disease is a recognized risk factor for premature atherosclerosis.
  • Unfortunately, most major randomized clinical trials that form the basis for evidence-based use of revascularization procedures exclude patients who have renal insufficiency.
  • Retrospective, observational studies suggest that patients with end-stage renal disease and severe coronary occlusive disease have a lower risk of death if they undergo coronary revascularization rather than medical therapy alone.
  • This difference appears to result from poor long-term results of percutaneous coronary intervention in patients who have chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease.Because randomized trials comparing percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass grafting have included patients undergoing balloon angioplasty and placement of bare-metal stents, their conclusions are suspect in the era of drug-eluting stents.
  • In this review, we discuss different revascularization options for patients with chronic kidney disease, the outcomes of revascularization procedures, and the risk factors for adverse outcomes.

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  • (PMID = 20200622.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-6702
  • [Journal-full-title] Texas Heart Institute journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tex Heart Inst J
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 76
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2829816
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Angioplasty, transluminal, percutanous coronary / coronary artery bypass / coronary artery bypass, off-pump / creatinine/blood/metabolism / drug-eluting stents / extracorporeal circulation / glomerular filtration rate / kidney failure, chronic / renal dialysis / stents / treatment outcome
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47. Parzanese I, Maccarone D, Caniglia L, Pisani F, Mazzotta C, Rizza V, Famulari A: Risk factors that can influence kidney transplant outcome. Transplant Proc; 2006 May;38(4):1022-3
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  • [Title] Risk factors that can influence kidney transplant outcome.
  • The survival and function of a kidney transplant are influenced by numerous immunological and nonimmunological factors.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of a number of cadaveric donor parameters on transplanted kidney function, and in particular on the occurrence of delayed graft function (DGF) since DGF is one of the most important factors in long-term organ survival.
  • This study looked at 143 patients who underwent kidney transplant of whom 32 displayed DGF.
  • We observed that a donor history of hypertension (46.8% DGF vs 23.27% no DGF; P = .01) and high levels of donor creatinine prior to organ removal (1.9 +/- 1.2 mg/dL DGF vs 1.2 +/- 0.9 mg/dL no DGF; P = .007) were significant risk factors for DGF among kidney recipients.
  • [MeSH-major] Delayed Graft Function / physiopathology. Graft Survival / physiology. Kidney Transplantation / adverse effects. Kidney Transplantation / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cadaver. Creatinine / blood. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Kidney Function Tests. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Time Factors. Tissue Donors / statistics & numerical data. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16757251.001).
  • [ISSN] 0041-1345
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplant. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine
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48. Campese VM, Hadaya B, Chiu J: HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors and the kidney. Curr Hypertens Rep; 2005 Oct;7(5):337-42
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  • [Title] HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors and the kidney.
  • It has not been well established whether statins confer similar benefits to the kidney.
  • In this review, we critically consider the available data whereby dyslipidemia mediates renal dysfunction by modulating the inflammatory response to diverse cytokines.
  • We also review the emerging database suggesting that statins may modulate renal dysfunction by altering the response of the kidney to dyslipidemia, particularly in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and post-kidney transplant.
  • [MeSH-major] Cardiovascular Diseases / prevention & control. Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Kidney Diseases / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Dyslipidemias / complications. Dyslipidemias / drug therapy. Humans. Inflammation / drug therapy. Kidney Failure, Chronic / complications. Kidney Failure, Chronic / therapy. Kidney Transplantation

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  • (PMID = 16157074.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-6417
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hypertension reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Hypertens. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
  • [Number-of-references] 50
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49. Guevara N, Lassalle S, Castillo L, Butori C, Santini J: [Angiomyolipoma of the parotid gland]. Ann Otolaryngol Chir Cervicofac; 2008 Apr;125(2):90-3
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  • INTRODUCTION: Angiomyolipoma is a rare benign mesenchymal tumor.
  • It often arises in the kidney and in association with tuberous sclerosis or lymphangioléiomyomatosis.
  • Partial parotidectomy was performed and the tumor showed the characteristic appearance of angiomyolipoma, with an admixture of fat smooth cells and tortuous thick-walled blood vessels.
  • CONCLUSION: This article discusses the presentation and management associated with this exceptional tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiomyolipoma / diagnosis. Parotid Neoplasms / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 18280455.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-438X
  • [Journal-full-title] Annales d'oto-laryngologie et de chirurgie cervico faciale : bulletin de la Société d'oto-laryngologie des hôpitaux de Paris
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Otolaryngol Chir Cervicofac
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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50. Aregger F, Pilop C, Uehlinger DE, Brunisholz R, Carrel TP, Frey FJ, Frey BM: Urinary proteomics before and after extracorporeal circulation in patients with and without acute kidney injury. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg; 2010 Mar;139(3):692-700
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  • [Title] Urinary proteomics before and after extracorporeal circulation in patients with and without acute kidney injury.
  • OBJECTIVE: Acute kidney injury is a well-known complication with high morbidity and mortality after cardiopulmonary bypass.
  • Cardiopulmonary bypass-associated acute kidney injury is still poorly understood.
  • Acute kidney injury was defined according to the RIFLE classification.
  • To identify differentially regulated proteins in acute kidney injury, we next compared the urinary proteome obtained on the first postoperative day between patients with and without acute kidney injury.
  • Acute kidney injury developed in 6 of 36 patients.
  • A modified urinary albumin was increased, and zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein and a fragment of adrenomedullin-binding protein were decreased in patients with acute kidney injury.
  • Decreased excretion of zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein in patients with acute kidney injury was confirmed by Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in an independent cohort of 22 patients with and 46 patients without acute kidney injury.
  • Zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein is a potentially useful predictive marker for acute kidney injury after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery.
  • [MeSH-major] Cardiopulmonary Bypass / adverse effects. Kidney Diseases / etiology. Kidney Diseases / urine. Proteomics

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20176211.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-685X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Thorac. Cardiovasc. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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51. Can B, Kulaksiz Erkmen G, Dalmizrak O, Ogus IH, Ozer N: Purification and characterisation of rat kidney glutathione reductase. Protein J; 2010 May;29(4):250-6
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  • [Title] Purification and characterisation of rat kidney glutathione reductase.
  • Kidney and liver tissues were considered as a rich source of GR.
  • In this study, rat kidney GR was purified and some of its properties were investigated.
  • NADH was used as a coenzyme by rat kidney GR but with a lower efficiency (32.7%) than NADPH.
  • An optimum pH of 6.5 and optimum temperature of 65 degrees C were found for rat kidney GR.
  • [MeSH-major] Glutathione Reductase / chemistry. Glutathione Reductase / metabolism. Kidney / enzymology

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  • (PMID = 20490902.001).
  • [ISSN] 1875-8355
  • [Journal-full-title] The protein journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Protein J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 53-59-8 / NADP; EC 1.8.1.7 / Glutathione Reductase; ULW86O013H / Glutathione Disulfide
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52. Leclerc E, Baudoin R, Corlu A, Griscom L, Luc Duval J, Legallais C: Selective control of liver and kidney cells migration during organotypic cocultures inside fibronectin-coated rectangular silicone microchannels. Biomaterials; 2007 Apr;28(10):1820-9
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  • [Title] Selective control of liver and kidney cells migration during organotypic cocultures inside fibronectin-coated rectangular silicone microchannels.
  • In this work, the behaviors of embryonic liver and kidney explants were studied inside rectangular polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels.
  • In kidney monocultures, with and without fibronectin, we did not observe any migration inside the microchannels.
  • Contrary to liver cells, kidney cell migration was triggered when both fibronectin coating and coculture with liver or another kidney explant were used.
  • The migration was more largely observed in coculture with liver when compared to kidney-kidney cocultures.
  • In the case of liver-kidney coculture with fibronectin, the progression of the kidney cells inside the microchannels appears as a displacement of the entire kidney explant in the direction of the liver.
  • After contact, we observed a complete merging of both liver and kidney explants.
  • In contrast, for liver-kidney cocultures without fibronectin, only the liver moved toward the kidney.
  • [MeSH-major] Fibronectins / pharmacology. Kidney / cytology. Liver / cytology. Liver / growth & development. Liver, Artificial. Organ Culture Techniques / instrumentation. Tissue Engineering / instrumentation

