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1. Lin LQ, Zhang CP, Zhao JL, Liu Y, Zhang SJ, Jin JC, Wang L, Liu JR: Differential expression of proteomics models of colorectal cancer, colorectal benign disease and healthy controls. Proteome Sci; 2010 Mar 25;8:16

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Differential expression of proteomics models of colorectal cancer, colorectal benign disease and healthy controls.
  • BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is often diagnosed at a late stage with concomitant poor prognosis.
  • The hypersensitive analytical technique of proteomics can detect molecular changes before the tumor is palpable.
  • The protein chips have established the expression of tumor protein in the serum specimens and become the newly discovered markers for tumor diagnosis.
  • The objective of this study was to find new markers of the diagnosis among groups of CRC, colorectal benign diseases (CBD) and healthy controls.
  • One hundred serum samples, including 52 cases of colorectal cancer, 27 cases of colorectal benign disease, and 21 cases of healthy controls, were examined by SELDI-TOF-MS with WCX2 protein-chips.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The SELDI-TOF-MS is a useful tool to help diagnose colorectal cancer, especially during the early stage.

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  • (PMID = 20334691.001).
  • [ISSN] 1477-5956
  • [Journal-full-title] Proteome science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Proteome Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2862023
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2. Sturgeon CM, Duffy MJ, Stenman UH, Lilja H, Brünner N, Chan DW, Babaian R, Bast RC Jr, Dowell B, Esteva FJ, Haglund C, Harbeck N, Hayes DF, Holten-Andersen M, Klee GG, Lamerz R, Looijenga LH, Molina R, Nielsen HJ, Rittenhouse H, Semjonow A, Shih IeM, Sibley P, Sölétormos G, Stephan C, Sokoll L, Hoffman BR, Diamandis EP, National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry: National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry laboratory medicine practice guidelines for use of tumor markers in testicular, prostate, colorectal, breast, and ovarian cancers. Clin Chem; 2008 Dec;54(12):e11-79
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  • [Title] National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry laboratory medicine practice guidelines for use of tumor markers in testicular, prostate, colorectal, breast, and ovarian cancers.
  • BACKGROUND: Updated National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for the use of tumor markers in the clinic have been developed.
  • METHODS: Published reports relevant to use of tumor markers for 5 cancer sites--testicular, prostate, colorectal, breast, and ovarian--were critically reviewed.
  • RESULTS: For testicular cancer, alpha-fetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin, and lactate dehydrogenase are recommended for diagnosis/case finding, staging, prognosis determination, recurrence detection, and therapy monitoring. alpha-Fetoprotein is also recommended for differential diagnosis of nonseminomatous and seminomatous germ cell tumors.
  • Free PSA measurement data are useful for distinguishing malignant from benign prostatic disease when total PSA is <10 microg/L.
  • In colorectal cancer, carcinoembryonic antigen is recommended (with some caveats) for prognosis determination, postoperative surveillance, and therapy monitoring in advanced disease.
  • CA125 is also recommended for differential diagnosis of suspicious pelvic masses in postmenopausal women, as well as for detection of recurrence, monitoring of therapy, and determination of prognosis in women with ovarian cancer.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of these recommendations should encourage optimal use of tumor markers.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Breast Neoplasms / diagnosis. Clinical Laboratory Techniques. Colorectal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Ovarian Neoplasms / diagnosis. Prostatic Neoplasms / diagnosis. Testicular Neoplasms / diagnosis


3. Yang J, Wang D: [Clinical value of tumor-associated growth factor detection in the diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma]. Nan Fang Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao; 2007 Oct;27(10):1577-9
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  • [Title] [Clinical value of tumor-associated growth factor detection in the diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma].
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the diagnostic value of tumor-supplied growth factors (TSGF) in patients with colorectal carcinoma.
  • METHODS: The serum content of TSGF was determined in 71 patients with colorectal carcinoma 71, 55 with benign tumor, and 100 healthy volunteers with colorimetry.
  • RESULTS: TSGF concentration and its positivity rate were both significantly higher in colorectal carcinoma patients (81.5 x 10(3) U/L/71%) than in normal controls (55.7 x 10(3) U/L/3%) and patients with benign tumor (57.2 x 10(3)U/L/7.4%).TSGF positivity rate was independent of the patients' age, gender and stage of colorectal carcinoma.
  • The diagnostic sensitivity of TSGF was 71% for colorectal carcinoma, higher than that of carcinoembryonic antigen (43.7%).
  • CONCLUSION: TSGF is more sensitive than carcinoembryonic antigen for early diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Colorectal Neoplasms / blood

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  • (PMID = 17959542.001).
  • [ISSN] 1673-4254
  • [Journal-full-title] Nan fang yi ke da xue xue bao = Journal of Southern Medical University
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nan Fang Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
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4. Ahlquist T, Lind GE, Costa VL, Meling GI, Vatn M, Hoff GS, Rognum TO, Skotheim RI, Thiis-Evensen E, Lothe RA: Gene methylation profiles of normal mucosa, and benign and malignant colorectal tumors identify early onset markers. Mol Cancer; 2008;7:94
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  • [Title] Gene methylation profiles of normal mucosa, and benign and malignant colorectal tumors identify early onset markers.
  • BACKGROUND: Multiple epigenetic and genetic changes have been reported in colorectal tumors, but few of these have clinical impact.
  • This study aims to pinpoint epigenetic markers that can discriminate between non-malignant and malignant tissue from the large bowel, i.e. markers with diagnostic potential.
  • Possible CIMP tumors were identified by comparing the methylation profile with microsatellite instability (MSI), BRAF-, KRAS-, and TP53 mutation status.
  • RESULTS: The mean number of methylated genes per sample was 0.4 in normal colon mucosa from tumor-free individuals, 1.2 in mucosa from cancerous bowels, 2.2 in adenomas, and 3.9 in carcinomas.
  • The promoters of ADAMTS1, MAL, and MGMT were frequently methylated in benign samples as well as in malignant tumors, independent of microsatellite instability.
  • In contrast, normal mucosa samples taken from bowels without tumor were rarely methylated for the same genes.
  • CONCLUSION: Methylated ADAMTS1, MGMT, and MAL are suitable as markers for early tumor detection.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Colonic Neoplasms / genetics. Colonic Neoplasms / pathology. DNA Methylation. Early Detection of Cancer. Genes, Neoplasm. Intestinal Mucosa / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenoma / genetics. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Cluster Analysis. DNA, Neoplasm / metabolism. Epigenesis, Genetic. Female. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Humans. Male. Microsatellite Instability. Microsatellite Repeats / genetics. Middle Aged. Promoter Regions, Genetic. Sex Characteristics

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  • (PMID = 19117505.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-4598
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2639620
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5. Grossmann I, Avenarius JK, Mastboom WJ, Klaase JM: Preoperative staging with chest CT in patients with colorectal carcinoma: not as a routine procedure. Ann Surg Oncol; 2010 Aug;17(8):2045-50
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Preoperative staging with chest CT in patients with colorectal carcinoma: not as a routine procedure.
  • BACKGROUND: Preoperative staging of patients with colorectal carcinoma (CRC) has the potential benefit of altering treatment options when metastases are present.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients who undergo colorectal surgery in our hospital are prospectively registered, including patient, treatment, and histopathological characteristics; outcome; and follow-up.
  • These were diagnosed during follow-up as true metastases (n = 8), bronchus carcinoma (n = 2), benign lesions (n = 25), and remaining unknown (n = 15).
  • In none of the patients the treatment plan for the primary tumor was changed based on the staging chest CT.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / radiography. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplasm Staging / methods. Preoperative Care. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 20151212.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-4681
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2899025
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6. Wang W, Feng B, Li X, Yin P, Gao P, Zhao X, Lu X, Zheng M, Xu G: Urinary metabolic profiling of colorectal carcinoma based on online affinity solid phase extraction-high performance liquid chromatography and ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Mol Biosyst; 2010 Oct;6(10):1947-55
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  • [Title] Urinary metabolic profiling of colorectal carcinoma based on online affinity solid phase extraction-high performance liquid chromatography and ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.
  • Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is the third most commonly encountered cancer and fourth cause of cancer-associated death worldwide.
  • In this study both ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) and online affinity solid phase extraction-high performance liquid chromatography (SPE-HPLC) were used to analyze the urinary metabolites from 34 healthy volunteers, 34 benign colorectal tumor and 50 colorectal carcinoma patients to produce comprehensive metabolic profiling data.
  • [MeSH-major] Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid / methods. Colorectal Neoplasms / urine. Mass Spectrometry / methods

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  • (PMID = 20617254.001).
  • [ISSN] 1742-2051
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular bioSystems
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol Biosyst
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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7. Amato A: Colorectal gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Tech Coloproctol; 2010 Nov;14 Suppl 1:S91-5
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Colorectal Cancer.

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  • [Title] Colorectal gastrointestinal stromal tumor.
  • Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm arising in the digestive tract, with an estimated prevalence of 15-20 per 1,000,000.
  • Colorectal GISTs represent about 5-10% of the cases, mainly located in the rectum that is the third common site.
  • Benign GISTs are more common, but many tumors are of uncertain malignant potential; tumor size and rate of mitosis are still the most reliable criteria for assessing the risk of an aggressive behavior.
  • Surgery is the first-line treatment for resectable non-metastatic colorectal GIST.
  • Segmental colectomy with negative margins is recommended, and local excision is oncologically adequate in highly selected rectal tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

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  • (PMID = 20967481.001).
  • [ISSN] 1128-045X
  • [Journal-full-title] Techniques in coloproctology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tech Coloproctol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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8. Gelos M, Hinderberger D, Welsing E, Belting J, Schnurr K, Mann B: Analysis of albumin fatty acid binding capacity in patients with benign and malignant colorectal diseases using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Int J Colorectal Dis; 2010 Jan;25(1):119-27
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  • [Title] Analysis of albumin fatty acid binding capacity in patients with benign and malignant colorectal diseases using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy.
  • INTRODUCTION: In colorectal cancer (CRC), no biological marker is known that could serve both as a marker for detection and prognosis.
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine whether the FA binding to albumin is detectably and significantly altered in CRC patients when compared with patients having benign colorectal diseases.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred four patients operatively or endoscopically treated for CRC, sigmoid diverticulitis, or a colorectal adenoma were examined before procedure.
  • RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS: Patients with CRC showed significantly lower DR values (DR, -0.09 +/- 0.98 vs. 0.61 +/- 1.43) than patients with benign colorectal diseases, consistent with a change of conformation and transport function of albumin in CRC.
  • Within the CRC group, with advanced tumor stage, the difference in DR values increased.
  • Furthermore, a correlation with advanced tumor stage can be established.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / metabolism. Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy / methods. Fatty Acids / metabolism. Serum Albumin / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Demography. Endoscopy. Female. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Postoperative Care. Preoperative Care. Protein Binding

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  • (PMID = 19644694.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-1262
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of colorectal disease
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Colorectal Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fatty Acids; 0 / Serum Albumin
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9. Zhang JF, Gao CF, Wang XL, Zheng GB, Li DH: [Screening and expression of tumor markers in colorectal carcinoma]. Zhonghua Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2007 Apr 1;45(7):459-61
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Screening and expression of tumor markers in colorectal carcinoma].
  • OBJECTIVE: To screen the tumor markers of colorectal carcinoma and to investigate their expression in preoperative and postoperative serum.
  • METHODS: The distinct proteins in serum were detected in 87 cases of colorectal carcinoma, 68 cases of benign colorectal diseases and 56 healthy people by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS).
  • The distinct proteins in serum were detected in 87 cases of colorectal carcinoma pre-operation and within 15 days post operation with the same methods.
  • Compared with benign colorectal diseases and healthy control, the expression of the two proteins was obviously up-regulated in colorectal carcinoma (P < 0.01).
  • Compared with pre-operation, the expression on the 1(st) day post operation was obviously up-regulated (P < 0.01), and the expression decreased to pre-operative level on the 4(th) day post operation.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Two proteins with mass-to-charge ratios of 5955 Da and 5972 Da could be regarded as tumor markers in colorectal carcinoma, the expression may has some regularity.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Colorectal Neoplasms / blood. Mass Screening / methods

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  • (PMID = 17686301.001).
  • [ISSN] 0529-5815
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua wai ke za zhi [Chinese journal of surgery]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
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10. Belizon A, Balik E, Horst PK, Shantha Kumara HM, Nasar A, Whelan RL: Platelet-derived growth factor (subtype BB) is elevated in patients with colorectal carcinoma. Dis Colon Rectum; 2009 Jun;52(6):1166-71
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  • [Title] Platelet-derived growth factor (subtype BB) is elevated in patients with colorectal carcinoma.
  • PURPOSE: Platelet-derived growth factor-BB plays a role in the development of vascular and lymphatic vessels in tumors.
  • In this study plasma levels of platelet-derived growth factor-BB were assessed preoperatively in patients with adenomas and colorectal cancer to determine whether platelet-derived growth factor-BB is a useful marker or prognostic indicator.
  • METHODS: Patients with adenomas and colorectal cancer undergoing resection were assessed.
  • RESULTS: One hundred seventy-nine patients were studied (91 with colorectal cancer, 88 with adenomas).
  • Preoperative colorectal cancer platelet-derived growth factor-BB levels were higher (1,771.1 pg/ml; confidence intervals, 1,429-2,065) than in the benign neoplasm group (1083 pg/ml; confidence intervals, 933-1,192, P < 0.001).
  • In patients with colorectal cancer, a direct relationship was noted between platelet-derived growth factor-BB levels and disease severity.
  • CONCLUSION: Platelet-derived growth factor-BB levels were greater in patients with colorectal cancer (vs. patients with adenoma) and rose with increasing disease severity.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoma / blood. Colorectal Neoplasms / blood. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Chi-Square Distribution. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Female. Humans. Logistic Models. Male. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-sis. Statistics, Nonparametric

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  • (PMID = 19581863.001).
  • [ISSN] 1530-0358
  • [Journal-full-title] Diseases of the colon and rectum
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dis. Colon Rectum
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Platelet-Derived Growth Factor; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-sis; 0 / platelet-derived growth factor BB
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11. Huang Z, Li L, Wang J: Hypermethylation of SFRP2 as a potential marker for stool-based detection of colorectal cancer and precancerous lesions. Dig Dis Sci; 2007 Sep;52(9):2287-91
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  • [Title] Hypermethylation of SFRP2 as a potential marker for stool-based detection of colorectal cancer and precancerous lesions.
  • DNA methylation is a key mechanism of colorectal carcinogenesis.
  • Analysis of aberrantly methylation in stool DNA might provide a novel strategy for noninvasive detection of colorectal cancer (CRC).
  • To explore the feasibility of this approach, we have assessed the methylation status of secreted frizzled-related protein gene 2 (SFRP2) in stool samples from patients with CRC with respect to a series of healthy individuals and patients with benign colorectal diseases, using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction.
  • Methylation testing of fecal DNA may be a simple, promising, and noninvasive screening tool for colorectal neoplasia.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / genetics. Colorectal Neoplasms. DNA Methylation. DNA, Neoplasm / analysis. Feces / chemistry. Membrane Proteins / genetics. Precancerous Conditions
  • [MeSH-minor] Apoptosis. Biopsy. Colonoscopy. Diagnosis, Differential. Disease Progression. Humans. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Prognosis. Sensitivity and Specificity

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  • (PMID = 17410438.001).
  • [ISSN] 0163-2116
  • [Journal-full-title] Digestive diseases and sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dig. Dis. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 0 / Membrane Proteins; 0 / SFRP2 protein, human
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12. Tralhão JG, Hoti E, Serôdio M, Laranjeiro P, Paiva A, Abrantes AM, Pais ML, Botelho MF, Castro Sousa F: Perioperative tumor cell dissemination in patients with primary or metastatic colorectal cancer. Eur J Surg Oncol; 2010 Feb;36(2):125-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Perioperative tumor cell dissemination in patients with primary or metastatic colorectal cancer.
  • INTRODUCTION: Although there is general correlation between the TNM stage of colorectal cancer (CRC) and its prognosis, there is often significant variability of tumor behaviour and individual patient outcome, which is unaccounted for by pathologic factors alone.
  • Our aim was to estimate perioperative tumor cell dissemination in patients with primary or CRC liver metastases as a possible factor influencing the outcome.
  • The remaining six patients who underwent colon or liver resection for benign conditions, acted as the control group.
  • Blood samples were taken before the surgical incision (T0), immediately after tumor resection (T1) and at the end of the surgical intervention (T2).
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates no differences in the detected circulating numbers of tumor cells at different stages of surgical intervention.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / surgery. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Liver Neoplasms / surgery. Neoplastic Cells, Circulating / pathology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 19646840.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-2157
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of surgical oncology : the journal of the European Society of Surgical Oncology and the British Association of Surgical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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13. Torlakovic E, Marginean EC, Torlakovic G, Geyer R, Neufeld H, Decoteau J: Downregulation of RIZ1 protein expression in left-sided versus right-sided primary colorectal carcinomas and their distant metastases and the association with NF-B activation. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15112

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Downregulation of RIZ1 protein expression in left-sided versus right-sided primary colorectal carcinomas and their distant metastases and the association with NF-B activation.
  • RIZ1 frameshift mutations were recently reported to be confined to MSI-H colorectal tumors and proximal tumor origin, while its hypermethylation was not limited to MSI-H tumors.
  • However, RIZ1 protein expression has not been evaluated in colorectal carcinoma.
  • METHODS: TMAs included 28 left-sided and 12 right-sided primary colorectal adenocarcinomas, their matched normal mucosa and their respective distant metastases.
  • Left-sided tumors were compared to right-sided tumors for expression of RIZ1 protein and NF- B activation.
  • NF- B activation was determined by IHC detecting nuclear translocation of its p65 subunit in more than 30% tumor nuclei.
  • RESULTS: RIZ1 was less expressed in tumors than in benign mucosa (p<0.0001, r=- 0.377, Chi-Square).
  • Left-sided primary tumors showed less RIZ1 protein expression than right-sided (p=0.03, Chi-Square).
  • NF- B activation was more frequent in left-sided primary tumors and their respective metastases (35% in right vs. 67% in left; p=0.002, Chi-Square Test).
  • RIZ1 expression and NF- B activation were almost identical in primary and their respective metastatic tumors with only 3 discrepant results for NF- B status and 2 discrepant results in RIZ1 expression.
  • CONCLUSIONS: While RIZ1 downregulation in colorectal adenocarcinoma due to RIZ1 mutations appears to be associated with MSI-H and proximal origin, its protein expression appears to be downregulated more often in distal tumors.
  • NF- B activation is strongly associated with lower RIZ1 protein expression in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

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  • (PMID = 27960861.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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14. Marginean EC, Torlakovic G, Neufeld H, Torlakovic E: Association of upregulated GATA-4 transcription factor colorectal adenocarcinoma with metastatic and primary tumors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15093

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Association of upregulated GATA-4 transcription factor colorectal adenocarcinoma with metastatic and primary tumors.
  • Nuclear factor-B (NF-B) activation was shown to promote the growth of the colon tumors in experimental models and was correlated with tumor angiogenesis and progression in human colorectal cancer.
  • METHODS: Forty cases of colorectal adenocarcinoma were evaluated.
  • The benign colonic mucosa and the matching metastatic tumors of the same patients were also included in the study.
  • RESULTS: GATA-4 was expressed in 32% of colorectal adenocarcinoma, but not in benign colonic mucosa (p=0.0001, Chi-Square).
  • GATA-4 was also significantly more expressed in metastatic (41%) than in primary (21%) colorectal adenocarcinoma (p<0.0001, Chi-Square).
  • NF-B activation was not present in any of the samples of benign colonic mucosa, but it was detected in 64% adenocarcinomas (p<0.0001, Chi-Square).
  • CONCLUSIONS: GATA-4, a developmental transcription factor is not expressed by normal colonic mucosa, but is present in 1/5 of primary tumors that gave rise to distant metastases and in almost 1/2 of their respective metastases.
  • GATA-4 may have a role in colorectal adenocarcinoma development and progression and it should be further evaluated in prospective studies as a putative adverse prognostic factor in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

