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1. Goodlin SJ: End-of-life care in heart failure. Curr Cardiol Rep; 2009 May;11(3):184-91
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  • [Title] End-of-life care in heart failure.
  • The clinical syndrome of heart failure is increasing in prevalence, as is the number of elderly persons with heart failure.
  • Increasing frailty and progression of heart failure in large numbers of patients means clinicians are increasingly challenged to provide end-of-life care for heart failure patients.
  • End-of-life care has been little studied, but management can be understood from early clinical trials of advanced heart failure.
  • Evidence-based heart failure medications, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers, improve symptoms in patients with advanced heart failure and depressed ejection fraction and should usually be continued in end-stage disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Advance Directives. Attitude to Death. Heart Failure / mortality. Heart Failure / therapy. Life Support Care / standards

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  • (PMID = 19379638.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-3170
  • [Journal-full-title] Current cardiology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Cardiol Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 50
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2. Cherrington CC, Lawson TN, Clark KB: Illness representation of patients with systolic heart failure. Prog Cardiovasc Nurs; 2006;21(4):190-5
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  • [Title] Illness representation of patients with systolic heart failure.
  • To date, no studies describe the illness representation of persons with systolic heart failure, a significant contributor of morbidity and mortality in older adults.
  • The purpose of this study was to describe illness representation in heart failure.
  • Twenty-two subjects with New York Heart Association class II or III systolic heart failure were recruited at a university-based heart failure clinic.
  • The results suggest that participants believed that their heart failure was a chronic, cyclic disease with serious consequences that they could control through treatment.
  • In addition, participants believed that they understood their heart failure and did not have a negative affective response to their heart failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Attitude to Health. Heart Failure / prevention & control. Heart Failure / psychology

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  • (PMID = 17170594.001).
  • [ISSN] 0889-7204
  • [Journal-full-title] Progress in cardiovascular nursing
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prog Cardiovasc Nurs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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3. Clarke J: Heart disease and gender in mass print media. Maturitas; 2010 Mar;65(3):215-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Heart disease and gender in mass print media.
  • Heart disease is a major cause of death, disease and disability in the developed world for both men and women.
  • Women appear to be under-diagnosed and treated both because they fail to visit the doctor or hospital with relevant symptoms and because doctors tend to dismiss the seriousness of women's symptoms of heart disease.
  • This review examined the way that popular mass print media present the possible association between gender and heart disease.
  • It found that there was: [1] an under-representation of heart disease as a possible concern to women, [2] a dismissing or sensationalization of women's heart disease, [3] a tendency to blame women's complex menopausal bodies for the causes of heart disease, [4] an association of women with the heart disease of their husbands, [5] a linking of heart disease with masculinity and [6] a promotion of the idea of the need for women to fear of heart disease and the necessity of taking cholesterol-lowering drugs.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Diseases. Journalism, Medical / standards. Mass Media. Prejudice


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4. Boriani G, Gasparini M, Landolina M, Lunati M, Biffi M, Santini M, Padeletti L, Molon G, Botto G, De Santo T, Valsecchi S, InSync/InSync ICD Italian Registry Investigators: Effectiveness of cardiac resynchronization therapy in heart failure patients with valvular heart disease: comparison with patients affected by ischaemic heart disease or dilated cardiomyopathy. The InSync/InSync ICD Italian Registry. Eur Heart J; 2009 Sep;30(18):2275-83
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  • [Title] Effectiveness of cardiac resynchronization therapy in heart failure patients with valvular heart disease: comparison with patients affected by ischaemic heart disease or dilated cardiomyopathy. The InSync/InSync ICD Italian Registry.
  • AIMS: To analyse the effectiveness of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients with valvular heart disease (a subset not specifically investigated in randomized controlled trials) in comparison with ischaemic heart disease or dilated cardiomyopathy patients.
  • Patients with valvular heart disease treated with CRT (n = 108) in comparison with ischaemic heart disease (n = 737) and dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 635) patients presented: (i) a higher prevalence of chronic atrial fibrillation, with atrioventricular node ablation performed in around half of the cases;.
  • (iv) a favourable clinical response at 12 months with an improvement of the clinical composite score similar to that occurring in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and more pronounced than that observed in patients with ischaemic heart disease;.
  • (v) a long-term outcome, in term of freedom from death or heart transplantation, similar to patients affected by ischaemic heart disease and basically more severe than that of patients affected by dilated cardiomyopathy.
  • CONCLUSION: In 'real world' clinical practice, CRT appears to be effective also in patients with valvular heart disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Cardiac Pacing, Artificial. Cardiomyopathy, Dilated / therapy. Heart Failure / therapy. Heart Valve Diseases / complications. Myocardial Ischemia / therapy

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  • (PMID = 19515689.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-9645
  • [Journal-full-title] European heart journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. Heart J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2742782
  • [Investigator] Galimberti P; Regoli F; Ceriotti C; Cattafi G; Magenta G; Paolucci M; Vecchi R; Ricci R; Gaita F; Bocchiardo M; DiDonna P; Caponi D; Tavazzi L; Rordorf R; Petracci B; Vicentini A; Savastano S; Matteo PS; Pieragnoli P; Vincenti A; DeCeglia S; Ciró A; Gerardo Dei Tintori S; Curnis A; Mascioli G; Puglisi A; Bianchi S; Peraldo C; Sassara M; Achilli A; Turreni F; Rossi P; Perego GB; Ravazzi PA; Diotallevi P; Antonio e Biagio SS; Tritto M; Carboni A; Ardissino D; Gonzi G; Serra V; Vergara G; Maria Del Carmine S; Martignani C; Frabetti L; Orsola-Mailpighi S; Luzzi G; Laurenzi F; Camillo S; Pistis G; Cesario A; Grassi GB; Zanotto G; Orazi S; Camillo S; Ometto R; Bonanno C; Bortolo S; Barbieri E; Cuore S; Raviele A; Gasparini G; Luzi M; Sagone A; Anna S; Vado A; Croce S; Montenero A; Giovanni SS; Inama G; Sassone B; Briedda M; Zardo F; Maria S; Bertaglia E; Proclemer A; Maria S; Zanon F; Disertori M; Gramegna L; DelGreco M; Dallafior D; Chiara S; Tomasi C; Maresta A; Piancastelli M; Maria Croci S; Bridda A; Martino S; Mantovan R; Fusco A; Vicentini A; Baraldi P; Agostino S; Lonardi G; Rahue W; Maurizio S; Delise P; Menozzi C; MariaNuova S; Babudri P; Marconi R; DeFabrizio G; Alfano F; Moscati G; Barbato G; Gelmini P; DiSabato; Leopoldo S; Ricci S; Aulerio MD; Biagio S; Morgagni GL; Latini R; Bardelli G; Paulichl R; Tappeiner Merano F; Bernasconi M; Marzegalli M; Carlo S; Neri G; Occhetta E; Bocconcelli P; Salvatore S; Capucci A; Campana A; Giovanni S; Dibelardino N; Vaglio A
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5. Volz EM, Felker GM: How to use diuretics in heart failure. Curr Treat Options Cardiovasc Med; 2009 Dec;11(6):426-32
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  • [Title] How to use diuretics in heart failure.
  • Systemic and pulmonary congestion is a central aspect of both acute and chronic heart failure and directly leads to many of the clinical manifestations of these syndromes.
  • Therefore, diuretic therapy to treat congestion plays a fundamental role in heart failure management.
  • However, although diuretics are the most common drugs prescribed for heart failure, there is limited quality evidence to guide their use.
  • Unlike other components of the heart failure armamentarium, such as beta-blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, diuretics (with the exception of aldosterone antagonists) have not been shown to decrease heart failure progression or improve mortality.
  • Additionally, some observational data suggest that diuretics may actually be harmful in heart failure, contributing to neurohormonal activation, renal dysfunction, and potentially mortality.
  • Despite these concerns, diuretics remain ubiquitous in heart failure management because of the need to address symptoms of congestion and the lack of alternative strategies.
  • Recently, the development of a variety of potential adjuncts or alternatives to diuretic therapy has suggested the need for an active reappraisal of diuretic therapy for heart failure.
  • Loop diuretics, the mainstay of acute and chronic therapy for heart failure, are "threshold drugs"; therefore, an adequate dose to achieve a pharmacodynamic effect (ie, to increase urine output) must be prescribed for effective therapy.
  • Management of chronic heart failure often includes patient-directed titration of diuretics based on changes in symptoms or body weight in an attempt to decrease hospitalizations, although the efficacy of this strategy has not been tested in well-designed trials.

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  • (PMID = 19930980.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-3189
  • [Journal-full-title] Current treatment options in cardiovascular medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Treat Options Cardiovasc Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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6. Ceconi C, Cargnoni A, Francolini G, Parinello G, Ferrari R: Heart rate reduction with ivabradine improves energy metabolism and mechanical function of isolated ischaemic rabbit heart. Cardiovasc Res; 2009 Oct 1;84(1):72-82
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  • [Title] Heart rate reduction with ivabradine improves energy metabolism and mechanical function of isolated ischaemic rabbit heart.
  • AIMS: The anti-anginal agent ivabradine slows heart rate (HR) by selectively inhibiting the I(f) current in the sinus node.
  • We report an ex vivo study to evaluate the anti-ischaemic effect of ivabradine in terms of modulation of cardiac energy metabolism.
  • METHODS AND RESULTS: A Langendorff-perfused rabbit heart model was subjected to low-flow ischaemia and reperfusion.
  • Cardiac metabolism was studied by measuring cardiac high-energy phosphate contents via HPLC, mitochondrial respiration was analysed polarographically, and cardiac redox potentials by HPLC.
  • Cardiac function was determined in terms of the recovery of developed pressure during reperfusion and release of creatine kinase (CK) (spectrophotometrically) and noradrenaline (HPLC) after reperfusion.
  • This concentration protected the heart against ischaemia-reperfusion damage by reducing the rise in diastolic pressure (from 66 +/- 3 with vehicle to 39 +/- 4 mmHg, P < 0.01) and improving developed pressure after 30 min reperfusion (39 +/- 3 vs. 18 +/- 3 mmHg with vehicle, P < 0.01).
  • It preserved cardiac energy metabolism (ATP, from 3.7 +/- 0.3 to 11.0 +/- 0.6 microM/g dry weight, P < 0.001) and redox state (NADPH/NADP(+), from 2.5 +/- 0.5 to 4.2 +/- 0.5, P < 0.001).
  • There was a significant correlation between HR reduction in the ivabradine-treated hearts and cardiac creatine phosphate (r = 0.574, P = 0.02) and ATP levels (ATP, r = 0.674, P = 0.0042) at the end of ischaemia.
  • It significantly reduces cardiac energy consumption, preserves redox potentials during ischaemia, and enhances recovery at reperfusion.
  • [MeSH-major] Benzazepines / pharmacology. Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Cation Channels / antagonists & inhibitors. Energy Metabolism / drug effects. Heart / drug effects. Heart Rate / drug effects. Myocardial Ischemia / drug therapy

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  • [CommentIn] Cardiovasc Res. 2009 Oct 1;84(1):9-10 [19617225.001]
  • (PMID = 19477966.001).
  • [ISSN] 1755-3245
  • [Journal-full-title] Cardiovascular research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cardiovasc. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Benzazepines; 0 / Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Cation Channels; 3H48L0LPZQ / ivabradine; 8L70Q75FXE / Adenosine Triphosphate; EC 2.7.3.2 / Creatine Kinase; X4W3ENH1CV / Norepinephrine
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7. Tsutsui H: [Usefulness of ARB in heart failure]. Nihon Rinsho; 2009 Apr;67(4):751-7
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  • [Title] [Usefulness of ARB in heart failure].
  • An angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) is recommended as an alternative in patients with heart failure and left ventricular ejection fraction less than 40% intolerant of an ACE inhibitor.
  • In these patients, an ARB reduces the risk of death from a cardiovascularcause or hospital admission for worsening heart failure.
  • It is also recommended in patients with heart failure who remain symptomatic despite optimal treatment with an ACE inhibitor and beta-blocker.
  • Treatment with an ARB improves ventricular function and patient well-being, and reduces hospital admission for worsening heart failure.
  • In patients with heart failure and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction, although no treatment has yet been shown, convincingly, to reduce morbidity and mortality, adequate treatment of hypertension is important and ARB is considered to be able t o reduce the risk of admissionsfor heart failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists. Heart Failure / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 19348238.001).
  • [ISSN] 0047-1852
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nippon Rinsho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists; 0 / Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
  • [Number-of-references] 19
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8. Itter G, Jung W, Schoelkens BA, Linz W: The isolated working heart model in infarcted rat hearts. Lab Anim; 2005 Apr;39(2):178-93
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  • [Title] The isolated working heart model in infarcted rat hearts.
  • Congestive heart failure (CHF) is one of the most common causes of death in western countries.
  • The aim of this study was to establish and validate the working heart model in rat hearts with CHF.
  • In the rat model the animals show parameters and symptoms that can be extrapolated to the clinical situation of patients with end-stage heart failure.
  • The focus of attention was the evaluation of cardiodynamics (e.g.contractility) in the isolated 'working heart' model.
  • Formulae available in the past for determining certain parameters in the working heart model (e.g.external heart work) have to be fitted to the circumstances of the infarcted rat hearts with its different organ properties.CHF was induced in Wistar Kyoto (WKY/NHsd) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR/NHsd) by creating a permanent (8 week) occlusion of the left coronary artery, 2 mm distal to the origin from the aorta, by a modified technique (Itter et al. 2004).
  • We were able to establish and adapt a new and predictive working heart model in spontaneously hypertensive rat hearts with myocardial infarction (MI) 8-12 weeks after coronary artery ligation.
  • The SHR rat represented characteristic parameters and symptoms that could be extrapolated to the clinical situation of patients with end-stage heart failure (NYHA III-IV).
  • In the working heart model the infarcted animals showed reduced heart power, diminished contractility and enhanced heart work, much more so in the SHR/NHsd than in the Wistar Kyoto rat (WKY/NHsd).
  • The aim for the future is to find a causal therapy of heart failure treatment.
  • At present, only palliative therapy is possible for patients with heart failure.
  • For this reason the working heart model in CHF rat hearts should provide a valuable method for early testing of new therapeutic approaches for patients with CHF.
  • [MeSH-major] Disease Models, Animal. Heart Failure / physiopathology. Myocardial Contraction / physiology. Myocardial Infarction / physiopathology. Ventricular Function
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blood Pressure. Cardiac Output. Coronary Vessels / pathology. Heart Rate. Ligation / methods. Male. Rats. Rats, Inbred SHR. Rats, Wistar

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  • (PMID = 15901361.001).
  • [ISSN] 0023-6772
  • [Journal-full-title] Laboratory animals
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lab. Anim.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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9. Goldraich L, Beck-da-Silva L, Clausell N: Are scores useful in advanced heart failure? Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther; 2009 Aug;7(8):985-97
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  • [Title] Are scores useful in advanced heart failure?
  • Advanced heart failure (HF) is becoming an increasingly challenging problem as more patients with this disease are living longer, yet experiencing its inexorable progression.
  • These include the Heart Failure Survival Score, the Seattle Heart Failure Model, the Organized Program to Initiate Lifesaving Treatment in Hospitalized Patients With Heart Failure predictive schemes, the Acute Decompensated Heart Failure National Registry regression tree discrimination, among others.
  • The setting of advanced HF has not gained much attention as far as prognostication is concerned, and yet there lies potentially challenging decision-making situations where issues, such as heart transplantation, use of costly devices and end-of-life questions, are raised.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / diagnosis. Models, Biological

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  • (PMID = 19673676.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-8344
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert review of cardiovascular therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 104
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10. Boswood A, Murphy A: The effect of heart disease, heart failure and diuresis on selected laboratory and electrocardiographic parameters in dogs. J Vet Cardiol; 2006 May;8(1):1-9
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  • [Title] The effect of heart disease, heart failure and diuresis on selected laboratory and electrocardiographic parameters in dogs.
  • OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the influence of heart disease and heart failure on 9 parameters: the serum sodium, potassium, chloride, creatinine and urea concentrations, heart rate, vaso-vagal tonus index (VVTI), red cell number and hematocrit.
  • BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated that heart disease, heart failure and their treatment are associated with changes in laboratory and electrocardiographic parameters.
  • ANIMALS, MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were retrieved from 92 client-owned dogs with naturally occurring heart disease.
  • Dogs were classified according to the severity of their heart disease and or the presence of heart failure.
  • The effects of heart disease, the progression into heart failure, the initiation of successful therapy and the administration of diuretics on these parameters were determined.
  • RESULTS: Worse heart failure was characterized by the following changes: a significant fall in serum sodium and chloride concentrations and VVTI, and a significant increase in the serum urea concentration and heart rate.
  • The onset of heart failure was characterized by a fall in VVTI and chloride concentration.
  • The successful treatment of heart failure was characterized by a fall in heart rate, an increase in creatinine and sodium concentrations.
  • Dogs receiving diuretics had higher heart rates, lower VVTI, higher urea concentrations, lower potassium, sodium and chloride concentrations.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Numerous complex alterations in some of the studied parameters are associated with heart disease, heart failure and their treatment.
  • Further consideration of these changes may improve our skills in diagnosis, prognostication and treatment.