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  • (PMID = 17178157.001).
  • [ISSN] 0142-9612
  • [Journal-full-title] Biomaterials
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biomaterials
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Coated Materials, Biocompatible; 0 / Fibronectins; 0 / Silicones
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53. Rothman J, Crispen PL, Wong YN, Al-Saleem T, Fox E, Uzzo RG: Pathologic concordance of sporadic synchronous bilateral renal masses. Urology; 2008 Jul;72(1):138-42
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  • [Title] Pathologic concordance of sporadic synchronous bilateral renal masses.
  • OBJECTIVES: To review the collective experience evaluating pathologic concordance rates of sporadic bilateral synchronous renal tumors reported in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database and the published English literature and treated at Fox Chase Cancer Center; specifically, to analyze concordance rates of malignant versus benign disease, histologic type, tumor stage, and nuclear grade.
  • METHODS: We reviewed the SEER database, the published English language literature, and our own institutional tumor registry to identify all cases of sporadic, synchronous localized (cT1-3N0M0) bilateral renal masses.
  • Malignant and benign concordance rates were defined as agreement of any benign or malignant tumor type bilaterally.
  • Tumors with mixed histologies were discordant unless all patterns were identical bilaterally.
  • Nuclear grades were concordant if bilateral tumors were either "high" grade or "low" grade.
  • RESULTS: The malignant concordance rate in the SEER data was 99% (273 of 274), and benign concordance was 0 (0 of 1).
  • In the published literature and Fox Chase Cancer Center series, malignant concordance rates ranged from 84% to 95%, whereas benign concordance ranged from 39% to 67%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that in cases of bilateral sporadic localized synchronous renal masses, a diagnosis of ipsilateral renal cell carcinoma is associated with contralateral renal cell carcinoma in the vast majority of patients, whereas ipsilateral benign pathology is associated with contralateral benign disease at a substantially lower rate.
  • Histologic concordance is similarly high, meaning most cases of clear cell or papillary tumors ipsilaterally are concordant in the contralateral kidney.
  • These data are important when counseling and managing patients with bilateral synchronous sporadic renal tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / pathology

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  • (PMID = 18336882.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA006927; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA006927-45
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS59757; NLM/ PMC2527970
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54. Anchi T, Tamura K, Inoue K, Ashida S, Yamasaki I, Takeuchi T, Shuin T: [A case of carcinoid tumor arising from a horseshoe kidney]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2009 Jun;55(6):327-30
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  • [Title] [A case of carcinoid tumor arising from a horseshoe kidney].
  • Carcinoid tumor of the kidney is an extremely rare neoplasm.
  • We report a case of primary carcinoid tumor arising from a horseshoe kidney in a 31-year-old man.
  • From the results of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and angiography, we suspected renal tumor arising from a horseshoe kidney and performed left partial nephrectomy with isthmectomy.
  • Pathological findings of hematoxylin eosin staining revealed tumor cells proliferating in a cord-like and ribbon-like structure and the tumor cells stained strongly for chromogranin A, grimelius and neuron specific enolase.
  • According to these findings, we diagnosed carcinoid tumor arising from a horseshoe kidney.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoid Tumor / etiology. Kidney / abnormalities. Kidney Neoplasms / etiology


55. Crane HM, Kestenbaum B, Harrington RD, Kitahata MM: Amprenavir and didanosine are associated with declining kidney function among patients receiving tenofovir. AIDS; 2007 Jul 11;21(11):1431-9
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  • [Title] Amprenavir and didanosine are associated with declining kidney function among patients receiving tenofovir.
  • OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of antiretroviral agents and clinical factors on the development of tenofovir-associated kidney dysfunction.
  • Patients' kidney function prior to initiating and while receiving tenofovir was evaluated in relation to other antiretroviral medications and demographic and clinical characteristics.
  • Decline in kidney function was assessed by the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) as estimated by the Cockcroft-Gault (CG) equation, which incorporates weight.
  • Secondary analyses used the simplified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation.
  • RESULTS: Among the 445 patients initiating tenofovir, 51 (11%) developed a decline in kidney function.
  • In multivariate analysis, there was a significant association between decline in kidney function and concurrent use of amprenavir [odds ratio (OR) 3.6; P = 0.045] and didanosine (OR, 3.1; P = 0.006), age over 50 years (OR, 4.4; P = 0.03), and lower baseline weight (OR, 0.95/kg; P < 0.001).
  • Patients identified with kidney dysfunction by the MDRD equation did not fully overlap with those identified by the CG equation.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Didanosine and amprenavir use, increased age, and lower baseline weight were significantly associated with risk for kidney dysfunction among patients receiving tenofovir.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Age Factors. Analysis of Variance. Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. Body Weight. Carbamates / adverse effects. Carbamates / therapeutic use. Creatinine / urine. Didanosine / adverse effects. Didanosine / therapeutic use. Drug Interactions. Female. Glomerular Filtration Rate / drug effects. Humans. Kidney / drug effects. Kidney / metabolism. Linear Models. Male. Middle Aged. Sulfonamides / adverse effects. Sulfonamides / therapeutic use. Tenofovir. Time Factors

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  • [CommentIn] AIDS. 2007 Nov 30;21(18):2566 [18025906.001]
  • (PMID = 17589189.001).
  • [ISSN] 0269-9370
  • [Journal-full-title] AIDS (London, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AIDS
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / AI-060464; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / AI-27757
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-HIV Agents; 0 / Carbamates; 0 / Organophosphonates; 0 / Sulfonamides; 5S0W860XNR / amprenavir; 99YXE507IL / Tenofovir; AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine; JAC85A2161 / Adenine; K3GDH6OH08 / Didanosine
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56. Yang XJ, Zhou M, Hes O, Shen S, Li R, Lopez J, Shah RB, Yang Y, Chuang ST, Lin F, Tretiakova MM, Kort EJ, Teh BT: Tubulocystic carcinoma of the kidney: clinicopathologic and molecular characterization. Am J Surg Pathol; 2008 Feb;32(2):177-87
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  • [Title] Tubulocystic carcinoma of the kidney: clinicopathologic and molecular characterization.
  • The nature of tubulocystic carcinoma, a rare renal tumor composed of tubular and cystic structures, is poorly understood.
  • It has been suggested that it may represent a low-grade collecting duct carcinoma of the kidney despite the lack of sufficient molecular and pathologic evidence.
  • The aim of this study was to examine the clinical and pathologic features of 13 cases of tubulocystic carcinoma of the kidney.
  • Furthermore, using gene expression microarray analysis, we defined the molecular signature of this tumor by comparing it with other renal tumors in our previously established molecular profile database.
  • Histologically, all 13 tumors were composed of closely packed tubules and cysts of varying sizes separated by fibrovascular septa.
  • The epithelial lining cells of the tubules and cysts in this tumor were characterized by abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm with prominent nucleoli often showing a hobnail appearance.
  • Five of the 13 cases coexisted with papillary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) (n=3) or papillary adenoma (n=2).
  • Therefore, based on its unique pathologic features and molecular signature as well as its biologic behavior to develop metastasis either by itself or in association with papillary RCC, tubulocystic carcinoma of the kidney should be recognized as a distinct subtype of RCC and be distinguished from other malignant and benign cystic lesions of the kidney.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Chromosome Aberrations. Cystadenocarcinoma / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Humans. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis

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  • (PMID = 18223319.001).
  • [ISSN] 0147-5185
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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57. Montgomery RA, Zachary AA, Ratner LE, Segev DL, Hiller JM, Houp J, Cooper M, Kavoussi L, Jarrett T, Burdick J, Maley WR, Melancon JK, Kozlowski T, Simpkins CE, Phillips M, Desai A, Collins V, Reeb B, Kraus E, Rabb H, Leffell MS, Warren DS: Clinical results from transplanting incompatible live kidney donor/recipient pairs using kidney paired donation. JAMA; 2005 Oct 5;294(13):1655-63
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  • [Title] Clinical results from transplanting incompatible live kidney donor/recipient pairs using kidney paired donation.
  • CONTEXT: First proposed 2 decades ago, live kidney paired donation (KPD) was considered a promising new approach to addressing the shortage of organs for transplantation.
  • DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS: Prospective series of paired donations matched and transplanted from a pool of blood type or crossmatch incompatible donors and recipients with end-stage renal disease (6 conventional and 4 unconventional KPD transplants) at a US tertiary referral center (between June 2001 and November 2004) with expertise in performing transplants in patients with high immunologic risk.
  • INTERVENTION: Kidney paired donation and live donor renal transplantation.