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  • (PMID = 27964606.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. Skalicky T, Treska V, Liska V, Sutnar A, Molacek J, Mirka H, Ferda J, Ohlidalova K: The rare benign liver tumors. Bratisl Lek Listy; 2007;108(4-5):229-32
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  • [Title] The rare benign liver tumors.
  • As opposed to malignant secondary tumors, metastases of the colorectal carcinoma are benign tumors of the liver that are quite rare in the Czech Republic.
  • From the 55 patients operated on since 2000 at our department for benign liver tumors, the most frequent are haemangiomas, focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) and hepatocelular adenoma.
  • Only 7.3% of them form a different histological type of a tumor than this most frequently occurring trio of tumors.
  • The authors describe three cases of rather rare liver tumors with benign behavior that have the potential of becoming malignant.
  • It concerns mucin producing biliary tumors, which correspond to the pancreatic intraductal papillary mucin tumor, hepatic cystadenoma with ovarian stroma and a liver hamartoma in an adult patient (Ref 13).
  • [MeSH-major] Liver Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cholangitis, Sclerosing / diagnosis. Cholangitis, Sclerosing / surgery. Cystadenoma / diagnosis. Cystadenoma / surgery. Female. Hemangioma, Cavernous / diagnosis. Hemangioma, Cavernous / surgery. Humans. Middle Aged. Pancreatic Ducts. Pancreatic Neoplasms / diagnosis. Pancreatic Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 17694811.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-9248
  • [Journal-full-title] Bratislavské lekárske listy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bratisl Lek Listy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Slovakia
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16. Ohta M, Seto M, Ijichi H, Miyabayashi K, Kudo Y, Mohri D, Asaoka Y, Tada M, Tanaka Y, Ikenoue T, Kanai F, Kawabe T, Omata M: Decreased expression of the RAS-GTPase activating protein RASAL1 is associated with colorectal tumor progression. Gastroenterology; 2009 Jan;136(1):206-16
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  • [Title] Decreased expression of the RAS-GTPase activating protein RASAL1 is associated with colorectal tumor progression.
  • BACKGROUND & AIMS: Although colorectal cancer (CRC) progression has been associated with alterations in KRAS and RAS signaling, not all CRC cells have KRAS gene mutations.
  • The expression of the RAS protein activator like-1 (RASAL1) was examined in clinical colorectal neoplasms using immunohistochemistry.
  • The clinicopathologic (age, sex, and tumor site and grade) and molecular (KRAS gene mutation, as well as CTNNB1 and TP53 expression patterns) factors that could affect RASAL1 expression were examined.
  • RASAL1 expression was detected in 46.9% (30/64) of adenocarcinoma, 17.4% (8/46) of large adenoma, and no (0/42) small adenoma samples.
  • RASAL1 expression levels were correlated with the presence of wild-type KRAS gene in CRC tumor samples (P= .0010), distal location (P= .0066), and abnormal expression of TP53 (P= .0208).
  • Reductions in RASAL1 expression were detected more frequently in advanced lesions than in small adenomas, suggesting that RASAL1 functions in the progression of benign colonic neoplasms.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / etiology. Tumor Suppressor Proteins / physiology. ras GTPase-Activating Proteins / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Cell Line, Tumor. DNA Methylation. Disease Progression. Female. Gene Silencing. Genes, ras. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Signal Transduction


17. Ishikawa K, Kamohara Y, Tanaka F, Haraguchi N, Mimori K, Inoue H, Mori M: Mitotic centromere-associated kinesin is a novel marker for prognosis and lymph node metastasis in colorectal cancer. Br J Cancer; 2008 Jun 3;98(11):1824-9
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  • [Title] Mitotic centromere-associated kinesin is a novel marker for prognosis and lymph node metastasis in colorectal cancer.
  • Overexpression of MCAK has been correlated with aggressive forms of carcinoma, resulting in poor prognosis of colorectal cancer.
  • The purpose of this study was to quantify MCAK expression in malignant and benign colorectal tissues and to determine if MCAK expression levels correlate with clinicopathologic factors and prognosis in colorectal cancer patients.
  • Paired colorectal tissue samples from tumours and the corresponding normal tissues were obtained from 120 patients with colorectal cancer who underwent surgical resection.
  • MCAK expression was higher in colorectal cancer tissue (P<0.01) than in corresponding normal tissue, and this elevated expression level was markedly associated with factors such as lymph node metastasis (P=0.0023), venous invasion (P=0.019), peritoneal dissemination (P=0.021) and Dukes' classification (P=0.0023).
  • These data suggest that MCAK expression may serve as a good marker of prognosis and lymph node metastasis in colorectal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / metabolism. Kinesin / genetics. RNA, Messenger / analysis
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Lymphatic Metastasis. Multivariate Analysis. Prognosis. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • [Cites] Nat Cell Biol. 2001 Jan;3(1):E28-34 [11146647.001]
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  • (PMID = 18506187.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-1827
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / KIF2C protein, human; 0 / RNA, Messenger; EC 3.6.1.- / Kinesin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2410130
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18. Kline RC, Bazzett-Matabele LB: Adnexal masses and malignancies of importance to the colorectal surgeon. Clin Colon Rectal Surg; 2010 Jun;23(2):63-71

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Adnexal masses and malignancies of importance to the colorectal surgeon.
  • In this article, the authors review both benign and malignant ovarian masses, as the colorectal surgeon who encounters an adnexal mass at the time of surgery should be aware of the steps necessary for surgical staging and optimal tumor resection.Ovarian tumors-most of which are benign-are divided into three major categories, in order of frequency: epithelial, germ cell, and sex cord-stromal tumors.
  • Nonneoplastic conditions of the ovary that may present as adnexal masses include the following, according to World Health Organization (WHO) classification: pregnancy luteoma, hyperplasia of ovarian stroma, hyperthecosis, massive edema, solitary follicle cysts and corpus luteal cysts, multiple follicle cysts, and endometriosis.Epithelial ovarian tumors arise from the surface epithelium and can be benign or malignant.
  • Germ cell tumors are more likely to appear in females under 20 years, accounting for 70% of ovarian tumors in this age group.
  • Teratomas are the most common germ cell tumors.
  • Malignancies, in addition to malignant teratomas, include dysgerminomas, endodermal sinus tumors, and embryonal carcinomas.
  • The more common sex cord-stromal tumors include granulosa stromal cell tumors, Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors, and gynandroblastomas.Surgical staging and optimal tumor resection are also addressed, with a focus on epithelial malignancies, as they are the most relevant to colorectal surgeons.

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  • (PMID = 21629623.001).
  • [ISSN] 1530-9681
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinics in colon and rectal surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Colon Rectal Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2967325
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Adnexal masses / ovarian cancer / ovarian cysts
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19. Petrova TV, Nykänen A, Norrmén C, Ivanov KI, Andersson LC, Haglund C, Puolakkainen P, Wempe F, von Melchner H, Gradwohl G, Vanharanta S, Aaltonen LA, Saharinen J, Gentile M, Clarke A, Taipale J, Oliver G, Alitalo K: Transcription factor PROX1 induces colon cancer progression by promoting the transition from benign to highly dysplastic phenotype. Cancer Cell; 2008 May;13(5):407-19
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Transcription factor PROX1 induces colon cancer progression by promoting the transition from benign to highly dysplastic phenotype.
  • The Drosophila transcription factor Prospero functions as a tumor suppressor, and it has been suggested that the human counterpart of Prospero, PROX1, acts similarly in human cancers.
  • However, we show here that PROX1 promotes dysplasia in colonic adenomas and colorectal cancer progression.
  • PROX1 expression marks the transition from benign colon adenoma to carcinoma in situ, and its loss inhibits growth of human colorectal tumor xenografts and intestinal adenomas in Apc(min/+) mice, while its transgenic overexpression promotes colorectal tumorigenesis.
  • Furthermore, in intestinal tumors PROX1 is a direct and dose-dependent target of the beta-catenin/TCF signaling pathway, responsible for the neoplastic transformation.
  • Our data underscore the complexity of cancer pathogenesis and implicate PROX1 in malignant tumor progression through the regulation of cell polarity and adhesion.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoma / genetics. Colonic Neoplasms / genetics. Homeodomain Proteins / genetics. Tumor Suppressor Proteins / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Carcinoma in Situ / genetics. Cell Line, Tumor. Colorectal Neoplasms / genetics. Disease Progression. Gene Expression Profiling. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Humans. Phenotype. beta Catenin / physiology

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  • (PMID = 18455124.001).
  • [ISSN] 1878-3686
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer cell
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Cell
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / G0301154
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Homeodomain Proteins; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins; 0 / beta Catenin; 0 / prospero-related homeobox 1 protein
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20. Kume K, Murata I, Yoshikawa I, Yamasaki M, Kanda K, Otsuki M: Endoscopic piecemeal mucosal resection of large colorectal tumors. Hepatogastroenterology; 2005 Mar-Apr;52(62):429-32
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  • [Title] Endoscopic piecemeal mucosal resection of large colorectal tumors.
  • BACKGROUND/AIMS: Since endoscopic en bloc resection of large and sessile tumors is technically difficult, endoscopic en bloc piecemeal mucosal resection (EPMR) is usually chosen for resection of such tumors.
  • Tumors resected by EPMR are, however, difficult to evaluate histologically.
  • METHODOLOGY: We removed 30 large colorectal tumors in 30 patients by EPMR between 1992-2000.
  • Patients in whom no residual tumor was found by both endoscopic and histologic examination were considered to be "cured".
  • RESULTS: Histological examination of the resected tumor tissues revealed malignancy in 43.3% (13/30).
  • Three patients had invasive malignant tumors and underwent surgery.
  • Following complete endoscopic resection, recurrences were observed in 2 patients with benign tumors, which were resected by additional endoscopic resection.
  • All patients including the two with non-invasive malignant tumors remain free from recurrence during a mean follow-up period of 45.2 months (range, 3-104 months).
  • CONCLUSIONS: EPMR of benign or non-invasive large malignant tumors is a safe and effective procedure.
  • Complete excision of large, sessile and non-invasive tumors is possible, although complete removal by EPMR cannot be verified histologically.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoma / surgery. Carcinoma / surgery. Colorectal Neoplasms / surgery. Endoscopy, Digestive System / methods. Intestinal Mucosa / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Colonoscopy. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 15816450.001).
  • [ISSN] 0172-6390
  • [Journal-full-title] Hepato-gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hepatogastroenterology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
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21. Shi X, Gong E, Wu X: Alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase/P504S overexpression in colorectal carcinoma is correlated with tumor differentiation. Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol; 2007 Jun;15(2):175-80
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  • [Title] Alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase/P504S overexpression in colorectal carcinoma is correlated with tumor differentiation.
  • Little is known about correlation of AMACR expression with colorectal carcinoma (CRC) differentiation and prognosis.
  • These cases were divided into 3 groups according to the histologic differentiation of the primary tumors. group A included 50 cases of histologically well and moderately differentiated CRCs, 20 of these with lymph node metastasis; group B included 23 cases of well and moderately differentiated CRCs, histologically similar to group A, except these tumors had small foci (less than 20%) of high-grade carcinoma, and 10 of these had lymph node metastasis; group C included 33 cases of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and undifferentiated carcinoma, 17 with lymph node metastasis.
  • In group B, although overexpression of AMACR in primary tumors was similar to that of group A, it was only seen in 30.0% of group B metastatic tumors, which was similar to the rate of expression in group C (23.5%).
  • In contrast, rates of expression in group A primary and metastatic tumors were similar (80.0% and 75.0%).
  • Positive staining for AMACR in benign epithelium adjacent to tumor was rare (<2%).
  • Our findings support the view that the expression of AMACR in CRC is correlated with tumor differentiation.

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  • (PMID = 17525630.001).
  • [ISSN] 1541-2016
  • [Journal-full-title] Applied immunohistochemistry & molecular morphology : AIMM
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Appl. Immunohistochem. Mol. Morphol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; EC 5.1.- / Racemases and Epimerases; EC 5.1.99.4 / alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase
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22. Li FY, Ren XB, Xu EP, Huang Q, Sheng HQ, Lv BJ, Lai MD: RegIV expression showing specificity to gastrointestinal tract and its potential role in diagnosing digestive tract neuroendocrine tumor. J Zhejiang Univ Sci B; 2010 Apr;11(4):258-66
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  • [Title] RegIV expression showing specificity to gastrointestinal tract and its potential role in diagnosing digestive tract neuroendocrine tumor.
  • To learn more about RegIV, we evaluated its distribution by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in a total of 360 samples including 24 types of normal tissue, 40 benign and malignant lesions, and 18 neuroendocrine tumors.
  • Studies on additional sets of colorectal tumor samples showed that RegIV expression was predominant in colorectal adenoma (87.5%) and peritumoral tissue (100%) but not in cancer tissue (30.8%).
  • Among neuroendocrine tumors, RegIV had a relatively restricted expression to those of digestive system.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / metabolism. Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Gastrointestinal Tract / metabolism. Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Lectins, C-Type / biosynthesis. Neuroendocrine Tumors / metabolism

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  • [Cites] Mod Pathol. 2000 Feb;13(2):140-6 [10697270.001]
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  • [ErratumIn] J Zhejiang Univ Sci B. 2010 May;11(5):390
  • (PMID = 20349522.001).
  • [ISSN] 1862-1783
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of Zhejiang University. Science. B
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Zhejiang Univ Sci B
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Lectins, C-Type; 0 / REG4 protein, human
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2852542
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23. Amosenko FA, Korchagina EL, Matveeva TI, Vaganov IuE, Vlasov SB, Poltavets NV, Veselov VV, Gar'kavtseva RF, Poliakov AV: [Mutation analysis of K-ras protooncogene in colorectal adenocarcinomas and polyps in Russian patients]. Genetika; 2010 May;46(5):700-8
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  • [Title] [Mutation analysis of K-ras protooncogene in colorectal adenocarcinomas and polyps in Russian patients].
  • To estimate diagnostic value of K-ras mutations during cancer risk group formation, they were studied in the samples of sporadic carcinomas (n = 33) and malignant (n = 13) polyps of large intestine obtained during surgery or polypectomy.
  • Mutation frequency in carcinomas, benign and malignant polyps was 43, 49, and 69%, respectively.
  • In the healthy tissue of the large intestine, no changes in codons 12 and 13 in the K-ras gene were observed.
  • In patients with colorectal carcinoma the mutation frequency in the K-ras gene was not associated with disease onset age, location, and the extent of tumor differentiation while it was associated with the stage of tumor process.
  • The maximum mutation frequency was revealed in polyps of patients over 70 years of age as well as in the adenomas of villous histology and large size ((1 cm).
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / genetics. Colonic Polyps / genetics. Colorectal Neoplasms / genetics. DNA, Neoplasm / genetics. Genes, ras / genetics. Mutation

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  • (PMID = 20583607.001).
  • [ISSN] 0016-6758
  • [Journal-full-title] Genetika
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Genetika
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Codon; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm
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24. Cserni G, Bori R, Sejben I: Vascular invasion demonstrated by elastic stain-a common phenomenon in benign granular cell tumors. Virchows Arch; 2009 Feb;454(2):211-5

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  • [Title] Vascular invasion demonstrated by elastic stain-a common phenomenon in benign granular cell tumors.
  • Granular cell tumor is generally benign, but rare malignant cases have been documented.
  • Features of malignancy include necrosis, cellular spindling, vesicular nuclei with large nucleoli, increased mitotic activity, high nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio, and pleomorphism, but not vascular invasion.
  • Venous invasion was incidentally identified with the orcein elastic stain in an otherwise benign granular cell tumor (propositus case).
  • Four further benign granular cell tumors were also analyzed; venous invasion was discovered in three.
  • It is suggested that vascular invasion is not uncommon in granular cell tumors and should not lead to the classification of the tumor as malignant or atypical.
  • It is also suggested that some cases of vascular invasion identified by elastic stains in tumors such as colorectal carcinomas (where these stains are recommended for routine use) may also represent invasion of vascular structures without the propensity of metastasis.
  • [MeSH-major] Blood Vessels / pathology. Elastic Tissue / pathology. Granular Cell Tumor / pathology. Staining and Labeling / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Neoplasm Invasiveness

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  • (PMID = 19066954.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-2307
  • [Journal-full-title] Virchows Archiv : an international journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Virchows Arch.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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25. Königsrainer I, Steurer W, Witte M, Königsrainer A: Liver resection without hilus preparation and with selective intrahepatic hilus stapling for benign tumors and liver metastasis. Langenbecks Arch Surg; 2007 Jul;392(4):485-8
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  • [Title] Liver resection without hilus preparation and with selective intrahepatic hilus stapling for benign tumors and liver metastasis.
  • Extrahepatic isolation of portal vein, hepatic artery and hepatic duct, as well as lymphadenectomy of the liver hilum are generally accepted steps of liver resection, even for metastatic and benign indications.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-eight consecutive patients with resection for metastases and benign liver tumors were selected.
  • To date, no tumor recurrence was found in the hilum during the follow-up period.
  • Hilar dissection can, thus, be avoided in liver metastasis and benign liver tumors.

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  • (PMID = 17530278.001).
  • [ISSN] 1435-2443
  • [Journal-full-title] Langenbeck's archives of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Langenbecks Arch Surg
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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26. Consolo P, Luigiano C, Pellicano R, Ferrara F, Giacobbe G, Morace C, Pallio S, Tortora A, Melita G, Bassi M, D'Imperio N, Alibrandi A, Familiari L: Endoscopic resection as a safe and effective technique for treatment of pedunculated and non-pedunculated benign-appearing colorectal neoplasms measuring 40 mm or more in size. Minerva Med; 2010 Oct;101(5):311-8
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  • [Title] Endoscopic resection as a safe and effective technique for treatment of pedunculated and non-pedunculated benign-appearing colorectal neoplasms measuring 40 mm or more in size.
  • AIM: The aim of this paper was to evaluate the outcome of endoscopic resection (ER) for pedunculated and non-pedunculated colorectal neoplasms exceeding 4 cm in size.
  • METHODS: All patients with a colorectal neoplasms measuring 4 cm or more, who underwent ER at our institution between January 1996 and December 2008 were included in the study.
  • The mean neoplasms size was 48.2±12.5 mm.
  • There were 32 sessile, 26 flat and 9 pedunculated neoplasms.
  • The most frequent type of neoplasm was villous adenoma (76.1%).
  • CONCLUSION: ER is a safe and effective procedure for removing benign appearing very large colorectal neoplasms.
  • [MeSH-major] Colonic Polyps / surgery. Colonoscopy. Colorectal Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Hemostasis, Surgical / methods. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Postoperative Hemorrhage / etiology. Postoperative Hemorrhage / therapy. Tumor Burden