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  • (PMID = 19083331.001).
  • [ISSN] 1875-0834
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of veterinary cardiology : the official journal of the European Society of Veterinary Cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Vet Cardiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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11. Guzzetti S, La Rovere MT, Pinna GD, Maestri R, Borroni E, Porta A, Mortara A, Malliani A: Different spectral components of 24 h heart rate variability are related to different modes of death in chronic heart failure. Eur Heart J; 2005 Feb;26(4):357-62
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  • [Title] Different spectral components of 24 h heart rate variability are related to different modes of death in chronic heart failure.
  • AIMS: To assess whether analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) from 24 h Holter recordings provides information about the mode of death (pump failure vs. sudden death) in chronic heart failure (CHF).
  • Data from clinical assessment, echocardiography, right heart catheterization, exercise test, blood biochemical examination, and arrhythmia pattern were analysed.
  • [MeSH-major] Death, Sudden, Cardiac / etiology. Heart Failure / physiopathology. Heart Rate
  • [MeSH-minor] Circadian Rhythm. Disease Progression. Electrocardiography, Ambulatory / methods. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Heart Transplantation. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Pulmonary Wedge Pressure. Stroke Volume. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 15618038.001).
  • [ISSN] 0195-668X
  • [Journal-full-title] European heart journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. Heart J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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12. Vinsonneau U, Blanchard C, Brondex A, Castellant P, Cornily JC, Etienne Y, Godon P, Quiniou G: [Recurrent transient ischemic stroke in a young patient with papillary fibroelastoma of the mitral valve and hyperhomocysteinemia. A case report]. Ann Cardiol Angeiol (Paris); 2009 Feb;58(1):57-60
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  • [Transliterated title] Accidents vasculaires cérébraux ischémiques transitoires récurrents chez une jeune patiente secondaire à un fibroélastome papillaire de la valve mitrale et une hyperhomocystéïnémie. A propos d'une observation.
  • A papillary fibroelastoma is a benign cardiac tumor which can be associated with serious embolic complications.
  • The tumor was surgically removed to avoid new embolic events associated with a vitamin B supplementation.
  • [MeSH-major] Endocardial Fibroelastosis / complications. Heart Neoplasms / complications. Hyperhomocysteinemia / complications. Ischemic Attack, Transient / etiology. Mitral Valve. Papillary Muscles
  • [MeSH-minor] Cardiac Surgical Procedures. Echocardiography, Transesophageal. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Recurrence. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18614152.001).
  • [ISSN] 1768-3181
  • [Journal-full-title] Annales de cardiologie et d'angéiologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Cardiol Angeiol (Paris)
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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13. Shin J, Lobmeyer MT, Gong Y, Zineh I, Langaee TY, Yarandi H, Schofield RS, Aranda JM Jr, Hill JA, Pauly DF, Johnson JA: Relation of beta(2)-adrenoceptor haplotype to risk of death and heart transplantation in patients with heart failure. Am J Cardiol; 2007 Jan 15;99(2):250-5
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  • [Title] Relation of beta(2)-adrenoceptor haplotype to risk of death and heart transplantation in patients with heart failure.
  • Heart failure (HF) is characterized by neurohormonal activation of the sympathetic nervous and renin-angiotensin systems.
  • We hypothesized the genetic polymorphisms in the sympathetic nervous and renin-angiotensin systems are associated with adverse outcomes, defined as death or heart transplantation in patients with HF.
  • Male gender (hazard ratio 2.24, 95% confidence interval 1.27 to 3.94), higher New York Heart Association functional class (hazard ratio 2.54, 95% confidence interval 1.84 to 3.52), and 2 copies of ADRB2 Arg16Gln27 haplotype (hazard ratio 1.91, 95% confidence interval 1.09 to 3.36) increased the risk of adverse outcomes.
  • [MeSH-major] DNA / genetics. Death, Sudden, Cardiac / epidemiology. Heart Failure. Heart Transplantation. Polymorphism, Genetic. Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2 / genetics

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  • (PMID = 17223428.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-9149
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Cardiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL68834
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2; 9007-49-2 / DNA
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14. De Lorenzo F, Kakkar VV: Chronic heart failure- potential for pharmacological intervention. Curr Med Chem Cardiovasc Hematol Agents; 2005 Apr;3(2):149-55
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Chronic heart failure- potential for pharmacological intervention.
  • Heart failure is commonly associated with vascular diseases and a high rate of athero-thrombotic events, but the risks and benefits of antithrombotic therapy are unknown.
  • The incidence of thromboembolism in heart failure patients (which may include stroke, peripheral embolism, pulmonary embolism) seems to be around 2%, based on the data available from several small studies.
  • The pathophysiology of heart failure is complex.
  • There are many well- recognised factors, which are associated with thrombosis in heart failure patients, such as vascular abnormalities, increased coagulability and impaired blood flow.
  • In the past 50 years, many studies have been performed to find out if oral anticoagulation is of benefit for the prevention of thromboembolism in patients with heart failure.
  • Expert therapeutic guidelines in the Europe and North America agree that there is insufficient evidence to recommend that antithrombotic therapy should be given to patients with heart failure, unless they have atrial fibrillation or, perhaps, a previous thrombo-embolic episode.
  • There is a lack of evidence for any antithrombotic agent that is effective in patients with heart failure; therefore, randomised clinical trials need to be designed to test the hypothesis that patients with chronic heart failure would have benefit from anticoagulant therapy.
  • This review summarises the incidence, potential mechanism and therapeutic approaches for the management of thromboembolism in heart failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticoagulants / therapeutic use. Heart Failure / drug therapy. Heparin / therapeutic use. Warfarin / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 15853701.001).
  • [ISSN] 1568-0169
  • [Journal-full-title] Current medicinal chemistry. Cardiovascular and hematological agents
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Med Chem Cardiovasc Hematol Agents
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United Arab Emirates
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticoagulants; 5Q7ZVV76EI / Warfarin; 9005-49-6 / Heparin
  • [Number-of-references] 106
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15. Mosterd A, Hoes AW: Clinical epidemiology of heart failure. Heart; 2007 Sep;93(9):1137-46
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  • [Title] Clinical epidemiology of heart failure.
  • The aim of this paper is to review the clinical epidemiology of heart failure.
  • The last paper comprehensively addressing the epidemiology of heart failure in Heart appeared in 2000.
  • Despite an increase in manuscripts describing epidemiological aspects of heart failure since the 1990s, additional information is still needed, as indicated by various editorials.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 17699180.001).
  • [ISSN] 1468-201X
  • [Journal-full-title] Heart (British Cardiac Society)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Heart
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 25
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1955040
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16. Kociol RD, Hammill BG, Fonarow GC, Klaskala W, Mills RM, Hernandez AF, Curtis LH: Generalizability and longitudinal outcomes of a national heart failure clinical registry: Comparison of Acute Decompensated Heart Failure National Registry (ADHERE) and non-ADHERE Medicare beneficiaries. Am Heart J; 2010 Nov;160(5):885-92
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  • [Title] Generalizability and longitudinal outcomes of a national heart failure clinical registry: Comparison of Acute Decompensated Heart Failure National Registry (ADHERE) and non-ADHERE Medicare beneficiaries.
  • METHODS: We linked data from the Acute Decompensated Heart Failure National Registry (ADHERE) to 100% fee-for-service Medicare claims data.
  • We compared patient characteristics and inpatient mortality of linked and unlinked ADHERE hospitalizations; patient characteristics, readmission, and postdischarge mortality of linked ADHERE patients to a random 20% sample of Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized for heart failure; and characteristics of Medicare sites participating and not participating in ADHERE.
  • ADHERE hospitals were more likely than non-ADHERE hospitals to be teaching hospitals, have higher volumes of heart failure discharges, and offer advanced cardiac services.
  • CONCLUSION: Elderly patients in ADHERE are similar to Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized with heart failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Fee-for-Service Plans / economics. Heart Failure / therapy. Hospitalization / economics. Medicare / economics. Quality of Health Care. Registries

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 21095276.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-6744
  • [Journal-full-title] American heart journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. Heart J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ClinicalTrials.gov/ NCT00366639
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Lovell A: Raising awareness of the issues surrounding heart failure. Nurs Times; 2005 Feb 15-21;101(7):28-9
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  • [Title] Raising awareness of the issues surrounding heart failure.
  • This article highlights some of the key elements of care required to provide equity for heart failure sufferers and to raise awareness of the work of the British Heart Foundation (BHF), which funds and supports specialist heart nurses around the UK caring for patients with heart conditions including heart failure.
  • The BHF is running a Real Valentine appeal to raise 1m pounds sterling to fund 30 more specialist heart nurses.
  • [MeSH-major] Foundations / organization & administration. Heart Failure. Nurse Clinicians / organization & administration

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  • (PMID = 15759518.001).
  • [ISSN] 0954-7762
  • [Journal-full-title] Nursing times
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nurs Times
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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18. Pavlik G, Major Z, Varga-Pintér B, Jeserich M, Kneffel Z: The athlete's heart Part I (Review). Acta Physiol Hung; 2010 Dec;97(4):337-53
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  • [Title] The athlete's heart Part I (Review).
  • Importance of the athlete's heart has been arisen in the last decades.
  • Endurance performance is mostly limited by the characteristics of the athlete's heart.
  • Sudden death of the athletes is always associated with cardiac disorders.
  • </ul>Main characteristics of the athlete's heart can be divided into morphologic, functional and regulatory ones.
  • Adaptation of the cardiac regulation is manifested mostly by a lower heart rate (HR).
  • </ul>Summarizing: the athlete's heart is an enlarged but otherwise normal heart characterized by a low heart rate, an increased pumping capacity, and a greater ability to deliver oxygen to skeletal muscle.
  • [MeSH-major] Athletes. Exercise. Heart / physiopathology. Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular / etiology. Ventricular Function, Left
  • [MeSH-minor] Adaptation, Physiological. Autonomic Nervous System / physiopathology. Coronary Circulation. Death, Sudden, Cardiac / etiology. Death, Sudden, Cardiac / prevention & control. Energy Metabolism. Heart Rate. Humans. Microcirculation. Myocardial Contraction

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  • (PMID = 21138810.001).
  • [ISSN] 0231-424X
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta physiologica Hungarica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Physiol Hung
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Hungary
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19. Zimmermann WH: [Heart tissue from embryonic stem cells]. Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz; 2008 Sep;51(9):1021-5
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  • [Title] [Heart tissue from embryonic stem cells].
  • We and others made use of this intrinsic property to generate bioartificial heart muscle.
  • First proof-of-concept studies involved immature heart cells mainly from fetal chicken, neonatal rats and mice.
  • They eventually provided evidence that force-generating heart muscle can be engineered in vitro.
  • Recently, the focus shifted to the application of stem cells to eventually enable the generation of human heart muscle and reach following long-term goals:.
  • (1) development of a simplified in vitro model of heart muscle development;.
  • (3) allocation of surrogate heart tissue to myocardial repair applications.

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  • (PMID = 18773171.001).
  • [ISSN] 1436-9990
  • [Journal-full-title] Bundesgesundheitsblatt, Gesundheitsforschung, Gesundheitsschutz
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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20. Castro P, Gabrielli L, Verdejo H, Greig D, Mellado R, Concepción R, Sepúlveda L, Vukasovic JL, García L, Pizarro M, Pivet D, Carrillo C, Tapia F, Navarro M, Troncoso R, Baraona F, Llevaneras S, Hernández C, Godoy I, Jalil JE, Quintana JC, Orellana P, Chiong M, Lavandero S: [Heart energy metabolism and its role in the treatment of heart failure]. Rev Med Chil; 2010 Aug;138(8):1028-39
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  • [Title] [Heart energy metabolism and its role in the treatment of heart failure].
  • [Transliterated title] Metabolismo energético del corazón y sus proyecciones en el tratamiento de la insuficiencia cardíaca.
  • It is unknown why heart failure progresses even when patients are treated with the best therapy available.
  • Evidences suggest that heart failure progression is due to loss of neurohumoral blockade in advanced stages of the disease and to alterations in myocardial metabolism induced, in part, by this neurohumoral activation.
  • Alterations in cardiac energy metabolism, especially those related to substrate utilization and insulin resistance, reduce the efficiency of energy production, causing a heart energy reserve deficit.
  • These events play a basic role in heart failure progression.
  • Therefore, modulation of cardiac metabolism has arisen as a promissory therapy in the treatment of heart failure.
  • This review describes myocardial energy metabolism, evaluates the role of impaired energy metabolism in heart failure progression and describes new therapies for heart failure involving metabolic intervention.
  • [MeSH-major] Disease Progression. Energy Metabolism / physiology. Heart Failure / drug therapy. Heart Failure / physiopathology. Myocardium / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 21140063.001).
  • [ISSN] 0034-9887
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista médica de Chile
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Med Chil
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Chile
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21. Dubrey SW, Bell A, Mittal TK: Sarcoid heart disease. Postgrad Med J; 2007 Oct;83(984):618-23
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  • [Title] Sarcoid heart disease.
  • Cardiac involvement can affect individuals of any age, gender or race and has a predilection for the conduction system of the heart.
  • Heart involvement can also cause a dilated cardiomyopathy with consequent progressive heart failure.
  • Current advances lie in the newer methods of imaging and diagnosing this unusual heart disease.
  • This review describes the pathology and diagnosis of this condition and the newer imaging techniques that have developed for determining cardiac involvement.

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  • (PMID = 17916869.001).
  • [ISSN] 1469-0756
  • [Journal-full-title] Postgraduate medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Postgrad Med J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 47
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2600123
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22. Ammar KA, Jacobsen SJ, Mahoney DW, Kors JA, Redfield MM, Burnett JC Jr, Rodeheffer RJ: Prevalence and prognostic significance of heart failure stages: application of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association heart failure staging criteria in the community. Circulation; 2007 Mar 27;115(12):1563-70
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  • [Title] Prevalence and prognostic significance of heart failure stages: application of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association heart failure staging criteria in the community.
  • BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF) is a progressive disorder associated with frequent morbidity and mortality.
  • An American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology staging classification of HF has been developed to emphasize early detection and prevention.
  • Participants were classified by medical record review, symptom questionnaire, physical examination, and echocardiogram as follows: stage 0, healthy; stage A, HF risk factors; stage B, asymptomatic cardiac structural or functional abnormalities; stage C, HF symptoms; and stage D, severe HF.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / epidemiology. Severity of Illness Index


23. Sayasathid J, Tantiwongkosri K, Somboonna N: Unrecognized congenital heart disease among Thai children. J Med Assoc Thai; 2009 Mar;92(3):356-9
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  • [Title] Unrecognized congenital heart disease among Thai children.
  • OBJECTIVE: To report on the prevalence of unrecognized congenital heart disease (CHD) among elementary school children (231 schools, 6 cities in Tak province).
  • Those with abnormal heart sounds were re-evaluated by pediatric cardiologists.
  • RESULTS: Of the 278 subjects with abnormal heart sounds, 43 had proven heart disease, 40 showed CHD (1.05 per 1,000) and three had rheumatic valvular diseases.
  • CONCLUSION: Understanding the case rate helped approximate the number of children who are currently undetected but have heart problems or may develop heart problems in the future.
  • [MeSH-major] Asian Continental Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data. Heart Defects, Congenital / diagnosis. Heart Defects, Congenital / epidemiology


24. Diederichsen AC, Møller JE, Thayssen P, Junker AB, Videbaek L, Saekmose SG, Barington T, Kristiansen M, Kassem M: Effect of repeated intracoronary injection of bone marrow cells in patients with ischaemic heart failure the Danish stem cell study--congestive heart failure trial (DanCell-CHF). Eur J Heart Fail; 2008 Jul;10(7):661-7
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  • [Title] Effect of repeated intracoronary injection of bone marrow cells in patients with ischaemic heart failure the Danish stem cell study--congestive heart failure trial (DanCell-CHF).
  • BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that myocardial regeneration may be achieved by a single intracoronary bone marrow derived stem cell infusion in selected patients with ischaemic heart disease.
  • The effect is uncertain in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure and it is not known whether repeated infusions would have additional positive effects.
  • AIMS: To assess whether two treatments of intracoronary infusion of bone marrow stem cells, administered 4 months apart, could improve left ventricular (LV) systolic function in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure.
  • CONCLUSION: In this non-randomised study, no change in LV ejection fraction could be demonstrated after repeated intracoronary bone marrow stem cell treatment in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / therapy. Myocardial Ischemia / therapy. Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. Ventricular Dysfunction, Left / therapy

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  • (PMID = 18555742.001).
  • [ISSN] 1388-9842
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of heart failure
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Heart Fail.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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25. Thanajiraprapa T, Phupong V: Pregnancy complications in women with heart disease. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med; 2010 Oct;23(10):1200-4
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  • [Title] Pregnancy complications in women with heart disease.
  • OBJECTIVE: To identify pregnancy complications of women with heart disease delivering at a university hospital.
  • METHODS: A retrospective study was carried out of 193 pregnant women with heart disease delivered at a university hospital between January 1997 and December 2006.
  • RESULTS: Rheumatic heart disease (RHD), congenital heart disease (CHD), arrhythmia and cardiomyopathy were observed in 133 (68.9%), 26 (13.5%), 32 (16.6%) and 2 (1%) cases, respectively.
  • Cardiac complication was observed in 24 (12.4%) cases.
  • Congestive heart failure was the most common cardiac complication which observed in 11 (5.7%) cases.
  • The most common cardiac complication was congestive heart failure.