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  • [CommentIn] JAMA. 2005 Oct 5;294(13):1691-3 [16204670.001]
  • (PMID = 16204665.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-3598
  • [Journal-full-title] JAMA
  • [ISO-abbreviation] JAMA
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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58. Nakamura Y, Urashima M, Nishihara R, Matsuura A, Bekku K, Iguchi H, Uesugi T, Saegusa M, Aramaki K: Inflammatory pseudotumor of the kidney with renal artery penetration. Radiat Med; 2007 Dec;25(10):541-7
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  • [Title] Inflammatory pseudotumor of the kidney with renal artery penetration.
  • Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) is a quasineoplastic lesion that most commonly involves the lung and the orbit; kidney involvement is rare.
  • We report a case of inflammatory pseudotumor of the kidney.
  • Nonenhanced computed tomography (CT) demonstrated an ill-defined, isodensity mass measuring 3.5 cm in the lower portion of the left kidney.
  • Contrast-enhanced CT showed that branches of the renal artery without encasement penetrated the tumor; there was a little enhancement in the mass on the arterial phase and homogeneous enhancement on the venous phase.
  • Most IPTs of the kidney appear as an ill-defined, hypovascular, homogeneous tumor on CT images, with variable signal intensity on MRI T1WIs and low signal intensity on T2WIs.
  • Our case had the same imaging findings, with branches of the renal artery penetrating the tumor.
  • If the renal tumor has these radiological findings, the tumor may be IPT.
  • [MeSH-major] Granuloma, Plasma Cell / pathology. Kidney Diseases / pathology. Renal Artery / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 18085406.001).
  • [ISSN] 0288-2043
  • [Journal-full-title] Radiation medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiat Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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59. Arija I, Centeno C, Viveros A, Brenes A, Marzo F, Illera JC, Silvan G: Nutritional evaluation of raw and extruded kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. pinto) in chicken diets. Poult Sci; 2006 Apr;85(4):635-44
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  • [Title] Nutritional evaluation of raw and extruded kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. pinto) in chicken diets.
  • An experiment was conducted to study the effect of inclusion of different concentrations (0, 100, 200, and 300 g/kg) of raw kidney bean and extruded kidney bean in broiler chick (0 to 21 d of age) diets on performance, digestive organ sizes, protein and amino acid digestibilities, intestinal viscosity, cecal pH, and blood parameters.
  • Data were analyzed as a 3 x 2 factorial arrangement with 3 levels of kidney bean with and without extrusion.
  • Positive control without kidney bean was used.
  • Increasing the kidney bean content in the diet reduced weight gain and consumption, and increased the feed-to-gain ratio.
  • Relative pancreas, liver, and jejunum weights, and intestinal viscosity were increased in response to increasing kidney bean concentration in the diet.
  • The inclusion of different concentrations of kidney bean did not affect the apparent ileal digestibility of essential and nonessential amino acids, except for Met, Phe, and Cys, which were increased.
  • Increasing kidney bean in the diet did not affect blood parameters, except for total protein, which was increased, and for androstenedione and testosterone, which were reduced.
  • We concluded that the inclusion of kidney bean in chicken diets cause a negative effect on performance and CP and amino acid digestibilities, and modified digestive organ sizes, intestinal viscosity, cecal pH, and some blood parameters.
  • These effects were counteracted by the extrusion of kidney bean.
  • However, the inclusion of extruded kidney bean in a chick diet resulted in poorer performance compared with that obtained with a corn-soybean diet.

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  • (PMID = 16615347.001).
  • [ISSN] 0032-5791
  • [Journal-full-title] Poultry science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Poult. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Plant Preparations
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60. Al-Bazzaz PH: Kidney transplantation in Erbil, Iraq: a single-center experience. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl; 2010 Mar;21(2):359-62
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  • [Title] Kidney transplantation in Erbil, Iraq: a single-center experience.
  • Kidney transplantation is associated with improved quality of life and better survival among patients with end-stage renal disease.
  • The aim of this study is to assess the experience of kidney transplant program in a single center in Erbil, Iraq.
  • The records of 83 pairs, donors and recipients, treated with kidney transplantation at the Zheen Hospital in Erbil, over a two-year period were collected and analyzed.
  • In conclusion, even though experience related to kidney transplantation in Erbil is limited, the reported results are encouraging for a promising future.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Failure, Chronic / surgery. Kidney Transplantation. Tissue Donors / supply & distribution


61. Musquera Felip M, Peri Cusí L, Alcaraz Asensio A: [Surgical aspects of living-donor kidney transplantation]. Nefrologia; 2010;30 Suppl 2:71-9
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  • [Title] [Surgical aspects of living-donor kidney transplantation].
  • For these reasons, we can accept laparoscopic kidney living donor nephrectomy as the gold standard surgical technique in these patients.
  • In order to decide which kidney is better to extract, it is mandatory to maintain the best kidney in the donor.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Transplantation. Living Donors. Nephrectomy / methods

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  • (PMID = 21183965.001).
  • [ISSN] 0211-6995
  • [Journal-full-title] Nefrología : publicación oficial de la Sociedad Española Nefrologia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nefrologia
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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62. Petrovic V, Jovanovic I, Pesic I, Stefanovic V: Role of stem cells in kidney repair. Ren Fail; 2010;32(10):1237-44
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  • [Title] Role of stem cells in kidney repair.
  • End-stage renal disease and acute renal failure are the most important issues of practical and clinical nephrology, bearing in mind their high mortality rate, solely symptomatic treatment, and overall economic impact on society.
  • The advances in stem cell biology opened the door for the new era in treatment of many disorders, including renal, offering new therapeutical solutions.
  • Findings suggesting that the adult kidney contains stem cells and that stem cells from bone marrow have potential to differentiate into renal cells focused research on the possible application of these cells in therapy of kidney disorders.
  • The other promising candidates for stem cell therapy for the kidney are embryonic stem cells and amniotic fluid-derived stem cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Failure, Chronic / surgery

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  • (PMID = 20954989.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-6049
  • [Journal-full-title] Renal failure
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ren Fail
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
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63. Qiao H, Bai J, Chen Y, Tian J: Kidney modelling for FDG excretion with PET. Int J Biomed Imaging; 2007;2007:63234
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  • [Title] Kidney modelling for FDG excretion with PET.
  • The filtration process in kidney can be seen in the sequential images of each study.
  • Variational distribution of FDG in kidney can be detected in dynamic data.
  • According to the structure and function, kidney is divided into parenchyma and pelvis.
  • A unidirectional three-compartment model is proposed to describe the renal function in FDG excretion.

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  • (PMID = 17728841.001).
  • [ISSN] 1687-4188
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of biomedical imaging
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Biomed Imaging
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1950229
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64. Nemati E, Pourfarziani V, Jafari AM, Assari S, Moghani-Lankarani M, Khedmat H, Bagheri N, Saadat SH: Prediction of inpatient survival and graft loss in rehospitalized kidney recipients. Transplant Proc; 2007 May;39(4):974-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prediction of inpatient survival and graft loss in rehospitalized kidney recipients.
  • INTRODUCTION: Despite a sizeable amount of research conducted hitherto into predictors of renal transplantation outcomes, there are scarce, data on predictors of in-hospital outcomes of post-kidney transplant rehospitalization.
  • This study sought to provide a user-friendly prediction model for inpatient mortality and graft loss among rehospitalized kidney recipients.
  • METHOD: This retrospective review of 424 consecutive kidney recipients rehospitalized after kidney transplantation between the years 2000 and 2005 used multiple logistic regression analysis to evaluate predictors of hospitalization outcomes.
  • RESULTS: Multivariate analysis showed that age at admission, diabetes mellitus as the cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), admission due to cerebrovascular accident (CVA), surgical complications were predictors of in-hospital death; age at transplantation, surgical complications, and rejection were predictors of graft loss.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our prediction equations, using simple demographic and clinical variables, estimated the probability of inpatient mortality and graft loss among re-hospitalized kidney recipients.
  • [MeSH-major] Graft Survival / physiology. Hospital Mortality. Inpatients / statistics & numerical data. Kidney Transplantation / physiology. Patient Readmission / statistics & numerical data