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  • [ErratumIn] Minerva Med. 2011 Apr;102(2):XV. Giuseppinella, M [corrected to Melita, G]
  • (PMID = 21048553.001).
  • [ISSN] 0026-4806
  • [Journal-full-title] Minerva medica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Minerva Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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27. Wong SC, Chan CM, Ma BB, Hui EP, Ng SS, Lai PB, Cheung MT, Lo ES, Chan AK, Lam MY, Au TC, Chan AT: Clinical significance of cytokeratin 20-positive circulating tumor cells detected by a refined immunomagnetic enrichment assay in colorectal cancer patients. Clin Cancer Res; 2009 Feb 1;15(3):1005-12
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clinical significance of cytokeratin 20-positive circulating tumor cells detected by a refined immunomagnetic enrichment assay in colorectal cancer patients.
  • PURPOSE: Current immunomagnetic enrichment method can only detect general epithelial antigens of circulating tumor cells (CTC).
  • Further characterization of the CTCs to provide specific information on the tumor type is not possible.
  • We attempted to overcome this drawback by developing the methodology for using a gastrointestinal-specific anti-cytokeratin (CK) 20 antibody to detect CTCs in colorectal cancer patients' blood.
  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The protocol was validated using a colorectal cancer SW480 cell line.
  • The clinical significance of findings in colorectal cancer was investigated by detecting CK20-positive CTCs (pCTC) in patients with colorectal cancer, other common cancers, colorectal adenoma, benign colorectal diseases, and normal subjects.
  • Moreover, the malignant nature of CK20 pCTCs was examined by comparing chromosome 17 aberration patterns with those from the corresponding primary tumors.
  • When applied in patient samples, the detection rates were 62% (132 colorectal cancer patients; median number = 11 CTCs), 0% (120 patients with other common cancers), 6% (50 colorectal adenoma patients), 0% (120 patients with benign colorectal diseases), and 0% (40 normal subjects).
  • Furthermore, statistical analysis showed that CK20 pCTC numbers were associated with tumor-node-metastasis stage and lymph node status.
  • Using the median CK20 pCTC numbers as the cutoff points, stratified groups of colorectal cancer patients had significant differences in their recurrence, metastasis, and survival.
  • Finally, chromosome 17 aneusomy in 90% of colorectal cancer patients with CK20 pCTCs matched with those from the primary tumors.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Detection of CK20 pCTCs using the new protocol could generate clinically important information for colorectal cancer patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / blood. Immunomagnetic Separation / methods. Keratin-20 / blood. Neoplastic Cells, Circulating / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenoma / blood. Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Cell Line, Tumor. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17. Humans. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 19188172.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Keratin-20
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28. Koch M, Kienle P, Logan E, Antolovic D, Galindo L, Schmitz-Winnenthal FH, Schmidt J, Herfarth C, Weitz J: Detection of disseminated tumor cells in liver biopsies of colorectal cancer patients is not associated with a worse prognosis. Ann Surg Oncol; 2007 Feb;14(2):810-7
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  • [Title] Detection of disseminated tumor cells in liver biopsies of colorectal cancer patients is not associated with a worse prognosis.
  • BACKGROUND: Liver metastases occur frequently in colorectal cancer and are probably caused by disseminated tumor cells having been trapped in the liver.
  • The prognostic significance of hematogenous tumor cell dissemination has already been demonstrated for blood and bone marrow of patients with colorectal cancer.
  • The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and prognostic significance of disseminated tumor cells in liver biopsies of colorectal cancer patients.
  • METHODS: Liver biopsies from 100 patients with UICC stage I-III colorectal cancer were taken prospectively during resection of the primary tumor.
  • Liver biopsies obtained from 16 patients with benign gastrointestinal diseases served as negative controls.
  • RESULTS: Disseminated tumor cells were detected in liver samples of 10/100 (10%) patients with UICC stage I-III colorectal cancer.
  • Liver specimens from all seven patients with liver cirrhosis were CK 20-positive, whereas 16 patients with other benign gastrointestinal diseases were all CK 20-negative.
  • There was no correlation between tumor cell detection in liver biopsies and survival of the patients.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that detection of disseminated tumor cells in liver samples from patients with UICC stage I-III colorectal cancer has no prognostic influence.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Liver / pathology. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplastic Cells, Circulating / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Biopsy. Female. Humans. Keratin-20 / analysis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Prospective Studies


29. Cui M, Wang S, Ye YJ, Cui ZR, Ke Y: [Effect of tumor burden on differentiation of T lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of patients with colorectal cancer]. Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi; 2007 Jan 2;87(1):16-9
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  • [Title] [Effect of tumor burden on differentiation of T lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of patients with colorectal cancer].
  • OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effect of tumor burden on the differentiation of T1 and T2 cells and its implication in patients with colorectal cancer.
  • METHODS: Peripheral venous blood samples were obtained from 20 patients with primary colorectal cancer before and 7 days after the operation, radical operation in 17 patients and palliative resection in 3 patients.
  • Twenty sex and age-matched patients with benign diseases treated in the same period were used as controls.
  • RESULTS: At the time of diagnosis, the percentage of T1 and T2 cells in the peripheral lymphocytes of the case group was lower significantly than that of the control group (P = 0.006, and P = 0.017).
  • After getting rid of the tumor burden, the percentage of T1 cells increased, however, not significantly (P > 0.05).
  • The percentages of T1 cell of the patients with the tumor > or = 5 cm and of the patients with poorly differentiated tumors were significantly lower than those of the patients with the tumor < 5 cm and of the patients with well or moderately differentiated tumors (P = 0.064, and P = 0.072).
  • The percentage of T1 cells in the patients with lymph node metastasis and stage III approximately IV tumor were lower significantly than those of the patients without lymph node metastasis and those with stage I approximately II tumor (P = 0.033 and P = 0.033).
  • No significant differences were found between the population of T1 cells and such factors as tumor size, serosa invasion, and distant metastasis.
  • CONCLUSION: Tumor load suppresses the differentiation of T1 and T2 cells in the patients with colorectal cancer significantly, and may be an important factor in the development of immunosuppression.
  • After getting rid of the tumor burden, the percentages of T1 and T2 increase in a short time, and the immunologic function is improved.
  • Determination of T1 may be helpful to indicate the prognosis of colorectal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Cell Differentiation / immunology. Colorectal Neoplasms / blood. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. T-Lymphocytes / cytology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes / cytology. CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes / immunology. CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes / cytology. CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes / immunology. Female. Flow Cytometry. Humans. Killer Cells, Natural / cytology. Killer Cells, Natural / immunology. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Tumor Burden

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  • (PMID = 17403305.001).
  • [ISSN] 0376-2491
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua yi xue za zhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
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30. Galamb O, Sipos F, Solymosi N, Spisák S, Krenács T, Tóth K, Tulassay Z, Molnár B: Diagnostic mRNA expression patterns of inflamed, benign, and malignant colorectal biopsy specimen and their correlation with peripheral blood results. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 2008 Oct;17(10):2835-45
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Diagnostic mRNA expression patterns of inflamed, benign, and malignant colorectal biopsy specimen and their correlation with peripheral blood results.
  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Total RNA was extracted, amplified, and biotinylated from frozen colonic biopsies of patients with colorectal cancer (n=22), adenoma (n=20), hyperplastic polyp (n=11), inflammatory bowel disease (n=21), and healthy normal controls (n=11), as well as peripheral blood samples of 19 colorectal cancer and 11 healthy patients.
  • Between low-grade and high-grade dysplastic adenomas, 65 classifier probesets such as aquaporin 1, CXCL10, and APOD (90.91/100) were identified; between colorectal cancer and adenoma, 61 classifier probesets including axin 2, von Willebrand factor, tensin 1, and gremlin 1 (90.91/100) were identified.
  • Early- and advanced-stage colorectal carcinomas could be distinguished using 34 discriminatory transcripts (100/66.67).
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / blood. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. RNA, Messenger
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenoma / blood. Adenoma / genetics. Adenoma / pathology. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Biopsy. Case-Control Studies. Chi-Square Distribution. Colonic Polyps / blood. Colonic Polyps / genetics. Colonic Polyps / pathology. Gene Expression Profiling. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Humans. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases / blood. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases / pathology. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis. Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 18843029.001).
  • [ISSN] 1055-9965
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / RNA, Messenger
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31. Singhi AD, Montgomery EA: Colorectal granular cell tumor: a clinicopathologic study of 26 cases. Am J Surg Pathol; 2010 Aug;34(8):1186-92
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  • [Title] Colorectal granular cell tumor: a clinicopathologic study of 26 cases.
  • Granular cell tumor (GCT) is commonly located in the subcutaneous tissue and oral cavity, and uncommon in the gastrointestinal tract, in which the majority arises in the esophagus with over-representation in African Americans (AA).
  • We report the clinicopathologic features of 1 of the largest series to date of colorectal GCTs.
  • We reviewed the clinical features of 26 colorectal GCTs seen at our institution between the years 1995 to 2009, which included 24 biopsies, 1 low anterior resection, and 1 colectomy.
  • The majority of colorectal GCT involved the right colon (19/26, 73%) ranging in size from 0.2 to 1.8 cm (mean 0.6 cm).
  • Most neoplasms were encountered on routine colonoscopy (14/24, 64%), however 3 patients presented with hematochezia, 3 with changing bowel habits, 2 with Crohn disease, 1 with diverticular disease, and 1 with appendicitis.
  • Of the 20 cases available for histologic review, the tumors were noted to either be infiltrative (12/20, 60%) or marginated (8/20, 40%) involving either the mucosa (7/20, 35%), submucosa (10/20, 50%), or both (3/20, 15%).
  • The microscopic features were similar to those of GCTs found elsewhere, but many of the neoplasms differed by displaying nuclear pleomorphism (8/20, 40%), lymphoid cuffs (9/20, 45%), and focal calcification (7/20, 35%).
  • On immunochemistry, 18 of the neoplasms were stained for S-100 and all cases showed positive staining.
  • Although infrequently found in the colorectum, colorectal GCT typically presents incidentally on routine colonoscopy and involves the right colon; it is not over-represented in AA patients.
  • GCTs can have both an infiltrative or marginated growth pattern with a subset displaying nuclear pleomorphism, a lymphoid cuff, focal calcification, and reactive mucosal surface changes, which in our experience, may lead to misdiagnosis on colorectal mucosal biopsies.
  • Although GCTs were benign tumors in this series, if incompletely excised regrowth of the lesion may occur and therefore, follow-up may be warranted.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Colon / pathology. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Biopsy. Colectomy. Colonoscopy. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Intestinal Mucosa / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Prognosis. S100 Proteins / analysis

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  • (PMID = 20661017.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-0979
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / S100 Proteins
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32. Nocito A, Hahnloser D: [Indications for laparoscopic colorectal resections--also for cancers?]. Ther Umsch; 2005 Feb;62(2):119-26
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  • [Title] [Indications for laparoscopic colorectal resections--also for cancers?].
  • Laparoscopic procedures are applied to the treatment of almost all colonic diseases, including both benign and malignant lesions.
  • Significant benefits can be expected with a laparoscopic approach relative to decreased pain, ileus, length of hospital stay, disability, and possibly, adhesion formation and subsequent bowel obstruction, and improved cosmesis.
  • However, all those benefits are secondary in the treatment of cancer; tumor-free survival must be the primary goal.
  • Laparoscopic colorectal surgery for cancer will have a definite role in the future.
  • [MeSH-major] Colectomy / methods. Colonic Diseases / surgery. Colorectal Neoplasms / surgery. Laparoscopy. Rectal Diseases / surgery

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  • (PMID = 15756922.001).
  • [ISSN] 0040-5930
  • [Journal-full-title] Therapeutische Umschau. Revue thérapeutique
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ther Umsch
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Number-of-references] 73
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33. Kazaryan AM, Pavlik Marangos I, Rosseland AR, Røsok BI, Mala T, Villanger O, Mathisen O, Giercksky KE, Edwin B: Laparoscopic liver resection for malignant and benign lesions: ten-year Norwegian single-center experience. Arch Surg; 2010 Jan;145(1):34-40
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  • [Title] Laparoscopic liver resection for malignant and benign lesions: ten-year Norwegian single-center experience.
  • BACKGROUND: The introduction of laparoscopic liver resection has been challenging because new and safe surgical techniques have had to be developed, and skepticism remains about the use of laparoscopy for malignant neoplasms.
  • We present herein a large-volume single-center experience with laparoscopic liver resection.
  • One hundred thirteen patients had malignant lesions, of whom 96 had colorectal metastases.
  • INTERVENTION: Laparoscopic liver resection for malignant and benign lesions.
  • Tumor-free resection margins determined by histopathologic evaluation were achieved in 140 of 149 malignant specimens (94.0%).
  • The 5-year actuarial survival for patients undergoing procedures for colorectal metastases was 46%.
  • Perioperative morbidity and mortality and long-term survival after laparoscopic resection of colorectal metastases appear to be comparable to those after open resections.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / surgery. Hepatectomy / methods. Liver Diseases / surgery. Liver Neoplasms / surgery


34. Gottwald L, Korczyński J, Góra E, Bieńkiewicz A: [Adnexal tumors after surgical treatment of colorectal cancer]. Ginekol Pol; 2008 Apr;79(4):259-63
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  • [Title] [Adnexal tumors after surgical treatment of colorectal cancer].
  • OBJECTIVE: The risk of metastatic ovarian tumor is significantly higher in case of women with a history of colorectal cancer.
  • DESIGN: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the clinical presentation and histopathology of adnexal tumors in case of female patients with a history of colorectal adenocarcinoma.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective study on 13 women (each with a history of colorectal carcinoma, operated due to adnexal tumor between 2004 and 2007), has been conducted.
  • Subject characteristics, ultrasound, CT, serum tumor markers levels, histopathology and findings at surgery were analyzed.
  • RESULTS: Time distance between colorectal cancer surgery and ovarian tumor operation - measured in months -was shorter in cases of malignant neoplasms (10.13 +/- 3.98) than in benign tumors (26.2 +/- 19.37).
  • Ultrasound examination showed solid-cystic adnexal tumors in 8 malignant cases, and ovarian cysts in 5 benign conditions.
  • Unilateral adnexectomy only took place in one case of benign tumor and in one case of disseminated neoplasmatic disease.
  • CONCLUSIONS: When evaluating a patient with an adnexal tumor, a history of malignancy strongly suggests a metastatic nature.
  • The use of ultrasound associated with plasma levels of Ca 125, Ca 19-9 and CEA, represents a useful method of preoperative assessment of ovarian tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Colorectal Neoplasms / surgery. Ovarian Neoplasms / diagnosis. Ovarian Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. CA-125 Antigen / blood. CA-19-9 Antigen / blood. Carcinoembryonic Antigen / blood. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Poland. Retrospective Studies. Risk Assessment. Ultrasonography, Doppler, Color / methods

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  • (PMID = 18592863.001).
  • [ISSN] 0017-0011
  • [Journal-full-title] Ginekologia polska
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ginekol. Pol.
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CA-125 Antigen; 0 / CA-19-9 Antigen; 0 / Carcinoembryonic Antigen
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35. Bonin EA, Baron TH: Update on the indications and use of colonic stents. Curr Gastroenterol Rep; 2010 Oct;12(5):374-82
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  • Self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement is a minimally invasive option for achieving acute colonic decompression in obstructed colorectal cancer.
  • Colorectal stenting offers nonoperative, immediate, and effective colon decompression and allows bowel preparation for an elective oncologic resection.
  • Despite concerns of tumor seeding following endoscopic colorectal stent placement, no difference exists in oncologic long-term survival between patients who undergo stent placement followed by elective resection and those undergoing emergency bowel resection.
  • Colorectal stents have also been used in selected patients with benign colonic strictures.
  • Patients with benign colonic stricture with acute colonic obstruction who are at high risk for emergency surgery can gain temporary relief of obstruction after SEMS placement; the stent can be removed en bloc with the colon specimen at surgery.
  • This article reviews the techniques and indications of SEMS placement for benign and malignant colorectal obstructions.
  • [MeSH-major] Colonoscopy / methods. Colorectal Neoplasms / surgery. Intestinal Obstruction / surgery. Stents / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Colon / pathology. Colon / surgery. Colonic Diseases / etiology. Colonic Diseases / surgery. Constriction, Pathologic / surgery. Humans. Palliative Care. Pelvic Neoplasms / complications. Pelvic Neoplasms / surgery. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20703837.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-312X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current gastroenterology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Gastroenterol Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
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36. Achiam MP, Andersen LP, Klein M, Løgager V, Chabanova E, Thomsen HS, Rosenberg J: Differentiation between benign and malignant colon tumors using fast dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR colonography; a feasibility study. Eur J Radiol; 2010 Jun;74(3):e45-50
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  • [Title] Differentiation between benign and malignant colon tumors using fast dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR colonography; a feasibility study.
  • BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer will present itself as a bowel obstruction in 16-23% of all cases.
  • However, not all obstructing tumors are malignant and the differentiation between a benign and a malignant tumor can be difficult.
  • The purpose of our study was to determine whether fast dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging combined with MR colonography could be used to differentiate a benign from a malignant obstructing colon tumor.
  • METHODS: Patients with benign colon tumor stenosis, based on diverticulitis, were asked to participate in the study.
  • The same number of patients with verified colorectal cancer was included.
  • Two blinded observers analyzed the tumors on MR by placing a region of interest in the tumor and a series of parameters were evaluated, e.g. wash-in, wash-out and time-to-peak.
  • The wash-in and wash-out rates were significantly different between the benign and malignant tumors, and a clear distinction between benign and malignant disease was therefore possible by looking only at the MR data.
  • CONCLUSION: The results showed the feasibility of using fast dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging to differentiate between benign and malignant colonic tumors.
  • With a high intra-class correlation and significant differences found on independent segments of the tumor, the method appears to be reproducible.
  • [MeSH-major] Colonic Neoplasms / diagnosis. Diverticulitis / diagnosis. Diverticulitis / etiology. Image Enhancement / methods. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Meglumine. Organometallic Compounds
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Contrast Media. Diagnosis, Differential. Feasibility Studies. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Reproducibility of Results. Sensitivity and Specificity. Single-Blind Method

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  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 19419830.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-7727
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Radiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ClinicalTrials.gov/ NCT00114829
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Contrast Media; 0 / Organometallic Compounds; 0 / gadoterate meglumine; 6HG8UB2MUY / Meglumine
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37. Yu YJ, Liu YD, Xu X, Ma XW: [Diagnostic significance of cytokeratin 19 and 20 expression on micrometastasis of colorectal cancer]. Zhonghua Wei Chang Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2009 Jan;12(1):48-51
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  • [Title] [Diagnostic significance of cytokeratin 19 and 20 expression on micrometastasis of colorectal cancer].
  • OBJECTIVE: To inquire into the diagnostic significance of cytokeratin 19(CK19) and cytokeratin 20(CK20) expression on hematogenous micrometastasis of colorectal cancer.
  • METHODS: Forty-four patients with colorectal cancer were collected as colorectal cancer groups, and another 18 patients treated with abdominal surgical operations because of benign diseases were collected as benign disease group.
  • RESULTS: There were no positive expression of CK19 and CK20 in the portal and peripheral blood of all the patients in benign disease group.
  • Of the colorectal cancer group, 34 patients(77.3%) appeared positive expressions of CK19 and/or CK20 in portal and peripheral blood, and there was significant difference in the expressions of CK19 and CK20 between the two groups(P<0.05).
  • Within the colorectal cancer group, the positive expression rates of CK19 and CK20 in peripheral blood were 36.4% and 52.3%, and the rates in portal blood were 59.1% and 72.7%.
  • The postoperative metastasis and recurrence rate of colorectal cancer in patients with positive expression of CK19 and CK20 in peripheral blood was 61.5%, which was significantly higher than that(25.0%) in patients with positive expression in portal blood only(P<0.05).
  • CONCLUSIONS: In patients with colorectal cancer, the expressions of CK19 and CK20, which are determined by RT-PCR in blood from portal and peripheral veins, are the sensitive and specific indexes for diagnosing hematogenous micrometastasis of the cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Keratin-19 / blood. Keratin-20 / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Biomarkers, Tumor. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 19145504.001).
  • [ISSN] 1671-0274
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua wei chang wai ke za zhi = Chinese journal of gastrointestinal surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Wei Chang Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Keratin-19; 0 / Keratin-20
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38. Jones S, Chen WD, Parmigiani G, Diehl F, Beerenwinkel N, Antal T, Traulsen A, Nowak MA, Siegel C, Velculescu VE, Kinzler KW, Vogelstein B, Willis J, Markowitz SD: Comparative lesion sequencing provides insights into tumor evolution. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A; 2008 Mar 18;105(11):4283-8
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  • [Title] Comparative lesion sequencing provides insights into tumor evolution.
  • We show that the times separating the birth of benign, invasive, and metastatic tumor cells can be determined by analysis of the mutations they have in common.
  • When combined with prior clinical observations, these analyses suggest the following general conclusions about colorectal tumorigenesis: (i) It takes approximately 17 years for a large benign tumor to evolve into an advanced cancer but <2 years for cells within that cancer to acquire the ability to metastasize;.
  • (iii) the process of cell culture ex vivo does not introduce new clonal mutations into colorectal tumor cell populations; and (iv) the rates at which point mutations develop in advanced cancers are similar to those of normal cells.
  • These results have important implications for understanding human tumor pathogenesis, particularly those associated with metastasis.