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  • (PMID = 19903109.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-4954
  • [Journal-full-title] The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Matern. Fetal. Neonatal. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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26. Kovacevic-Preradovic T, Jenni R, Oechslin EN, Noll G, Seifert B, Attenhofer Jost CH: Isolated left ventricular noncompaction as a cause for heart failure and heart transplantation: a single center experience. Cardiology; 2009;112(2):158-64
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  • [Title] Isolated left ventricular noncompaction as a cause for heart failure and heart transplantation: a single center experience.
  • OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of isolated left ventricular noncompaction (IVNC) as a cause of heart failure and heart transplantation.
  • METHODS: There were 960 patients seen in the heart failure clinic from 1987 to 2005, with a complete evaluation including echocardiography at our center (study population, 82% men, mean age 52 years).
  • The following data were collected: type of heart disease, age at echocardiography and at heart transplantation, and frequency of heart transplantation.
  • Echocardiographic diagnosis of IVNC was based on our published criteria.
  • RESULTS: The etiologies of heart failure were coronary artery disease (CAD; 37%), idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (33%), valvular heart disease (11%), congenital heart disease (5%), IVNC (3%), hypertensive heart disease (3%), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (2%), myocarditis (1%), and <1% other diagnoses.
  • Heart transplantation was performed in 253 patients (26%) due to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (42%), CAD (39%), valvular heart disease (5%), congenital heart disease (5%), IVNC (2%), or other etiologies (< or =1% each).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The most common causes for heart failure remain idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, CAD and valvular heart disease.
  • Strictly using the criteria for the definition of IVNC, IVNC is a rare underlying cardiomyopathy for both, heart failure (2.7%) and heart transplantation (2%) in our center.
  • [MeSH-major] Cardiomyopathy, Dilated / epidemiology. Heart Failure / epidemiology. Heart Failure / surgery. Heart Transplantation
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic / complications. Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic / epidemiology. Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic / ultrasonography. Child. Coronary Artery Disease / complications. Coronary Artery Disease / epidemiology. Coronary Artery Disease / ultrasonography. Echocardiography. Female. Heart Defects, Congenital / complications. Heart Defects, Congenital / epidemiology. Heart Defects, Congenital / ultrasonography. Heart Valve Diseases / complications. Heart Valve Diseases / epidemiology. Heart Valve Diseases / ultrasonography. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Myocarditis / complications. Myocarditis / epidemiology. Myocarditis / ultrasonography. Prevalence. Retrospective Studies. Young Adult


27. Martinsen BJ: Reference guide to the stages of chick heart embryology. Dev Dyn; 2005 Aug;233(4):1217-37
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  • [Title] Reference guide to the stages of chick heart embryology.
  • Cardiac progenitors of the splanchnic mesoderm (primary and secondary heart field), cardiac neural crest, and the proepicardium are the major embryonic contributors to chick heart development.
  • Their contribution to cardiac development occurs with precise timing and regulation during such processes as primary heart tube fusion, cardiac looping and accretion, cardiac septation, and the development of the coronary vasculature.
  • Heart development is even more complex if one follows the development of the cardiac innervation, cardiac pacemaking and conduction system, endocardial cushions, valves, and even the importance of apoptosis for proper cardiac formation.
  • This review is meant to provide a reference guide (Table 1) on the developmental timing according to the staging of Hamburger and Hamilton (1951) (HH) of these important topics in heart development for those individuals new to a chick heart research laboratory.
  • Even individuals outside of the heart field, who are working on a gene that is also expressed in the heart, will gain information on what to look for during chick heart development.
  • This reference guide provides complete and easy reference to the stages involved in heart development, as well as a global perspective of how these cardiac developmental events overlap temporally and spatially, making it a good bench top companion to the many recently written in-depth cardiac reviews of the molecular aspects of cardiac development.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart / embryology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Proliferation. Chick Embryo. Gastrula / physiology. Heart Defects, Congenital / embryology. Myocardium / cytology. Pericardium / embryology. Somites. Syndrome

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 15986452.001).
  • [ISSN] 1058-8388
  • [Journal-full-title] Developmental dynamics : an official publication of the American Association of Anatomists
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dev. Dyn.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Guideline; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 181
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28. Kelly RG: Molecular inroads into the anterior heart field. Trends Cardiovasc Med; 2005 Feb;15(2):51-6
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  • [Title] Molecular inroads into the anterior heart field.
  • In 2001, three research groups described a previously unrecognized population of progenitor cells in pharyngeal mesoderm that gives rise to myocardium at the arterial pole of the heart.
  • In the last 4 years, the major importance of the cellular contribution of pharyngeal mesoderm to normal and pathologic heart development has become apparent.
  • Lineage-tracing experiments have defined the extent to which pharyngeal progenitor cells colonize the heart, revealing a contribution to venous, as well as arterial, pole myocardium; in addition, major molecular inroads have been made into understanding gene regulation in pharyngeal myocardial progenitor cells, implicating forkhead, Gata, LIM homeodomain, MEF2, SMAD, and T-box transcription factors.
  • The key role of the anterior heart field during normal heart development is underscored by the demonstration that both direct and indirect perturbation of myocardial progenitor cells in pharyngeal mesoderm result in congenital heart disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Embryo, Mammalian / physiology. Heart / embryology. Neural Crest / physiology

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  • (PMID = 15885570.001).
  • [ISSN] 1050-1738
  • [Journal-full-title] Trends in cardiovascular medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Trends Cardiovasc. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 46
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29. Nellessen E, Piérard L: [Anemia and heart failure]. Rev Med Liege; 2006 Mar;61(3):154-8
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  • [Title] [Anemia and heart failure].
  • [Transliterated title] Anémie et insuffisance cardiaque.
  • The prevalence of heart failure is increasing.
  • The Fick equation illustrates the relationship between anemia and heart failure.
  • Anemia is associated with a bad prognosis in heart failure.
  • Current guidelines recommend the correction of secondary causes when anemia is present in a heart failure patient.
  • [MeSH-major] Anemia / physiopathology. Anemia / therapy. Heart Failure / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 16681000.001).
  • [ISSN] 0370-629X
  • [Journal-full-title] Revue médicale de Liège
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Med Liege
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Belgium
  • [Number-of-references] 31
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30. Hognestad A, Holm T, Simonsen S, Kjekshus J, Andreassen AK: Serial measurements of peripheral vascular reactivity and exercise capacity in congestive heart failure and after heart transplantation. J Card Fail; 2005 Aug;11(6):447-54
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  • [Title] Serial measurements of peripheral vascular reactivity and exercise capacity in congestive heart failure and after heart transplantation.
  • In congestive heart failure (CHF) this regulation seems to be impaired, with attenuated peripheral vasodilatory capacity.
  • The results regarding improvement of peripheral vasoreactivity after heart transplantation (HTx) are conflicting, and the contribution of impaired peripheral vasoreactivity to the observed reduced exercise capacity among heart transplant recipients (HTR) has not been well elucidated.
  • [MeSH-major] Exercise Tolerance / physiology. Heart Failure / physiopathology. Heart Failure / surgery. Heart Transplantation. Vascular Resistance / physiology


31. Hata N, Yokoyama S, Shinada T, Kobayashi N, Shirakabe A, Tomita K, Kitamura M, Kurihara O, Takahashi Y: Acute kidney injury and outcomes in acute decompensated heart failure: evaluation of the RIFLE criteria in an acutely ill heart failure population. Eur J Heart Fail; 2010 Jan;12(1):32-7
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  • [Title] Acute kidney injury and outcomes in acute decompensated heart failure: evaluation of the RIFLE criteria in an acutely ill heart failure population.
  • AIMS: The clinical course including the outcome of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) correlates with renal dysfunction, but the evaluation of renal function has not yet been standardized.
  • The underlying aetiology was ischaemic heart disease, hypertensive heart disease, cardiomyopathy, valvular diseases, and 'other' in 124, 70, 60, 107, and 15 patients, respectively.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / complications. Hospitalization / statistics & numerical data. Kidney Diseases / etiology

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  • (PMID = 20023042.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-0844
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of heart failure
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Heart Fail.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine
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32. Danchin N, Kadri Z: Clinical perspectives of heart rate slowing for coronary event reduction and heart failure. Adv Cardiol; 2006;43:45-53
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  • [Title] Clinical perspectives of heart rate slowing for coronary event reduction and heart failure.
  • Heart rate is a major determinant of myocardial oxygen consumption.
  • There is ample evidence of an association between high heart rate and poor outcome in numerous clinical settings.
  • Experimental studies in monkeys have shown a link between increased heart rate and development of atherosclerosis.
  • In the clinical setting, increased heart rate has been found associated with coronary plaque rupture.
  • Beyond the potential benefits of heart rate lowering in patients with coronary artery disease, medications capable of decreasing heart rate without altering left ventricular function, such as the I(f) current inhibitor ivabradine, might prove particularly helpful in patients with chronic heart failure associated with coronary artery disease, but also in heart failure without systolic dysfunction, or in patients needing inotropic support for acute heart failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenergic beta-Antagonists / pharmacology. Benzazepines / pharmacology. Cardiotonic Agents / pharmacology. Cardiovascular Diseases / drug therapy. Heart Rate / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Diastole / drug effects. Diastole / physiology. Heart Conduction System / drug effects. Heart Conduction System / physiopathology. Humans. Ion Channels / drug effects. Oxygen Consumption / drug effects. Oxygen Consumption / physiology

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  • (PMID = 16936471.001).
  • [ISSN] 0065-2326
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv Cardiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic beta-Antagonists; 0 / Benzazepines; 0 / Cardiotonic Agents; 0 / Ion Channels; 3H48L0LPZQ / ivabradine
  • [Number-of-references] 27
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33. Limbu YR, Malla R, Regmi SR, Dahal R, Nakarmi HL, Yonzan G, Gartaula RP: Public knowledge of heart attack in a Nepalese population survey. Heart Lung; 2006 May-Jun;35(3):164-9
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  • [Title] Public knowledge of heart attack in a Nepalese population survey.
  • OBJECTIVE: Limited knowledge of heart attack symptoms may prevent patients from seeking time-dependent thrombolytic therapy, an intervention that offers impressive survival benefit.
  • Previous studies carried out in developed countries demonstrated a deficit of knowledge about a wide range of heart attack symptoms.
  • The aim of this study was to describe knowledge of heart attack, knowledge of heart attack symptoms, and anticipated first response to symptoms among the lay public in Nepal.
  • Those <16 years of age, all health professionals, and individuals with a history of heart attack were excluded.
  • RESULTS: A total of 862 (72.3%) participants had heard of heart attack.
  • Significantly more male than female participants had heard of heart attack (P <.001).
  • Of the respondents, 91.7% with >or=10 years of education (ED-2) had heard of heart of attack, whereas only 54% respondents with <10 years of education or who were illiterate (unable to read and write) (ED-1) had heard of heart attack, and in both the male and female populations, a higher percentage of the ED-2 group had heard of heart attack than the ED-1 group (92.6% vs. 60% and 85.6% vs. 49.6%, respectively).
  • A significantly higher number of respondents from 31 to 50 years of age (AGE-2) had heard of heart attack than those 16 to 30 years of age (AGE-1) and those >50 years of age (AGE-3) (P <.001).
  • Among 862 respondents who had heard of heart attack, 21.3% could not name any heart attack symptoms.
  • A total of 16 different heart attack symptoms were named.
  • Only 3.7% could name >or=2 typical heart attack symptoms.
  • A large number (77.6%) of respondents preferred immediate hospital referral and/or doctor consultation after a heart attack.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In Nepal, better-educated men are more aware of heart attack.
  • Fainting or collapsing and chest pain and shortness of breath were leading heart attack symptoms named by the general population.
  • Public heart attack awareness is not adequate and knowledge of wide range of heart attack symptoms is deficient in the Nepalese general population.

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  • (PMID = 16701110.001).
  • [ISSN] 0147-9563
  • [Journal-full-title] Heart & lung : the journal of critical care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Heart Lung
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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34. Imlach WL, Finch SC, Miller JH, Meredith AL, Dalziel JE: A role for BK channels in heart rate regulation in rodents. PLoS One; 2010;5(1):e8698
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  • [Title] A role for BK channels in heart rate regulation in rodents.
  • The heart generates and propagates action potentials through synchronized activation of ion channels allowing inward Na(+) and Ca(2+) and outward K(+) currents.
  • There are a number of K(+) channel types expressed in the heart that play key roles in regulating the cardiac cycle.
  • Large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) ion channels are not thought to be directly involved in heart function.
  • Here we present evidence that heart rate can be significantly reduced by inhibiting the activity of BK channels.
  • Agents that specifically inhibit BK channel activity, including paxilline and lolitrem B, slowed heart rate in conscious wild-type mice by 30% and 42%, respectively.
  • Heart rate of BK channel knock-out mice (Kcnma1(-/-)) was not affected by these BK channel inhibitors, suggesting that the changes to heart rate were specifically mediated through BK channels.
  • The possibility that these effects were mediated through BK channels peripheral to the heart was ruled out with experiments using isolated, perfused rat hearts, which showed a significant reduction in heart rate when treated with the BK channel inhibitors paxilline (1 microM), lolitrem B (1 microM), and iberiotoxin (0.23 microM), of 34%, 60%, and 42%, respectively.
  • Furthermore, paxilline was shown to decrease heart rate in a dose-dependent manner.
  • These results implicate BK channels located in the heart to be directly involved in the regulation of heart rate.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Rate / physiology. Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels / physiology

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  • (PMID = 20090847.001).
  • [ISSN] 1932-6203
  • [Journal-full-title] PloS one
  • [ISO-abbreviation] PLoS ONE
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Indole Alkaloids; 0 / Indoles; 0 / Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels; 0 / Mycotoxins; 0 / Potassium Channel Blockers; 57186-25-1 / paxilline; 81771-19-9 / lolitrem B
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2806827
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35. Abu-Issa R, Kirby ML: Heart field: from mesoderm to heart tube. Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol; 2007;23:45-68
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  • [Title] Heart field: from mesoderm to heart tube.
  • In this review we discuss the major morphogenetic and regulative events that control myocardial progenitor cells from the time that they delaminate from the epiblast in the primitive streak to their differentiation into cardiomyocytes in the heart tube.
  • During chick and mouse embryogenesis, myocardial progenitor cells go through four specific processes that are sequential but overlapping: specification of the cardiogenic mesoderm, determination of the bilaterally symmetric heart fields, patterning of the heart field, and finally cardiomyocyte differentiation and formation of the heart tube.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart / embryology. Mesoderm. Morphogenesis. Myocardium

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  • (PMID = 17456019.001).
  • [ISSN] 1081-0706
  • [Journal-full-title] Annual review of cell and developmental biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Annu. Rev. Cell Dev. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL 070140; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL 083240; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL 084413
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 138
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36. Lund LH, Mancini DM: Peak VO2 in elderly patients with heart failure. Int J Cardiol; 2008 Apr 10;125(2):166-71
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  • [Title] Peak VO2 in elderly patients with heart failure.
  • The incidence and prevalence of heart failure increase with age.
  • The cardinal manifestation of heart failure is exercise intolerance.
  • The cardiopulmonary exercise test with determination of peak VO(2) provides an integrated measure of both central and peripheral abnormalities in heart failure.
  • It is used to predict prognosis, identify patients for cardiac transplantation and to distinguish cardiac from pulmonary causes of unexplained dyspnea.
  • Most data is derived from middle-aged patients with moderate to severe systolic heart failure.
  • Many elderly patients suffer from diastolic heart failure and the value of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in diastolic heart failure and in the elderly has not been well studied.
  • This review examines the physiology of aging and the clinical utility of exercise testing in elderly patients with heart failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Exercise Test / methods. Exercise Tolerance / physiology. Heart Failure / physiopathology. Oxygen Consumption / physiology

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  • (PMID = 18067981.001).
  • [ISSN] 1874-1754
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cardiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Number-of-references] 52
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37. Lane DA, Chong AY, Lip GY: Psychological interventions for depression in heart failure. Cochrane Database Syst Rev; 2005;(1):CD003329
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  • [Title] Psychological interventions for depression in heart failure.
  • BACKGROUND: Heart failure is a common and growing health problem.
  • Depression may increase the risk of recurrent cardiac events and death, either through direct pathophysiological mechanisms such as thrombogenesis or ventricular arrhythmias, or through behavioural mechanisms.
  • Depressed patients are less likely to adhere to their medication regimen and modify their lifestyle appropriately, thereby increasing the likelihood of recurrent cardiac events and death.
  • The effects of psychological interventions for depression in terms of reducing depression and improving prognosis in patients with heart failure are unknown.
  • OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of psychological interventions for depression in people with heart failure on depression and quality of life, morbidity, and mortality in these patients.
  • SELECTION CRITERIA: RCTs of psychological interventions for depression in adults (18 years or older) with heart failure.
  • The secondary outcomes were the acceptability of treatment, quality of life, cardiac morbidity (hospital re-admission for heart failure and non-fatal cardiovascular events), reduction of cardiovascular behavioural risk factors, health economics, and death.
  • MAIN RESULTS: No RCTs of psychological interventions for depression in patients with heart failure were identified.
  • AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Depression is common among patients with heart failure.
  • Randomised controlled trials of psychological interventions for depression in heart failure patients are needed to investigate the impact of such interventions on depression, quality of life, behavioural CVD risk factors, cardiac morbidity, health economics and mortality, given the paucity of such trials in this area and the increasing prevalence of heart failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Depression / therapy. Heart Failure / psychology. Psychotherapy

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  • (PMID = 15674906.001).
  • [ISSN] 1469-493X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Cochrane database of systematic reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cochrane Database Syst Rev
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 49
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38. Mocelin AO, Issa VS, Bacal F, Guimarães GV, Cunha E, Bocchi EA: The influence of aetiology on inflammatory and neurohumoral activation in patients with severe heart failure: a prospective study comparing Chagas' heart disease and idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. Eur J Heart Fail; 2005 Aug;7(5):869-73
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  • [Title] The influence of aetiology on inflammatory and neurohumoral activation in patients with severe heart failure: a prospective study comparing Chagas' heart disease and idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.
  • We studied 35 patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC group) and 28 patients with Chagas' heart disease (Chagas' group) and 12 control subjects.
  • We compared plasma tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), soluble TNF-alpha receptor type 1 (sTNF-R1), soluble Fas (sFas), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and brain natriuretic peptide type B (BNP) concentrations between the groups.
  • Higher BNP levels were associated with death and heart transplantation in both aetiologies.
  • Inflammatory activation in Chagas heart disease differs from IDC and is associated with heart failure severity.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD95 / blood. Cardiomyopathy, Dilated / blood. Chagas Cardiomyopathy / blood. Interleukin-6 / blood. Natriuretic Peptide, Brain / blood. Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor / blood. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / analysis


39. Dunlay SM, Weston SA, Redfield MM, Killian JM, Roger VL: Anemia and heart failure: a community study. Am J Med; 2008 Aug;121(8):726-32
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  • [Title] Anemia and heart failure: a community study.
  • PURPOSE: Anemia is an important comorbidity in heart failure and has been associated with increased mortality.
  • The goals of this study were to define the prevalence of anemia in a community population with heart failure, examine trends in prevalence over time, and evaluate the role of anemia in patients with heart failure with preserved and reduced ejection fraction.
  • METHODS: Two cohorts of Olmsted County residents with heart failure were examined.
  • The retrospective cohort included incident heart failure cases from 1979 to 2002 (n=1063).
  • The prospective cohort included active heart failure cases from 2003 to 2006 (n=677).
  • CONCLUSION: In the community, half of patients with heart failure are anemic, and the prevalence of anemia has increased over time.
  • Anemia is more prevalent in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and is associated with a large increase in mortality.