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  • (PMID = 17524866.001).
  • [ISSN] 0041-1345
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplant. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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65. Hilhorst MT, Kranenburg LW, Busschbach JJ: Should health care professionals encourage living kidney donation? Med Health Care Philos; 2007 Mar;10(1):81-90
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  • [Title] Should health care professionals encourage living kidney donation?
  • Living kidney donation provides a promising opportunity in situations where the scarcity of cadaveric kidneys is widely acknowledged.
  • While many patients and their relatives are willing to accept its benefits, others are concerned about living kidney programs; they appear to feel pressured into accepting living kidney transplantations as the only proper option for them.
  • Evidence suggests that both patients and their relatives have attitudes towards living kidney donation that are often open to change and, accordingly, can be influenced.
  • [MeSH-major] Counseling / ethics. Kidney Transplantation / psychology. Living Donors / psychology. Physician-Patient Relations / ethics. Professional-Family Relations / ethics


66. Kageyama S, Tsuru T, Okamoto K, Narita M, Okada Y: Primary synovial sarcoma arising from a crossed ectopic kidney with fusion. Int J Urol; 2010 Jan;17(1):96-8
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  • [Title] Primary synovial sarcoma arising from a crossed ectopic kidney with fusion.
  • Crossed renal ectopia with fusion is a rare anomaly of the kidney.
  • The present case report describes a 67-year-old man with renal tumor who had been diagnosed as having a crossed ectopic kidney with fusion for 25 years.
  • The pathological diagnosis of the primary tumor specimen was Wilms' tumor with favorable histology.
  • Upon tumor recurrence, molecular detection of SYT-SSX2 fusion transcripts lead to the diagnosis of synovial sarcoma of the kidney.
  • To our knowledge, this is the first case of primary synovial sarcoma arising from a crossed ectopic kidney with fusion.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney / abnormalities. Kidney Neoplasms / complications. Sarcoma, Synovial / complications

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  • (PMID = 20377831.001).
  • [ISSN] 1442-2042
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of urology : official journal of the Japanese Urological Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
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67. Misra S, Gordon JD, Fu AA, Glockner JF, Chade AR, Mandrekar J, Lerman L, Mukhopadhyay D: The porcine remnant kidney model of chronic renal insufficiency. J Surg Res; 2006 Oct;135(2):370-9
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  • [Title] The porcine remnant kidney model of chronic renal insufficiency.
  • BACKGROUND: The purpose of the present study was to develop and characterize a porcine model of chronic renal insufficiency created by renal artery embolization.
  • In the pilot group, the embolization procedure was optimized with respect to the size of polyvinyl acrylide (PVA) particles, coils, and amount of kidney embolized.
  • The animals were followed serially for 4 weeks after the embolization procedure to determine the renal function and hypertensive response.
  • RESULTS: The kidney function after the embolization was characterized by acute deterioration in renal function, followed by improvement, and "stable" chronic renal insufficiency with statistically significant elevation in creatinine and BUN being observed until day 42.
  • The remnant kidney developed fibrosis in the tublointerstitial compartment as it hypertrophied and increased its weight which remained significantly elevated after embolization.
  • CONCLUSIONS: A reproducible remnant kidney model of chronic renal insufficiency in pigs was developed.
  • In this model, stable renal insufficiency develops by 4 weeks that lasts until 12 weeks.
  • [MeSH-major] Disease Models, Animal. Kidney / pathology. Renal Insufficiency, Chronic / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Angiography. Animals. Blood Pressure. Blood Urea Nitrogen. Creatinine / metabolism. Male. Organ Size. Renal Artery Obstruction / surgery. Sus scrofa. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 16815448.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-4804
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of surgical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Surg. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine
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68. Yang B, Sonawane ND, Zhao D, Somlo S, Verkman AS: Small-molecule CFTR inhibitors slow cyst growth in polycystic kidney disease. J Am Soc Nephrol; 2008 Jul;19(7):1300-10
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  • [Title] Small-molecule CFTR inhibitors slow cyst growth in polycystic kidney disease.
  • Cyst expansion in polycystic kidney disease (PKD) involves progressive fluid accumulation, which is believed to require chloride transport by the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein.
  • These compounds also inhibited cyst number and growth by >80% in an embryonic kidney cyst model involving 4-d organ culture of embryonic day 13.5 mouse kidneys in 8-Br-cAMP-containing medium.
  • Subcutaneous delivery of tetrazolo-CFTR(inh)-172 and Ph-GlyH-101 to neonatal, kidney-specific PKD1 knockout mice produced stable, therapeutic inhibitor concentrations of >3 microM in urine and kidney tissue.
  • Treatment of mice for up to 7 d remarkably slowed kidney enlargement and cyst expansion and preserved renal function.
  • These results implicate CFTR in renal cyst growth and suggest that CFTR inhibitors may hold therapeutic potential to reduce cyst growth in PKD.

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  • (PMID = 18385427.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-3450
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL73856; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / P50 DK057328; United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / R01 EY013574; United States / NIBIB NIH HHS / EB / R01 EB000415; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK054053; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK57328; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK035124; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073856; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / P30 DK072517; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK54053; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK72517; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL059198; United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / EY13574; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK35124; United States / NIBIB NIH HHS / EB / EB00415; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL59198; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R37 DK035124; United States / NIBIB NIH HHS / EB / R37 EB000415
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cadherins; 0 / Cdh16 protein, mouse; 0 / TRPP Cation Channels; 0 / Thiazolidines; 0 / polycystic kidney disease 1 protein; 126880-72-6 / Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator; 14379-80-7 / glycine hydrazide; EC 2.7.7.- / Cre recombinase; EC 2.7.7.- / Integrases; TE7660XO1C / Glycine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2440296
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69. Wang Y, Wang Z, Wang W, Ren H, Zhang W, Chen N: Analysis of factors associated with renal function in Chinese adults with congenital solitary kidney. Intern Med; 2010;49(20):2203-9
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  • [Title] Analysis of factors associated with renal function in Chinese adults with congenital solitary kidney.
  • BACKGROUND: Patients with congenital solitary kidney have an increased risk of developing hypertension, proteinuria and renal insufficiency.
  • However, the specific factors associated with the progression of renal function in adults with congenital solitary kidney remain still unclear.
  • The purpose of this study was to identify factors that are independently associated with renal function progression in patients with congenital solitary kidney.
  • METHODS: Sixty-five Chinese adults with congenital solitary kidney (48 patients with unilateral renal agenesis and 17 with severe unilateral renal dysplasia) were recruited into our study retrospectively.
  • RESULTS: Of sixty-five patients with congenital solitary kidney, the prevalence of hypertension, proteinuria and renal insufficiency was 36.9%, 35.4% and 38.5%, respectively.
  • While there was no statistically significant difference in prevalence of hypertension between patients with and without renal insufficiency, the prevalence of proteinuria in patients with renal insufficiency was significantly higher than in those without renal insufficiency (p<0.05).
  • Logistic regression analysis revealed that kidney length and proteinuria were independently associated with the progression of renal function (OR=0.20, 95%CI 0.05-0.79, and OR=8.30, 95%CI 2.30-29.96, respectively).
  • CONCLUSION: Hypertension, proteinuria or renal insufficiency was present in approximately one-third of adults with congenital solitary kidney.
  • Those with a kidney length of less than 120 mm or proteinuria had a much higher risk of renal insufficiency.
  • [MeSH-major] Hypertension, Renal / etiology. Kidney / abnormalities. Kidney Failure, Chronic / etiology. Proteinuria / etiology

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  • (PMID = 20962438.001).
  • [ISSN] 1349-7235
  • [Journal-full-title] Internal medicine (Tokyo, Japan)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Intern. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 268B43MJ25 / Uric Acid; AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine
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70. Newsome BB, Warnock DG, Kiefe CI, Weissman NW, Houston TK, Centor RM, Person SD, McClellan WM, Allison JJ: Delay in time to receipt of thrombolytic medication among Medicare patients with kidney disease. Am J Kidney Dis; 2005 Oct;46(4):595-602
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  • [Title] Delay in time to receipt of thrombolytic medication among Medicare patients with kidney disease.
  • BACKGROUND: Patients with kidney disease and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) receive standard therapy, including thrombolytic medication, less frequently than patients with normal kidney function.
  • Our goal is to identify potential differences in thrombolytic medication delays and thrombolytic-associated bleeding events by severity of kidney disease.
  • Average time to thrombolytic therapy was longer in patients with worse kidney function.
  • Adjusted hazard ratios for minutes to thrombolytic therapy were 0.83 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79 to 0.87) for patients with a serum creatinine level of 1.6 to 2.0 mg/dL (141 to 177 micromol/L) and 0.58 (95% CI, 0.53 to 0.63) for patients with a creatinine level greater than 2.0 mg/dL (>177 micromol/L) or on dialysis therapy compared with those with normal kidney function.
  • Odds ratios for bleeding events in patients administered thrombolytics versus those who were not decreased with worse kidney function: adjusted odds ratios, 2.28 (95% CI, 2.16 to 2.42) in patients with normal kidney function and 1.84 (95% CI, 1.09 to 3.10) in dialysis patients.
  • CONCLUSION: Patients with worse kidney function experienced treatment delays, but were not at greater risk for thrombolysis-associated excess bleeding events.
  • [MeSH-major] Fibrinolytic Agents / administration & dosage. Kidney Diseases / complications. Medicare / statistics & numerical data. Myocardial Infarction / drug therapy. Thrombolytic Therapy / statistics & numerical data