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  • (PMID = 18337506.001).
  • [ISSN] 1091-6490
  • [Journal-full-title] Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA57345; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R37 CA043460; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA127306; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA121113; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / GM078986; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA127306; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA062924; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM078986; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA62924; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA120237; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA121113; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / GM078986-02; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA043703; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA43460; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA043703; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA120237; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U54 CA116867; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM078986-02; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA116867; United States / Howard Hughes Medical Institute / / ; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R37 CA057345; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA057345; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA105090
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 9007-49-2 / DNA
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2393770
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39. Nio Y, Iguchi C, Itakura M, Toga T, Hashimoto K, Koike M, Omori H, Sato Y, Endo S: High incidence of synchronous or metachronous breast cancer in patients with malignant and benign thyroid tumor or tumor-like disorders. Anticancer Res; 2009 May;29(5):1607-10
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  • [Title] High incidence of synchronous or metachronous breast cancer in patients with malignant and benign thyroid tumor or tumor-like disorders.
  • In the patients with benign and malignant thyroid tumor or tumor-like disorders, the incidence of other malignancies was surveyed, and the frequency of thyroid cancer in patients with breast cancer was also surveyed.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between 1982 and 2005, a total of 201 female patients received surgery for tumor or tumor-like disorders, including 65 carcinoma, 68 adenoma, 61 adenomatous goiter and 7 chronic thyroiditis cases.
  • RESULTS: The overall incidence rate of breast cancer was 16.4% (33/201) in the patients, who received thyroid surgeries and was much higher than other malignancies: 2.0% gastric cancer, 1.0% uterine and colorectal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / epidemiology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / complications. Thyroid Neoplasms / complications


40. Svendsen MN, Brünner N, Christensen IJ, Ytting H, Bentsen C, Lomholt AF, Nielsen HJ: Biological variations in plasma VEGF and VEGFR-1 may compromise their biomarker value in colorectal cancer. Scand J Clin Lab Invest; 2010 Nov;70(7):503-11
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  • [Title] Biological variations in plasma VEGF and VEGFR-1 may compromise their biomarker value in colorectal cancer.
  • INTRODUCTION: Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) plays a prominent role in tumor angiogenesis and plasma VEGF concentration may carry prognostic information in colorectal cancer.
  • The VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR-1) is a regulatory receptor which is shredded into plasma of patients with colorectal cancer.
  • For both molecules, large biological variation and lack of standardization of assay procedures are major challenges.
  • In addition, we evaluated plasma VEGF and VEGFR-1 as markers of colorectal disease in a case-control study on four groups of 77 individuals undergoing bowel endoscopy.
  • Groups were categorized as 'no findings', 'non-malignant findings', 'adenoma', or 'colorectal cancer'.
  • In addition, we found large biological variations with CV up to 69.2% for VEGF and CV up to 35.9% for VEGFR-1.
  • CONCLUSION: There was no difference in plasma VEGF or VEGFR-1 between patients with no findings, benign disease, pre-malignant findings, and malignant findings after endoscopy.
  • The poor discrimination between patients may be explained by the large inter- and intra-subject variations found for both molecules in volunteers.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Colorectal Neoplasms / blood. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / blood. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1 / blood

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  • (PMID = 20873967.001).
  • [ISSN] 1502-7686
  • [Journal-full-title] Scandinavian journal of clinical and laboratory investigation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Scand. J. Clin. Lab. Invest.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / VEGFA protein, human; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; EC 2.7.10.1 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1
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41. Shen C, Hu L, Xia L, Li Y: Quantitative real-time RT-PCR detection for survivin, CK20 and CEA in peripheral blood of colorectal cancer patients. Jpn J Clin Oncol; 2008 Nov;38(11):770-6
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  • [Title] Quantitative real-time RT-PCR detection for survivin, CK20 and CEA in peripheral blood of colorectal cancer patients.
  • OBJECTIVE: To establish a sensitive method for the early detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood (PB) of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients.
  • METHODS: PB samples were collected from 156 CRC patients, 40 benign colorectal disease patients, 40 healthy individuals and 45 patients with other solid tumors.
  • The expression of the three mRNAs in CRC patients was significantly higher than that in benign control and healthy volunteers, and the expression of survivin and CK20 was not significantly higher than that of patients with other solid tumors.
  • However, the expression of CEA mRNA was significantly higher than that of patients with other solid tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoembryonic Antigen / blood. Colorectal Neoplasms / blood. Colorectal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Microtubule-Associated Proteins / blood. Neoplasm Proteins / blood. Neoplastic Cells, Circulating / chemistry. RNA, Messenger / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Base Sequence. Cell Line, Tumor. Female. Humans. Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins. Keratin-20 / blood. Keratin-20 / genetics. Leukocytes, Mononuclear / chemistry. Leukocytes, Mononuclear / cytology. Male. Middle Aged. Molecular Sequence Data. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 18845519.001).
  • [ISSN] 1465-3621
  • [Journal-full-title] Japanese journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Jpn. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / BIRC5 protein, human; 0 / Carcinoembryonic Antigen; 0 / Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins; 0 / KRT20 protein, human; 0 / Keratin-20; 0 / Microtubule-Associated Proteins; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / RNA, Messenger
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42. Agaimy A, Stoehr R, Vieth M, Hartmann A: Benign serrated colorectal fibroblastic polyps/intramucosal perineuriomas are true mixed epithelial-stromal polyps (hybrid hyperplastic polyp/mucosal perineurioma) with frequent BRAF mutations. Am J Surg Pathol; 2010 Nov;34(11):1663-71
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  • [Title] Benign serrated colorectal fibroblastic polyps/intramucosal perineuriomas are true mixed epithelial-stromal polyps (hybrid hyperplastic polyp/mucosal perineurioma) with frequent BRAF mutations.
  • Colorectal fibroblastic polyp and intramucosal perineurioma are 2 synonyms for a recently described benign mucosal lesion with a predilection for the rectosigmoid colon.
  • We analyzed the clinicopathological features of 29 fibroblastic polyps and investigated them for the first time for mutations known to be involved in serrated colorectal epithelial polyps (BRAF, KRAS, and PIK3CA).
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoma / pathology. Colonic Polyps / pathology. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Epithelial Cells / pathology. Fibroblasts / pathology. Intestinal Mucosa / pathology. Mutation. Nerve Sheath Neoplasms / pathology. Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf / genetics. Stromal Cells / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. DNA Mutational Analysis. Female. Humans. Hyperplasia. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases / genetics. Proto-Oncogene Proteins / genetics. ras Proteins / genetics

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  • (PMID = 20962618.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-0979
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / KRAS protein, human; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins; EC 2.7.1.- / Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; EC 2.7.1.137 / PIK3CA protein, human; EC 2.7.11.1 / BRAF protein, human; EC 2.7.11.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf; EC 3.6.5.2 / ras Proteins
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43. Lázár G, Paszt A, Simonka Z, Rokszin R, Abrahám S: [Laparoscopic surgery in colorectal tumors]. Magy Onkol; 2010 Jun;54(2):117-22
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Laparoscopic surgery in colorectal tumors].
  • The minimally invasive technique, by means of the undoubted advantages of the method, has become fully accepted in the surgical treatments of the most benign and functional diseases.
  • Today it has been proven that the laparoscopic technique is safely usable also in the surgical treatment of colorectal tumors.
  • The authors, analyzing their own and the international experiences, present the laparoscopic surgical treatment of colorectal tumors.
  • Seventy-four patients were treated with laparoscopic-assisted colorectal intestinal resection in the Department of Surgery of the University of Szeged between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2008.
  • The surgical indication was neoplastic colorectal lesion in 40 cases.
  • The histological processes of specimens justified tumor-free oral, aboral and circumferential resection in all cases.
  • Summarizing our own and international experiences it can be stated that the laparoscopic surgeries performed due to colorectal tumors are safe, and are also appropriate with respect to oncosurgery.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / surgery. Digestive System Surgical Procedures / methods. Laparoscopy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Colectomy / methods. Female. Humans. Hungary. Male. Middle Aged. Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures / methods. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20576587.001).
  • [ISSN] 0025-0244
  • [Journal-full-title] Magyar onkologia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Magy Onkol
  • [Language] hun
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Hungary
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44. Rubie C, Frick VO, Wagner M, Schuld J, Gräber S, Brittner B, Bohle RM, Schilling MK: ELR+ CXC chemokine expression in benign and malignant colorectal conditions. BMC Cancer; 2008;8:178
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  • [Title] ELR+ CXC chemokine expression in benign and malignant colorectal conditions.
  • BACKGROUND: CXCR2 chemokine ligands CXCL1, CXCL5 and CXCL6 were shown to be involved in chemoattraction, inflammatory responses, tumor growth and angiogenesis.
  • Here, we comparatively analyzed their expression profile in resection specimens from patients with colorectal adenoma (CRA) (n = 30) as well as colorectal carcinoma (CRC) (n = 48) and corresponding colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) (n = 16).
  • RESULTS: In contrast to CXCL6, we demonstrated CXCL1 and CXCL5 mRNA and protein expression to be significantly up-regulated in CRC and CRLM tissue specimens in relation to their matched tumor neighbor tissues.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoma / metabolism. Carcinoma / metabolism. Chemokines, CXC / biosynthesis. Colorectal Neoplasms / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Amino Acid Sequence. Chemokine CXCL1 / biosynthesis. Chemokine CXCL1 / genetics. Chemokine CXCL5 / biosynthesis. Chemokine CXCL5 / genetics. Chemokine CXCL6 / biosynthesis. Chemokine CXCL6 / genetics. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Liver Neoplasms / genetics. Liver Neoplasms / metabolism. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Male. Middle Aged. RNA, Messenger / biosynthesis. RNA, Messenger / genetics. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction. Up-Regulation

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  • (PMID = 18578857.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2407
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CXCL1 protein, human; 0 / CXCL5 protein, human; 0 / CXCL6 protein, human; 0 / Chemokine CXCL1; 0 / Chemokine CXCL5; 0 / Chemokine CXCL6; 0 / Chemokines, CXC; 0 / RNA, Messenger
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2459188
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45. Wang YC, Yu ZH, Liu C, Xu LZ, Yu W, Lu J, Zhu RM, Li GL, Xia XY, Wei XW, Ji HZ, Lu H, Gao Y, Gao WM, Chen LB: Detection of RASSF1A promoter hypermethylation in serum from gastric and colorectal adenocarcinoma patients. World J Gastroenterol; 2008 May 21;14(19):3074-80
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Detection of RASSF1A promoter hypermethylation in serum from gastric and colorectal adenocarcinoma patients.
  • AIM: To evaluate the diagnostic role of serum RASSF1A promoter hypermethylation in gastric and colorectal adenocarcinoma.
  • METHODS: Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSPCR) was used to examine the promoter methylation status of the serum RASSF1A gene in 47 gastric adenocarcinoma patients, 45 colorectal adenocarcinoma patients, 60 patients with benign gastrointestinal disease (30 with benign gastric disease and 30 with benign colorectal disease), and 30 healthy donor controls.
  • A paired study of RASSF1A promoter methylation status in primary tumor, adjacent normal tissue, and postoperative serum were conducted in 25 gastric and colorectal adenocarcinoma patients who later were underwent surgical therapy.
  • RESULTS: The frequencies of detection of serum RASSF1A promoter hypermethylation in gastric (34.0%) and colorectal (28.9%) adenocarcinoma patients were significantly higher than those in patients with benign gastric (3.3%) or colorectal (6.7%) disease or in healthy donors (0%) (P < 0.01).
  • The methylation status of RASSF1A promoter in serum samples was consistent with that in paired primary tumors, and the MSPCR results for RASSF1A promoter methylation status in paired preoperative samples were consistent with those in postoperative serum samples.
  • The serum RASSF1A promoter hypermethylation did not correlate with patient sex, age, tumor differentiation grade, surgical therapy, or serum carcinoembryonic antigen level.
  • CONCLUSION: Aberrant CpG island methylation within the promoter region of RASSF1A is a promising biomarker for gastric and colorectal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / genetics. Biomarkers, Tumor / genetics. Colorectal Neoplasms / genetics. DNA Methylation. DNA, Neoplasm / blood. Promoter Regions, Genetic. Stomach Neoplasms / genetics. Tumor Suppressor Proteins / genetics

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  • (PMID = 18494062.001).
  • [ISSN] 1007-9327
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 0 / RASSF1 protein, human; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2712178
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46. Lewis MR, Deavers MT, Silva EG, Malpica A: Ovarian involvement by metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma: still a diagnostic challenge. Am J Surg Pathol; 2006 Feb;30(2):177-84
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  • [Title] Ovarian involvement by metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma: still a diagnostic challenge.
  • Ovarian involvement by metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma, although not an uncommon occurrence, remains a diagnostic challenge.
  • The gross and histologic features of such metastases overlap those of primary ovarian epithelial neoplasms such as endometrioid or mucinous adenocarcinoma.
  • The clinical and pathologic features of 86 cases of metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma involving the ovary were reviewed.
  • Presenting symptoms included abdominal or pelvic pain (45 cases), rectal bleeding (13 cases), change in bowel habits (20 cases), and vaginal bleeding (5 cases).
  • Many involved ovaries featured smooth capsules without gross evidence of surface involvement by tumor.
  • In general, the tumors had typical histologic features of metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma, including a garland pattern and dirty necrosis.
  • In 23 cases, foci with a benign or low malignant potential appearance were seen.
  • Immunohistochemical studies showed that 29 of 29 tumors (100%) were positive for CK20; focal CK7 positivity was seen in 5 of 30 cases (17%).
  • Metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an ovarian mass, even if the mass is large and unilateral or in a young patient, to secure proper treatment of these patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Ovarian Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Carcinoma, Endometrioid / pathology. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 16434891.001).
  • [ISSN] 0147-5185
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
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47. Qiu MZ, Yuan ZY, Luo HY, Ruan DY, Wang ZQ, Wang FH, Li YH, Xu RH: Impact of pretreatment hematologic profile on survival of colorectal cancer patients. Tumour Biol; 2010 Aug;31(4):255-60
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Impact of pretreatment hematologic profile on survival of colorectal cancer patients.
  • Pretreatment hematologic abnormalities have been reported to have prognostic value in patients with solid tumors.
  • The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of abnormalities in the hematologic profile in patients with colorectal cancer before treatment and to evaluate if such a profile could be used for prognostic evaluations.
  • We identified all patients in Cancer Center of Sun Yat-Sen University who were diagnosed as colorectal cancers between May 2005 and August 2009.
  • We identified 363 patients with colorectal cancer and 315 patients with benign diseases for the final analysis.
  • The percentages of leukocytosis, anemia, and thrombocytosis were significantly higher in colorectal cancer patients than in patients with benign diseases.
  • Univariate analysis showed that advanced tumor stages, leukocytosis, anemia, thrombocytosis, and low histological grade were all significantly associated with shorter survival.
  • The multivariate Cox analysis revealed that low histological grade, tumor stage, pretreatment anemia, and thrombocytosis remained independent prognostic variables for survival.
  • Anemia and thrombocytosis can be considered as useful prognostic markers in patients with colorectal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Anemia / diagnosis. Colorectal Neoplasms / mortality. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Leukocytosis / diagnosis. Thrombocytosis / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 20336401.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-0380
  • [Journal-full-title] Tumour biology : the journal of the International Society for Oncodevelopmental Biology and Medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tumour Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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48. Gao Y, Zhang B: [Expression of TEIF protein in colorectal tumors and its correlation with centrosome abnormality]. Ai Zheng; 2009 Dec;28(12):1277-82
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Expression of TEIF protein in colorectal tumors and its correlation with centrosome abnormality].
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Telomerase transcriptional elements-interacting factor (TEIF) gene found recently by our research group is a transcription factor of a kind of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene, and expresses in many kinds of tumor tissues.
  • This study was to evaluate the expression of TEIF protein in human colorectal tumors and to explore its correlation with centrosome abnormality.
  • METHODS: The expression of TEIF in 10 specimens of normal intestinal mucosa tissue, 30 specimens of colorectal cancer, and 54 specimens of colorectal adenoma was detected by immunohistochemistry.
  • RESULTS: Immunohistochemistry results showed that the differences of TEIF protein expression between the normal group and each tumor groups were statistically significant (P<0.01), and the difference of TEIF protein expression between the malignant tumor group and the benign group was not significant (P>0.05).
  • Immunofluorescence results showed that centrosome amplification-positive rate was significantly higher in the colorectal cancer group than in the normal group or the adenoma group (both P<0.01); the difference of the centrosome amplification positive rate between Grade I adenoma and Grade III adenoma was statistically significant (P<0.05), and the differences of the centrosome amplification positive rate between Grade II adenoma and Grade I or III adenoma were statistically significant (P>0.05).
  • CONCLUSIONS: TEIF protein and centrosome amplification is commonly found in colorectal tumors.
  • The expression level of TEIF is related to tumor histological grade and malignant degree.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / metabolism. Adenoma / metabolism. Centrosome / pathology. Colorectal Neoplasms / metabolism. Transcription Factors / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19958622.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Ai zheng = Aizheng = Chinese journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ai Zheng
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Transcription Factors; 0 / Tubulin; EC 2.7.1.- / SCYL1 protein, human
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49. Chuang D, Paddison JS, Booth RJ, Hill AG: Differential production of cytokines following colorectal surgery. ANZ J Surg; 2006 Sep;76(9):821-4
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

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  • [Title] Differential production of cytokines following colorectal surgery.
  • BACKGROUND: Colorectal surgery is associated with a number of postoperative complications, including anastomotic leak and local recurrence.
  • Cytokines are secreted into the peritoneal cavity after colorectal surgery and have a number of metabolic and immunological effects.
  • METHODS: Patients undergoing either elective rectal excision or colectomy for benign or malignant disease were recruited into the study.
  • The drain fluid was assayed for interleukin (IL)-1beta, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-13 using multiplexed biomarker immunoassays.
  • [MeSH-major] Colon / secretion. Colon / surgery. Interleukins / secretion. Rectum / secretion. Rectum / surgery. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / secretion

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  • (PMID = 16922906.001).
  • [ISSN] 1445-1433
  • [Journal-full-title] ANZ journal of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] ANZ J Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interleukins; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
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50. Qualtrough D, Singh K, Banu N, Paraskeva C, Pignatelli M: The actin-bundling protein fascin is overexpressed in colorectal adenomas and promotes motility in adenoma cells in vitro. Br J Cancer; 2009 Oct 6;101(7):1124-9
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  • [Title] The actin-bundling protein fascin is overexpressed in colorectal adenomas and promotes motility in adenoma cells in vitro.
  • BACKGROUND: Fascin is overexpressed in many cancers, including colorectal, but its role in the malignant transformation of benign colorectal adenomas is unclear.
  • METHODS: Immunohistochemical analysis of fascin expression was carried out in resected human colorectal adenoma specimens.
  • RESULTS: We show fascin overexpression in adenomas increasing with tumour size, histological type, and degree of dysplasia and increased cell motility in adenoma cell lines following fascin transfection.
  • CONCLUSION: These data suggest an important role for fascin in the malignant progression of colorectal tumours.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoma / pathology. Carrier Proteins / physiology. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Microfilament Proteins / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Movement. Disease Progression. Humans. Immunohistochemistry

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  • (PMID = 19738613.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-1827
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carrier Proteins; 0 / FSCN1 protein, human; 0 / Microfilament Proteins
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2768091
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51. Yang BL, Gu YF, Shao WJ, Chen HJ, Sun GD, Jin HY, Zhu X: Retrorectal tumors in adults: magnetic resonance imaging findings. World J Gastroenterol; 2010 Dec 14;16(46):5822-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Retrorectal tumors in adults: magnetic resonance imaging findings.
  • AIM: To retrospectively evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of adult retrorectal tumors and compare with histopathologic findings.
  • METHODS: MRI features of 21 patients with preoperative suspicion of retrorectal tumors were analyzed based on the histopathological and clinical data.
  • RESULTS: Fourteen benign cystic lesions appeared hypointense on T1-weighted images, and hyperintense on T2-weighted images with regular peripheral rim.
  • Six solid tumors were malignant lesions and showed heterogeneous intensity on MRI.
  • Gastrointestinal stromal tumors displayed low signal intensity on T1-weighted images, and intermediate to high signal intensity on T2-weighted images.
  • CONCLUSION: MRI is a helpful technique to define the extent of the retrorectal tumor and its relationship to the surrounding structures, and also to demonstrate possible complications so as to choose the best surgical approach.
  • [MeSH-major] Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Rectal Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 21155003.001).
  • [ISSN] 2219-2840
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3001973
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52. Zheng JP, Shao GL, Chen YT, Fan SF, Yang JM: [Feasibility study on CT guided percutaneous incisional needle biopsy for deep pelvic masses by different puncture approaches]. Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi; 2009 Oct;31(10):786-9

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Sixty-four malignant lesions were confirmed by pathology, including 30 adenocarcinomas, 19 squamous cell carcinomas, 5 unclassified malignant tumors, 3 small cell carcinomas, 2 malignant giant cell tumors of bone, 2 hepatocellular carcinomas and 3 false negative lesions which were confirmed at the second PINBs as malignant tumors, respectively.
  • Benign neoplasms were confirmed in 8 cases, including fibrosis tissue in 6 lesions, bone tuberculosis in 1 and ovarian cyst in 1.
  • No hematoma, nerve damage, infection, and tumor transplantation in pelvic cavity developed after the PINB procedure.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Biopsy, Needle / methods. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Pelvic Neoplasms / pathology. Pelvis / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Colorectal Neoplasms / radiography. Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted / methods. Feasibility Studies. Female. Fibrosis / pathology. Fibrosis / radiography. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / radiography. Male. Middle Aged. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Uterine Neoplasms / pathology. Uterine Neoplasms / radiography

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  • (PMID = 20021836.001).
  • [ISSN] 0253-3766
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua zhong liu za zhi [Chinese journal of oncology]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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53. Nguyen KT, Gamblin TC, Geller DA: World review of laparoscopic liver resection-2,804 patients. Ann Surg; 2009 Nov;250(5):831-41
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  • SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Initially described for peripheral, benign tumors resected by nonanatomic wedge resections, minimally invasive liver resections are now being performed more frequently, even for larger, malignant tumors located in challenging locations.
  • Tumor type, operative characteristics, perioperative morbidity, and oncologic outcomes were tabulated.
  • Fifty percent were for malignant tumors, 45% were for benign lesions, 1.7% were for live donor hepatectomies, and the rest were indeterminate.
  • The 3-year overall and disease-free survival rates after laparoscopic liver resection for colorectal metastasis to the liver were 80% to 87% and 51%, respectively.
  • Oncologically, 3- and 5-year survival rates reported for hepatocellular carcinoma and colorectal cancer metastases are comparable to open hepatic resection, albeit in a selected group of patients.