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  • (PMID = 18691487.001).
  • [ISSN] 1555-7162
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Med.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL072435-06; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL059205; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL072435-02; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL 72435; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL059205-09; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL059205-06; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL059205-09; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL059205-05A1; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL072435-03; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL072435-02; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL072435-05A1; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL059205-05A1; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL059205-04; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL059205-08; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL059205-08; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL059205-02; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL072435; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL 59205; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL059205-10A1; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL059205-06; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL059205-03; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL059205-04; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL059205-07; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL072435-03; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL072435-06; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL059205-07; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL072435-05A1; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL072435-04; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL059205-03; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL072435-04; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL072435-01; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL059205-10A1
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS64637; NLM/ PMC2538566
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40. Palatini P: Elevated heart rate: a "new" cardiovascular risk factor? Prog Cardiovasc Dis; 2009 Jul-Aug;52(1):1-5
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  • [Title] Elevated heart rate: a "new" cardiovascular risk factor?
  • A number of epidemiologic studies and several experimental lines of research point to high heart rate as a main risk factor for cardiovascular disease.
  • From the present symposium, it appears clear that this is particularly the case for heart rate.
  • The pathogenetic mechanisms for the connection of resting heart rate with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular morbidity have been elaborated extensively in the chapter papers of this symposium, suggesting that there is a causal relationship between heart rate and cardiovascular mortality.
  • The benefit of heart rate reduction has been proved in patients with coronary artery disease or congestive heart failure.
  • Until now it has been difficult to determine whether modulation of heart rate is beneficial also in patients free of cardiac diseases.
  • The impressive amount of available epidemiologic data show support for the continued effort to raise awareness of the clinical importance of resting heart rate among health care professionals.
  • [MeSH-major] Cardiovascular Diseases / physiopathology. Cardiovascular System / physiopathology. Heart Rate

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  • (PMID = 19615486.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-1740
  • [Journal-full-title] Progress in cardiovascular diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prog Cardiovasc Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 46
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41. Bidargaddi N, Sarela A, Korhonen I: Physiological state characterization by clustering heart rate, heart rate variability and movement activity information. Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc; 2008;2008:1749-52
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  • [Title] Physiological state characterization by clustering heart rate, heart rate variability and movement activity information.
  • The objective is to identify whether it is possible to discriminate between normal and abnormal physiological state based on heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV) and movement activity information in subjects with cardiovascular complications.
  • HR, HRV and movement information were obtained from cardiac patients over a period of 6 weeks using an ambulatory activity and single lead ECG monitor.
  • By applying k-means clustering on HR, HRV and movement information obtained from cardiac patients, we obtained 3 clusters in inactive state and one cluster in active state.
  • [MeSH-major] Cardiovascular Diseases / diagnosis. Cardiovascular Diseases / physiopathology. Heart Rate / physiology. Movement / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Analysis of Variance. Biomedical Engineering. Databases, Factual. Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted. Electrocardiography / statistics & numerical data. Energy Metabolism. Humans. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 19163018.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-170X
  • [Journal-full-title] Conference proceedings : ... Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Annual Conference
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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42. Dirven MJ, Cornelissen JM, Barendse MA, van Mook MC, Sterenborg JA: Cause of heart murmurs in 57 apparently healthy cats. Tijdschr Diergeneeskd; 2010 Nov 15;135(22):840-7
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  • [Title] Cause of heart murmurs in 57 apparently healthy cats.
  • Heart murmurs are caused by turbulent blood flow or by vibration of cardiac structures.
  • Turbulent blood flow may originate from structural heart disease or from physiological phenomena.
  • The aims of this study were to establish the cause of heart murmurs in apparently healthy adult cats and to determine whether a heart murmur is a reliable indicator of heart disease.
  • In this retrospective study, we reviewed the medical records of cats in which a heart murmur was detected during physical examination by one of the authors in the period January 2008 to December 2009.
  • Heart disease was present in 50 (88%) cats, namely, left ventricular hypertrophy in 44 (77%) and congenital defects in 6 (11%) cats.
  • In conclusion, most heart murmurs in apparently healthy cats are detected in the left or right parasternal region and are caused by dynamic left and right ventricular outflow tract obstruction.
  • Because most cats (88%) with a heart murmur had heart disease in this study, if a heart murmur is detected in an apparently healthy cat, echocardiography is recommended to determine the cause of the heart murmur and the presence of heart disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Cat Diseases / etiology. Heart Murmurs / veterinary. Heart Ventricles / physiopathology. Ventricular Outflow Obstruction / veterinary

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  • (PMID = 21141381.001).
  • [ISSN] 0040-7453
  • [Journal-full-title] Tijdschrift voor diergeneeskunde
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tijdschr Diergeneeskd
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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43. Popović D, Brkić P, Nesić D, Stojiljković S, Sćepanović L, Ostojić MC: [Electrophysiological characteristics of the athlete's heart]. Med Pregl; 2007 Mar-Apr;60(3-4):156-9
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  • [Title] [Electrophysiological characteristics of the athlete's heart].
  • INTRODUCTION: The athletic heart syndrome is characterized by morphological, functional and electrophysiological alterations as an adaptive response to vigorous physical activity.
  • Athletes heart is predominantly associated with a programmed, intensive training.
  • ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE ATHLETE'S HEART: The response of the body to vigorous physical activity is a multiorgan system phenomenon.
  • These changes include: depression of sympathetic activity and stimulation of parasympathetic activity, so electrophysiological characteristics of the athlete's heart must differ from the sedentary Although these facts, are well known, the athlete's heart is not a precisely defined concept.
  • CONCLUSION: Considering the number of sudden cardiac deaths in athletes, it is needless to say how important it is to distinguish physiological changes of the heart due to physical activity, and pathological changes due to some cardiac diseases.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart / physiopathology. Heart Conduction System / physiopathology. Sports
  • [MeSH-minor] Adaptation, Physiological. Heart Diseases / etiology. Heart Diseases / physiopathology. Humans. Syndrome

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  • (PMID = 17853728.001).
  • [ISSN] 0025-8105
  • [Journal-full-title] Medicinski pregled
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Pregl.
  • [Language] srp
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Serbia and Montenegro
  • [Number-of-references] 18
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44. Wolfram R, Oguogho A, Palumbo B, Sinzinger H: Enhanced oxidative stress in coronary heart disease and chronic heart failure as indicated by an increased 8-epi-PGF(2alpha). Eur J Heart Fail; 2005 Mar 2;7(2):167-72
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  • [Title] Enhanced oxidative stress in coronary heart disease and chronic heart failure as indicated by an increased 8-epi-PGF(2alpha).
  • Patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) (n=20) and 20 healthy, age-matched, and sex-matched controls were investigated in parallel.
  • 8-Epi-PGF(2alpha) levels were correlated with the functional severity of heart failure [New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification] and LVEF.

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  • (PMID = 15701462.001).
  • [ISSN] 1388-9842
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of heart failure
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Heart Fail.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 27415-26-5 / 8-epi-prostaglandin F2alpha; B7IN85G1HY / Dinoprost
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45. Mendez GF, Betancourt L, Galicia-Mora G: The impact of heart failure clinic in the improvement on quality of life of heart failure patients in Mexico. Int J Cardiol; 2007 Feb 7;115(2):242-3
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  • [Title] The impact of heart failure clinic in the improvement on quality of life of heart failure patients in Mexico.
  • Heart failure clinic (HFC) has emerged as an innovative strategy to improve prognosis and Quality of Life (QOL) of Heart Failure (HF) patients.
  • QOL was measured by the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ).
  • [MeSH-major] Cardiac Care Facilities. Heart Failure / therapy. Quality of Life

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  • (PMID = 16766057.001).
  • [ISSN] 1874-1754
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cardiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Letter
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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46. Akyol A, Alper AT, Cakmak N, Hasdemir H, Eksik A, Oguz E, Erdinler I, Ulufer FT, Gurkan K: Long-term effects of cardiac resynchronization therapy on heart rate and heart rate variability. Tohoku J Exp Med; 2006 Aug;209(4):337-46
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  • [Title] Long-term effects of cardiac resynchronization therapy on heart rate and heart rate variability.
  • Congestive heart failure is characterized by significant autonomic dysfunction.
  • Development of left bundle branch block in congestive heart failure is a predictor of worse outcome.
  • There are several lines of evidence that cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), by biventricular stimulation in patients with severe heart failure and left bundle branch block, improves autonomic functions which can be quantified by measuring heart rate variability.
  • The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of CRT on autonomic functions quantified by heart rate variability and mean heart rate (HR) in patients with advanced heart failure and left bundle branch block in short and long-term follow-up.
  • A total of 35 patients with systolic heart failure and left bundle branch block (mean-age 60 +/- 11 years; 24 male and 11 female; mean left ventricular ejection fraction [EF]: 22.3 +/- 3%) were enrolled.
  • Mean HR and one of the time-domain parameters of heart rate variability, standard deviation of the R-R intervals (SDNN) were measured.
  • Decrease in mean heart rate and increase in SDNN were statistically significant in the third month and second year recordings when compared to baseline recording (p values were < 0.001 for both).
  • In conclusion, CRT with biventricular pacing provides sustained improvement in autonomic function in patients with advanced heart failure and left bundle branch block.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / therapy. Heart Rate / physiology

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  • (PMID = 16864956.001).
  • [ISSN] 0040-8727
  • [Journal-full-title] The Tohoku journal of experimental medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tohoku J. Exp. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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47. Haddad GE, Saunders L, Carles M, Crosby SD, del Monte F, Macgillivray TE, Semigran MJ, Dec GW, Hajjar RJ, Doye AA, Glass R, El M, Gwathmey JK: Fingerprint profile of alcohol-associated heart failure in human hearts. Alcohol Clin Exp Res; 2008 May;32(5):814-21
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  • [Title] Fingerprint profile of alcohol-associated heart failure in human hearts.
  • BACKGROUND: Excessive alcohol consumption is recognized as a cause of left ventricular dysfunction and leads often to alcohol-induced heart failure.
  • In addition, since chronic alcohol-consumption is a social behavior that is not always clearly self-reported clinically, it has been difficult to diagnose alcohol-induced heart failure versus heart failure due to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM).
  • Interestingly, both diseases are associated with left ventricular dysfunction and congestive heart failure.
  • METHODS: We have created a human heart failure cDNA array for IDCM from nonfailing and failing human hearts.
  • The array contains 1,143 heart specific oligonucleotide probes.
  • This array was used to screen RNA samples from transplant recipients and organ donors with alcohol-related heart failure.
  • RESULTS: Our study shows that alcohol-induced heart failure has a "specific fingerprint" profile of de-regulated genes.
  • This profile can differentiate patients with pure alcohol-induced heart failure from patients with heart failure from IDCM with alcohol as a complicating or contributing factor.
  • Furthermore, the pattern of gene de-regulation suggests a pivotal role for changes in matrix, cytoskeletal, and structural proteins in the development of clinical heart failure resulting from excessive alcohol consumption.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We report for the first time a genomic "fingerprint" profile of de-regulated genes associated with human alcohol-induced heart failure.
  • We conclude that the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced heart failure in humans is likely related to changes in architectural (e.g. cytoskeletal), matrix, and/or structural proteins.
  • Nevertheless, there is a point at which extracellular as well as cellular changes result in irreversible heart failure.

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  • (PMID = 18336640.001).
  • [ISSN] 1530-0277
  • [Journal-full-title] Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / S06 GM008016; United States / NIAAA NIH HHS / AA / AA066758; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL67516
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] England
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48. Farzaneh-Far R, Na B, Whooley MA, Schiller NB: Left-ventricular power-to-mass ratio at peak exercise predicts mortality, heart failure, and cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary artery disease: data from the Heart and Soul Study. Cardiology; 2009;114(3):226-34
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  • [Title] Left-ventricular power-to-mass ratio at peak exercise predicts mortality, heart failure, and cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary artery disease: data from the Heart and Soul Study.
  • BACKGROUND: Quantitative stress echocardiography enables calculation of left-ventricular power-to-mass ratio (LVPMR) at peak exercise, a novel measure of cardiac performance per unit mass of myocardial tissue.
  • METHODS: LVPMR (watts/kilogram) at peak exercise was defined as (k x heart rate x mean arterial pressure x stroke volume)/LV mass.
  • We measured LVPMR in 918 adults with stable ambulatory coronary artery disease recruited for the Heart and Soul Study.
  • Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, heart failure hospitalization, and combined adverse cardiovascular events.
  • RESULTS: Compared with patients in the highest LVPMR quartile, those in the lowest quartile were at increased risk of all-cause mortality (adjusted HR 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-3.3), heart failure hospitalization (adjusted HR 2.9; 95% CI 1.2-6.9), and combined adverse cardiovascular events (adjusted HR 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-3.4).
  • CONCLUSIONS: In patients with stable ambulatory coronary artery disease, LVPMR at peak exercise predicts mortality, heart failure hospitalization, and adverse cardiovascular events.
  • [MeSH-major] Coronary Artery Disease / ultrasonography. Echocardiography, Stress. Exercise Test. Heart Failure / epidemiology. Ventricular Dysfunction, Left / ultrasonography

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.
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  • (PMID = 19672059.001).
  • [ISSN] 1421-9751
  • [Journal-full-title] Cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cardiology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL079235-01A1
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2778238
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49. Petersen JW, Felker GM: Inflammatory biomarkers in heart failure. Congest Heart Fail; 2006 Nov-Dec;12(6):324-8
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  • [Title] Inflammatory biomarkers in heart failure.
  • Multiple lines of evidence support the "cytokine hypothesis," which suggests that inflammation plays an important role in the development and progression of heart failure.
  • Circulating markers of inflammation, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6, and C-reactive protein, may be useful in establishing the diagnosis, gauging prognosis, and evaluating the response to therapy in patients with heart failure.
  • In addition to their potential as heart failure biomarkers, inflammatory cytokines have been investigated as targets of heart failure therapy.
  • Although results for therapies directed against specific cytokines (such as tumor necrosis factor alpha) have thus far been disappointing, multiple studies continue to address the therapeutic potential of modulating the immune response in heart failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers / blood. C-Reactive Protein / analysis. Cytokines / blood. Heart Failure / blood. Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I / blood. Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type II / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Etanercept. Humans. Immunoglobulin G / therapeutic use. Interleukin-6 / blood. Prognosis. Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor / therapeutic use. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / blood