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  • (PMID = 16183413.001).
  • [ISSN] 1523-6838
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Kidney Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / AHRQ HHS / HS / T32 HS013852; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL70786
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cardiovascular Agents; 0 / Fibrinolytic Agents; AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine
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71. Mazaris EM, Warrens AN, Papalois VE: Ethical issues in live donor kidney transplant: views of medical and nursing staff. Exp Clin Transplant; 2009 Mar;7(1):1-7
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  • [Title] Ethical issues in live donor kidney transplant: views of medical and nursing staff.
  • OBJECTIVES: The ongoing development of live donor kidney transplant has generated many ethical dilemmas.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: An anonymous and confidential questionnaire was sent to 236 members of the medical and nursing staff of the West London Renal and Transplant Centre, to assess their views on the ethics of the current practice of live donor kidney transplant.
  • Respondents considered live donor kidney transplant ethically acceptable between blood relatives (100%), nonblood relatives and friends (92.6%), and strangers (47.2%).
  • Most respondents were willing to donate a kidney to a blood relative (92.6%) or a nonblood relative or friend (81.5%), and 12.0% were willing to donate to a stranger.
  • Considering themselves as potential recipients if they had end-stage renal disease, most would accept a kidney from a blood relative (91.7%) or nonblood relative or friend (85.2%),while 44.5% would accept a kidney from a stranger.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Live related and unrelated kidney donation are considered ethically acceptable procedures, and nondirected donation is gaining support among transplant professionals.
  • [MeSH-major] Attitude of Health Personnel. Directed Tissue Donation / ethics. Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice. Kidney Transplantation / ethics. Living Donors / ethics. Tissue and Organ Procurement / ethics

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  • (PMID = 19364304.001).
  • [ISSN] 1304-0855
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental and clinical transplantation : official journal of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp Clin Transplant
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Turkey
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72. Mozer P, Leroy A, Payan Y, Troccaz J, Chartier-Kastler E, Richard F: Computer-assisted access to the kidney. Int J Med Robot; 2005 Dec;1(4):58-66
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  • [Title] Computer-assisted access to the kidney.
  • OBJECTIVES: The aim of this paper is to introduce the principles of computer-assisted access to the kidney.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: Both CT and US images of informed normal volunteer were obtained to perform calculation on the accuracy of registration and punctures were carried out on a kidney phantom to measure the precision of the whole of the system.
  • RESULTS: We carried out millimetric registrations on real data and guidance experiments on a kidney phantom showed encouraging results of 4.7 mm between planned and reached targets.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney / surgery. Surgery, Computer-Assisted

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
  • (PMID = 17518406.001).
  • [ISSN] 1478-596X
  • [Journal-full-title] The international journal of medical robotics + computer assisted surgery : MRCAS
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Med Robot
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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73. Geel A, Zuidema W, van Gelder T, van Doornum G, Weimar W: Successful vaccination against varicella zoster virus prior to kidney transplantation. Transplant Proc; 2005 Mar;37(2):952-3
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  • [Title] Successful vaccination against varicella zoster virus prior to kidney transplantation.
  • BACKGROUND: In recent years we have observed a number of severe complications of primary varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections after adult kidney transplantation.
  • We questioned how many patients on the waiting list for kidney transplantation had not been protected against VZV and whether patients with renal insufficiency would be able to develop a specific immune response upon VZV vaccination.
  • METHODS: We examined the VZV antibody titer of 280 patients on the kidney transplant waiting list.
  • Seronegative kidney transplant candidates were vaccinated twice with a live attenuated varicella vaccine at an interval of 6 weeks.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Viral / blood. Chickenpox / immunology. Chickenpox Vaccine / therapeutic use. Kidney Transplantation / immunology

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  • (PMID = 15848586.001).
  • [ISSN] 0041-1345
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplant. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Viral; 0 / Chickenpox Vaccine
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74. Bader AA, Tamussino KF, Winter R: Ectopic (pelvic) kidney mimicking bulky lymph nodes at pelvic lymphadenectomy. Gynecol Oncol; 2005 Mar;96(3):873-5
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  • [Title] Ectopic (pelvic) kidney mimicking bulky lymph nodes at pelvic lymphadenectomy.
  • BACKGROUND: Ectopic (pelvic) kidney is the most common congenital renal anomaly with an incidence of 1 in 500 to 1 in 2000.
  • A pelvic kidney can be encountered at pelvic or paraaortic lymphadenectomy.
  • CASE REPORTS: In two patients undergoing pelvic lymphadenectomy, lobulated tumors near the pelvic brim were initially interpreted as bulky lymph node conglomerates.
  • Further dissection showed the ureter to originate from the masses, leading to a diagnosis of pelvic kidney.
  • CONCLUSION: Pelvic kidneys mistaken for bulky lymph nodes are a potential intraoperative pitfall in patients with gynecologic malignancies.
  • Keys to recognition include an index of suspicion, identifying the course of the ureter and origin of the renal vessels, and confirming absence of a kidney at the normal location.
  • [MeSH-major] Genital Neoplasms, Female / surgery. Kidney / abnormalities. Lymph Nodes / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Lymphatic Metastasis. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 15721442.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-8258
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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75. Mekeel KL, Mazur MJ, Reddy KS, Mulligan DC, Heilman RL, Chakkera HA, Andrews PE, Moss AA: Diffuse parenchymal urine leak after kidney transplantation following degloving injury during donor nephrectomy. Am J Transplant; 2007 Aug;7(8):2039-41
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  • [Title] Diffuse parenchymal urine leak after kidney transplantation following degloving injury during donor nephrectomy.
  • Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy can result in trauma to the kidney which may affect recipient graft function.
  • In this case, the kidney sustained a complete degloving of the capsule during extraction.
  • The kidney was transplanted and had immediate, good renal function, but postoperative course was complicated by a large urinoma that drained through the wound.
  • Exploration was negative for a defined urine leak, but the surface of the denuded kidney was leaking a significant amount of unconcentrated urine.
  • The patient was successfully treated with tissue glue treatment to the kidney surface and peritoneal window.
  • [MeSH-major] Intraoperative Complications. Kidney / injuries. Kidney Transplantation / adverse effects. Laparoscopy / adverse effects. Nephrectomy / adverse effects. Tissue Donors. Tissue and Organ Procurement / methods

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  • (PMID = 17578504.001).
  • [ISSN] 1600-6135
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
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76. Krajisnik T, Olauson H, Mirza MA, Hellman P, Akerström G, Westin G, Larsson TE, Björklund P: Parathyroid Klotho and FGF-receptor 1 expression decline with renal function in hyperparathyroid patients with chronic kidney disease and kidney transplant recipients. Kidney Int; 2010 Nov;78(10):1024-32
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  • [Title] Parathyroid Klotho and FGF-receptor 1 expression decline with renal function in hyperparathyroid patients with chronic kidney disease and kidney transplant recipients.
  • However, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) develop secondary hyperparathyroidism despite high levels of serum FGF23, indicating a parathyroid FGF23 'resistance'.
  • Here we analyzed the expression of the FGF23 receptors Klotho and FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1) in 88 hyperplastic parathyroid glands from 31 patients with CKD (including 21 renal allograft recipients), and their regulation in isolated bovine and human hyperplastic parathyroid cells.
  • Thus parathyroid Klotho and FGFR1 decrease with declining renal function, possibly because of alterations in mineral metabolism related to the failing kidney.
  • [MeSH-major] Glucuronidase / metabolism. Hyperparathyroidism / metabolism. Kidney / physiopathology. Kidney Diseases / metabolism. Kidney Transplantation / physiology. Parathyroid Glands / metabolism. Receptors, Fibroblast Growth Factor / metabolism