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  • [CommentIn] Ann Surg. 2015 Aug;262(2):e77-8 [24509191.001]
  • [CommentIn] Ann Surg. 2015 Aug;262(2):e78 [24670850.001]
  • (PMID = 19801936.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-1140
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 114
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54. Zhou X, Shang JQ, Zhou JN: [Transsacral local wide resection for mid-lower rectal tumors]. Zhonghua Wei Chang Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2009 Jan;12(1):44-7

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Transsacral local wide resection for mid-lower rectal tumors].
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of transsacral local wide resection for mid-lower rectal tumors.
  • METHODS: Clinical data of 133 patients undergone transsacral local wide resection for mid-lower rectal tumors between September 1994 and September 2005 were analyzed retrospectively.
  • Postoperative diagnosis was adenoma in 28 patients, hyperplastic polyp in 3 patients, carcinoid in 8 patients, gastrointestinal stromal tumor in 1 patient,adenoma with intra-mucosal carcinogenesis in 29 patients and adenocarcinoma invading into submucosa in 64 patients.
  • CONCLUSION: Transsacral local wide resection is simple and safe for mid-lower rectal tumors, which is an appropriate procedure for mid-lower rectal benign tumor and can serve as a sphincter-saving operation for selected T(1) lower rectal carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Rectal Neoplasms / surgery. Sacrococcygeal Region / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19145503.001).
  • [ISSN] 1671-0274
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua wei chang wai ke za zhi = Chinese journal of gastrointestinal surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Wei Chang Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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55. Buell JF, Thomas MT, Rudich S, Marvin M, Nagubandi R, Ravindra KV, Brock G, McMasters KM: Experience with more than 500 minimally invasive hepatic procedures. Ann Surg; 2008 Sep;248(3):475-86
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all patients who underwent a minimally invasive procedure for the management of hepatic tumors between January 2001 and April 2008.
  • To compare the various forms of surgery, we analyzed the incidence of complications, tumor recurrence, mortality, and cost.
  • The representative tumor histologies were: hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC; N = 210), colorectal carcinoma (N = 40), miscellaneous liver metastases (N = 42), biliary cancer (N = 20), and benign tumors (N = 176).
  • Our present data are equivalent or superior to those encountered in any large open series.
  • This series confirmed excellent interim survival rates after laparoscopic HR and superiority over RFA in the treatment of cancer, with significantly lower local tumor recurrence rate.
  • [MeSH-major] Hepatectomy / statistics & numerical data. Liver Neoplasms / surgery. Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures / statistics & numerical data
  • [MeSH-minor] Catheter Ablation / statistics & numerical data. Humans. Laparoscopy / statistics & numerical data. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / epidemiology. Retrospective Studies. Ultrasonography / statistics & numerical data

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  • [CommentIn] Ann Surg. 2009 Jun;249(6):1064-5; author reply 1065-6 [19474661.001]
  • (PMID = 18791368.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-1140
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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56. Castillo OA, Vitagliano G, Kerkebe M, Parma P, Pinto I, Diaz M: Laparoscopic adrenalectomy for suspected metastasis of adrenal glands: our experience. Urology; 2007 Apr;69(4):637-41
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  • METHODS: A total of 34 adrenalectomies were performed in 32 patients for incidental adrenal masses discovered at primary tumor diagnosis or during follow-up.
  • The primary tumors diagnosed were 13 cases of lung carcinoma, 9 of renal cell carcinoma, 2 of colorectal carcinoma, 2 of bladder carcinoma, and 1 each of ovarian carcinoma, breast cancer, gastric cancer, and melanoma.
  • Two patients had no history of a primary tumor.
  • The mean tumor size was 4.3 cm (range 1.5 to 9).
  • The microscopic analysis revealed 22 malign lesions (64.7%) and 12 cases of benign pathologic features (35.3%).
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / secondary. Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / surgery. Adrenalectomy / methods. Laparoscopy

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  • (PMID = 17445640.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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57. Shantha Kumara HM, Hoffman A, Kim IY, Feingold D, Dujovny N, Kalady M, Luchtefeld M, Whelan RL: Colorectal resection, both open and laparoscopic-assisted, in patients with benign indications is associated with proangiogenic changes in plasma angiopoietin 1 and 2 levels. Surg Endosc; 2009 Feb;23(2):409-15
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Colorectal resection, both open and laparoscopic-assisted, in patients with benign indications is associated with proangiogenic changes in plasma angiopoietin 1 and 2 levels.
  • INTRODUCTION: Plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels are increased after surgery and may stimulate tumor growth after cancer resection.
  • This study's purpose was to determine the impact of open and minimally invasive (MIS) colorectal resection (CR) for benign indications on plasma Ang 1 and 2 levels.
  • CONCLUSION: CR for benign pathology results in higher Ang 2 levels, lower Ang 1 levels, and lower Ang 1 to Ang 2 ratios early after surgery.
  • These results, plus the already noted VEGF increases, suggest that surgery results in proangiogenic plasma protein changes that may stimulate tumor growth early after surgery.

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  • [ErratumIn] Surg Endosc. 2009 Feb;23(2):416. Kallady, M [corrected to Kalady, M]
  • (PMID = 18813991.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-2218
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgical endoscopy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg Endosc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / ANGPT1 protein, human; 0 / Angiopoietin-1; 0 / Angiopoietin-2
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58. De Chiara L, Rodríguez-Piñeiro AM, Rodríguez-Berrocal FJ, Cordero OJ, Martínez-Ares D, Páez de la Cadena M: Serum CD26 is related to histopathological polyp traits and behaves as a marker for colorectal cancer and advanced adenomas. BMC Cancer; 2010;10:333
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Serum CD26 is related to histopathological polyp traits and behaves as a marker for colorectal cancer and advanced adenomas.
  • BACKGROUND: Serum CD26 (sCD26) levels were previously found diminished in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients compared to healthy donors, suggesting its potential utility for early diagnosis.
  • Patients were diagnosed as having no colorectal pathology, non-inflammatory or inflammatory bowel disease, polyps (hyperplastic, non-advanced and advanced adenomas) or CRC.
  • RESULTS: At a 460 ng/mL cut-off, the sCD26 has a sensitivity and specificity of 81.8% (95% CI, 64.5-93.0%) and 72.3% (95% CI, 65.0-77.2%) for CRC regarding no or benign colorectal pathology.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our preliminary results show that measurement of the sCD26 is a non-invasive and reasonably sensitive assay, which could be combined with others such as the faecal occult blood test for the early diagnosis and screening of CRC and advanced adenomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoma / blood. Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Colorectal Neoplasms / blood. Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 / blood. Polyps / metabolism. Polyps / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Colonoscopy. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Sensitivity and Specificity. Survival Rate. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20584285.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2407
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; EC 3.4.14.5 / Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2912863
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59. Koukoutsis I, Pappas A, Karanikas G, Kotzadimitriou K, Chrysikos J, Tzika S, Koronakis N, Karavitis G, Lagoudianakis E, Manouras A: Desmoid tumor of the supraclavicular region: a case report. Cases J; 2009;2:7222

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Desmoid tumor of the supraclavicular region: a case report.
  • Desmoid tumors are rare, benign fibroblastic tumors that are locally infiltrative and can cause extensive morbidity by destruction of adjacent vital structures.
  • Due to the rarity of these tumors, evidence regarding optimal treatment protocols is drawn from case reports and single-arm series with small patient numbers.
  • We report a case of a patient with a desmoid tumor of the left supraclavicular region that was diagnosed and treated in our department and a review of the current literature.

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  • (PMID = 19829936.001).
  • [ISSN] 1757-1626
  • [Journal-full-title] Cases journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cases J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2740207
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60. Davidson T, Goitein O, Avigdor A, Zwas ST, Goshen E: 18F- FDG-PET/CT for the diagnosis of tumor thrombosis. Isr Med Assoc J; 2009 Feb;11(2):69-73
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] 18F- FDG-PET/CT for the diagnosis of tumor thrombosis.
  • BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolism is a well-recognized and relatively frequent complication of malignancy, whereas tumor thrombosis is a rare complication of solid cancers.
  • The correct diagnosis of tumor thrombosis and its differentiation from VTE can alter patient management and prevent unnecessary long-term anticoagulation treatment.
  • OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the contribution of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography to the diagnosis of tumor thrombosis and its differentiation from VTE.
  • METHODS: PET/CT scans from 11 patients with suspected tumor thrombosis were retrospectively evaluated.
  • RESULTS: Eight occult tumor thromboses were identified by PET/CT-positive scans.
  • Underlying pathologies included pancreatic, colorectal, renal cell, and head-neck squamous cell carcinoma, as well as lymphoma (4 patients).
  • Accuracy of PET/CT to differentiate between tumor thrombosis and benign VTE was 100% in this small study.
  • It appears that PET/CT may be helpful in the diagnosis of occult tumor thrombosis and its differentiation from VTE.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplastic Cells, Circulating. Positron-Emission Tomography. Thromboembolism / diagnosis. Tomography, X-Ray Computed
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Carcinoma / radiography. Carcinoma / radionuclide imaging. Cohort Studies. Diagnosis, Differential. Digestive System Neoplasms / radiography. Digestive System Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Female. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Humans. Kidney Neoplasms / radiography. Kidney Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Lymphoma / radiography. Lymphoma / radionuclide imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Predictive Value of Tests. Radiopharmaceuticals. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 19432032.001).
  • [ISSN] 1565-1088
  • [Journal-full-title] The Israel Medical Association journal : IMAJ
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Isr. Med. Assoc. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Israel
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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61. Campos FG, Valarini R: Evolution of laparoscopic colorectal surgery in Brazil: results of 4744 patients from the national registry. Surg Laparosc Endosc Percutan Tech; 2009 Jun;19(3):249-54
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Evolution of laparoscopic colorectal surgery in Brazil: results of 4744 patients from the national registry.
  • BACKGROUND: Since its introduction, laparoscopic colorectal surgery has raised intense debate and controversies regarding its safety and effectiveness.
  • METHODS: This multicentric registry reports the experience of 28 Brazilian surgical teams specializing in laparoscopic colorectal surgery.
  • Benign diseases were diagnosed in 2356 patients (49.6%).
  • Two thousand three hundred and eighty-nine (50.4%) malignant tumors were operated upon, and histologic classification showed 2347 (98%) adenocarcinomas, 30 (0.6%) spinocelular carcinomas, and 12 (0.2%) other histologic types.
  • Tumor recurrence rate was 16.3% among patients followed more than 1 year.
  • Compared with other registries, there was a 75% increase in the number of groups performing laparoscopic colorectal surgery and a decrease in conversions (from 10.5% to 5.5%) and mortality (from 1.5% to 0.9%) rates.
  • (2) operative indications for benign and malignant diseases were similar, and diverticular disease of the colon comprised 40% of the benign ones;.

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  • (PMID = 19542856.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-4908
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg Laparosc Endosc Percutan Tech
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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62. Regöly-Mérei A, Bereczky M, Arató G, Telek G, Pallai Z, Lugasi A, Antal M: [Nutritional and antioxidant status of colorectal cancer patients]. Orv Hetil; 2007 Aug 12;148(32):1505-9
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  • [Title] [Nutritional and antioxidant status of colorectal cancer patients].
  • INTRODUCTION: Oxidative stress is one of the risk factors of colorectal carcinogenesis.
  • In inflammatory reactions the activated leucocytes product mutagenic and mitogenic free radicals, hereby promoting tumor formation.
  • AIM: Evaluation of some parameters of antioxidant and nutritional status in patients with benign or malignant colorectal neoplasm.
  • RESULTS: In patients with malignant tumor the dietary fiber, folate and vitamin A intake was under the optimal level, and the serum prealbumin concentration was lower than in patients with benign lesion.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The insufficient folate and vitamin A intake, the high incidence of overweight and obesity, and the abnormal values of the biomarkers of antioxidant status observed in the study groups seem to support the correlation between colorectal tumor, nutritional and antioxidant status.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoma / blood. Antioxidants / metabolism. Carcinoma / blood. Colorectal Neoplasms / blood. Free Radical Scavengers / blood. Nutritional Status

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  • (PMID = 17675278.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6002
  • [Journal-full-title] Orvosi hetilap
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Orv Hetil
  • [Language] hun
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Hungary
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antioxidants; 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Free Radical Scavengers; 0 / Prealbumin; 11103-57-4 / Vitamin A; 4Y8F71G49Q / Malondialdehyde; 935E97BOY8 / Folic Acid; EC 1.11.1.9 / Glutathione Peroxidase
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63. Crivello A, Giacalone A, Vaglica M, Scola L, Forte GI, Macaluso MC, Raimondi C, Di Noto L, Bongiovanni A, Accardo A, Candore G, Palmeri L, Verna R, Caruso C, Lio D, Palmeri S: Regulatory cytokine gene polymorphisms and risk of colorectal carcinoma. Ann N Y Acad Sci; 2006 Nov;1089:98-103
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  • [Title] Regulatory cytokine gene polymorphisms and risk of colorectal carcinoma.
  • Classic examples include Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and inflammatory bowel disease-associated colorectal cancer.
  • As an example, IL-10-deficient mice develop severe atrophic gastritis and a chronic enterocolitis, developing colorectal cancer similar to human inflammatory bowel disease-associated neoplasia.
  • Animal experiments suggest that TGF-beta1 plays a biphasic role in carcinogenesis by protecting against the early formation of benign epithelial growths, but promoting a significant stimulation of tumor growth invasion and metastasis during tumor progression.
  • We assessed association of functional polymorphisms (-1082G/A; -592C/A) and TGF-beta1 (-509C/T; +869C/T) influencing the IL-10 production to colorectal cancer risk in a case-control study of 62 patients and 124 matched controls.
  • These results suggest that the +869C allele, responsible for a Leu-->Pro substitution in the signal peptide sequence of the TGF-beta1 protein, may have a predisposing role in the development of colorectal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / genetics. Colorectal Neoplasms / genetics. Genetic Predisposition to Disease. Transforming Growth Factor beta1 / genetics

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  • (PMID = 17261758.001).
  • [ISSN] 0077-8923
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Transforming Growth Factor beta1; 130068-27-8 / Interleukin-10; 9DLQ4CIU6V / Proline; GMW67QNF9C / Leucine
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64. Jost RS, Jost R, Schoch E, Brunner B, Decurtins M, Zollikofer CL: Colorectal stenting: an effective therapy for preoperative and palliative treatment. Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol; 2007 May-Jun;30(3):433-40
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  • [Title] Colorectal stenting: an effective therapy for preoperative and palliative treatment.
  • PURPOSE: To demonstrate the effectiveness of preoperative and palliative colorectal stent placement in acute colonic obstruction.
  • In 59 patients (88%) the obstruction was malignant, while in 8 (12%) it was benign.
  • The improved general condition and adequate bowel cleansing allowed single-stage tumor resection and primary end-to-end anastomosis without complications in 31 cases (86% of all operations), while only 5 patients had colostomies.
  • [MeSH-major] Colonic Diseases / surgery. Colorectal Neoplasms / surgery. Intestinal Obstruction / surgery. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Palliative Care. Stents


65. Metser U, You J, McSweeney S, Freeman M, Hendler A: Assessment of tumor recurrence in patients with colorectal cancer and elevated carcinoembryonic antigen level: FDG PET/CT versus contrast-enhanced 64-MDCT of the chest and abdomen. AJR Am J Roentgenol; 2010 Mar;194(3):766-71
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  • [Title] Assessment of tumor recurrence in patients with colorectal cancer and elevated carcinoembryonic antigen level: FDG PET/CT versus contrast-enhanced 64-MDCT of the chest and abdomen.
  • OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare FDG PET/CT and contrast-enhanced 64-MDCT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis in the detection of tumor recurrence in patients with colorectal cancer and an elevated level of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA).
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis included 50 patients (31 men, 19 women; mean age, 61 years; range, 28-89 years) with 55 clinical events of elevated or increasing CEA level who underwent FDG PET/CT and MDCT for suspected tumor recurrence.
  • Fifty-four of 61 tumor sites suspected as tumor recurrence with any imaging technique were found to be local recurrence or metastatic colorectal cancer at final analysis.
  • The other seven sites were one separate malignant tumor (small lymphocytic lymphoma) and six benign lesions.
  • Diagnosis was based on histopathologic findings (n = 27) or clinical and imaging findings (n = 35) during a median follow-up period of 12 months (range, 6-31 months).
  • One site of tumor recurrence was missed prospectively at both MDCT and PET/CT.
  • In a tumor site-based analysis, the sensitivities of PET/CT and MDCT were 98.1% and 66.7% (p < 0.0001), and the specificities were 75% and 62.5% (p = 0.56).
  • Tumors correctly identified with PET/CT and missed with MDCT were local recurrence in the presacral space (n = 5), metastatic subcentimeter lymph nodes (n = 4), peritoneal deposits (n = 3), and recurrences at the periphery of radiofrequency ablated metastatic lesions of the liver (n = 2) and in the abdominal wall (n = 1), liver (n = 1), and uterine cervix (n = 1).
  • CONCLUSION: FDG PET/CT has higher sensitivity than MDCT in the identification of sites of recurrent and metastatic disease in patients with colorectal cancer and an elevated CEA level.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / radiography. Colorectal Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / radiography. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / radionuclide imaging. Radiopharmaceuticals. Tomography, Emission-Computed / methods. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Carcinoembryonic Antigen / blood. Contrast Media. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis / radiography. Neoplasm Metastasis / radionuclide imaging. Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted. Radiography, Abdominal. Radiography, Thoracic. Sensitivity and Specificity

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  • (PMID = 20173157.001).
  • [ISSN] 1546-3141
  • [Journal-full-title] AJR. American journal of roentgenology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AJR Am J Roentgenol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carcinoembryonic Antigen; 0 / Contrast Media; 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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66. Ivanova A, Iarŭmov N, Toshev S, Adzharov D, Krŭstev Z, Angelov K, Sokolov M, Gribnev P: [Pilot study on M2-PK-- a new non-invasive parameter for early diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma]. Khirurgiia (Sofiia); 2007;(6):5-7
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  • [Title] [Pilot study on M2-PK-- a new non-invasive parameter for early diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma].
  • To determine the level of tumor marker pyruvate kinase dimer (M2-PK) in the feces of patients with colorectal cancer and benign polyps, as well as in individuals with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases.
  • Fecal M2-PK determination could be outlined as a highly reliable non-invasive approach to the diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma.
  • The establishing of elevated values in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases decreases the specificity of M2-PK as a tumor marker.
  • However, this does not compromise its essential clinical significance, because the precise diagnosis in both diseases imposes an obligatory performance of colonoscopy.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Pyruvate Kinase / analysis
  • [MeSH-minor] Colonic Polyps / diagnosis. Colonic Polyps / enzymology. Early Diagnosis. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Feces / chemistry. Female. Humans. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases / diagnosis. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases / enzymology. Male. Middle Aged. Pilot Projects. Sensitivity and Specificity