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  • (PMID = 17170586.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-5299
  • [Journal-full-title] Congestive heart failure (Greenwich, Conn.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Congest Heart Fail
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Immunoglobulin G; 0 / Interleukin-6; 0 / Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor; 0 / Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I; 0 / Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type II; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; 9007-41-4 / C-Reactive Protein; OP401G7OJC / Etanercept
  • [Number-of-references] 36
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50. Ripley TL, Chonlahan JS, Germany RE: Candesartan in heart failure. Clin Interv Aging; 2006;1(4):357-66
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  • [Title] Candesartan in heart failure.
  • Candesartan is one of two angiotensin receptor blockers approved for use in heart failure.
  • MEDLINE was searched using OVID and PubMed to evaluate the evidence for using candesartan in patients with heart failure.
  • Clinical evidence supports the indication for use in systolic heart failure.
  • Results for use in patients with diastolic heart failure were non-significant.
  • Candesartan is a safe and effective option for patients with systolic heart failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers / therapeutic use. Benzimidazoles / therapeutic use. Heart Failure / drug therapy. Tetrazoles / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Death, Sudden. Heart Failure, Systolic / drug therapy. Humans. Hyperkalemia / chemically induced. Hyperkalemia / epidemiology. Kidney Diseases / chemically induced. Kidney Diseases / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 18046913.001).
  • [ISSN] 1176-9092
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical interventions in aging
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Interv Aging
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers; 0 / Benzimidazoles; 0 / Tetrazoles; S8Q36MD2XX / candesartan
  • [Number-of-references] 66
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2699637
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51. Pedersen SS, Herrmann-Lingen C, de Jonge P, Scherer M: Type D personality is a predictor of poor emotional quality of life in primary care heart failure patients independent of depressive symptoms and New York Heart Association functional class. J Behav Med; 2010 Feb;33(1):72-80
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  • [Title] Type D personality is a predictor of poor emotional quality of life in primary care heart failure patients independent of depressive symptoms and New York Heart Association functional class.
  • Quality of life is an important patient-centered outcome and predictor of mortality in heart failure, but little is known about the role of personality as a determinant of quality of life in this patient group.
  • We examined the influence of Type D personality (i.e., increased negative emotions paired with emotional non-expression) on quality of life in primary care heart failure patients, using a prospective study design.
  • Heart failure patients (n = 251) recruited from 44 primary care practices in Germany completed standardized questionnaires at baseline and 9 months.
  • Adjusting for demographics, New York Heart Association functional class, and depressive symptoms, Type D remained an independent determinant of emotional (P = .03) but not physical quality of life (P = .29).
  • Primary care heart failure patients with a Type D personality experienced poorer emotional but not physical quality of life compared to non-Type D patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Depression / psychology. Emotions. Heart Failure / psychology. Personality. Quality of Life / psychology

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  • (PMID = 19937107.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-3521
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of behavioral medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Behav Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2813529
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52. Fairweather D, Rose NR: Inflammatory heart disease: a role for cytokines. Lupus; 2005;14(9):646-51
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Inflammatory heart disease: a role for cytokines.
  • Inflammatory heart disease is a rising concern worldwide.
  • Many pathogens including bacteria, protozoa and viruses have been associated with heart disease in patients, and are able to induce similar disease in animal models.
  • Recognition of pathogens by the innate immune system leads to release of proinflammatory cytokines that both reduce infection and increase chronic inflammatory heart disease.
  • Elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines are able to overcome tolerance to chronic disease, indicating that environmental factors are important in determining progression to chronic heart disease.
  • Understanding the mechanisms leading to chronic heart disease will be critical for developing effective therapies to reduce cardiac dysfunction and heart failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Autoimmune Diseases / physiopathology. Cytokines / immunology. Heart Diseases / immunology. Inflammation / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 16218459.001).
  • [ISSN] 0961-2033
  • [Journal-full-title] Lupus
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lupus
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / AI51835; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL67290; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL70729
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cytokines
  • [Number-of-references] 30
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53. Almenar Bonet L: [Spanish Heart Transplantation Registry. 19th Official Report of the Spanish Society of Cardiology Working Group on Heart Failure, Heart Transplantation and Associated Therapies (1984-2007)]. Rev Esp Cardiol; 2008 Nov;61(11):1178-90
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  • [Title] [Spanish Heart Transplantation Registry. 19th Official Report of the Spanish Society of Cardiology Working Group on Heart Failure, Heart Transplantation and Associated Therapies (1984-2007)].
  • [Transliterated title] Registro Español de Trasplante Cardiaco. XIX Informe Oficial de la Sección de Insuficiencia Cardiaca, Trasplante Cardiaco y Otras Alternativas Terapéuticas de la Sociedad Española de Cardiología (1984-2007).
  • INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this article was to present the results of the heart transplantations carried out in Spain from the first use of this therapeutic modality in May 1984.
  • METHODS: A descriptive analysis of all heart transplantations performed up until December 31, 2007 was carried out.
  • The typical clinical profile of a Spanish heart transplant patient in 2007 was that of a 52-year-old male who had been diagnosed with non-revascularizable ischemic heart disease and who had severely depressed ventricular function and a poor functional status.
  • The implanted heart typically came from a 37-year-old donor who had died from a head injury or brain hemorrhage and the average waiting time was 103 days.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The survival rate obtained with heart transplantation in Spain, especially in recent years, has made transplantation the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage heart failure and a poor functional status and for whom there are few other established medical or surgical options.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / surgery. Heart Transplantation / statistics & numerical data. Registries

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  • (PMID = 19000493.001).
  • [ISSN] 1579-2242
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista española de cardiología
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Esp Cardiol
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents
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54. Palatini P: Heart rate as predictor of outcome. Blood Press Monit; 2008 Jun;13(3):167-8
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  • [Title] Heart rate as predictor of outcome.
  • The importance of resting heart rate in predicting the development of hypertension and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has been demonstrated in a large number of studies.
  • The relationship between high heart rate and cardiovascular mortality held true in studies performed in hypertensive participants.
  • In most epidemiologic studies, the predictive power of resting heart rate for all-cause mortality was equal to or even greater than that of total cholesterol, smoking, or systolic blood pressure.
  • Data obtained with ambulatory or home measurement did not show any advantage of heart rate measured out of the office over clinic heart rate, but the available evidence is still limited and more research is needed.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Rate. Hypertension / complications. Tachycardia / complications

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  • (PMID = 18496295.001).
  • [ISSN] 1359-5237
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood pressure monitoring
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood Press Monit
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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55. Selman L, Harding R, Beynon T, Hodson F, Coady E, Hazeldine C, Walton M, Gibbs L, Higginson IJ: Improving end-of-life care for patients with chronic heart failure: "Let's hope it'll get better, when I know in my heart of hearts it won't". Heart; 2007 Aug;93(8):963-7
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  • [Title] Improving end-of-life care for patients with chronic heart failure: "Let's hope it'll get better, when I know in my heart of hearts it won't".
  • BACKGROUND: Although chronic heart failure (CHF) has a high mortality rate and symptom burden, and clinical guidance stipulates palliative care intervention, there is a lack of evidence to guide clinical practice for patients approaching the end of life. AIMS:.
  • DESIGN: Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted with 20 patients with CHF (New York Heart Association functional classification III-IV), 11 family carers, 6 palliative care clinicians and 6 cardiology clinicians.
  • Patients and carers live with fear and anxiety, and are uninformed about the implications of their diagnosis.
  • Cardiac staff confirmed that they rarely raise such issues with patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Advance Care Planning. Heart Failure / therapy. Terminal Care / methods

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  • (PMID = 17309905.001).
  • [ISSN] 1468-201X
  • [Journal-full-title] Heart (British Cardiac Society)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Heart
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1994396
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56. Fernandes JR: The experience of a broken heart. Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am; 2005 Dec;17(4):319-27, ix
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  • [Title] The experience of a broken heart.
  • Infants who have congenital heart disease (CHD) are born with a "broken heart."
  • Health care professionals are presented with the challenge of caring for the infant's physiologically defective heart as well as the emotional heart of the parents as they begin to accept this diagnosis.
  • Thus, all will know "the experience of a broken heart. "
  • [MeSH-major] Adaptation, Psychological. Attitude to Health. Heart Defects, Congenital / diagnosis. Intensive Care, Neonatal / psychology. Parents / psychology

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  • (PMID = 16344202.001).
  • [ISSN] 0899-5885
  • [Journal-full-title] Critical care nursing clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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57. Jaarsma T, Haaijer-Ruskamp FM, Sturm H, Van Veldhuisen DJ: Management of heart failure in The Netherlands. Eur J Heart Fail; 2005 Mar 16;7(3):371-5
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  • [Title] Management of heart failure in The Netherlands.
  • In The Netherlands, the incidence and prevalence of heart failure are rising as is the case in most other European countries.
  • Overall, there are 200,000 patients with heart failure in The Netherlands and around 25,000 hospitalisations annually with a discharge diagnosis of heart failure.
  • There is an active guideline program in different professional organisations (e.g. general practitioners, cardiologists) and in 2002 a collaborative multidisciplinary guideline for management of chronic heart failure was developed.
  • However, there is clearly room for improvement in the adherence to these guidelines both with regard to the diagnosis and the treatment of HF patients.
  • At present, general practitioners and cardiologists differ in their views on heart failure, resulting in differences in diagnosis and management.
  • In addition to the multidisciplinary guidelines, several other initiatives have been developed to improve outcomes in these patients, such as rapid access clinics and outpatient heart failure clinics.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 15718177.001).
  • [ISSN] 1388-9842
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of heart failure
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Heart Fail.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic beta-Antagonists; 0 / Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Diuretics; 27O7W4T232 / Spironolactone; 73K4184T59 / Digoxin
  • [Number-of-references] 30
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58. Coskun KO, Coskun ST, El Arousy M, Amin Parsa M, Schulz U, Deyerling W, Tenderich G, Bairaktaris A, Koerfer R: Cardiac surgery after heart transplantation: coronary artery bypass grafting and heart valve replacement. Heart Surg Forum; 2007;10(2):E110-4
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  • [Title] Cardiac surgery after heart transplantation: coronary artery bypass grafting and heart valve replacement.
  • INTRODUCTION: Due to increasing need for and a shortage of donor organs, therapeutic procedures such as heart valve replacement for valve insufficiency and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) for graft vasculopathy (GVP) must be performed to improve allograft function to avoid retransplantation.
  • METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients who underwent surgical procedures after orthotopic heart transplantation.
  • Since 1989, we have performed more than 1400 heart transplantation procedures.
  • One of the 3 received the valve 3 years after heart transplantation while suffering from mitral regurgitation grade IV, and another patient received the valve 1 year following heart transplantation while suffering from mitral insufficiency grade III due to infective endocarditis.
  • Three patients underwent coronary artery revascularization, 2 patients underwent the procedure 1 and 7 years after heart transplantation because of GVP, 1 patient underwent the procedure simultaneously with heart transplantation because of donor coronary artery disease.
  • One patient received concomitant CABG with heart transplantation because of 75% left anterior descending stenoses in the donor organ, and one patient received CABG 1 year after heart transplantation because of rapidly progressive GVP in the left anterior descending artery.
  • One patient with a graft at the mitral position died 9 years after heart transplantation and 6 years after mitral valve replacement.
  • Two patients with a graft at the tricuspid position died 17 and 4 years after heart transplantation (6 and 3 years after valve replacement, respectively).
  • CONCLUSION: Cardiac surgical procedures can be safely performed after heart transplantation.
  • To improve graft and patient survival, such procedures must be carefully performed after heart transplantation to avoid retransplantation.
  • [MeSH-major] Coronary Artery Bypass / methods. Coronary Stenosis / surgery. Heart Transplantation / adverse effects. Heart Valve Diseases / surgery. Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cardiomyopathy, Dilated / diagnosis. Cardiomyopathy, Dilated / surgery. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Graft Rejection. Graft Survival. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Risk Assessment. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome. Vascular Patency / physiology


59. Zeigler VL: Congenital heart disease and genetics. Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am; 2008 Jun;20(2):159-69, v
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  • [Title] Congenital heart disease and genetics.
  • Improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart disease have drastically reduced the morbidity and mortality associated with such defects.
  • Knowledge regarding the genetic contributions to congenital heart disease is considered to be in its infancy; however, the field of cardiovascular genetics in humans is moving at a rapid pace.
  • This article discusses what is currently known about the genetic contribution to congenital heart disease, including structural defects and congenital cardiac arrhythmias.
  • Genetic and chromosomal syndromes that involve the heart are reviewed along with genetic testing.
  • [MeSH-major] Arrhythmias, Cardiac / congenital. Arrhythmias, Cardiac / genetics. Critical Care / methods. Heart Defects, Congenital / genetics. Specialties, Nursing / methods


60. Tam VH, Fung LM: Severe right heart failure in two patients with thyrotoxicosis. Hong Kong Med J; 2008 Aug;14(4):321-3
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  • [Title] Severe right heart failure in two patients with thyrotoxicosis.
  • Congestive heart failure is a recognised complication of uncontrolled thyrotoxicosis but isolated right heart failure is rarely seen in association with thyrotoxicosis.
  • Two cases of right heart failure associated with thyrotoxicosis are presented.
  • In a 45-year-old man with right heart failure, investigations for all common secondary causes of right heart failure were negative.
  • The right heart failure subsided after treatment of the thyrotoxicosis.
  • In a 36-year-old woman, the right heart failure had two underlying causes, thyrotoxicosis and an atrial septal defect.
  • Treatment of thyrotoxicosis alone resulted in improvement of pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure.
  • Thyrotoxicosis should be considered as a possible cause of pulmonary hypertension or isolated right heart failure.

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  • (PMID = 18685168.001).
  • [ISSN] 1024-2708
  • [Journal-full-title] Hong Kong medical journal = Xianggang yi xue za zhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hong Kong Med J
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antithyroid Agents; 0 / Cardiotonic Agents
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61. Courville KA, Ventura H: Hypertension and heart failure: diagnosis and management. Curr Hypertens Rep; 2006 Jun;8(3):185-90
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  • [Title] Hypertension and heart failure: diagnosis and management.
  • Heart failure continues to be a significant problem faced by today's health care professional.
  • Heart failure remains one of the principal causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.
  • The prevalence of heart failure continues to increase, largely due to an aging population and to modern technologic innovations that have led to prolonged survival of the cardiac patient.
  • Hypertension increases the risk for heart failure in all age groups.
  • In those individuals aged 40 years or older whose blood pressure is > 140/90 mm Hg, the lifetime risk for developing heart failure may be twice as high as that of their aged-matched counterparts.
  • Therefore, it is imperative that the clinician be aware of the current diagnostic and therapeutic advancements for the early detection and aggressive treatment of hypertension and heart failure, to prevent patients from developing symptoms of heart failure and to decrease the need for hospitalizations once the diagnosis is confirmed.
  • [MeSH-major] Antihypertensive Agents / therapeutic use. Heart Failure / etiology. Heart Failure / prevention & control. Hypertension / diagnosis. Hypertension / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenergic beta-Antagonists / therapeutic use. Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers / therapeutic use. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Calcium Channel Blockers / therapeutic use. Diastole / drug effects. Humans. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists / therapeutic use. Sodium Potassium Chloride Symporter Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Stroke Volume / drug effects. Systole / drug effects. Ventricular Dysfunction, Left / diagnosis. Ventricular Dysfunction, Left / drug therapy. Ventricular Dysfunction, Left / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 17147915.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-6417
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hypertension reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Hypertens. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic beta-Antagonists; 0 / Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers; 0 / Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Antihypertensive Agents; 0 / Calcium Channel Blockers; 0 / Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists; 0 / Sodium Potassium Chloride Symporter Inhibitors
  • [Number-of-references] 47
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62. Mahle WT, Newburger JW, Matherne GP, Smith FC, Hoke TR, Koppel R, Gidding SS, Beekman RH 3rd, Grosse SD, American Heart Association Congenital Heart Defects Committee of the Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young, Council on Cardiovascular Nursing, and Interdisciplinary Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research, American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery, and Committee on Fetus and Newborn: Role of pulse oximetry in examining newborns for congenital heart disease: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association and American Academy of Pediatrics. Circulation; 2009 Aug 4;120(5):447-58
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Role of pulse oximetry in examining newborns for congenital heart disease: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association and American Academy of Pediatrics.
  • BACKGROUND: The purpose of this statement is to address the state of evidence on the routine use of pulse oximetry in newborns to detect critical congenital heart disease (CCHD).
  • METHODS AND RESULTS: A writing group appointed by the American Heart Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics reviewed the available literature addressing current detection methods for CCHD, burden of missed and/or delayed diagnosis of CCHD, rationale of oximetry screening, and clinical studies of oximetry in otherwise asymptomatic newborns.
  • MEDLINE database searches from 1966 to 2008 were done for English-language papers using the following search terms: congenital heart disease, pulse oximetry, physical examination, murmur, echocardiography, fetal echocardiography, and newborn screening.
  • The American Heart Association classification of recommendations and levels of evidence for practice guidelines were used.
  • [MeSH-major] Evidence-Based Medicine. Heart Defects, Congenital / diagnosis. Heart Defects, Congenital / mortality. Neonatal Screening / standards. Oximetry / standards


63. Pinelli M, Bindi M, Moroni F, Rosada J, Castiglioni M: [Clinical differences between heart failure versus ischemic patients]. Recenti Prog Med; 2007 Jul-Aug;98(7-8):378-83
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  • [Title] [Clinical differences between heart failure versus ischemic patients].
  • Heart failure represents a very common disease with high mortality, despite therapeutic and preventive measures.
  • In order to evaluate the characteristics of heart failure patients, a case-control study was carried out, comparing sixty heart failure patients versus sixty patients who presented an evident atherosclerotic disease, but not heart failure.
  • Among the differences we found, a higher heart rate, reduced levels of free-triiodothyronine and increased levels of serum uric acid in heart failure patients might directly contribute to its pathophysiology and represent potential therapeutic targets.
  • [MeSH-major] Atherosclerosis / blood. Heart Failure / blood. Myocardial Ischemia / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Biomarkers / blood. Case-Control Studies. Electrocardiography. Female. Heart Rate. Humans. Male. Risk Factors. Triiodothyronine / blood. Uric Acid / blood

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  • (PMID = 17685185.001).
  • [ISSN] 0034-1193
  • [Journal-full-title] Recenti progressi in medicina
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Recenti Prog Med
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 06LU7C9H1V / Triiodothyronine; 268B43MJ25 / Uric Acid
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64. Beetz N, Hein L, Meszaros J, Gilsbach R, Barreto F, Meissner M, Hoppe UC, Schwartz A, Herzig S, Matthes J: Transgenic simulation of human heart failure-like L-type Ca2+-channels: implications for fibrosis and heart rate in mice. Cardiovasc Res; 2009 Dec 1;84(3):396-406
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  • [Title] Transgenic simulation of human heart failure-like L-type Ca2+-channels: implications for fibrosis and heart rate in mice.
  • AIMS: Cardiac L-type Ca(2+)-currents show distinct alterations in chronic heart failure, including increased single-channel activity and blunted adrenergic stimulation, but minor changes of whole-cell currents.
  • In order to determine whether prolonged alteration of Ca(2+)-channel gating by beta(2)-subunits contributes to heart failure pathogenesis, we generated and characterized transgenic mice with cardiac overexpression of a beta(2a)-subunit or the pore Ca(v)1.2 or both, respectively.
  • METHODS AND RESULTS: Four weeks induction of cardiac-specific overexpression of rat beta(2a)-subunits shifted steady-state activation and inactivation of whole-cell currents towards more negative potentials, leading to increased Ca(2+)-current density at more negative test potentials.
  • Double-transgenics showed cardiac arrhythmia.
  • Overt cardiac hypertrophy was not observed in any model.
  • CONCLUSION: Cardiac overexpression of a Ca(2+)-channel beta(2a)-subunit alone is sufficient to induce Ca(2+)-channel properties characteristic of chronic human heart failure. beta(2a)-overexpression by itself did not induce cardiac hypertrophy or contractile dysfunction, but aggravated the development of arrhythmia and fibrosis in Ca(v)1.2-transgenic mice.

