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29. Cariaga-Martinez AE, Lorenzati MA, Riera MA, Cubilla MA, De La Rossa A, Giorgio EM, Tiscornia MM, Gimenez EM, Rojas ME, Chaneton BJ, Rodríguez DI, Zapata PD: Tumoral prostate shows different expression pattern of somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2) and phosphotyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 (PTPN6) according to tumor progression. Adv Urol; 2009;:723831
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  • [Title] Tumoral prostate shows different expression pattern of somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2) and phosphotyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 (PTPN6) according to tumor progression.
  • Many studies on SHP-1 revealed that the expression of this protein was diminished or abolished in several of the cancer cell lines and tissues examined.
  • However, it is necessary to confront the cell lines data with real situation in cancer cases.
  • Our studies have shown that epithelial expressions of both proteins, SHP-1 and SSTR2, in normal and benign hyperplasia are localized in the luminal side of duct and acinar cells.

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  • (PMID = 19365586.001).
  • [ISSN] 1687-6369
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Egypt
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2667939
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30. Haji BE, Das DK, Al-Ayadhy B, Pathan SK, George SG, Mallik MK, Abdeen SM: Fine-needle aspiration cytologic features of four special types of breast cancers: mucinous, medullary, apocrine, and papillary. Diagn Cytopathol; 2007 Jul;35(7):408-16
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  • Recognition of special types of breast cancers by fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology may have prognostic implications but some difficulties still exist in the ability of cytopathologists to determine the tumor subtypes.
  • Detailed cytomorphological features were studied in the four special and unusual types of breast cancer cases (8 cases of mucinous, 9 medullary, 9 apocrime, and 11 papillary) and compared between themselves and with those of 32 duct cell carcinomas, not otherwise specified (NOS).
  • Papillary carcinomas were also compared with 10 benign papillary lesions.
  • In mucinous carcinoma, the frequency of signet ring cells (62.5%), and background pools of mucin (87.5%) were significantly higher than those of duct cell carcinoma (NOS), medullary carcinoma, apocrine carcinoma, and papillary carcinoma (P = 0.0408 to < 0.0001).
  • In medullary carcinomas, lymphomononuclear cell infiltration (100.0%) was observed in significantly higher number of cases than in papillary, mucinous, and apocrine types (P < 0.0001).
  • Abnormal apocrine cells and papillary formation, characterizing all the apocrine carcinomas and papillary carcinomas, respectively, were present in significantly lower number in other variants and in duct cell carcinoma (NOS) (P = 0.0002 to <0.0001).
  • Glycogen vacuoles (63.6%) were observed in a significantly higher number of papillary carcinoma as compared to duct cell carcinoma (NOS), apocrine, and medullary carcinomas (P = 0.0047 to 0.0022).
  • The significant parameters differentiating papillary carcinoma and benign papillary lesions were loose cohesive clusters (P = 0.001) and acinar formation by neoplastic cells (P = 0.0237).
  • Histopathology reports available in 36 cases, confirmed the cytodiagnosis of carcinoma in all 35 cases and the benign lesion in one case.
  • Cytological subtyping was confirmed in 13 of 16 special types of carcinomas and all the 15 duct cell carcinoma (NOS).
  • Thus, special and unusual variants of duct cell carcinomas like mucinous, medullary, apocrine, and papillary have specific cytomorphological features, which differentiate them from one another and from duct cell carcinoma (NOS).
  • However, differentiating features between papillary carcinoma and benign papillary lesions were very few in this study.