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  • (PMID = 18622373.001).
  • [ISSN] 0450-2167
  • [Journal-full-title] Khirurgii︠a︡
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Khirurgiia (Sofiia)
  • [Language] bul
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Bulgaria
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 2.7.1.40 / Pyruvate Kinase
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67. Koh DM, Brown G, Meer Z, Norman AR, Husband JE: Diagnostic accuracy of rim and segmental MRI enhancement of colorectal hepatic metastasis after administration of mangafodipir trisodium. AJR Am J Roentgenol; 2007 Feb;188(2):W154-61
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  • [Title] Diagnostic accuracy of rim and segmental MRI enhancement of colorectal hepatic metastasis after administration of mangafodipir trisodium.
  • OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of rim and segmental MRI enhancement of hepatic metastasis of colorectal cancer after administration of mangafodipir trisodium (MnDPDP).
  • SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Sixty-one patients with a potentially resectable hepatic metastasis of colorectal cancer consecutively underwent breath-hold T1-weighted MRI in the axial and coronal planes 30 minutes and 24 hours after administration of MnDPDP.
  • RESULTS: Two hundred thirty lesions were identified at MRI: 210 lesions were metastatic, and 20 were benign.
  • CONCLUSION: Rim and segmental enhancement at MRI 24 hours after MnDPDP administration enabled accurate characterization of hepatic colorectal metastasis.
  • These features may aid in preoperative mapping of hepatic tumor burden and disease distribution in patients with colorectal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Edetic Acid / analogs & derivatives. Image Enhancement / methods. Liver Neoplasms / diagnosis. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Pyridoxal Phosphate / analogs & derivatives

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  • (PMID = 17242222.001).
  • [ISSN] 1546-3141
  • [Journal-full-title] AJR. American journal of roentgenology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AJR Am J Roentgenol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Contrast Media; 5V5IOJ8338 / Pyridoxal Phosphate; 9G34HU7RV0 / Edetic Acid; P28BIW0UTB / N,N'-bis(pyridoxal-5-phosphate)ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid
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68. Kawakita M, Hiramatsu K: Diacetylated derivatives of spermine and spermidine as novel promising tumor markers. J Biochem; 2006 Mar;139(3):315-22
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  • [Title] Diacetylated derivatives of spermine and spermidine as novel promising tumor markers.
  • DiAcSpm was more sensitive than CEA for detecting colorectal cancer patients, while DiAcSpd was highly specific for malignant conditions in that the excretion of the latter was scarcely elevated in cases of benign urogenital diseases.
  • An ELISA procedure for rapid determination of DiAcSpm was developed to promote the clinical application of these new tumor markers, and subsequent studies indicated that DiAcSpm was elevated in 60% of colorectal cancer patients at early stages (stage 0 + I), whereas only 10% of these patients were CEA-positive.
  • The evidence accumulated so far indicates that DiAcSpm and DiAcSpd are promising novel tumor markers.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / urine. Neoplasms / urine. Spermidine / analogs & derivatives. Spermine / analogs & derivatives

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  • (PMID = 16567395.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-924X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of biochemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Biochem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 2FZ7Y3VOQX / Spermine; 77928-71-3 / N',N''-diacetylspermine; U87FK77H25 / Spermidine
  • [Number-of-references] 39
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69. Olesen SH, Christensen LL, Sørensen FB, Cabezón T, Laurberg S, Orntoft TF, Birkenkamp-Demtröder K: Human FK506 binding protein 65 is associated with colorectal cancer. Mol Cell Proteomics; 2005 Apr;4(4):534-44
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  • [Title] Human FK506 binding protein 65 is associated with colorectal cancer.
  • We initiated the present study to identify new genes associated with colorectal cancer.
  • In a previously published microarray study an EST (W80763), later identified as the gene hFKBP10 (NM_021939), was found to be strongly expressed in tumors while absent in the normal mucosa.
  • Here we describe this gene hFKBP10 together with its encoded protein hFKBP65 as a novel marker associated with colorectal cancer.
  • Analysis of 31 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 14 normal colorectal mucosa by RealTime PCR for hFKBP10 showed a significant up-regulation in tumors, when compared with normal mucosa.
  • Immunohistochemical analysis of 26 adenocarcinomas and matching normal mucosa, as well as benign hyperplastic polyps and adenomas, using a monoclonal anti-hFKBP65 antibody, showed that the protein was not present in normal colorectal epithelial cells, but strongly expressed in the tumor cells of colorectal cancer.
  • The protein was also expressed in fibroblasts of both normal mucosa and tumor tissue.
  • Western blot analysis of matched tumors and normal mucosa supported the finding of increased hFKBP65 expression in tumors compared with normal mucosa, in addition to identifying the molecular mass of hFKBP65 to approximately 72 kDa.
  • In conclusion, the protein hFKBP65 is associated with colorectal cancer, and we hypothesize the protein to be involved in fibroblast and transformed epithelial cell-specific protein synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / metabolism. Colorectal Neoplasms / metabolism. Tacrolimus Binding Proteins / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 15671042.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-9476
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cell Proteomics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; EC 5.2.1.- / Tacrolimus Binding Proteins
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70. Roessler M, Rollinger W, Mantovani-Endl L, Hagmann ML, Palme S, Berndt P, Engel AM, Pfeffer M, Karl J, Bodenmüller H, Rüschoff J, Henkel T, Rohr G, Rossol S, Rösch W, Langen H, Zolg W, Tacke M: Identification of PSME3 as a novel serum tumor marker for colorectal cancer by combining two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a strictly mass spectrometry-based approach for data analysis. Mol Cell Proteomics; 2006 Nov;5(11):2092-101
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  • [Title] Identification of PSME3 as a novel serum tumor marker for colorectal cancer by combining two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a strictly mass spectrometry-based approach for data analysis.
  • The purpose of this study was to identify and validate novel serological protein biomarkers of human colorectal cancer (CRC).
  • M., Schneidinger, B., Pfeffer, M., Andres, H., Karl, J., Bodenmuller, H., Ruschoff, J., Henkel, T., Rohr, G., Rossol, S., Rosch, W., Langen, H., Zolg, W., and Tacke, M. (2005) Identification of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase as a novel serum tumor marker for colorectal cancer. Clin.
  • The PSME3-containing spot on tumor gels showed no visible difference to the corresponding spot on matched control gels.
  • MS analysis revealed the presence of two proteins, PSME3 and annexin 4 (ANXA4) in one and the same spot on tumor gels, whereas the matched spot contained only one protein, ANXA4, on control gels.
  • Finally by developing a highly sensitive immunoassay, PSME3 could be detected in human sera and was significantly elevated in CRC patients compared with healthy donors and patients with benign bowel disease.
  • We propose that PSME3 be considered a novel serum tumor marker for CRC that may have significance in the detection and in the management of patients with this disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Autoantigens / blood. Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Colorectal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional. Mass Spectrometry / methods. Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex / blood

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  • (PMID = 16893879.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-9476
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cell Proteomics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Autoantigens; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Ki antigen; EC 3.4.25.1 / Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex
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71. Croce MV, Isla-Larrain M, Remes-Lenicov F, Colussi AG, Lacunza E, Kim KC, Gendler SJ, Segal-Eiras A: MUC1 cytoplasmic tail detection using CT33 polyclonal and CT2 monoclonal antibodies in breast and colorectal tissue. Histol Histopathol; 2006 08;21(8):849-55
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  • [Title] MUC1 cytoplasmic tail detection using CT33 polyclonal and CT2 monoclonal antibodies in breast and colorectal tissue.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied 163 breast and 89 colorectal cancer specimens, 10 breast and 14 colorectal benign conditions, and 12 breast and 20 colorectal normal samples.
  • From each tumor sample, subcellular fractions were obtained and analyzed by SDS-PAGE and WB.
  • Seven out of ten (70%) benign breast specimens were positive with CT33 while all samples stained with CT2; in normal breast sample tissues, all were positive with both Abs.
  • In colorectal cancer samples, both antibodies stained 47/89 (53%) samples; CT2 reacted in 13/14 (93%) of benign samples while CT33 showed a positive reaction in 9/14 (64%) of benign specimens.
  • By WB, in breast and colorectal cancer samples, similar results were obtained with both antibodies: a main band at about 30kDa which represents the smaller subunit.
  • CONCLUSION: CT33 polyclonal antibody has demonstrated its efficacy to detect MUC1 in breast and colorectal cancer tissues with similar reactivity to CT2.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / metabolism. Breast Neoplasms / metabolism. Colorectal Neoplasms / metabolism. Mucin-1 / metabolism. Organic Cation Transport Proteins / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Neoplasm / immunology. Antibodies, Neoplasm / metabolism. Biomarkers, Tumor. Breast / anatomy & histology. Breast / metabolism. Breast / pathology. Cell Fractionation. Colon / anatomy & histology. Colon / metabolism. Colon / pathology. Humans. Immunoenzyme Techniques. Rectum / anatomy & histology. Rectum / metabolism. Rectum / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16691537.001).
  • [ISSN] 1699-5848
  • [Journal-full-title] Histology and histopathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Histol. Histopathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Neoplasm; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / MUC-1 monoclonal antibody; 0 / Mucin-1; 0 / Organic Cation Transport Proteins; 0 / SLC22A16 protein, human
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72. Falguières T, Maak M, von Weyhern C, Sarr M, Sastre X, Poupon MF, Robine S, Johannes L, Janssen KP: Human colorectal tumors and metastases express Gb3 and can be targeted by an intestinal pathogen-based delivery tool. Mol Cancer Ther; 2008 Aug;7(8):2498-508
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  • [Title] Human colorectal tumors and metastases express Gb3 and can be targeted by an intestinal pathogen-based delivery tool.
  • The targeting of solid tumors requires delivery tools that resist intracellular and extracellular inactivation, and that are taken up specifically by tumor cells.
  • We have shown previously that the recombinant nontoxic B-subunit of Shiga toxin (STxB) can serve as a delivery tool to target digestive tumors in animal models.
  • The aim of this study was to expand these experiments to human colorectal cancer.
  • Tissue samples of normal colon, benign adenomas, colorectal carcinomas, and liver metastases from 111 patients were obtained for the quantification of the expression of the cellular STxB receptor, the glycosphingolipid globotriaosyl ceramide (Gb(3) or CD77).
  • We found that compared with normal tissue, the expression of Gb(3) was strongly increased in colorectal adenocarcinomas and their metastases, but not in benign adenomas.
  • Of a given tumor sample, on average, 80% of the cells could visibly bind STxB, and upon incubation at 37 degrees C, STxB was transported to the Golgi apparatus, following the retrograde route.
  • This STxB-specific intracellular targeting allows the molecule to avoid recycling and degradation, and STxB could consequently be detected on tumor cells even 5 days after initial uptake.
  • In conclusion, the targeting properties of STxB could be diverted for the delivery of contrast agents to human colorectal tumors and their metastases, whose early detection and specific targeting remains one of the principal challenges in oncology.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, Tumor-Associated, Carbohydrate / biosynthesis. Colorectal Neoplasms / therapy. Intestines / microbiology. Shiga Toxins / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Chromatography, Thin Layer. Female. Humans. Liver Neoplasms / metabolism. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Male. Middle Aged. Trihexosylceramides / biosynthesis

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  • (PMID = 18687997.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-7163
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular cancer therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cancer Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, Tumor-Associated, Carbohydrate; 0 / Gb3 antigen; 0 / Shiga Toxins; 0 / Trihexosylceramides; 0 / stxB toxin; 71965-57-6 / globotriaosylceramide
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73. Ma TL, Ni PH, Zhong J, Tan JH, Qiao MM, Jiang SH: Low expression of XIAP-associated factor 1 in human colorectal cancers. Chin J Dig Dis; 2005;6(1):10-4
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  • [Title] Low expression of XIAP-associated factor 1 in human colorectal cancers.
  • The aims of the present study were: (i) to investigate the expression of XAF1 in human colorectal cancers (CRC) both in vitro and in vivo, and (ii) to evaluate the possibility of XAF1 as a new tumor marker.
  • The expression of XAF1 in tissue was relatively lower in primary CRC compared with a relatively higher level in benign colorectal tumors (P < 0.01).
  • Although the XAF1 expression in circulation of those with CRC was also lower than in those with benign tumors, there was no statistical significance (P > 0.05).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The present results suggest that the low expression of XAF1 in tumor tissue coincides with a similar level in the peripheral circulation, which contributes at least part to the malignant behavior of CRC.
  • Integrating the XAF1 relative expression value with the other three traditional tumor biomarkers created a four-parameter assay that significantly improved the rate of diagnosis of CRC.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Colonic Neoplasms / genetics. Colonic Neoplasms / physiopathology. Neoplasm Proteins / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Apoptosis. Case-Control Studies. Female. Gene Expression Profiling. Humans. Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins. Male. Middle Aged. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Zinc Fingers

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  • (PMID = 15667552.001).
  • [ISSN] 1443-9611
  • [Journal-full-title] Chinese journal of digestive diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chin J Dig Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / XAF1 protein, human
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74. Chen TH, Lin CJ, Wu RC, Ho YP, Hsu CM, Lin WP, Tseng YP, Chen CH, Chiu CT: The application of miniprobe ultrasonography in the diagnosis of colorectal subepithelial lesions. Chang Gung Med J; 2010 Jul-Aug;33(4):380-8
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  • [Title] The application of miniprobe ultrasonography in the diagnosis of colorectal subepithelial lesions.
  • This study investigated the value of colonoscopic miniprobe ultrasonography for differential diagnosis and treatment strategy in patients with colorectal subepithelial lesions (SEL).
  • METHODS: Miniprobe ultrasonography was Performed in 40 consecutive patients with suspected colorectal SEL or residual lesions after endoscopic resection at one medical center by the same endoscopist (C-J Lin).
  • The final diagnosis of these lesions was confirmed by cross section imaging, histopathologic findings, or clinical follow-up.
  • RESULTS: Miniprobe EUS allowed high-resolution imaging and a successful approach to all colorectal SEL through the working channel of a sigmoidoscope or colonoscope without breakdown of the miniprobe.
  • Thirteen patients, suspected of having rectal carcinoid tumors (mean size, 6.9 +/- 3.3 mm), were treated radically by endoscopic mucosal resection using a transparent cap (EMRC) after EUS confirmation of no muscular invasion.
  • Three patients had no residual or recurrent carcinoid tumor on EUS examination after previous empiric polypectomy or biopsy.
  • Five patients had suspected rectal myogenic stromal tumors on EUS; three were transferred for surgical resection due to uterine myoma compression (N = 2) or mucinous adenocarcinoma of the appendix with rectal metastasis (N = 1), and two had uterine myoma detected by gynecologic ultrasound or CT.
  • One appendiceal stone with orifice obstruction mimicking cecal submucosal tumor was proved by surgical resection.
  • The other six patients had various benign lesions, which were diagnosed and followed-up by EUS without progression.
  • In thirty-five of forty patients (88%) colorectal SEL were managed uneventfully according to EUS interpretation.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Miniprobe ultrasonography can be a useful supplement to routine colonoscopy and provide treatment guidance for suspected colorectal subepithelial lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Colonoscopy / methods. Colorectal Neoplasms / ultrasonography. Endosonography / methods

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  • (PMID = 20804667.001).
  • [ISSN] 2309-835X
  • [Journal-full-title] Chang Gung medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chang Gung Med J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China (Republic : 1949- )
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75. Xi L, Gooding W, McCarty K, Godfrey TE, Hughes SJ: Identification of mRNA markers for molecular staging of lymph nodes in colorectal cancer. Clin Chem; 2006 Mar;52(3):520-3
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  • [Title] Identification of mRNA markers for molecular staging of lymph nodes in colorectal cancer.
  • Surprisingly, no systematic analysis of potential mRNA markers for colorectal cancer has been reported.
  • We therefore performed an extensive mRNA marker survey for colorectal cancers.
  • We analyzed all markers by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR on a limited set of primary tumors and benign lymph nodes.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Several mRNA markers are capable of providing exceptionally accurate characterization of lymph node status in colorectal cancer.
  • An automated, multimarker, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assay for characterization of lymph nodes from colorectal cancer patients may be useful for improved staging and therapeutic decision making in colorectal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Colorectal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Lymph Nodes / pathology. RNA, Messenger / analysis

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  • (PMID = 16510433.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-9147
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Chem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-01958
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / RNA, Messenger
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76. Uenoyama Y, Seno H, Fukuda A, Sekikawa A, Nanakin A, Sawabu T, Kawada M, Kanda N, Suzuki K, Yada N, Fukui H, Chiba T: Hypoxia induced by benign intestinal epithelial cells is associated with cyclooxygenase-2 expression in stromal cells through AP-1-dependent pathway. Oncogene; 2006 Jun 1;25(23):3277-85
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  • [Title] Hypoxia induced by benign intestinal epithelial cells is associated with cyclooxygenase-2 expression in stromal cells through AP-1-dependent pathway.
  • Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays important roles in tumor development.
  • Especially in the early-stage colorectal tumors, COX-2 expression is often observed in the tumor stroma.
  • In the present study, we simulated the indirect interaction between epithelial cells and stromal cells in the process of colorectal tumor development using an in vitro co-culture model in which NIH3T3 fibroblasts were co-cultured with 'sparsely' or 'densely' populated intestinal epithelial cells, Intestine-407 as a model of premalignant or benign intestinal epithelial cells, and DLD-1 and Caco-2 as models of malignant epithelial cells.
  • Interestingly, there was pericellular hypoxia in the vicinity of NIH3T3 fibroblasts when co-cultured with 'dense' epithelial cells, and the recovery of the partial pressure of oxygen level resulted in the reduction of enhanced COX-2 expression only in NIH3T3 fibroblasts co-cultured with 'dense' Intestine-407 cells.
  • Thus, pericellular hypoxia of the stromal cells caused by densely populated epithelial cells may be one of the potent COX-2 enhancers before completion of malignant transformation during intestinal tumor development.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Caco-2 Cells. Cell Count. Cell Line, Tumor. Coculture Techniques. Enzyme Induction / physiology. Humans. Mice. NIH 3T3 Cells. Precancerous Conditions / enzymology. Precancerous Conditions / metabolism. Precancerous Conditions / pathology. Stromal Cells / enzymology. Stromal Cells / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16407821.001).
  • [ISSN] 0950-9232
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncogene
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncogene
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Membrane Proteins; 0 / Transcription Factor AP-1; EC 1.14.99.1 / Cyclooxygenase 2; EC 1.14.99.1 / PTGS2 protein, human
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77. Bettstetter M, Woenckhaus M, Wild PJ, Rümmele P, Blaszyk H, Hartmann A, Hofstädter F, Dietmaier W: Elevated nuclear maspin expression is associated with microsatellite instability and high tumour grade in colorectal cancer. J Pathol; 2005 Apr;205(5):606-14
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  • [Title] Elevated nuclear maspin expression is associated with microsatellite instability and high tumour grade in colorectal cancer.
  • In this study, expression of maspin was analysed in 41 colorectal carcinomas with high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H) and 159 microsatellite stable colorectal cancers (MSS/MSI-L) by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and partly by relative quantitative real-time RT-PCR and western blot analyses.
  • Significant upregulation of maspin expression was found in MSI-H tumours compared to both MSS/MSI-L tumours and matched benign colonic mucosa.
  • These findings provide new insights into the role of maspin in colorectal cancer progression and may be useful for diagnosis and treatment strategies.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Colorectal Neoplasms / metabolism. Microsatellite Repeats. Neoplasm Proteins / metabolism. Serpins / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Blotting, Western. Cell Nucleus / metabolism. CpG Islands. Cytoplasm / metabolism. DNA Methylation. DNA, Neoplasm / genetics. Genes, Tumor Suppressor. Humans. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Staging. Promoter Regions, Genetic. RNA, Neoplasm / genetics. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction / methods. Transcription, Genetic