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  • [CommentIn] Kidney Int. 2010 Nov;78(10):953-5 [21030971.001]
  • (PMID = 20686451.001).
  • [ISSN] 1523-1755
  • [Journal-full-title] Kidney international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Kidney Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Minerals; 0 / Parathyroid Hormone; 0 / Receptors, Calcitriol; 0 / Receptors, Fibroblast Growth Factor; 0 / fibroblast growth factor 23; 62031-54-3 / Fibroblast Growth Factors; EC 3.2.1.31 / Glucuronidase; EC 3.2.1.31 / klotho protein
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77. Bouman CS, Oudemans-van Straaten HM: Timing of renal replacement therapy in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Curr Opin Crit Care; 2007 Dec;13(6):656-61
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  • [Title] Timing of renal replacement therapy in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Timing of renal replacement therapy in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury is highly subjective, and may influence outcome.
  • We discuss renal and nonrenal criteria for timing considering the recent literature.
  • All but one randomized controlled trial indicated better outcome with early renal replacement therapy but had poor methodological quality.
  • SUMMARY: In the absence of large randomized controlled trials we can make no firm recommendations for timing of renal replacement therapy in acute kidney injury.
  • Since rapid recovery of renal function is unlikely when other organ failure persists and the consequences of acute kidney injury may be more severe in critically ill patients, we suggest other organ failure is also considered.
  • Patients with acute kidney injury, persisting shock and poorly recovering functions of other organs may benefit from early therapy.
  • For future studies, we recommend describing renal replacement therapy timing according to the 'RIFLE' classification, as modified by the Acute Kidney Injury Network, and quantifying the severity of other organ failure.
  • Biomarkers may refine acute kidney injury and timing definitions in the future.
  • [MeSH-major] Acute Kidney Injury / therapy. Critical Illness. Kidney / injuries. Renal Replacement Therapy / methods. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17975386.001).
  • [ISSN] 1070-5295
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in critical care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Crit Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers
  • [Number-of-references] 51
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78. Murphy AM, Buck AM, Benson MC, McKiernan JM: Increasing detection rate of benign renal tumors: evaluation of factors predicting for benign tumor histologic features during past two decades. Urology; 2009 Jun;73(6):1293-7
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  • [Title] Increasing detection rate of benign renal tumors: evaluation of factors predicting for benign tumor histologic features during past two decades.
  • OBJECTIVES: To determine whether the detection of benign renal tumors is increasing and to identity the predictors of benign histologic features.
  • The detection of renal cortical tumors has increased with the increased use of abdominal imaging.
  • Current imaging and biopsy techniques cannot predict the renal tumor histologic features with complete accuracy, and many patients undergo surgery for benign lesions.
  • A cohort of 775 patients with a tumor diameter of <or.0 cm, nonmetastatic disease, and nonfamilial disease was selected.
  • Univariate and multivariate logarithmic regression analyses were used to determine the parameters to predict for benign histologic features.
  • RESULTS: The proportion of renal surgery for benign tumors of <or.0 cm in diameter has increased annually.
  • When patients were stratified by the year of surgery, the proportion of benign tumors was 5.0% before 1998, 15.2% from 1998 to 2003, and 21.2% from 2004 to 2007.
  • The mean diameter of benign and malignant tumors was 3.0 and 3.5 cm, respectively, and the mean tumor diameter significantly decreased during the study period (P = .006).
  • Using multivariate analysis, the year of surgery, tumor diameter, and female sex were independent predictors of benign histologic features (P < .05).
  • Age, incidental diagnosis, body mass index, and race were not significant predictors (P > .05).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Even when controlling for tumor diameter and sex, the incidence of benign tumors detected at renal surgery at our institution has increased significantly in the past 2 decades.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Neoplasms / pathology

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  • [CommentIn] Urology. 2009 Jun;73(6):1297-8 [19482148.001]
  • [CommentIn] Urology. 2009 Jun;73(6):1298-9 [19482149.001]
  • (PMID = 19371933.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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79. Blanco L, Larrinaga G, Pérez I, López JI, Gil J, Agirregoitia E, Varona A: Acid, basic, and neutral peptidases present different profiles in chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and in oncocytoma. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol; 2008 Apr;294(4):F850-8
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  • [Title] Acid, basic, and neutral peptidases present different profiles in chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and in oncocytoma.
  • Renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) are neoplasias with high prevalence and mortality.
  • We previously reported that several peptidases may be involved in the pathophysiology of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC).
  • Now, to gain insight into the reasons that lead the various RCC types to behave very differently with regard to aggressiveness and response to anticancer treatments, we analyzed subsets of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC), and renal oncocytoma (RO), a benign tumor; as well as different grades and stages of CCRCCs.
  • Particulate APN, APB, and APA activities were decreased in both ChRCC and RO (tumor vs. nontumor tissues).
  • Interestingly, activities were downregulated in a tumor-type specific way and the intensities of the decreases were stronger in the benign tumor than in the malignant type.
  • Moreover, when two key histopathological parameters for tumor prognosis (high vs. low stage and grade) were analyzed, increases of activity were also observed in several of these cell surface peptidases (APN, APB).
  • These results may suggest an involvement of several peptidases in the pathophysiology of renal cancer, since they presented different patterns of activity and expression in tumors with different behaviors.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoma, Oxyphilic / genetics. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / genetics. Kidney Neoplasms / genetics. Peptide Hydrolases / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. DNA Primers. Female. Gene Expression Profiling. Humans. Hydrogen-Ion Concentration. Kinetics. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Polymerase Chain Reaction


80. Sudarshan S, Linehan WM: Genetic basis of cancer of the kidney. Semin Oncol; 2006 Oct;33(5):544-51
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  • [Title] Genetic basis of cancer of the kidney.
  • Kidney cancer is not a single disease.
  • It is made up of a number of different types of cancer that occur in the kidney, each with a different histologic type, having a different clinical course, responding differently to therapy and caused by a different gene.
  • The identification of families with a predisposition to the development of renal neoplasms, including von Hippel-Lindau (VHL), hereditary papillary renal carcinoma (HPRC), Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD), and hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC), has made possible the identification of the different genes for these cancers.
  • The elucidation of molecular pathogenesis in these familial forms of kidney cancer should provide the opportunity to determine successful approaches for novel therapeutic agents.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Papillary / genetics. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / genetics. Genetic Predisposition to Disease. Kidney Neoplasms / genetics. von Hippel-Lindau Disease / genetics

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  • (PMID = 17045083.001).
  • [ISSN] 0093-7754
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / Intramural NIH HHS / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 87
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81. Kalb B, Martin DR, Salman K, Sharma P, Votaw J, Larsen C: Kidney transplantation: structural and functional evaluation using MR Nephro-Urography. J Magn Reson Imaging; 2008 Oct;28(4):805-22
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  • [Title] Kidney transplantation: structural and functional evaluation using MR Nephro-Urography.
  • End-stage-renal disease (ESRD) is a major health issue in the United States, and the Medicare costs of ESRD totaled nearly USD 21 billion in 2005.
  • Renal transplantation has emerged as the treatment of choice in this patient population, providing improved quality of life and lower healthcare costs compared with other treatment options.
  • Imaging evaluation of a graft kidney plays a critical role in the postoperative care of the renal transplant patient.
  • In the past, diagnostic evaluation of the transplant kidney has depended upon a combination of ultrasonography, computed tomography, MRI, and biopsy, used in conjunction with the patient's clinical presentation.
  • However, new and developing advances in MR technology has lead to the development of MR Nephro-Urography (MRNU), which provides both anatomic and functional evaluation of the kidney in a single examination.
  • It is expected that the increasing use of MRNU will have a significant impact on the management of renal transplant patients.
  • This review describes MRNU methodology, examines known posttransplant complications, and highlights the utility of MRNU as a comprehensive imaging examination to diagnose both surgical and medical complications of the transplant kidney.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney / blood supply. Kidney Failure, Chronic / surgery. Kidney Transplantation. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Postoperative Complications / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Graft Rejection. Graft Survival. Humans. Recovery of Function. Renal Dialysis