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  • (PMID = 17580344.001).
  • [ISSN] 8755-1039
  • [Journal-full-title] Diagnostic cytopathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Diagn. Cytopathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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31. Borka K: [Claudin expression in different pancreatic cancers and its significance in differential diagnostics]. Magy Onkol; 2009 Sep;53(3):273-8
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  • The aim of our studies was to compare the different CLDN expression patterns in normal pancreas cells, pancreatic endocrine tumors, adenocarcinomas, mucinous cystic tumors and acinar cell carcinomas.
  • ) In addition to the well-known CLDN-1 and -4 expression CLDN-2, -3 and -7 proteins were demonstrated in ductal cells, while CLDN-3 and -7 proteins showed expression in acinar cells.
  • 3.) The level of CLDN-1, -4 and -7 protein expression in borderline cystic tumors is in between that of benign and malignant tumors.
  • 4.) This is a first review on childhood acinar cell carcinoma causing Cushing syndrome.
  • The adenocarcinomas and cystic mucinous tumors of exocrine origin denoted CLDN-1, -2, -4 and -7 positivity, whereas acinar cell carcinomas expressed only CLDN-1 and -2.
  • Considering the CLDN expression observed in normal pancreas cells, it can be established that CLDN-1, -2 and -4 proteins are definitely markers of ductal differentiation, CLDN-1 protein of acinar and CLDN-3 of endocrine differentiation. 2).
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Claudins / metabolism. Pancreatic Neoplasms / diagnosis. Pancreatic Neoplasms / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19793693.001).
  • [ISSN] 0025-0244
  • [Journal-full-title] Magyar onkologia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Magy Onkol
  • [Language] hun
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Hungary
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / CLDN1 protein, human; 0 / CLDN2 protein, human; 0 / CLDN3 protein, human; 0 / CLDN4 protein, human; 0 / CLDN7 protein, human; 0 / Claudin-1; 0 / Claudin-3; 0 / Claudin-4; 0 / Claudins; 0 / Membrane Proteins
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32. Knight JF, Shepherd CJ, Rizzo S, Brewer D, Jhavar S, Dodson AR, Cooper CS, Eeles R, Falconer A, Kovacs G, Garrett MD, Norman AR, Shipley J, Hudson DL: TEAD1 and c-Cbl are novel prostate basal cell markers that correlate with poor clinical outcome in prostate cancer. Br J Cancer; 2008 Dec 02;99(11):1849-58
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  • [Title] TEAD1 and c-Cbl are novel prostate basal cell markers that correlate with poor clinical outcome in prostate cancer.
  • Our aim was to identify novel basal cell markers and assess their prognostic and functional significance in prostate cancer.
  • RNA from basal and luminal cells isolated from benign tissue by immunoguided laser-capture microdissection was subjected to expression profiling.
  • The transcription factor TEAD1 and the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl were identified as novel basal cell markers.
  • Knockdown of either marker using siRNA in prostate cell lines led to decreased cell growth in PC3 and disrupted acinar formation in a 3D culture system of RWPE1.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. DNA-Binding Proteins / biosynthesis. Nuclear Proteins / biosynthesis. Prostatic Neoplasms / metabolism. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-cbl / biosynthesis. Transcription Factors / biosynthesis

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  • (PMID = 19002168.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-1827
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / G0501019; United Kingdom / Cancer Research UK / / ; United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / Nuclear Proteins; 0 / RNA, Small Interfering; 0 / TEAD1 protein, human; 0 / Transcription Factors; EC 2.3.2.27 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-cbl; EC 6.3.2.- / CBL protein, human
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2600693
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33. Yaskiv O, Cao D, Humphrey PA: Microcystic adenocarcinoma of the prostate: a variant of pseudohyperplastic and atrophic patterns. Am J Surg Pathol; 2010 Apr;34(4):556-61
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  • Cystic change in adenocarcinoma of the prostate is unusual and may be confused with benign cystic atrophy.
  • This alteration was defined as cystic dilatation and rounded expansion of the malignant gland profile, with a flat luminal cell lining layer.
  • The microcystic glands were typically adjacent to usual small acinar adenocarcinoma.
  • Ninety-six percent of the microcystic cases showed alpha-methylacyl CoA racemase overexpression and all cases showed complete basal cell loss (using 34betaE12 and p63 antibodies) in immunohistochemistry.
  • Microcystic adenocarcinoma of the prostate is a distinctive histomorphologic presentation of prostatic adenocarcinoma that is deceptively benign-looking at low magnifications.
  • Detection of intraluminal crystalloids or wispy blue mucin at low magnification, immunostains for alpha-methylacyl CoA racemase, and basal cells, and a search for adjacent usual small acinar adenocarcinoma are helpful diagnostic aids.
  • [MeSH-minor] Atrophy. Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Cysts / enzymology. Cysts / pathology. Humans. Male. Prostatectomy. Racemases and Epimerases / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 20216381.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-0979
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; EC 5.1.- / Racemases and Epimerases; EC 5.1.99.4 / alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase
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4. Iczkowski KA, Montironi R: Adenoid cystic/basal cell carcinoma of the prostate strongly expresses HER-2/neu. J Clin Pathol; 2006 Dec;59(12):1327-30
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  • [Title] Adenoid cystic/basal cell carcinoma of the prostate strongly expresses HER-2/neu.
  • Adenoid cystic/basal cell carcinoma (ACBCC) is a rare neoplasm in the prostate.
  • Ten acinar adenocarcinomas of varying grades were also immunostained as controls.
  • Protein and mRNA expression were 2+ to 3+ (of 3+) in all patients with ACBCC, compared to a breast cancer control with strong reactivity, whereas protein expression was noted in only one acinar carcinoma and mRNA expression was absent in all acinar carcinomas.
  • Benign acini expressed HER-2/neu only in the basal layer.
  • The finding of strong, consistent HER-2/neu expression in ACBCC suggests that treatment with Herceptin (trastuzumab) may be effective in patients with this rare tumour.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Adenoid Cystic / metabolism. Carcinoma, Basal Cell / metabolism. Mixed Tumor, Malignant / metabolism. Prostatic Neoplasms / metabolism. Receptor, ErbB-2 / metabolism