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  • (PMID = 15714592.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3417
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / RNA, Neoplasm; 0 / SERPIN-B5; 0 / Serpins
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78. Lin HZ, Chen L, Zhou DF, Hao LH, Li XC, Chang H: [Study on the early liver metastasis forecast of colorectal neoplasms]. Zhonghua Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2006 Nov 1;44(21):1486-9
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  • [Title] [Study on the early liver metastasis forecast of colorectal neoplasms].
  • OBJECTIVE: To obtain some effective objective markers used to predict the early liver metastasis of colorectal tumor, the relationship of liver metastasis of colorectal tumor with associate detection three markers such as CK20mRNA, CD44v6 and VEGF was studied.
  • METHODS: The expression of CK20mRNA in patrol venous blood from 30 colorectal cancer patients was detected by fluorescent quantitative RT-PCR, and the results of CD44v6 and VEGF in colorectal cancer tissue were determined by means of immunohistochemistry, and then compared with those in control groups.
  • RESULTS: The rate of positive expression of CK20mRNA in colorectal cancer patients' patrol venous blood was obviously superior to the level of benign pathological changes controls (P < 0.01), and significantly higher than that of normal controls (P < 0.01).
  • The rate of positive expression of CD44v6 and VEGF in colorectal tumor tissue was distinctly superior to the level of benign pathological controls, and remarkable higher than that of normal controls (P < 0.01).
  • The rate of positive expression of CK20mRNA in patrol venous blood was evidently correlated to the expression of CD44v6 and VEGF in tumor tissue (r(1) = 0.933, r(2) = 0.906, P < 0.05).
  • CONCLUSIONS: If combined detecting these markers of CK20mRNA, CD44v6 and VEGF to forecast liver metastasis of colorectal tumor, the sensitivity and specialty of prediction will be improved, there were highly clinical values in predicting in early diagnosis liver metastasis of colorectal tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Liver Neoplasms / diagnosis. Liver Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antigens, CD44 / analysis. Early Diagnosis. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Keratin-20 / blood. Keratin-20 / genetics. Middle Aged. RNA, Messenger / genetics. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction. Sensitivity and Specificity. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors / analysis

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  • (PMID = 17349177.001).
  • [ISSN] 0529-5815
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua wai ke za zhi [Chinese journal of surgery]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD44; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Keratin-20; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors
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79. Smeets P, Ham H, Ceelen W, Boterberg T, Verstraete K, Goethals I: Differentiation between peri-anastomotic inflammatory changes and local recurrence following neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy surgery for colorectal cancer using visual and semiquantitative analysis of PET-CT data. Q J Nucl Med Mol Imaging; 2010 Jun;54(3):327-32
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  • [Title] Differentiation between peri-anastomotic inflammatory changes and local recurrence following neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy surgery for colorectal cancer using visual and semiquantitative analysis of PET-CT data.
  • AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of visual and semiquantitative [¹⁸F]fluorodeoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) data for the diagnosis of peri-anastomotic colorectal cancer recurrence, taking into account the time period between surgery and [¹⁸F]FDG PET-CT scanning.
  • METHODS: The study population consisted of 70 patients who had prior preoperative radiochemotherapy and surgical resection of the primary tumor and who underwent whole body [¹⁸F]FDG PET-CT scanning for the detection of recurrent disease.
  • The final diagnosis was based on pathological proof or clinical and/or imaging follow-up data.
  • Of these, 11 (41%) patients had a local tumor recurrence and 16 (59%) had no recurrent tumor.
  • Among the 43 patients without increased [¹⁸F]FDG uptake at the peri-anastomosis, none had local tumor recurrence.
  • However, when the time period between surgery and [¹⁸F]FDG PET-CT scanning was taken into account, overlap of SUV(max) was mainly observed within a postoperative period of ≤12 months; thereafter, a threshold SUV(max) of 3.2 discriminated between benign and malignant lesions in all but one patient.
  • CONCLUSION: In our series, visually increased [¹⁸F]FDG uptake at the peri-anastomosis was 100% sensitive but non-specific (73% specificity) for the diagnosis of local tumor recurrence.
  • On the other hand, normal [¹⁸F]FDG uptake at the peri-anastomosis precluded a local tumor recurrence (a negative predictive value of 100%).
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / radiography. Colorectal Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Fluorine Radioisotopes. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Humans. Inflammation / radiography. Inflammation / radionuclide imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / radiography. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / radionuclide imaging. Positron-Emission Tomography. Radiopharmaceuticals. Retrospective Studies. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 20639817.001).
  • [ISSN] 1824-4785
  • [Journal-full-title] The quarterly journal of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging : official publication of the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine (AIMN) [and] the International Association of Radiopharmacology (IAR), [and] Section of the Society of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry and Biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Q J Nucl Med Mol Imaging
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fluorine Radioisotopes; 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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80. Shantha Kumara HM, Grieco MJ, Yan X, Kalady MF, DiMaggio V, Kim DG, Hyman N, Feingold DL, Whelan RL: Minimally invasive colorectal resection for cancer is associated with a short-lived decrease in soluble Tie-2 receptor levels, which may transiently inhibit VEGF-mediated angiogenesis (via altered blood levels of free Ang-1 and Ang-2). Surg Endosc; 2010 Oct;24(10):2581-7
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  • [Title] Minimally invasive colorectal resection for cancer is associated with a short-lived decrease in soluble Tie-2 receptor levels, which may transiently inhibit VEGF-mediated angiogenesis (via altered blood levels of free Ang-1 and Ang-2).
  • After minimally invasive colorectal resection (MICR), Ang-1 levels decrease and Ang-2 levels increase, which may stimulate angiogenesis in wounds and residual tumor foci.
  • METHODS: Blood samples were taken preoperatively (PreOp) and on postoperative days (POD) 1 and 3 from 50 cancer and 53 benign disease MICR patients.
  • RESULTS: PreOp plasma sTie-2 levels were significantly higher in the benign group (27.6 ± 10.2) than in the cancer group (22.9 ± 7.9).
  • A significant drop from PreOp occurred in sTie-2 levels in the cancer group on POD1 (20.0 ± 7.4) and POD3 (21.0 ± 6.6) and in the benign group on POD1 (24.8 ± 9.1).
  • The benign group's POD3 and the cancer group's POD7-13 sTie-2 levels were statistically similar to the PreOp levels while the benign group's POD7-13 level was significantly higher.
  • The benign group's early results were similar.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiopoietin-2 / blood. Colectomy. Colorectal Neoplasms / surgery. Neovascularization, Pathologic / physiopathology. Receptor, TIE-2 / blood. Rectum / surgery. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors / physiology

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  • [CommentIn] Surg Endosc. 2011 Aug;25(8):2769-70 [21487885.001]
  • (PMID = 20354881.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-2218
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgical endoscopy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg Endosc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiopoietin-2; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, TIE-2
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81. Lee JH, Park SG, Jee KN, Park DG, Namgung H, Song IH: Performance of FDG PET/CT in postoperative colorectal cancer patients with a suspected recurrence and a normal CEA level. Nucl Med Commun; 2010 Jun;31(6):576-82
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  • [Title] Performance of FDG PET/CT in postoperative colorectal cancer patients with a suspected recurrence and a normal CEA level.
  • PURPOSE: The performance of 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) has been not established for the evaluation of recurrent colorectal cancer.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of FDG PET/CT in postoperative colorectal cancer patients with normal carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels.
  • METHODS: This retrospective study was conducted on 63 FDG PET/CT cases, involving postoperative colorectal cancer patients suspected of having recurrent or metastatic lesions with normal CEA levels.
  • Histopathology, a clinical imaging work-up (including an FDG PET/CT examination), and determination of tumor marker levels during the follow-up served as the reference standard.
  • CONCLUSION: FDG PET/CT is a valuable tool to distinguish recurrence or metachronous tumor from postoperative changes or other benign lesions in postoperative colorectal cancer patients with normal CEA levels and radiologically or clinically suspicious lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoembryonic Antigen / metabolism. Colorectal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Colorectal Neoplasms / metabolism. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Positron-Emission Tomography. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 20216474.001).
  • [ISSN] 1473-5628
  • [Journal-full-title] Nuclear medicine communications
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nucl Med Commun
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carcinoembryonic Antigen; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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82. Kadiyska TK, Kaneva RP, Nedin DG, Alexandrova AB, Gegova AT, Lalchev SG, Christova T, Mitev VI, Horst J, Bogdanova N, Kremensky IM: Novel MLH1 frameshift mutation in an extended hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer family. World J Gastroenterol; 2006 Dec 28;12(48):7848-51
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  • [Title] Novel MLH1 frameshift mutation in an extended hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer family.
  • AIM: To present novel frameshift mutation c.31delC [p.L11X] in the MLH1 gene identified in an extended Bulgarian hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) family and to analyze the molecular and clinical findings within the pedigree concerning the proposal of adequate individual prophylactic strategy for all mutation carriers.
  • One of the mutation carriers developed a benign giant cell soft tissue tumor.
  • The primary tumor localizations were frequently extracolonic and detailed yearly gastrointestinal and gynecological examinations have been proposed to the mutation carriers.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / genetics. Carrier Proteins / genetics. Colorectal Neoplasms, Hereditary Nonpolyposis / genetics. Frameshift Mutation / genetics. Nuclear Proteins / genetics. Pedigree
  • [MeSH-minor] Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Bulgaria. DNA, Neoplasm / genetics. Female. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Genetic Counseling. Humans. Male. Microsatellite Instability. Middle Aged. MutS Homolog 2 Protein / genetics. Sequence Deletion / genetics

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  • [Cites] Fam Cancer. 2005;4(3):227-32 [16136382.001]
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  • (PMID = 17203532.001).
  • [ISSN] 1007-9327
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing; 0 / Carrier Proteins; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 0 / MLH1 protein, human; 0 / Nuclear Proteins; EC 3.6.1.3 / MSH2 protein, human; EC 3.6.1.3 / MutS Homolog 2 Protein
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4087554
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83. Belizon A, Balik E, Horst P, Feingold D, Arnell T, Azarani T, Cekic V, Skitt R, Kumara S, Whelan RL: Persistent elevation of plasma vascular endothelial growth factor levels during the first month after minimally invasive colorectal resection. Surg Endosc; 2008 Feb;22(2):287-97
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  • [Title] Persistent elevation of plasma vascular endothelial growth factor levels during the first month after minimally invasive colorectal resection.
  • BACKGROUND: Elevations of plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) have been noted early after colorectal resection.
  • Because VEGF is a potent promoter of angiogenesis, which is critical to tumor growth, a sustained increase in blood VEGF levels after surgery may stimulate the growth of residual metastases early after surgery.
  • This preliminary study aimed to determine VEGF levels during the first month after colorectal resection.
  • RESULTS: A total of 49 patients with cancer and 30 patients with benign indications, all of whom underwent minimally invasive colorectal resection, were assessed separately.
  • With regard to the benign patients, the median preoperative VEGF level was 112 pg/ml, and the peak postoperative value, 286 pg/ml, was noted during postoperative week 2.
  • CONCLUSION: This preliminary study demonstrates that after minimally invasive colorectal resection for cancer, median VEGF levels are significantly elevated on POD 3 and remain increased for as long as 4 weeks.
  • Significant elevations in a similar pattern also were noted for the benign patients.
  • It is possible that the growth of residual tumor deposits may be stimulated early after surgery.
  • [MeSH-major] Colonic Diseases / blood. Colonic Diseases / surgery. Colorectal Neoplasms / blood. Colorectal Neoplasms / surgery. Laparoscopy. Rectal Diseases / surgery. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / blood

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  • [CommentIn] Surg Endosc. 2008 Feb;22(2):285-6 [17973168.001]
  • (PMID = 18204877.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-2218
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgical endoscopy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg Endosc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
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84. Gold DV, Stein R, Burton J, Goldenberg DM: Enhanced expression of CD74 in gastrointestinal cancers and benign tissues. Int J Clin Exp Pathol; 2010;4(1):1-12
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  • [Title] Enhanced expression of CD74 in gastrointestinal cancers and benign tissues.
  • Colorectal and gastric carcinomas gave similar results with 60% and 86%, respectively, positive for CD74 with an intense, diffuse staining pattern.
  • These findings are supportive of a role for CD74 in the development and maintenance of gastrointestinal neo-plasia, and provide a rationale for development of therapeutic agents that are able to block CD74 function, specifically within the tumor cell.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / metabolism. Adenoma / metabolism. Antigens, Differentiation, B-Lymphocyte / metabolism. Digestive System Neoplasms / metabolism. Histocompatibility Antigens Class II / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Colorectal Neoplasms / metabolism. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Pancreatic Neoplasms / metabolism. Pancreatic Neoplasms / pathology. Stomach Neoplasms / metabolism. Stomach Neoplasms / pathology. Tissue Array Analysis

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  • (PMID = 21228923.001).
  • [ISSN] 1936-2625
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of clinical and experimental pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Clin Exp Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA096924
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, Differentiation, B-Lymphocyte; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Histocompatibility Antigens Class II; 0 / invariant chain
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3016099
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; CD74 / colon carcinoma / gastric carcinoma / invariant chain / pancreatic carcinoma
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85. Guillen-Ahlers H, Suckow MA, Castellino FJ, Ploplis VA: Fas/CD95 deficiency in ApcMin/+ mice increases intestinal tumor burden. PLoS One; 2010 Feb 05;5(2):e9070
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  • [Title] Fas/CD95 deficiency in ApcMin/+ mice increases intestinal tumor burden.
  • BACKGROUND: Fas, a member of the tumor necrosis family, is responsible for initiating the apoptotic pathway when bound to its ligand, Fas-L.
  • Defects in the Fas-mediated apoptotic pathway have been reported in colorectal cancer.
  • One of the main limitations of the Apc(Min/+) mouse model is that it only develops benign polyps.
  • However, Apc(Min/+)/Fas(lpr) mice presented with a dramatic increase in tumor burden relative to Apc(Min/+) mice and invasive lesions at advanced ages.
  • CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrated that imposition of a Fas deletion in an Apc(Min/+) background results in a more aggressive phenotype of the Apc(Min/+) mouse model, with more rapid development of invasive intestinal tumors and a decrease in Fas-L levels.

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  • (PMID = 20140201.001).
  • [ISSN] 1932-6203
  • [Journal-full-title] PloS one
  • [ISO-abbreviation] PLoS ONE
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / P01 HL073750; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL 73750
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein; 0 / Antigens, CD95; 0 / Fas Ligand Protein; 0 / Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2816700
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86. Davies M, Arumugam PJ, Shah VI, Watkins A, Roger Morgan A, Carr ND, Beynon J: The clinical significance of lymph node micrometastasis in stage I and stage II colorectal cancer. Clin Transl Oncol; 2008 Mar;10(3):175-9
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  • [Title] The clinical significance of lymph node micrometastasis in stage I and stage II colorectal cancer.
  • The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and prognostic significance of immunohistochemically detected micrometastasis (IHM) in patients with localised colorectal cancer (CRC) (Dukes' A and B).
  • There was no correlation of IHM with age, gender, site, size and grade of tumour, depth of tumour invasion or perineural and vascular invasion.
  • DISCUSSION: We have shown that isolated CK-positive epithelioid cells are commonly found in morphologically benign pericolic lymph nodes of patients with localised (Dukes' A or B) CRC.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Female. Humans. Keratins / metabolism. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 18321821.001).
  • [ISSN] 1699-048X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical & translational oncology : official publication of the Federation of Spanish Oncology Societies and of the National Cancer Institute of Mexico
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Transl Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 68238-35-7 / Keratins
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87. Uner A, Ebinc FA, Akyurek N, Unsal D, Mentes BB, Dursun A: Vascular endothelial growth factor, c-erbB-2 and c-erbB-3 expression in colorectal adenoma and adenocarcinoma. Exp Oncol; 2005 Sep;27(3):225-8
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  • [Title] Vascular endothelial growth factor, c-erbB-2 and c-erbB-3 expression in colorectal adenoma and adenocarcinoma.
  • AIM: To analyze vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), c-erbB-2 and c-erbB-3 expression and to evaluate their relation to clinicopathologic parameters and pathogenesis of colorectal carcinoma.
  • METHODS: Sections of adenoma, intramucosal carcinoma and adenocarcinoma were evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 85 malignant and 37 benign colorectal neoplasms for the expression of VEGF, c-erbB-2 and c-erbB-3 considering clinicopathological variables.
  • RESULTS: VEGF was detected in comparable percentages of all neoplasm types while c-erbB-2 expression was detectable more frequently in adenoma than adenocarcinoma cases (65% vs 43%).
  • Except for the correlation of c-erbB-3 expression with Dukes' staging, there was no correlation between the studied markers and grade of differentiation, Dukes' stage and localization of colorectal adenocarcinoma. c-erbB-3 expression was seen more frequently in tubular adenomas, while c-erbB-2 expression was higher in tubulovillous and villous types.
  • CONCLUSION: These results suggest that VEGF, c-erbB-2, c-erbB-3 expression does not have prognostic value in colorectal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / genetics. Adenoma / genetics. Colorectal Neoplasms / genetics. Receptor, ErbB-2 / biosynthesis. Receptor, ErbB-3 / biosynthesis. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Gene Expression Profiling. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Survival

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  • (PMID = 16244586.001).
  • [ISSN] 1812-9269
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ukraine
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, ErbB-2; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, ErbB-3
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88. Ferroni P, Roselli M, Spila A, D'Alessandro R, Portarena I, Mariotti S, Palmirotta R, Buonomo O, Petrella G, Guadagni F: Serum sE-selectin levels and carcinoembryonic antigen mRNA-expressing cells in peripheral blood as prognostic factors in colorectal cancer patients. Cancer; 2010 Jun 15;116(12):2913-21
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  • [Title] Serum sE-selectin levels and carcinoembryonic antigen mRNA-expressing cells in peripheral blood as prognostic factors in colorectal cancer patients.
  • BACKGROUND: This study analyzed the possible prognostic value of presurgical serum soluble (s)E-selectin levels and/or carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) mRNA positivity in predicting the disease-free survival of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients.
  • METHODS: CEA mRNA (obtained from blood-borne cells by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction [RT-PCR]), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and sE-selectin levels were analyzed in blood samples obtained from 78 patients with primary (n = 62) or recurrent (n = 16) CRC, 40 patients with benign colorectal (CR) diseases, and 78 controls.
  • Median baseline sE-selectin levels were higher in patients with CRC (43 ng/mL) compared with controls (36 ng/mL) or patients with benign CR diseases (31 ng/mL, P < .001).
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoembryonic Antigen / genetics. Colorectal Neoplasms / blood. E-Selectin / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. RNA, Messenger / blood. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 20336782.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Carcinoembryonic Antigen; 0 / E-Selectin; 0 / RNA, Messenger
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89. Horváth HC, Lakatos P, Kósa JP, Bácsi K, Borka K, Bises G, Nittke T, Hershberger PA, Speer G, Kállay E: The candidate oncogene CYP24A1: A potential biomarker for colorectal tumorigenesis. J Histochem Cytochem; 2010 Mar;58(3):277-85
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  • [Title] The candidate oncogene CYP24A1: A potential biomarker for colorectal tumorigenesis.
  • Because 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1) is considered to be the main enzyme determining the biological half-life of 1,25-D(3), we have examined expression of the CYP24A1 mRNA (by real-time RT-PCR) and protein (by immunohistochemistry) in normal human colon mucosa, colorectal adenomas, and adenocarcinomas in 111 patients.
  • Although 76% of the normal and benign colonic tissue was either completely devoid of or expressed very low levels of CYP24A1, in the majority of the adenocarcinomas (69%), the enzyme was present at high concentrations.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / enzymology. Adenoma / enzymology. Biomarkers, Tumor / biosynthesis. Colorectal Neoplasms / enzymology. Steroid Hydroxylases / biosynthesis