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  • (PMID = 19620129.001).
  • [ISSN] 1755-3245
  • [Journal-full-title] Cardiovascular research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cardiovasc. Res.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL 079599
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Calcium Channels, L-Type; 0 / L-type calcium channel alpha(1C); 0 / Protein Subunits; 1W21G5Q4N2 / Okadaic Acid; 23583-48-4 / 8-Bromo Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2777953
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65. Quercioli A, Mach F, Montecucco F: Novel treatment strategy with direct renin inhibition against heart failure. Panminerva Med; 2010 Mar;52(1):41-51
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  • [Title] Novel treatment strategy with direct renin inhibition against heart failure.
  • Non-uniformity exists on heart failure definitions.
  • Heart failure includes typical signs and symptoms deriving from alterations in left ventricular systolic or diastolic function.
  • Systolic heart failure results from the acute or chronic reduction of the left ventricular ejection fraction.
  • Conversely, heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is characterized by excessive myocardial fibrosis and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy that cause reduced left ventricular relaxation.
  • Both heart failure subtypes cause identical symptoms and signs.
  • Clinical and laboratory tests assist in the diagnosis of systolic heart failure or heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (diastolic heart failure) and can help in the identification of different causes of the disease and comorbidities.
  • In the last two decades, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been identified as a crucial regulator in all phases of systolic and diastolic heart failure.
  • Several ongoing clinical studies will probably clarify the role of renin inhibitors in heart failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / prevention & control. Renin / antagonists & inhibitors

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  • (PMID = 20228725.001).
  • [ISSN] 1827-1898
  • [Journal-full-title] Panminerva medica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Panminerva Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.4.23.15 / Renin
  • [Number-of-references] 92
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66. Ootaki C, Manzo A, Kamohara K, Popović ZB, Fukamachi K, Ootaki Y: Heart rate variability in a progressive heart failure model with rapid ventricular pacing. Heart Surg Forum; 2008;11(5):E295-9
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  • [Title] Heart rate variability in a progressive heart failure model with rapid ventricular pacing.
  • BACKGROUND: Heart rate variability (HRV) is an indicator of autonomic nervous system functionality and a recognized predictor of cardiac death; however, the changes in HRV occurring in progressive heart failure are not fully understood.
  • The purpose of this study was to evaluate the progressive changes of autonomic system activity in progressive heart failure by rapid ventricular pacing in an animal model.
  • METHODS: Heart failure was induced in 13 mongrel dogs (27.8 +/- 3.7 kg) by rapid ventricular pacing (230 beats/min) for 4 weeks and maintenance of pacing at a reduced rate (190 beats/min) for 2 weeks.
  • Hemodynamic and echocardiographic data were obtained before and after induction of heart failure.
  • RESULTS: Cardiac output decreased significantly (3.6 L/min versus 1.6 L/min, P < .001) after 6 weeks of ventricular pacing.
  • Significantly increased were the heart rate (126 beats/min versus 138 beats/min, P < .05), left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (9.1 mm Hg versus 30.9 mm Hg, P < .001), and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (8.0 mm Hg versus 18.7 mm Hg, P < .001).
  • A ratio of low- to high-frequency components increased in moderate heart failure and decreased in severe heart failure.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Changes in the high-frequency component and low-frequency component are important for assessing heart failure in progressive heart failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Arrhythmias, Cardiac / etiology. Arrhythmias, Cardiac / physiopathology. Cardiac Pacing, Artificial / adverse effects. Electrocardiography / methods. Heart Failure / etiology. Heart Failure / physiopathology. Heart Rate. Heart Ventricles / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 18948244.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-6662
  • [Journal-full-title] The heart surgery forum
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Heart Surg Forum
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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67. Nuri MM, Naseem A, Raza A, Ahmad W, Raja MK, Ahmad A, Rasheed A, Gohar A: Right ventricular myxoma with heart failure. J Coll Physicians Surg Pak; 2005 Mar;15(3):184-6
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  • [Title] Right ventricular myxoma with heart failure.
  • Cardiac myxomas are histologically benign tumors but they may be lethal because of their strategic position.
  • We report a case of a large right ventricular myxoma presenting with heart failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / diagnosis. Heart Neoplasms / diagnosis. Heart Neoplasms / surgery. Mitral Valve Insufficiency / surgery. Myxoma / diagnosis. Myxoma / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Biopsy, Needle. Cardiac Surgical Procedures / methods. Echocardiography, Transesophageal. Follow-Up Studies. Heart Valve Prosthesis. Heart Ventricles. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Pakistan. Rare Diseases. Risk Assessment. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15808106.001).
  • [ISSN] 1022-386X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons--Pakistan : JCPSP
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Coll Physicians Surg Pak
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Pakistan
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68. Yang XY, Li XF, Lü XD, Liu YL: Incidence of congenital heart disease in Beijing, China. Chin Med J (Engl); 2009 May 20;122(10):1128-32
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  • [Title] Incidence of congenital heart disease in Beijing, China.
  • BACKGROUND: The incidence of congenital heart disease has been studied in developed countries for many years, but rarely in the mainland of China.
  • Fetal echocardiographic screening for congenital heart disease was first performed in Beijing in the early 2000s, but the impact was not clear.
  • The current study was undertaken to determine the incidence of congenital heart disease in Beijing, China and to estimate the impact of fetal echocardiography on the incidence of liveborn congenital heart disease.
  • METHODS: The study involved all infants with congenital heart disease among the 84 062 total births in Beijing during the period of January 1 and December 31, 2007.
  • An echocardiographic examination was performed on every baby suspected to have congenital heart disease, prenatally or/and postnatally.
  • RESULTS: A total of 686 infants were shown to have congenital heart disease among 84 062 total births.
  • The incidence of congenital heart disease in stillbirths and live births was 168.8/1000 and 6.7/1000, respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of liveborn congenital heart disease in Beijing is within the range reported in developed countries.
  • Fetal echocardiography reduce significantly the incidence of liveborn congenital heart disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Defects, Congenital / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] China / epidemiology. Echocardiography. Female. Fetal Heart / ultrasonography. Humans. Incidence. Infant, Newborn. Pregnancy. Prenatal Diagnosis / methods. Stillbirth / epidemiology


69. Piccini JP, Hranitzky P: Diagnostic monitoring strategies in heart failure management. Am Heart J; 2007 Apr;153(4 Suppl):12-7
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  • [Title] Diagnostic monitoring strategies in heart failure management.
  • Heart failure affects 5 million Americans and is associated with a tremendous economic burden, leading to 26.7 billion dollars in health care expenditures each year (American Heart Association, American Stroke Association.
  • Heart disease and stroke statistics--2004 update.
  • Available at http://www.americanheart.org/downloadable/heart/1072969766940HSStats2004Update.pdf.
  • Half of these expenditures (nearly $14 billion) are for costly hospital admissions for acute decompensated heart failure.
  • Despite the ubiquity and frequency of acute decompensated heart failure, we have few available techniques to anticipate and correct decompensation.
  • With the advent of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator for the prevention of sudden cardiac death and biventricular pacing for dyssynchrony in heart failure (HF) refractory to medical treatment, indications for implantable devices are expanding in the HF population.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / diagnosis. Heart Failure / therapy. Monitoring, Ambulatory / instrumentation. Prostheses and Implants

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  • (PMID = 17394898.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-6744
  • [Journal-full-title] American heart journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. Heart J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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70. Zimmermann WH, Cesnjevar R: Cardiac tissue engineering: implications for pediatric heart surgery. Pediatr Cardiol; 2009 Jul;30(5):716-23
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  • [Title] Cardiac tissue engineering: implications for pediatric heart surgery.
  • Heart transplantation would be a therapeutic option but is restricted due to a lack of suitable donor organs and, even in case of successful heart transplantation, lifelong immune suppression would frequently be associated with a number of serious side effects.
  • As an alternative to heart transplantation and classical cardiac reconstructive surgery, tissue-engineered myocardium might become available to augment hypomorphic hearts and/or provide new muscle material for complex myocardial reconstruction.
  • These potential applications of tissue engineered myocardium will, however, impose major challenges to cardiac tissue engineers as well as heart surgeons.
  • This review will provide an overview of available cardiac tissue-engineering technologies, discuss limitations, and speculate on a potential application of tissue-engineered heart muscle in pediatric heart surgery.
  • [MeSH-major] Cardiac Surgical Procedures / methods. Heart / physiology. Heart Defects, Congenital / therapy. Regeneration. Tissue Engineering / methods

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  • (PMID = 19319461.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-1971
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Cardiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 60
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2691807
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71. Spies C, Farzaneh-Far R, Na B, Kanaya A, Schiller NB, Whooley MA: Relation of obesity to heart failure hospitalization and cardiovascular events in persons with stable coronary heart disease (from the Heart and Soul Study). Am J Cardiol; 2009 Oct 1;104(7):883-9
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  • [Title] Relation of obesity to heart failure hospitalization and cardiovascular events in persons with stable coronary heart disease (from the Heart and Soul Study).
  • Obesity is an independent risk factor for recurrent events among patients with established coronary heart disease (CHD).
  • We used proportional hazards models to evaluate the extent to which the association of obesity with subsequent heart failure (HF) hospitalization or cardiovascular (CV) events (myocardial infarction, stroke, or CHD death) was explained by baseline co-morbidities, cardiac disease severity, inflammation, insulin resistance, neurohormones and adipokines.
  • This association does not appear to be mediated by co-morbid conditions, cardiac disease severity, insulin resistance, inflammation, neurohormones, or adipokines.
  • [MeSH-major] Coronary Disease / epidemiology. Heart Failure / epidemiology. Hospitalization / statistics & numerical data. Myocardial Infarction / epidemiology. Obesity / epidemiology


72. Loebe M, Ramasubbu K, Hamilton DJ: [Diabetes and heart transplantation]. Clin Res Cardiol; 2006 Jan;95 Suppl 1:i48-53
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  • [Title] [Diabetes and heart transplantation].
  • Diabetes is frequently encountered in patients presenting with end-stage heart failure to be listed for transplantation.
  • While diabetes used to be a contra-indication for heart transplantation, careful preoperative evaluation and individualized postoperative medication lead to long-term outcome after heart transplantation equal to non-diabetic patients.
  • A multidisciplinary team allows for closely monitoring and treating patients with diabetes after heart transplant.
  • [MeSH-major] Diabetes Complications. Heart Failure / surgery. Heart Transplantation / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 16598548.001).
  • [ISSN] 1861-0692
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical research in cardiology : official journal of the German Cardiac Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Res Cardiol
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 75
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73. Morris SA, Hatcher HF, Reddy DK: Digoxin therapy for heart failure: an update. Am Fam Physician; 2006 Aug 15;74(4):613-8
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  • [Title] Digoxin therapy for heart failure: an update.
  • Digoxin therapy has long been used to treat heart failure; however, its effectiveness was not completely known until recently.
  • Results of the Digitalis Investigation Group trial showed that adding digoxin to standard heart failure therapy had no effect on mortality.
  • However, adding digoxin decreased hospitalizations related to heart failure and improved symptoms in patients treated for heart failure.
  • Reanalyses of the trial's findings have raised new questions about the role of digoxin in heart failure treatment.
  • Digoxin generally does not have a role in the treatment of diastolic heart failure and is not a first-line therapy for managing atrial fibrillation in patients with heart failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Cardiotonic Agents / therapeutic use. Digoxin / therapeutic use. Heart Failure / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 16939183.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-838X
  • [Journal-full-title] American family physician
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am Fam Physician
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cardiotonic Agents; 73K4184T59 / Digoxin
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74. Verheugt CL, Uiterwaal CS, van der Velde ET, Meijboom FJ, Pieper PG, van Dijk AP, Vliegen HW, Grobbee DE, Mulder BJ: Mortality in adult congenital heart disease. Eur Heart J; 2010 May;31(10):1220-9
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  • [Title] Mortality in adult congenital heart disease.
  • AIMS: Mortality in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet its extent and the major mortality risks are unclear.
  • METHODS AND RESULTS: The Dutch CONCOR national registry for adult congenital heart disease was linked to the national mortality registry.
  • Of all deaths, 77% had a cardiovascular origin; 45% were due to chronic heart failure (26%, age 51.0 years) or sudden death (19%, age 39.1 years).
  • Several complications predicted all-cause mortality beyond the effects of age, gender, and congenital heart disease severity, i.e. endocarditis, supraventricular arrhythmias, ventricular arrhythmias, conduction disturbances, myocardial infarction, and pulmonary hypertension (HR range 1.4-3.1, P < 0.05).
  • Almost all complications predicted death due to heart failure (HR range 2.0-5.1, P < 0.05); conduction disturbances and pulmonary hypertension predicted sudden death (HR range 2.0-4.7, P < 0.05).
  • CONCLUSION: Mortality is increased in adults with congenital heart disease, particularly in the young.
  • Mortality risk, particularly by heart failure, is increased by virtually all complications.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Defects, Congenital / mortality


75. Shelton RJ, Rigby AS, Cleland JG, Clark AL: Effect of a community heart failure clinic on uptake of beta blockers by patients with obstructive airways disease and heart failure. Heart; 2006 Mar;92(3):331-6
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  • [Title] Effect of a community heart failure clinic on uptake of beta blockers by patients with obstructive airways disease and heart failure.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine the pattern of beta blocker prescribing over one year in a heart failure clinic with a structured approach towards initiation and dose titration and to give a real life perspective on beta blocker use, compliance, and target dose achievement.
  • METHODS: Data were retrospectively analysed on 513 consecutive patients regularly attending a community heart failure clinic over a year.
  • CONCLUSION: The majority of patients with heart failure and obstructive airways disease can safely tolerate low dose initiation and gradual up titration of beta blockers.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenergic beta-Antagonists / administration & dosage. Heart Failure / drug therapy. Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive / complications

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  • (PMID = 15951394.001).
  • [ISSN] 1468-201X
  • [Journal-full-title] Heart (British Cardiac Society)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Heart
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic beta-Antagonists
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1860814
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76. Ozmen N, Cebeci BS, Kardeşoğlu E: [Inflammatory markers in heart failure]. Anadolu Kardiyol Derg; 2006 Mar;6(1):51-4
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  • [Title] [Inflammatory markers in heart failure].
  • Heart failure is a leading cause of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity.
  • It has been shown that inflammatory markers may play a role in the pathogenesis of heart failure.
  • Therefore, inflammatory markers and anticytokine therapy in heart failure have become the attractive subjects in the literature.
  • In this article, we reviewed inflammatory markers in heart failure and their prognostic significance based on the literature data.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers / blood. Cytokines / antagonists & inhibitors. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Predictive Value of Tests. Prognosis. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / antagonists & inhibitors