82. Olson GE, Winfrey VP, Hill KE, Burk RF: Megalin mediates selenoprotein P uptake by kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells. J Biol Chem; 2008 Mar 14;283(11):6854-60
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  • [Title] Megalin mediates selenoprotein P uptake by kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells.
  • Selenoprotein P (Sepp1) contains most of the selenium in blood plasma, and it is utilized by the kidney, brain, and testis as a selenium source for selenoprotein synthesis.
  • We recently demonstrated that apolipoprotein E receptor-2 (ApoER2) is required for Sepp1 uptake by the testis and that deletion of ApoER2 reduces testis and brain, but not kidney, selenium levels.
  • This study examined the kidney Sepp1 uptake pathway.
  • Tissue ligand binding assays using cryosections of Sepp1-/- kidneys revealed that the proximal tubule epithelium contained Sepp1-binding sites that were blocked by the receptor-associated protein, RAP, an inhibitor of lipoprotein receptor-ligand interactions.
  • Ligand blotting assays of kidney membrane preparations fractionated by SDS-PAGE revealed that Sepp1 binds megalin, a lipoprotein receptor localized to the proximal tubule epithelium.
  • Immunolocalization analyses confirmed the in vivo co-localization of Sepp1 and megalin in wild type kidneys and demonstrated the absence of proximal tubule Sepp1 uptake in megalin null mice.
  • These results demonstrate that kidney selenium homeostasis is mediated by a megalin-dependent Sepp1 uptake pathway in the proximal tubule.
  • [MeSH-major] Epithelial Cells / metabolism. Gene Expression Regulation. Kidney Tubules / cytology. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-2 / physiology. Selenoprotein P / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 18174160.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-9258
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of biological chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Biol. Chem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / ES02497; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / HD044863
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / LDL-Receptor Related Proteins; 0 / Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-2; 0 / Receptors, Lipoprotein; 0 / Selenoprotein P; 0 / low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 8
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83. Barroso LV, Miranda EP, Cruz NI, Medeiros MA, Araújo AC, Mota Filho FH, Medeiros FC: Analysis of sexual function in kidney transplanted men. Transplant Proc; 2008 Dec;40(10):3489-91
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  • [Title] Analysis of sexual function in kidney transplanted men.
  • INTRODUCTION: Sexual dysfunction among renal failure and kidney transplant patients remains controversial.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate sexual functions of men on hemodialysis compared with patients undergoing kidney transplantation.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Our study was based on 36 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing hemodialysis versus 32 kidney transplanted patients.
  • CONCLUSION: It was possible to conclude from our study that kidney transplants do improve sexual function of patients with ESRD on hemodialysis.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Transplantation / physiology. Libido. Renal Dialysis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Coitus / psychology. Humans. Kidney Failure, Chronic / physiopathology. Kidney Failure, Chronic / psychology. Male. Middle Aged. Orgasm. Penile Erection / physiology. Personal Satisfaction. Reference Values. Sexual Behavior. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19100420.001).
  • [ISSN] 0041-1345
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplant. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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84. Kümmerlin I, ten Kate F, Smedts F, Horn T, Algaba F, Trias I, de la Rosette J, Laguna MP: Core biopsies of renal tumors: a study on diagnostic accuracy, interobserver, and intraobserver variability. Eur Urol; 2008 Jun;53(6):1219-25
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  • [Title] Core biopsies of renal tumors: a study on diagnostic accuracy, interobserver, and intraobserver variability.
  • OBJECTIVE: The diagnostic accuracy of in-bench core biopsies (CBs) from renal masses, and the interobserver and intraobserver variability in pathological subtyping of renal tumors were assessed.
  • METHODS: We performed two CBs in 62 consecutive renal masses suspected for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), obtained after radical or partial nephrectomy and, in one case, after autopsy.
  • RESULTS: Five tumors were benign and 57 malignant.
  • Eight percent to 16% of the CBs were considered inadequate for diagnosis.
  • In 0-8% of the cases, the pathologist could not discriminate between a benign or malignant tumor.
  • Pathological subtyping of CBs was highly reproducible with the exception of the chromophobe renal cell carcinoma, which was problematic on HE-stained sections only.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Neoplasms / pathology

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  • [CommentIn] Eur Urol. 2008 Jun;53(6):1226-7 [18082319.001]
  • [CommentIn] Eur Urol. 2008 Jun;53(6):1226 [18082318.001]
  • (PMID = 18082317.001).
  • [ISSN] 0302-2838
  • [Journal-full-title] European urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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85. Garg AX, Muirhead N, Knoll G, Yang RC, Prasad GV, Thiessen-Philbrook H, Rosas-Arellano MP, Housawi A, Boudville N, Donor Nephrectomy Outcomes Research (DONOR) Network: Proteinuria and reduced kidney function in living kidney donors: A systematic review, meta-analysis, and meta-regression. Kidney Int; 2006 Nov;70(10):1801-10
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  • [Title] Proteinuria and reduced kidney function in living kidney donors: A systematic review, meta-analysis, and meta-regression.
  • We reviewed any study where 10 or more healthy adults donated a kidney, and proteinuria, or glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was assessed at least 1 year later.
  • Kidney donation results in small increases in urinary protein.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Transplantation / adverse effects. Living Donors. Proteinuria / etiology. Renal Insufficiency / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Glomerular Filtration Rate / physiology. Humans. Incidence. Kidney / physiopathology. Middle Aged. Nephrectomy. Outcome Assessment (Health Care). Risk Factors


86. Ríos A, Conesa C, Ramírez P, Galindo PJ, Fernández OM, Rodríguez MM, Parrilla P: Attitude survey of hospital workers in the surgical services toward living kidney donation. Transplant Proc; 2005 Nov;37(9):3621-5
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  • [Title] Attitude survey of hospital workers in the surgical services toward living kidney donation.
  • INTRODUCTION: A living donor kidney is currently the most accepted kind of solid organ donation, given the low level of morbidity and mortality and the good results in the recipient.
  • Our objective was to analyze the attitudes toward living kidney donation in a surgical department.
  • Attitudes toward living kidney donation were evaluated using a questionnaire on donation and transplantation, which evaluated various psychosocial variables.
  • RESULTS: Two hundred sixty-three respondents of mean age 40 +/- 10 years were analysed for attitudes toward living kidney donation.
  • The attitude toward cadaveric organ donation was not reflective of that toward living kidney donation (P = .241).
  • CONCLUSIONS: A favorable attitude toward living kidney donation was high among hospital staff of the surgical department.
  • Those for whom it was not favorable were influenced by personal factors such as partner's attitude and the possibility of needing a kidney in the future.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney. Living Donors. Personnel, Hospital / psychology. Surgery Department, Hospital

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  • (PMID = 16386486.001).
  • [ISSN] 0041-1345
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation proceedings
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplant. Proc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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87. Fernandez NJ, West KH, Jackson ML, Kidney BA: Immunohistochemical and histochemical stains for differentiating canine cutaneous round cell tumors. Vet Pathol; 2005 Jul;42(4):437-45
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  • [Title] Immunohistochemical and histochemical stains for differentiating canine cutaneous round cell tumors.
  • Immunohistochemical and histochemical stains are useful adjunct techniques in the diagnosis of canine cutaneous round cell tumors, which can appear histologically similar.
  • We applied a panel of monoclonal antibodies (recognizing tryptase, chymase, serotonin for mast cells; CD1a, CD18, MHC class II for histiocytes; CD3 for T lymphocytes; CD79a for B lymphocytes and plasma cells) and one histochemical stain (naphthol AS-D chloroacetate for chymase activity) to formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of canine cutaneous mast cell tumors, histiocytomas, lymphosarcomas, plasmacytomas, and unidentified round cell tumors.
  • Of 21 tumors with a histologic diagnosis of mast cell tumor, 7/7 (100%) grade I, 6/7 (85.7%) grade II, and 3/7 (42.9%) grade III tumors were diagnosed as mast cell tumors based on positive staining for tryptase antigen and chymase activity.
  • Chymase was detected immunohistochemically in both tumor and nontumor cells, while serotonin was not detected in most mast cell tumors, and thus, neither was useful in the diagnosis of mast cell tumors.
  • A final diagnosis was obtained for 4/5 (80%) of the unidentified tumors, indicating the usefulness of multiple stains in poorly differentiated round cell tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Dog Diseases / pathology. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / veterinary. Immunohistochemistry / veterinary. Lymphoma / veterinary. Skin Neoplasms / veterinary
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antibodies, Monoclonal. Antigens, CD18. Chymases. Coloring Agents. Diagnosis, Differential. Dogs. Histological Techniques / veterinary. Serine Endopeptidases. Tryptases

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  • (PMID = 16006603.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-9858
  • [Journal-full-title] Veterinary pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vet. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antigens, CD18; 0 / Coloring Agents; EC 3.4.21.- / Serine Endopeptidases; EC 3.4.21.39 / Chymases; EC 3.4.21.59 / Tryptases
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88. Ghanei E, Miladipour A, Nasrollahi A, Homayuni M: Brucellosis with kidney failure. Iran J Kidney Dis; 2009 Apr;3(2):109-11
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  • [Title] Brucellosis with kidney failure.
  • While involvement of the bones, joints, and liver is not rare, brucellosis may rarely involve the kidney.
  • We present a case of brucellosis with hepatitis, pancytopenia, peripheral arthritis, and kidney failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Acute Kidney Injury / microbiology. Arthritis, Infectious / microbiology. Brucellosis / complications. Hepatitis / microbiology. Pancytopenia / microbiology

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  • (PMID = 19395788.001).
  • [ISSN] 1735-8582
  • [Journal-full-title] Iranian journal of kidney diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Iran J Kidney Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Iran
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; N12000U13O / Doxycycline; Y45QSO73OB / Streptomycin
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89. Dash A, Wolf JS: Percutaneous treatment of renal cystic nephroma. J Endourol; 2005 Jul-Aug;19(6):724-5
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  • [Title] Percutaneous treatment of renal cystic nephroma.
  • Cystic nephroma is a rare, presumed benign, renal tumor that occurs in both children and adults.