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  • (PMID = 19901270.001).
  • [ISSN] 1551-5044
  • [Journal-full-title] The journal of histochemistry and cytochemistry : official journal of the Histochemistry Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Histochem. Cytochem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Ki-67 Antigen; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Receptors, Calcitriol; EC 1.14.- / Steroid Hydroxylases; EC 1.14.13.126 / CYP24A1 protein, human; EC 1.14.13.126 / Vitamin D3 24-Hydroxylase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2825493
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90. Brozovich M, Read TE, Salgado J, Akbari RP, McCormick JT, Caushaj PF: Laparoscopic colectomy for apparently benign colorectal neoplasia: A word of caution. Surg Endosc; 2008 Feb;22(2):506-9
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  • [Title] Laparoscopic colectomy for apparently benign colorectal neoplasia: A word of caution.
  • PURPOSE: Endoscopically unresectable apparently benign colorectal polyps are considered by some surgeons as ideal for their early laparoscopic colectomy experience.
  • (1) a substantial fraction of patients undergoing laparoscopic colectomy for apparently benign colorectal neoplasia will have adenocarcinoma on final pathology; and (2) in our practice, we perform an adequate laparoscopic oncological resection for apparently benign polyps as evidenced by margin status and nodal retrieval.
  • METHODS: Data from a consecutive series of patients undergoing laparoscopic colectomy (on an intention-to-treat basis) for endoscopically unresectable neoplasms with benign preoperative histology were retrieved from a prospective database and supplemented by chart review.
  • The median nodal harvest was 12 and all resection margins were free of neoplasm.
  • Mean diameter of benign tumors was 3.2 cm (range 0.5-10.0cm) versus 3.9cm (range 1.5-7.5cm) for adenocarcinomas (p = 0.189, t - test).
  • CONCLUSION: A substantial fraction of endoscopically unresectable colorectal neoplasms with benign histology on initial biopsy will harbor invasive adenocarcinoma, some of advanced stage.
  • This finding supports the practice of performing oncological resection for all patients with endoscopically unresectable neoplasms of the colorectum.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / surgery. Colectomy / methods. Colonic Polyps / surgery. Colorectal Neoplasms / surgery. Laparoscopy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Male

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  • (PMID = 17704872.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-2218
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgical endoscopy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg Endosc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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91. Pesta M, Holubec L Jr, Topolcan O, Cerna M, Rupert K, Holubec LS, Treska V, Kormunda S, Elgrova L, Finek J, Cerny R: Quantitative estimation of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 7 (MMP-2, MMP-7) and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 2 (TIMP-1, TIMP-2) in colorectal carcinoma tissue samples. Anticancer Res; 2005 Sep-Oct;25(5):3387-91
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  • [Title] Quantitative estimation of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 7 (MMP-2, MMP-7) and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 2 (TIMP-1, TIMP-2) in colorectal carcinoma tissue samples.
  • BACKGROUND: An essential step in the process of tumor invasion and metastasis involves the degradation of tissue barriers in the extracellular matrix (ECM), particularly in the basal membrane (BM).
  • Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), in particular MMP-2, MMP-7, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2, play an important role in the process of ECM and BM degradation in connection with tumor invasion.
  • The aim of our study was to assess the levels of MMP-2, MMP-7, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 mRNA expression in colorectal carcinoma tissue samples and to correlate them with the stage of the disease.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study included samples of tumor tissue of 38 patients with colorectal carcinoma and samples of tissue of 11 patients with benign disease.
  • RESULTS: The levels of mRNA expression of MMP-2, MMP-7 and TIMP-1 were significantly higher in tumor tissue samples that in the control tissue (p<0.0005, p<0.0007 and p<0.0004).
  • In addition the presence of mRNA MMP-2, MMP-7, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 in tumor tissue samples in these parameters was significantly higher than in the control tissue (p<0.003, p<0.0001, p<0.0001 and p<0.05).
  • CONCLUSION: This pilot study demonstrated that a significant difference in the level and in the presence of mRNA MMP-2, MMP-7 and TIMP-1 expressions between tumor colorectal and control colorectal tissues might be helpful for the prognosis of colorectal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / enzymology. Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 / biosynthesis. Matrix Metalloproteinase 7 / biosynthesis. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 / biosynthesis. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Polymerase Chain Reaction. RNA, Messenger / biosynthesis. RNA, Messenger / genetics

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  • (PMID = 16101153.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1; 127497-59-0 / Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2; EC 3.4.24.23 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 7; EC 3.4.24.24 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 2
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92. Hague A, Hicks DJ, Hasan F, Smartt H, Cohen GM, Paraskeva C, MacFarlane M: Increased sensitivity to TRAIL-induced apoptosis occurs during the adenoma to carcinoma transition of colorectal carcinogenesis. Br J Cancer; 2005 Feb 28;92(4):736-42
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  • [Title] Increased sensitivity to TRAIL-induced apoptosis occurs during the adenoma to carcinoma transition of colorectal carcinogenesis.
  • The death ligand TRAIL (Apo2L) has potential for cancer therapy, since tumour cells are thought to be more sensitive than normal cells.
  • We investigated whether sensitivity to TRAIL increases during the adenoma to carcinoma transition of colorectal carcinogenesis.
  • This finding was recapitulated in an in vitro model of tumour progression in which conversion of the adenoma cell line AA/C1 to a tumorigenic phenotype was associated with increased TRAIL sensitivity (P<0.001).
  • Increased TRAIL sensitivity during colorectal carcinogenesis has been previously attributed to changes in the balance between TRAIL receptors TRAIL-R1 and -R2 and "decoy" receptors TRAIL-R3 and -R4 during malignant progression.
  • In summary, during colorectal carcinogenesis, there is a marked increase in sensitivity to TRAIL-induced apoptosis associated with progression from benign to malignant tumour that could be exploited for colon cancer therapy, but alterations in cell surface TRAIL receptor expression may not be the primary reason for this change.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoma / pathology. Apoptosis. Carcinoma / pathology. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Membrane Glycoproteins / metabolism. Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor / metabolism. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antineoplastic Agents / metabolism. Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins. Blotting, Western. Cell Line, Tumor. Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel. Flow Cytometry. GPI-Linked Proteins. Humans. Mice. Mice, Nude. Receptors, TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand. TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand. Tumor Necrosis Factor Decoy Receptors

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  • (PMID = 15685228.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0920
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins; 0 / GPI-Linked Proteins; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / Receptors, TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand; 0 / Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor; 0 / TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand; 0 / TNFRSF10A protein, human; 0 / TNFRSF10B protein, human; 0 / TNFRSF10C protein, human; 0 / TNFSF10 protein, human; 0 / Tnfrsf10b protein, mouse; 0 / Tnfsf10 protein, mouse; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor Decoy Receptors; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2361885
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93. Petersen M, Evert M, Schneider-Stock R, Pross M, Rüschoff J, Roessner A, Lippert H, Meyer F: Serous oligocystic adenoma (SOIA) of the pancreas--first reported case of a genetically fixed association in a patient with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Pathol Res Pract; 2009;205(11):801-6
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  • [Title] Serous oligocystic adenoma (SOIA) of the pancreas--first reported case of a genetically fixed association in a patient with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC).
  • Cystic tumor lesions of the pancreas are relatively uncommon.
  • Advances in imaging and pathohistology, including immunohistochemistry, have led to the detection and classification of novel tumor entities.
  • One of these classified cystic neoplasms of the pancreas is serous oligocystic adenoma (SOIA), a rare and benign tumor lesion.
  • Both tumor tissue specimens had been characterized for a high level of microsatellite instability (MSI) and loss of hMLH1, as well as for a corresponding germ line mutation in hMLH1 gene, leading to the diagnosis of hereditary non-polyposis associated colon cancer (HNPCC).
  • The case is remarkable since the SOIA revealed MSI and loss of hMLH1 protein in the tumor cells that has never been reported for this tumor type.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms, Hereditary Nonpolyposis / genetics. Cystadenoma / genetics. Pancreatic Neoplasms / genetics


94. Modlin IM, Kidd M, Latich I, Zikusoka MN, Eick GN, Mane SM, Camp RL: Genetic differentiation of appendiceal tumor malignancy: a guide for the perplexed. Ann Surg; 2006 Jul;244(1):52-60
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  • [Title] Genetic differentiation of appendiceal tumor malignancy: a guide for the perplexed.
  • OBJECTIVE: To use differential gene expression of candidate markers to discriminate benign appendiceal carcinoids (APCs) from malignant and mixed cell APCs.
  • SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Controversy exists in regard to the appropriate surgical management of APCs since it is sometimes difficult to predict tumor behavior using traditional pathologic criteria.
  • METHODS: Total RNA was isolated using TRIzol reagent from 42 appendiceal samples, including appendiceal carcinoids identified at exploration for appendicitis (no evidence of metastasis; n = 16), appendicitis specimens (n = 11), malignant appendiceal tumors (> 1.5 cm, evidence of metastatic invasion; n = 7), and mixed (goblet) cell appendiceal adenocarcinoids (n = 3), normal appendiceal tissue (n = 5), and 5 colorectal cancers.
  • RESULTS: CgA message was elevated (> 1000-fold, P < 0.05) in all tumor types.
  • MAGE-D2 and MTA1 message were significantly elevated (> 10-fold, P < 0.01) in the malignant and goblet cell adenocarcinoid tumors but not in the appendicitis-associated carcinoids or normal mucosa.
  • Elevated CgA transcript and protein levels indicative of a carcinoid tumor were identified in one acute appendicitis sample with no histologic evidence of a tumor.
  • CgA identified all appendiceal tumors as well as covert lesions, which may be more prevalent than previously recognized.
  • The molecular delineation of malignant appendiceal tumor potential provides a scientific basis to define the appropriate surgical management as opposed to morphologic assessment alone.

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  • (PMID = 16794389.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-4932
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA097050; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01-CA-097050
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing; 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm; 0 / Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Cell Cycle Proteins; 0 / Chromogranin A; 0 / Chromogranins; 0 / Genetic Markers; 0 / MAGED2 protein, human; 0 / NAP1L1 protein, human; 0 / NLRP1 protein, human; 0 / Nuclear Proteins; 0 / Nucleosome Assembly Protein 1; 0 / Repressor Proteins; EC 3.5.1.- / Mta1 protein, human; EC 3.5.1.98 / Histone Deacetylases
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1570599
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95. Wheless SA, McKinney KA, Zanation AM: A prospective study of the clinical impact of a multidisciplinary head and neck tumor board. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2010 Nov;143(5):650-4
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  • [Title] A prospective study of the clinical impact of a multidisciplinary head and neck tumor board.
  • OBJECTIVE: There have been no studies undertaken on the effect of the multidisciplinary head and neck tumor board on treatment planning.
  • The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of the multidisciplinary tumor board in altering diagnosis, stage, and treatment plan in patients with head and neck tumors.
  • SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A prospective study of the discussions concerning 120 consecutive patients presented at a multidisciplinary head and neck tumor board was performed.
  • As each patient was presented, a record was made of the "pre-conference" diagnosis, stage, and treatment plan.
  • After case discussion, the "post-conference" diagnosis, stage, and treatment plan were recorded.
  • Results are compared between malignant and benign tumor cohorts.
  • RESULTS: The study population comprised 120 patients with new presentations of head and neck tumors: 84 malignancies and 36 benign tumors.
  • Approximately 27 percent of patients had some change in tumor diagnosis, stage, or treatment plan.
  • Change in treatment was significantly more common in cases of malignancy, occurring in 24 percent of patients versus six percent of benign tumors (P = 0.0199).
  • CONCLUSION: A multidisciplinary tumor board affects diagnostic and treatment decisions in a significant number of patients with newly diagnosed head and neck tumors.
  • The multidisciplinary approach to patient care may be particularly effective in managing malignant tumors, in which treatment plans are most frequently altered.
  • [MeSH-major] Decision Making. Head and Neck Neoplasms / diagnosis. Interdisciplinary Communication. Medical Audit / organization & administration. Medical Oncology / methods. Otolaryngology / methods. Radiation Oncology / methods

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 20974334.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-6817
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / T32 DC005360; United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / T32 DC005360
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS248576; NLM/ PMC2994101
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96. Grieco MJ, Shantha Kumara HM, Baxter R, Dujovny N, Kalady MF, Cekic V, Luchtefeld M, Whelan RL: Minimally invasive colorectal resection is associated with a rapid and sustained decrease in plasma levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in the colon cancer setting. Surg Endosc; 2010 Oct;24(10):2617-22
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  • [Title] Minimally invasive colorectal resection is associated with a rapid and sustained decrease in plasma levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in the colon cancer setting.
  • BACKGROUND: Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates tumor growth directly via tumor cell EGF receptors or indirectly via its proangiogenic effects.
  • This study's purpose was to determine the impact of minimally invasive colorectal resection (MICR) on postoperative (postop) plasma EGF levels in the colorectal cancer (CRC) and benign disease settings and to see if preoperative (PreOp) EGF levels are altered in cancer patients.
  • METHODS: MICR patients with benign pathology (n = 40) and CRC (n = 48) had blood samples taken PreOp and on postoperative days (POD) 1 and 3.
  • RESULTS: The cancer and benign groups were comparable except for age.
  • The mean PreOp CRC plasma EGF level (122.9 ± 75.9 pg/ml) was significantly higher than that of the benign group (85.3 ± 38.5 pg/ml) (p = 0.015).
  • The benign group's POD3 and POD7-14 EGF levels were significantly lower than the PreOp level; later levels returned toward baseline.
  • MICR is associated with a significant decrease in EGF levels early postop in both cancer and benign settings.
  • Unlike the benign group, EGF blood levels in cancer patients remain low during the second postop month.
  • EGF may have value as a tumor marker.
  • [MeSH-major] Colectomy. Colonic Neoplasms / surgery. Epidermal Growth Factor / blood. Laparoscopy

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  • [CommentIn] Surg Endosc. 2011 Aug;25(8):2766-7; author reply 2768 [21416177.001]
  • (PMID = 20354877.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-2218
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgical endoscopy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg Endosc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 62229-50-9 / Epidermal Growth Factor
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97. Belinsky GS, Claffey KP, Nambiar PR, Guda K, Rosenberg DW: Vascular endothelial growth factor and enhanced angiogenesis do not promote metastatic conversion of a newly established azoxymethane-induced colon cancer cell line. Mol Carcinog; 2005 Jun;43(2):65-74
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  • The organo-specific carcinogen, azoxymethane (AOM), produces colon tumors in mice that share many pathological features with sporadic human colorectal cancer (CRC).
  • To assess the role of the microenvironment in preventing the invasive phenotype, multiple benign in situ adenocarcinomas were harvested from AOM-treated mice and cultured in vitro.
  • However, tumor cell growth was extremely limiting under standard culturing conditions.
  • Thus, we injected tumor cells directly into nude mice and performed two serial transplants, and successfully explanted a rapidly growing epithelial tumor cell line (AJ02nm(0)).
  • When injected subcutaneously (sc) into nude mice, AJ02nm(0) cells formed well-differentiated adenocarcinomas with minimal tumor invasive capacity.
  • AJ02nm-VEGF cells produced rapidly growing tumors in nude mice that exhibited extensive pseudo-epithelial ductal architecture and supporting vasculature, but without increased invasive potential compared to controls.
  • [MeSH-major] Colonic Neoplasms / blood supply. Neovascularization, Pathologic / physiopathology. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antigens, CD31 / analysis. Apoptosis. Cell Division. Cell Line, Tumor. Colorectal Neoplasms / blood supply. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. Karyotyping. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred A. Mice, Nude. Neoplasm Transplantation. Transfection

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  • (PMID = 15768385.001).
  • [ISSN] 0899-1987
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular carcinogenesis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Carcinog.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 81428
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD31; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
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98. Garneau H, Paquin MC, Carrier JC, Rivard N: E2F4 expression is required for cell cycle progression of normal intestinal crypt cells and colorectal cancer cells. J Cell Physiol; 2009 Nov;221(2):350-8
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  • [Title] E2F4 expression is required for cell cycle progression of normal intestinal crypt cells and colorectal cancer cells.
  • Immunofluorescence experiments in human fetal intestine revealed that cells expressing high nuclear levels of E2F4 also expressed cyclin A protein.
  • Lastly, E2F4 and its target cyclin A were up-regulated and mostly nuclear in human colorectal tumor cells in comparison to the corresponding benign epithelium.
  • These results indicate that nuclear E2F4 may be determinant in the promotion of proliferation of human intestinal epithelial crypt cells and colorectal cancer cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Cell Cycle. Colorectal Neoplasms / metabolism. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology. E2F4 Transcription Factor / metabolism. Intestines / cytology. Intestines / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Agar. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Nucleus / metabolism. Cell Proliferation. Cyclin A / metabolism. DNA / biosynthesis. Down-Regulation. Epithelial Cells / cytology. Epithelial Cells / metabolism. G1 Phase. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Gene Knockdown Techniques. Humans. Protein Transport. S Phase

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  • (PMID = 19562678.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-4652
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cellular physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cell. Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cyclin A; 0 / E2F4 Transcription Factor; 0 / E2F4 protein, human; 9002-18-0 / Agar; 9007-49-2 / DNA
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99. Halazun KJ, Al-Mukhtar A, Aldouri A, Malik HZ, Attia MS, Prasad KR, Toogood GJ, Lodge JP: Right hepatic trisectionectomy for hepatobiliary diseases: results and an appraisal of its current role. Ann Surg; 2007 Dec;246(6):1065-74
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  • RESULTS: Of the 275 patients, 160 had colorectal metastases, 49 had biliary tract cancers, 20 had hepatocellular carcinomas, 20 had other metastatic tumors, and 12 had benign diseases.
  • Concomitant procedures were carried out in 192 patients: caudate lobectomy in 45 patients, resection of tumors from the liver remnant in 57 patients, resection of the extrahepatic biliary tree in 45 patients, and lymphadenectomy in 45 patients.
  • Survivals for individual tumor types were acceptable, with 5-year survivals for colorectal metastasis and cholangiocarcinoma being 38% and 32%, respectively.
  • The outcome is not influenced by additional concomitant resection of tumors from the planned liver remnant.
  • [MeSH-major] Hepatectomy / methods. Liver Neoplasms / surgery

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  • [CommentIn] Ann Surg. 2008 Jul;248(1):138-9; author reply 139-40 [18580219.001]
  • (PMID = 18043112.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-4932
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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100. Liu W, Wei W, Winer D, Bamberger AM, Bamberger C, Wagener C, Ezzat S, Asa SL: CEACAM1 impedes thyroid cancer growth but promotes invasiveness: a putative mechanism for early metastases. Oncogene; 2007 Apr 26;26(19):2747-58
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  • CEACAM1 is a putative tumor suppressor based on diminished expression in some solid neoplasms such as colorectal carcinoma.
  • However, CEACAM1 is overexpressed in some tumors such as non-small cell lung cancer.
  • CEACAM1 is expressed in thyroid carcinoma cell lines derived from tumors that exhibit aggressive behavior.
  • Forced CEACAM1 expression enhanced cell-matrix adhesion and migration and promoted tumor invasiveness.
  • Conversely, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated downregulation of CEACAM1 expression in MRO cells accelerated cell cycle progression and significantly enhanced tumor size in xenografted mice.
  • CEACAM1 is not appreciably expressed in normal thyroid tissue or benign thyroid tumors.
  • In a human thyroid tissue array, CEACAM1 reactivity was associated with metastatic spread but not with increased tumor size.
  • These findings identify CEACAM1 as a unique mediator that restricts tumor growth whereas increasing metastatic potential.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD / physiology. Carcinoembryonic Antigen / metabolism. Cell Adhesion Molecules / physiology. Cell Proliferation. Thyroid Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma, Follicular / metabolism. Adenocarcinoma, Follicular / pathology. Adult. Aged. Animals. Carcinoma / metabolism. Carcinoma / pathology. Cell Line, Tumor. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21 / genetics. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21 / metabolism. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27 / genetics. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27 / metabolism. Female. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Gene Silencing. Humans. Male. Mice. Mice, SCID. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. RNA, Small Interfering / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 17057731.001).
  • [ISSN] 0950-9232
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncogene
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncogene
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / CD66 antigens; 0 / CDKN1A protein, human; 0 / Carcinoembryonic Antigen; 0 / Ceacam1 protein, mouse; 0 / Cell Adhesion Molecules; 0 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21; 0 / RNA, Small Interfering; 147604-94-2 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27
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