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  • (PMID = 16524802.001).
  • [ISSN] 1302-8723
  • [Journal-full-title] Anadolu kardiyoloji dergisi : AKD = the Anatolian journal of cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anadolu Kardiyol Derg
  • [Language] tur
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Turkey
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
  • [Number-of-references] 36
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77. McGregor E, Dunn MJ: Proteomics of the heart: unraveling disease. Circ Res; 2006 Feb 17;98(3):309-21
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  • [Title] Proteomics of the heart: unraveling disease.
  • Heart diseases resulting in heart failure are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developed countries.
  • Underlying molecular causes of cardiac dysfunction in most heart diseases are still largely unknown but are expected to result from causal alterations in gene and protein expression.
  • Proteomic technology now allows us to examine global alterations in protein expression in the diseased heart and can provide new insights into cellular mechanisms involved in cardiac dysfunction.
  • The majority of proteomic investigations still use 2D gel electrophoresis (2-DE) with immobilized pH gradients to separate the proteins in a sample and combine this with mass spectrometry (MS) technologies to identify proteins.
  • In spite of the development of novel gel-free technologies, 2-DE remains the only technique that can be routinely applied to parallel quantitative expression profiling of large sets of complex protein mixtures such as whole cell lysates.
  • Furthermore, 2-DE delivers a map of intact proteins, which reflects changes in protein expression level, isoforms, or post-translational modifications.
  • The use of proteomics to investigate heart disease should result in the generation of new diagnostic and therapeutic markers.
  • In this article, we review the current status of proteomic technologies, describing the 2-DE proteomics workflow, with an overview of protein identification by MS and how these technologies are being applied to studies of human heart disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Diseases / genetics. Proteome / genetics. Proteomics

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  • (PMID = 16484627.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4571
  • [Journal-full-title] Circulation research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Circ. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Proteome
  • [Number-of-references] 153
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78. Vistnes M, Christensen G, Omland T: Multiple cytokine biomarkers in heart failure. Expert Rev Mol Diagn; 2010 Mar;10(2):147-57
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  • [Title] Multiple cytokine biomarkers in heart failure.
  • Raised levels of circulating proinflammatory cytokines are associated with disease progression and adverse outcomes in chronic heart failure patients.
  • Inflammatory markers may be predictive of congestive heart failure and myocardial infarction, allowing enhanced risk stratification.
  • The profile of cytokine blood levels differs in accordance with the initiating cause and type of heart failure.
  • Therefore, subclassification of heart failure patients based on cytokine measurements could potentially identify subgroups of patients, permitting tailored or personalized therapy.
  • However, the measurement of multiple cytokines as part of a multimarker prognostic or diagnostic biomarker approach remains to be implemented in current clinical practice, as current knowledge of the underlying biology of cytokine release in heart disease is still too limited and a bioinformatic tool for interpretation of cytokine profiles is needed.
  • Nevertheless, multiplex protein analyses are likely to constitute an important part of experimental and clinical research on heart failure and cytokines, paving the way for more accurate heart failure treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers / metabolism. Cytokines / metabolism. Heart Failure / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 20214534.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-8352
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert review of molecular diagnostics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Rev. Mol. Diagn.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Cytokines
  • [Number-of-references] 78
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79. Pirracchio R, Cholley B, De Hert S, Solal AC, Mebazaa A: Diastolic heart failure in anaesthesia and critical care. Br J Anaesth; 2007 Jun;98(6):707-21
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  • [Title] Diastolic heart failure in anaesthesia and critical care.
  • Diastolic heart failure is an underestimated pathology with a high risk of acute decompensation during the perioperative period.
  • This article reviews the epidemiology, risk factors, pathophysiology, and treatment of diastolic heart failure.
  • Although frequently underestimated, diastolic heart failure is a common pathology.
  • Diastolic heart failure involves heart failure with preserved left ventricular (LV) function, and LV diastolic dysfunction may account for acute heart failure occurring in critical care situations.
  • Hypertensive crisis, sepsis, and myocardial ischaemia are frequently associated with acute diastolic heart failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Anesthesia / methods. Critical Care / methods. Heart Failure / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 17468492.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0912
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of anaesthesia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br J Anaesth
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 121
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80. Suárez-Peñaranda JM, Muñoz JI, Rodríguez-Calvo MS, Ortíz-Rey JA, Concheiro L: The pathology of the heart conduction system in congenital heart block. J Clin Forensic Med; 2006 Aug-Nov;13(6-8):341-3
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  • [Title] The pathology of the heart conduction system in congenital heart block.
  • The incidence of congenital complete heart block is estimated in 1 of 2500-20,000 births.
  • Many cases are isolated (found in an otherwise normal heart) and the pathology of the heart conduction system is variable.
  • We report a 51-year-old man with the diagnosis of complete heart block, with a permanent pacemaker.
  • The heart was hypertrophic (450g) and the left ventricle thickened.
  • Histopathological examination of the heart conduction system showed that the sinus and atrioventricular nodes were normal, but the His bundle was interrupted and replaced by fibrous tissue.
  • Loss of conducting fibres and their replacement by fibrous tissue is the most common pathological process in complete heart block.
  • [MeSH-major] Bundle of His / pathology. Heart Block / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Autopsy. Diagnosis, Differential. Forensic Medicine. Heart Conduction System / pathology. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 17029919.001).
  • [ISSN] 1353-1131
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical forensic medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Forensic Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
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81. Galinier M: [Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction]. Presse Med; 2008 Jul-Aug;37(7-8):1121-31
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  • [Title] [Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction].
  • [Transliterated title] Insuffisance cardiaque à fraction d'éjection préservée.
  • Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) is defined by the combination of clinical symptoms or signs of heart failure and an ejection fraction> or =50+/-5%.
  • HFPEF accounts for nearly 50% of cases of heart failure, and its prevalence is increasing as the population ages.
  • Diagnosis of HFPEF is facilitated by the development of plasma assays of natriuretic peptides and of Doppler echocardiography.
  • Its prognosis is similar to that of systolic heart failure and leads to frequent hospitalization for acute decompensation.
  • Its treatment calls for the same therapeutic arsenal as for systolic heart failure, except among patients with diabetes.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / physiopathology. Stroke Volume / physiology

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  • (PMID = 18400457.001).
  • [ISSN] 2213-0276
  • [Journal-full-title] Presse medicale (Paris, France : 1983)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Presse Med
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic beta-Antagonists; 0 / Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Calcium Channel Blockers; 0 / Natriuretic Peptides
  • [Number-of-references] 33
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82. Huang RL, Listerman J, Goring J, Giesberg C, Nading MA, Butler J: Beta-blocker therapy for heart failure: should the therapeutic target be dose or heart rate reduction? Congest Heart Fail; 2006 Jul-Aug;12(4):206-10; quiz 211-2
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  • [Title] Beta-blocker therapy for heart failure: should the therapeutic target be dose or heart rate reduction?
  • Therapeutic target with beta blockers in heart failure, i.e., target heart rate reduction or beta-blocker dose, is controversial.
  • To resolve this controversy, the authors studied 152 heart failure patients on beta blockers who were divided into four groups based on median peak exercise heart rate reduction as compared with predicted and prescription of at least 50% recommended beta-blocker dose.
  • Baseline and peak exercise heart rates were 74 +/- 14 and 116 +/- 21 bpm, respectively.
  • Median heart rate reduction at peak exercise was 35%.
  • When median or higher peak heart rate reduction was achieved, there were no significant survival differences noted between patients on different beta-blocker doses.
  • With below-median peak heart rate reduction, there was a strong trend toward better event-free survival with higher beta-blocker doses.
  • In conclusion, the results suggest that higher heart rate reduction is associated with better outcomes for heart failure patients overall and, for patients with persistently elevated heart rates, higher beta-blocker doses provided additional benefit.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenergic beta-Antagonists / therapeutic use. Heart Failure / drug therapy. Heart Rate / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 16894279.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-5299
  • [Journal-full-title] Congestive heart failure (Greenwich, Conn.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Congest Heart Fail
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic beta-Antagonists; 0 / Carbazoles; 0 / Propanolamines; 0K47UL67F2 / carvedilol; GEB06NHM23 / Metoprolol
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83. Singh S, Loke YK, Furberg CD: Thiazolidinediones and heart failure: a teleo-analysis. Diabetes Care; 2007 Aug;30(8):2148-53
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  • [Title] Thiazolidinediones and heart failure: a teleo-analysis.
  • OBJECTIVE: Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are known to increase the risk of heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes.
  • We aimed to evaluate the magnitude of the risk of heart failure with TZDs and classify this adverse effect under the novel dose-time-susceptibility system.
  • RESULTS: A random-effects meta-analysis of three randomized controlled trials showed an odds ratio (OR) of 2.1 (95% CI 1.08-4.08; P = 0.03) for the risk of heart failure in patients randomized to TZDs compared with placebo.
  • Four observational studies revealed an OR of 1.55 (1.33-1.80; P < 0.00001) for heart failure with TZDs.
  • A dose-time-susceptibility analysis of 28 published reports and 214 spontaneous reports from the CADRMP database showed that heart failure was more likely to occur after several months (with median treatment duration of 24 weeks after initiation of therapy).
  • Heart failure equally occurred at high and low doses.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our teleo-analysis confirms the increased magnitude of the risk of heart failure with TZDs.
  • [MeSH-major] Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / drug therapy. Heart Failure / chemically induced. Thiazolidinediones / adverse effects

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  • [CommentIn] Evid Based Med. 2008 Feb;13(1):8 [18234916.001]
  • [CommentIn] ACP J Club. 2008 Jan-Feb;148(1):5 [18170992.001]
  • (PMID = 17536074.001).
  • [ISSN] 1935-5548
  • [Journal-full-title] Diabetes care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Diabetes Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Meta-Analysis
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hypoglycemic Agents; 0 / Thiazolidinediones
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84. Nishida K, Kyoi S, Yamaguchi O, Sadoshima J, Otsu K: The role of autophagy in the heart. Cell Death Differ; 2009 Jan;16(1):31-8
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  • [Title] The role of autophagy in the heart.
  • In the heart, autophagy is important for the turnover of organelles at low basal levels under normal conditions and it is upregulated in response to stresses such as ischemia/reperfusion and in cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure.
  • Cardiac remodeling involves increased rates of cardiomyocyte cell death and precedes heart failure.
  • The functional role of autophagy during ischemia/reperfusion in the heart is complex.
  • It has also been unclear whether autophagy is protective or detrimental in response to ischemia/reperfusion in the heart.
  • In this review, we will summarize the role of autophagy in the heart under both normal conditions and in response to stress.
  • [MeSH-major] Autophagy. Heart Failure / metabolism. Myocardial Reperfusion Injury / metabolism. Myocardium / metabolism. Myocytes, Cardiac / metabolism. Organelles / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19008922.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-5403
  • [Journal-full-title] Cell death and differentiation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cell Death Differ.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 91
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85. El-Menyar A, AlMahmeed W: Heart failure in 2010. Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther; 2010 Sep;8(9):1231-4
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  • [Title] Heart failure in 2010.
  • The Heart Failure Congress 2010 in Berlin presented the latest trials and trends in the medical and mechanical therapy of heart failure in the presence of impaired or preserved left ventricular ejection fraction.
  • It covered all aspects of heart failure from epidemiology through basic and translational science to prevention.
  • The congress highlighted new drugs, novel biomarkers, updated trials, the role of imaging in risk stratification and the importance of telecare in the reduction of heart failure readmission.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / diagnosis. Heart Failure / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antidiuretic Hormone Receptor Antagonists. Calcium Channel Blockers / therapeutic use. Cardiac Myosins / physiology. Cardiotonic Agents / therapeutic use. Clinical Trials as Topic. Enzyme Activators / therapeutic use. Guanylate Cyclase / physiology. Humans. Prognosis. Risk Assessment

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  • (PMID = 20828344.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-8344
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert review of cardiovascular therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Congresses
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antidiuretic Hormone Receptor Antagonists; 0 / Calcium Channel Blockers; 0 / Cardiotonic Agents; 0 / Enzyme Activators; EC 3.6.1.- / Cardiac Myosins; EC 4.6.1.2 / Guanylate Cyclase
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86. Gradman AH, Alfayoumi F: From left ventricular hypertrophy to congestive heart failure: management of hypertensive heart disease. Prog Cardiovasc Dis; 2006 Mar-Apr;48(5):326-41
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  • [Title] From left ventricular hypertrophy to congestive heart failure: management of hypertensive heart disease.
  • Other than age, left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is the most potent predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in the hypertensive population, and is an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease, sudden death, heart failure and stroke.
  • The latter is directly related to the degree of myocardial fibrosis and is the hemodynamic hallmark of hypertensive heart disease.
  • When diastolic dysfunction is present, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure increases out-of-proportion to volume and may be elevated at rest or with exertion leading to clinical heart failure.
  • At least one third of heart failure patients in the United States can be considered to have heart failure related to diastolic dysfunction.
  • Compared to heart failure patients with systolic dysfunction, diastolic heart failure patients are more likely to be older, female, and to be hypertensive at the time of presentation.
  • Although it has been assumed that LVH may lead to systolic dysfunction, evidence is lacking that LVH resulting from hypertension is a major risk factor for systolic heart failure independent of coronary artery disease.
  • Treatment of hypertension greatly attenuates the development of LVH and significantly decreases the incidence of heart failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Antihypertensive Agents / therapeutic use. Heart Failure / prevention & control. Hypertension / drug therapy. Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular / prevention & control


87. Chow CM, Donovan L, Manuel D, Johansen H, Tu JV, Canadian Cardiovascular Outcomes Research Team: Regional variation in self-reported heart disease prevalence in Canada. Can J Cardiol; 2005 Dec;21(14):1265-71
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  • [Title] Regional variation in self-reported heart disease prevalence in Canada.
  • OBJECTIVE: To provide an analysis of the self-reported prevalence of heart disease and three specific cardiac conditions--myocardial infarction (MI), angina and congestive heart failure (CHF)--in subgroups of the Canadian population.
  • METHODS: Data from the Public Use Microdata File from Statistics Canada's 2000/2001 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) were used to estimate the crude self-reported prevalence of heart disease, MI, angina and CHF in Canada.
  • RESULTS: Based on the 2000/2001 CCHS data, it was estimated that among Canadians 12 years of age and older, 5.0% (n=1,286,000) have heart disease, 2.1% (n=537,000) have had a heart attack, 1.9% (n=483,000) have angina and 1.0% (n=264,000) have CHF.
  • Marked variation in the prevalence of heart disease and the other specific cardiac conditions exists across age and sex groups, and across geographical regions.
  • The prevalence of heart disease is low among those younger than 50 years; thereafter, the prevalence of heart disease increases and is more common among men than among women.
  • By 70 years of age, at least one in four men and one in five women report having heart disease.
  • Large differences in the burden of heart disease were observed across provinces, territories and health regions.
  • Comparison of the highest and lowest prevalence rates among provinces and territories revealed a 1.9-fold difference for heart disease, a 2.8-fold difference for MI, a 2.3-fold difference for angina and a 3.3-fold difference for CHF.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Large regional differences in the prevalence of heart disease and other specific cardiac conditions were observed across Canada.
  • These data may assist health system planners to identify those regions and population subgroups most affected by heart disease, and to support the development of heart disease prevention and treatment programs.
  • [MeSH-major] Angina Pectoris / epidemiology. Heart Failure / epidemiology. Myocardial Infarction / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Distribution. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Canada / epidemiology. Child. Female. Geography. Health Surveys. Heart Diseases / epidemiology. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prevalence. Self Disclosure. Sex Distribution. Surveys and Questionnaires


88. Thielke D, Thyssen JP, Sejersen HM: [Cardiac myxoma--a rare cause of cerebral embolism]. Ugeskr Laeger; 2008 Aug 11;170(33):2460
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  • [Title] [Cardiac myxoma--a rare cause of cerebral embolism].
  • Cardiac myxoma is the most common benign heart tumor.
  • We report a case with multiple brain metastases, presumably due to tumor embolization.
  • It is important to perform transthoracic echocardiography at a very early stage to exclude structural heart disease in patients with signs of multiple brain metastases.
  • Though myxoma is a rare cause of cerebral embolism, detection of this tumor is relatively easy and surgical resection of myxoma is usually a permanent measure to prevent subsequent stroke.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / complications. Heart Neoplasms / complications. Intracranial Embolism / etiology. Myxoma / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Stroke / prevention & control

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  • (PMID = 18761832.001).
  • [ISSN] 1603-6824
  • [Journal-full-title] Ugeskrift for laeger
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ugeskr. Laeg.
  • [Language] dan
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
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89. Zuily S, Jourdain P, Decup D, Agrinier N, Loiret J, Groshens S, Funck F, Bellorini M, Juillière Y, Alla F: Impact of heart failure management unit on heart failure-related readmission rate and mortality. Arch Cardiovasc Dis; 2010 Feb;103(2):90-6
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  • [Title] Impact of heart failure management unit on heart failure-related readmission rate and mortality.
  • BACKGROUND: Heart failure is the leading cause of hospital admissions and an economic burden.
  • In accordance with European guidelines, a dedicated heart failure unit was created in René Dubos Hospital (Pontoise, France) in 2002.
  • AIM: To evaluate the impact of an in-hospital heart failure management unit on heart failure prognosis.
  • METHODS: We conducted a descriptive study of all-cause in-hospital mortality and heart failure related readmission rates in the year after the first admission for heart failure, from January 1997 to December 2007.
  • RESULTS: There were no significant differences in patient characteristics (age, sex, diabetes mellitus, left ventricular ejection fraction<45%) other than renal insufficiency, in patients admitted for heart failure from 1997 to 2007.
  • After the creation of the heart failure unit, we observed a significant decrease in heart failure related readmission rate from 21.7% in 2002 to 15.6% in 2007 (p<0.0001), whereas there was no difference in this rate before the creation of the unit (34.3% in 1997 and in 2001; p=0.90).
  • All-cause in-hospital mortality rate decreased from 9.3% in 1997 to 5.1% in 2007 (p<0.0001) and showed a tendency to decrease after the creation of the heart failure unit (p=0.06).
  • CONCLUSION: Heart failure related readmission rates in new patients in the year after the first admission for heart failure reduced dramatically after the creation of the heart failure unit.
  • All-cause in-hospital mortality in heart failure patients decreased over the 10-year study period.
  • [MeSH-major] Coronary Care Units / statistics & numerical data. Heart Failure / mortality. Heart Failure / therapy. Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) / statistics & numerical data. Patient Readmission / statistics & numerical data