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  • (PMID = 16053364.001).
  • [ISSN] 0892-7790
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of endourology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Endourol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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90. Boutet A, De Frutos CA, Maxwell PH, Mayol MJ, Romero J, Nieto MA: Snail activation disrupts tissue homeostasis and induces fibrosis in the adult kidney. EMBO J; 2006 Nov 29;25(23):5603-13
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  • [Title] Snail activation disrupts tissue homeostasis and induces fibrosis in the adult kidney.
  • During embryonic development, the kidney epithelium originates from cells that undergo a mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET).
  • The reverse process, epithelium to mesenchyme transition (EMT), has been implicated in epithelial tumor progression and in the fibrosis that leads to end-stage kidney failure.
  • Snail transcription factors induce both natural and pathological EMT, but their implication in renal development and disease is still unclear.
  • We show that Snail genes are downregulated during the MET that occurs during renal development and that this is correlated with Cadherin-16 expression.
  • Snail suppresses Cadherin-16 via the direct repression of the kidney differentiation factor HNF-1beta, a novel route by which Snail disrupts epithelial homeostasis.
  • Indeed, Snail activation is sufficient to induce EMT and kidney fibrosis in adult transgenic mice.
  • Significantly, Snail is also activated in patients with renal fibrosis.
  • Thus, Snail expression is suppressed during renal development and it must remain silent in the mature kidney where its aberrant activation leads to fibrosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental. Kidney / embryology. Kidney / pathology. Kidney Diseases / genetics. Transcription Factors / agonists


91. Gorodetskaya I, Zenios S, McCulloch CE, Bostrom A, Hsu CY, Bindman AB, Go AS, Chertow GM: Health-related quality of life and estimates of utility in chronic kidney disease. Kidney Int; 2005 Dec;68(6):2801-8
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  • [Title] Health-related quality of life and estimates of utility in chronic kidney disease.
  • BACKGROUND: Health-related quality of life and estimates of utility have been carefully evaluated in persons with end-stage renal disease.
  • Fewer studies have examined these parameters in persons with chronic kidney disease (CKD).
  • METHODS: To determine the relations among kidney function, health-related quality of life, and estimates of utility, we administered the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Short Form 36 (KDQOL-36), Health Utilities Index (HUI)-3, and Time Trade-off (TTO) questionnaires to 205 persons with CKD.
  • On cross-sectional analysis, lower levels of kidney function were associated with significantly lower scores on the SF-12 Physical Health Composite (P= 0.002), the Burden of Kidney Disease subscale (P < 0.0001), and the Effects of Kidney Disease subscale (P < 0.0001) of the KDQOL-36trade mark.
  • Kidney function was significantly associated with the TTO (P= 0.008) and global HUI-3 utility (P= 0.016) although these associations were attenuated after adjustment for diabetes.
  • A decline in eGFR was associated with a significant increase in the reported Burden of Kidney Disease (5.0 point change per year per mL/min/1.73 m2 decline in eGFR) and with marginally significant changes in the Dexterity and Pain attributes of the HUI-3.
  • [MeSH-major] Cost of Illness. Health Status. Quality of Life. Renal Insufficiency, Chronic / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Creatinine / blood. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Glomerular Filtration Rate. Humans. Kidney Failure, Chronic / psychology. Kidney Failure, Chronic / therapy. Longitudinal Studies. Male. Middle Aged. Renal Dialysis. Surveys and Questionnaires

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  • (PMID = 16316356.001).
  • [ISSN] 0085-2538
  • [Journal-full-title] Kidney international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Kidney Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK58411; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR-00079
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine
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92. Khoury JA, Brennan DC: Infectious complications in kidney transplant recipients: review of the literature. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl; 2005 Oct-Dec;16(4):453-97
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  • [Title] Infectious complications in kidney transplant recipients: review of the literature.
  • Since the initial successful kidney transplantation in humans, the field of renal transplantation has made significant progress.
  • Enhanced surgical techniques also improved the overall survival of kidney recipients.
  • In this article, we provide an overview of infections in kidney transplant recipients, a detailed illustration of specific infectious agents with a focus on cytomegalovirus, and finally we lay some general principles for limiting the burden of infectious complications in kidney transplants through proper infection control measures.

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  • (PMID = 18202503.001).
  • [ISSN] 1319-2442
  • [Journal-full-title] Saudi journal of kidney diseases and transplantation : an official publication of the Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation, Saudi Arabia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Saudi Arabia
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93. Dear JW, Yuen PS: Setting the stage for acute-on-chronic kidney injury. Kidney Int; 2008 Jul;74(1):7-9
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  • [Title] Setting the stage for acute-on-chronic kidney injury.
  • Acute-on-chronic kidney disease will be familiar to many nephrologists.
  • Hsu et al. quantify the risk of acute-on-chronic disease across the stages of preexisting chronic kidney disease.
  • Their study demonstrates the valuable insights that large epidemiological studies can bring to the field of acute kidney injury.
  • [MeSH-major] Acute Kidney Injury / epidemiology. Kidney Failure, Chronic / epidemiology

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  • [Cites] Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2008 May;3(3):887-94 [18216348.001]
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  • [CommentOn] Kidney Int. 2008 Jul;74(1):101-7 [18385668.001]
  • (PMID = 18560361.001).
  • [ISSN] 1523-1755
  • [Journal-full-title] Kidney international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Kidney Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / Z99 DK999999
  • [Publication-type] Comment; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 10
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS295237; NLM/ PMC3113484
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94. Merkle M, Rupprecht HD: [Lymphoproliferative disease following kidney transplantation]. Dtsch Med Wochenschr; 2005 Jul 15;130(28-29):1691-4
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  • [Title] [Lymphoproliferative disease following kidney transplantation].
  • HISTORY AND CLINICAL FINDINGS: A 31-year-old male patient was referred because of a worsening graft function 56 months after an allogenic kidney transplantation for interstitial nephritis.
  • Correction of volume status did not result in an improvement of kidney function.
  • INVESTIGATIONS: Kidney biopsy showed a low degree nephrosclerosis and some interstitial fibrosis, but no signs of rejection.
  • DIAGNOSIS: EBV-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD).
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cyclophosphamide / therapeutic use. Doxorubicin / therapeutic use. Kidney Transplantation / adverse effects. Lymphoma, B-Cell / etiology. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / etiology. Prednisone / therapeutic use. Vincristine / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Abdominal Pain. Adult. Diagnosis, Differential. Diarrhea. Humans. Immunosuppressive Agents / administration & dosage. Immunosuppressive Agents / adverse effects. Male. Remission Induction. Risk Factors


95. Smith KD: Toll-like receptors in kidney disease. Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens; 2009 May;18(3):189-96
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  • [Title] Toll-like receptors in kidney disease.
  • This review focuses on the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) of the innate immune system and their role in recognizing infection and injury, and regulating inflammatory responses in the kidney.
  • Tonic interactions between TLRs and environmental agonists derived from commensal microbes and endogenous sources may also influence autoimmune disease and inflammatory disorders affecting the kidney.
  • CONCLUSION: Future studies to decipher the contribution of TLRs and other innate immune receptors in the regulation of inflammation, immune responses, and injury in the kidney will pave the way for novel therapeutic interventions.