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  • (PMID = 20226428.001).
  • [ISSN] 1875-2128
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of cardiovascular diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch Cardiovasc Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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90. Gill PS, Davis R, Davies M, Freemantle N, Lip GY: Rationale and study design of a cross sectional study documenting the prevalence of Heart Failure amongst the minority ethnic communities in the UK: the E-ECHOES Study (Ethnic--Echocardiographic Heart of England Screening Study). BMC Cardiovasc Disord; 2009;9:47
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  • [Title] Rationale and study design of a cross sectional study documenting the prevalence of Heart Failure amongst the minority ethnic communities in the UK: the E-ECHOES Study (Ethnic--Echocardiographic Heart of England Screening Study).
  • BACKGROUND: Heart failure is an important cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.
  • Studies to date have not established the prevalence heart failure amongst the minority ethnic community in the UK.
  • T'he aim of the E-ECHOES (Ethnic--Echocardiographic Heart of England Screening Study)is to establish, for the first time, the community prevalence and severity of left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) and heart failure amongst the South Asian and Black African-Caribbean ethnic groups in the UK.
  • This is the largest study on heart failure amongst these ethnic groups.
  • In addition it will increase knowledge of the aetiology and management of heart failure within minority ethnic communities.
  • [MeSH-major] African Continental Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data. Asian Continental Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data. Echocardiography / statistics & numerical data. Heart Failure / ethnology. Mass Screening / statistics & numerical data. Minority Groups / statistics & numerical data. Research Design. Ventricular Dysfunction, Left / ethnology

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  • (PMID = 19793391.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2261
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cardiovascular disorders
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cardiovasc Disord
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2765971
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91. Naito AT, Shiojima I, Komuro I: Wnt signaling and aging-related heart disorders. Circ Res; 2010 Nov 26;107(11):1295-303
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  • [Title] Wnt signaling and aging-related heart disorders.
  • Aging is associated with various heart diseases, and this may be attributable, in part, to the prolonged exposure of the heart to cardiovascular risk factors.
  • However, aging is also associated with heart disorders such as diastolic dysfunction that are not necessarily linked to the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases.
  • As a part of the review series on Wnt signaling and the cardiovascular system, we discuss here the possible involvement of Wnt signaling in aging-associated heart diseases or heart disorders.
  • [MeSH-major] Aging / metabolism. Heart Diseases / metabolism. Heart Diseases / physiopathology. Signal Transduction / physiology. Wnt Proteins / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 21106946.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4571
  • [Journal-full-title] Circulation research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Circ. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Wnt Proteins
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92. Hsu RB, Lin FY, Chou NK, Ko WJ, Chi NH, Wang SS: Heart transplantation in patients with extreme right ventricular failure. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg; 2007 Sep;32(3):457-61
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  • [Title] Heart transplantation in patients with extreme right ventricular failure.
  • OBJECTIVE: Donor shortage and improved medical treatment of heart failure increase the prevalence of patients with extreme right ventricular failure and ascites to heart transplantation.
  • The clinical outcome of heart transplantation in these patients has rarely been reported.
  • Here, we sought to evaluate the clinical outcome of heart transplantation in patients with extreme right ventricular failure and refractory ascites.
  • RESULTS: Between 1993 and 2005, 12 patients with extreme right ventricular failure and refractory ascites underwent orthotopic heart transplantation at the authors' hospital.
  • The causes of heart failure were congenital heart disease in four patients, dilated cardiomyopathy in two patients, rheumatic heart disease in two patients, coronary artery disease in two patients, and restrictive cardiomyopathy and transplant coronary artery disease each in one patient.
  • Eight of 12 patients had previous cardiac operation.
  • The findings of preoperative abdominal sonography were massive ascites in all patients, congestive liver in 11 patients, and probably cardiac cirrhosis in 1 patient.
  • One patient underwent combined heart and kidney transplantations.
  • Patients with previous cardiac operation had a higher mortality rate (5/7 vs 1/5).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Heart transplantation in patients with extreme right ventricular failure and refractory ascites was associated with high mortality and morbidity.
  • The presence of previous cardiac operation implied even poor prognosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / surgery. Heart Transplantation. Ventricular Dysfunction, Right / surgery

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  • (PMID = 17587592.001).
  • [ISSN] 1010-7940
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery : official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Cardiothorac Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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93. Naughton MT, Lorenzi-Filho G: Sleep in heart failure. Prog Cardiovasc Dis; 2009 Jan-Feb;51(4):339-49
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  • [Title] Sleep in heart failure.
  • Sleep plays a large role in patients with heart failure.
  • In normal subjects, sleep is usually in a supine position with reduced sympathetic drive, elevated vagal tone and as such a relatively lower cardiac output and minute ventilation, allowing for recuperation.
  • Patients with heart failure may not experience the same degree of autonomic activity change and the supine position may place a large strain on the pulmonary system.
  • More than half of all heart failure patients have one of two types of sleep apnea: either obstructive or central sleep apnea.
  • Obstructive sleep apnea is likely to be a cause of heart failure due to large negative intrathoracic pressures, apnea related hypoxemia and hypercapnia, terminated by an arousal and surge in systemic blood pressure associated with endothelial damage and resultant premature atherosclerosis.
  • Central sleep apnea with Cheyne Stokes pattern of respiration (CSA-CSR) occurs as a result of increased central controller (brainstem driving ventilation) and plant (ventilation driving CO2) gain in the setting of a delayed feed back (i.e., low cardiac output).
  • It is thought this type of apnea is a result of moderately to severely impaired cardiac function and is possibly indicative of high mortality.
  • Treatment of CSA-CSR is best undertaken by treating the underlying cardiac condition which may include with medications, pacemakers, transplantation or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP).
  • In such patients CPAP exerts unique effects to assist cardiac function and reduce pulmonary edema.
  • Whether CPAP improves survival in this heart failure population remains to be determined.
  • [MeSH-major] Autonomic Nervous System / physiopathology. Heart Failure / complications. Heart Failure / physiopathology. Sleep Apnea, Central / etiology. Sleep Apnea, Central / physiopathology. Sleep Apnea, Obstructive / etiology. Sleep Apnea, Obstructive / physiopathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cardiovascular Agents / therapeutic use. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure / methods. Evidence-Based Medicine. Heart Transplantation. Humans. Oxygen Inhalation Therapy. Pacemaker, Artificial. Prevalence. Supine Position. Treatment Outcome. Victoria / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 19110135.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-1740
  • [Journal-full-title] Progress in cardiovascular diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prog Cardiovasc Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cardiovascular Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 97
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94. van der Harst P, de Boer RA, Samani NJ, Wong LS, Huzen J, Codd V, Hillege HL, Voors AA, van Gilst WH, Jaarsma T, van Veldhuisen DJ: Telomere length and outcome in heart failure. Ann Med; 2010;42(1):36-44
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Telomere length and outcome in heart failure.
  • Senescence is a potential factor in the pathogenesis and progression of heart failure.
  • In heart failure telomeres are shorter, but the prognostic value associated with telomere length has not been defined.
  • METHODS: Telomere length was prospectively determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 890 patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class II to IV heart failure.
  • After 18 months, we examined the association between telomere length and the predefined primary end-point: time to death or hospitalization for heart failure.
  • In multivariate analysis shorter telomere length remained associated with a higher risk for death or hospitalization (hazard ratio, 1.74; 95% CI 1.07-2.95) after adjustment for age of heart failure onset, gender, hemoglobin, renal function, and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide level, a history of stroke, atrial fibrillation, and diabetes.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Shorter length of telomeres predicts the occurrence of death or hospitalization in patients with chronic heart failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / mortality. Heart Failure / physiopathology. Telomere / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19941413.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2060
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 114471-18-0 / Natriuretic Peptide, Brain
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95. Reinglas J, Haddad H, Davies RA, Mielniczuk L: Cardiorenal syndrome and heart failure. Curr Opin Cardiol; 2010 Mar;25(2):141-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cardiorenal syndrome and heart failure.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Concomitant anemia, heart failure, and renal disease can be seen in a large proportion of patients with heart failure.
  • RECENT FINDING: Dysfunctional heart can promote the dysfunction of the kidneys through a variety of pathophysiological mechanism, the reciprocal holds true as well.
  • Heart failure has been considered as the most common type of cardiovascular complication seen in patients with renal failure.
  • Central to this relationship lies anemia, which can be the result or the cause of either heart or kidney disease.
  • SUMMARY: Cardiorenal syndrome is a complex condition, which requires the collaboration and resources from cardiology, cardiac surgery, nephrology, and critical care.
  • [MeSH-major] Anemia / complications. Heart Failure / complications. Kidney Failure, Chronic / etiology

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  • (PMID = 20166239.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-7080
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Opin. Cardiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Diuretics; 0 / Vasodilator Agents; 11000-17-2 / Vasopressins; K72T3FS567 / Adenosine
  • [Number-of-references] 66
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96. Zhang J, Fletcher JG, Scott Harmsen W, Araoz PA, Williamson EE, Primak AN, McCollough CH: Analysis of heart rate and heart rate variation during cardiac CT examinations. Acad Radiol; 2008 Jan;15(1):40-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Analysis of heart rate and heart rate variation during cardiac CT examinations.
  • RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: We sought to examine heart rate and heart rate variability during cardiac computed tomography (CT).
  • Forty-two patients with heart rate greater than 70 bpm were pretreated with oral beta-blockers (in five patients, use of beta-blocker was not known).
  • Mean heart rate and percentage of beats outside a +/-5 bpm region about the mean were compared between baseline (free breathing), prescan hyperventilation, and scan acquisition (breath-hold).
  • Mean heart rate during scan acquisition was significantly lower than at baseline (CAC 58.2 +/- 8.5 bpm; CTA 59.2 +/- 8.8 bpm; baseline 62.8 +/- 8.9 bpm; P < .001).
  • The injection of contrast had no significant effect on heart rate (58.2 bpm versus 59.2 bpm, P = .24) or percentage of beats outside a +/-5 bpm about the mean (3.0% versus 3.3%, P = .64).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Breath-holding during cardiac CT scan acquisition significantly lowers the mean heart rate by approximately 4 bpm, but heart rate variability is the same or less compared with normal breathing.

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  • (PMID = 18078905.001).
  • [ISSN] 1076-6332
  • [Journal-full-title] Academic radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acad Radiol
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIBIB NIH HHS / EB / EB007986-01; United States / NIBIB NIH HHS / EB / R01 EB007986; United States / NIBIB NIH HHS / EB / R01 EB007986-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS121547; NLM/ PMC2744859
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97. McNamara DM: Emerging role of pharmacogenomics in heart failure. Curr Opin Cardiol; 2008 May;23(3):261-8
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  • [Title] Emerging role of pharmacogenomics in heart failure.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The promise of pharmacogenomics is that it will one day result in targeted heart failure therapy that maximizes individual benefit and diminishes risk.
  • Recent reports from the Beta Blocker Evaluation Survival and African American Heart Failure clinical trials provide a roadmap of how this promise may soon be realized.
  • This review will discuss recent investigations of pharmacogenomics in heart failure, and the challenge of converting genomic heterogeneity into a usable clinical tool.
  • The efficacy of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and the combination of isosorbide dinitrate and hydralazine differs in black and white heart failure cohorts.
  • Initial reports from the African American Heart Failure Trial demonstrate the impact of aldosterone synthase polymorphism on left ventricle remodeling, outcomes and the impact of isosorbide dinitrate and hydralazine.
  • Investigations from the African American Heart Failure Trial will continue to focus on determining the genomic bases for observed racial differences in therapeutic efficacy.
  • Investigators are beginning to delineate the genomic basis for differences in drug efficacy between black and white heart failure cohorts.
  • Pharmacogenomics will have an increasing role in the treatment of heart failure patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / genetics. Pharmacogenetics

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  • (PMID = 18382216.001).
  • [ISSN] 0268-4705
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Opin. Cardiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 42
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98. Mercadier JJ: [Current pathophysiologic approaches to heart failure]. Presse Med; 2007 Jun;36(6 Pt 2):979-84
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Current pathophysiologic approaches to heart failure].
  • [Transliterated title] Approches physiopathologiques actuelles de l'insuffisance cardiaque.
  • Heart failure is the consequence of cardiac remodeling that affects all the structural and functional aspects of the heart, from its ventricular geometry to the molecular components of myocytes and other myocardial cells.
  • Activation of some of these pathways leads to a beneficial adaptive remodeling (growth, cardiac hypertrophy of pregnancy and of athletes) or on the contrary to harmful remodeling (heart disease).
  • The predominance of the stimulation of the harmful pathways over that of the beneficial pathways in heart disease is responsible for progression towards heart failure.
  • Current research aims at identifying new pathways and participants in the beneficial and harmful remodeling of the myocardium in order to develop new drugs that will block ever more specifically the harmful pathways but also stimulate the beneficial ones, to prevent progression towards heart failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 17433611.001).
  • [ISSN] 0755-4982
  • [Journal-full-title] Presse medicale (Paris, France : 1983)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Presse Med
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Number-of-references] 18
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99. Kaan A: Caring for patients with heart failure. Nurs BC; 2005 Feb;37(1):22-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Caring for patients with heart failure.
  • Heart failure affects more: 350,000 Canadians and accounts for more than dollar 1 billion of Canada's health budget.
  • It is the most common condition requiring re-hospitalization and carries with it a mortality rate of between 25% and 40% (Liu et al., 2003) In British Columbia, approximately 70,000 people (1.5% of the B.C. population) were diagnosed with heart failure in 2003 and it is estimated that a further 70,000 people may be living undiagnosed with the condition (British Columbia Ministry of Health Services, 2003).
  • The vast majority of people with heart failure are over 70 years of age.
  • As our population ages, it is reasonable to expect that the burden of heart failure on our health system will continue to increase.
  • Heart failure is usually a chronic condition marked by frequent exacerbations.

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  • [CommentIn] Nurs BC. 2005 Apr;37(2):6 [15918414.001]
  • (PMID = 15790280.001).
  • [ISSN] 1185-3638
  • [Journal-full-title] Nursing BC
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nurs BC
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic beta-Antagonists; 0 / Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Anticoagulants; 0 / Diuretics
  • [Number-of-references] 9
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100. Zhang QY, Ye Q, DU JB, Li WZ: [The value of the New York University Pediatric Heart Failure Index in chronic heart failure in children]. Zhonghua Er Ke Za Zhi; 2010 Sep;48(9):703-7
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  • [Title] [The value of the New York University Pediatric Heart Failure Index in chronic heart failure in children].
  • OBJECTIVE: The study was designed to explore the value of the New York University Pediatric Heart Failure Index (NYU PHFI) for diagnosing and grading chronic heart failure in children.
  • METHODS: Totally 105 children with chronic heart failure or structural heart disease but without signs and symptoms of heart failure were enrolled.
  • According to modified Ross score as the referent criteria, the diagnostic value of NYU PHFI in quantifying chronic heart failure severity in children was studied.
  • Furthermore, according to the grading of heart failure using modified Ross score, the area under the ROC curves of NYU PHFI was examined, respectively, in order to find out the optimal cut-off point.
  • According to modified Ross score, NYU PHFI scores in different severity of heart failure in children differed significantly (F = 80.034, P = 0.000).
  • According to modified Ross scores of 0 - 2 as being without heart failure, 3 - 6 as mild degree of heart failure, 7 - 9 as moderate degree of heart failure and 10 - 12 as severe degree of heart failure, the areas under the ROC curve of the NYU PHFI diagnosing if heart failure was present, differentiating moderate from mild and severe from moderate heart failure were 0.982, 0.942 and 0.918, respectively, and the sum of sensitivity and specificity was favorite when 6, 10 and 13 scores were set as cut-off value diagnosing the presence of heart failure, differentiating moderate from mild, and severe from moderate heart failure, respectively.
  • According to above classification of heart failure based on NYU PHFI score, plasma NT-proBNP concentration was significantly different in different degree of heart failure (F = 53.31, P < 0.001).
  • Plasma NT-proBNP concentration in those without heart failure was significantly lower than that of mild heart failure, and it was also significantly lower in mild heart failure than that of severe heart failure.
  • CONCLUSION: NYU PHFI was highly valuable for diagnosing chronic heart failure in children and 0 - 6 scores as being without heart failure, 7 - 10 scores as mild degree, 11 - 13 scores as moderate degree and 14 - 30 scores as severe degree of heart failure could be used as the reference criteria of different severities of heart failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Failure / diagnosis. Severity of Illness Index

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  • (PMID = 21092534.001).
  • [ISSN] 0578-1310
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua er ke za zhi = Chinese journal of pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Er Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
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