35. Weiler C, Reu S, Zengel P, Kirchner T, Ihrler S: Obligate basal cell component in salivary oncocytoma facilitates distinction from acinic cell carcinoma. Pathol Res Pract; 2009;205(12):838-42
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  • [Title] Obligate basal cell component in salivary oncocytoma facilitates distinction from acinic cell carcinoma.
  • The differential diagnosis between benign salivary oncocytoma (ONC) and low-grade malignant acinic cell carcinoma (ACC) can be difficult due to a significant histomorphological overlap of the structural and cytological presentation of both tumor types.
  • The statistically significant stronger expression of CK7 in ONC and stronger expression of PAS and alpha-amylase in ACC in routine practice each is hampered by a pronounced overlap between both tumor groups.
  • The obligate presence of an additional small basal cell component in all cases of ONC, demonstrable with p63 and CK5/6, enables a straightforward distinction from ACC, being constantly devoid of a basal cell component.
  • The detection of this basal cell component in ONC in routine Hematoxylin-eosin stain is difficult and in some cases not possible; therefore, immunohistochemistry with p63 or CK5/6 is recommended for selected cases.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoma, Oxyphilic / pathology. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Carcinoma, Acinar Cell / pathology. Salivary Gland Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Keratin-5 / analysis. Keratin-6 / analysis. Male. Middle Aged. Predictive Value of Tests. Trans-Activators / analysis. Transcription Factors. Tumor Suppressor Proteins / analysis

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  • (PMID = 19646823.001).
  • [ISSN] 1618-0631
  • [Journal-full-title] Pathology, research and practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathol. Res. Pract.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / KRT5 protein, human; 0 / Keratin-5; 0 / Keratin-6; 0 / TP63 protein, human; 0 / Trans-Activators; 0 / Transcription Factors; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins
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36. Yamaguchi R, Tanaka M, Yokoyama T, Nonaka Y, Kojima K, Terasaki H, Yamaguchi M, Fukunaga M, Toh U, Nakashima O, Kage M, Yano H: Clinicocytopathology of breast cancers with a ring-like appearance on ultrasonography and/or magnetic resonance imaging. Pathol Int; 2010 Jan;60(1):22-6
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  • On breast cancer imaging some cancers have an anechoic or high-echoic zone in the tumor on ultrasonography and ring-shaped enhancement on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with high intensity in the central area of the tumor on T2-weighted imaging, necessitating their differentiation from benign disease.
  • Histologically the cancer cells of these lesions showing a ring-like appearance were located in the periphery of the tumor, with a central hypocellular zone.
  • The percentage ratio of the cancer-zone width to the tumor diameter was 26.4 +/- 7.8 and 8.0 +/- 3.2 (mean +/- SD), respectively (P= 0.003).
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Acinar Cell / diagnosis

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  • [ErratumIn] Pathol Int. 2010 Apr;60(4):336. Nonaka, Hideyuki [corrected to Nonaka, Yasuhide]
  • (PMID = 20055948.001).
  • [ISSN] 1440-1827
  • [Journal-full-title] Pathology international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathol. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
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37. Bonkhoff H: [Differential diagnosis of prostate cancer: impact of pattern analysis and immunohistochemistry]. Pathologe; 2005 Nov;26(6):405-21
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • For each Gleason pattern exist a number of benign and malignant mimickers that can simulate prostatic adenocarcinoma.
  • Basal cell markers (34betaE12 and P63) are very useful to analyze histo-architectural features of small and large glandular lesions.
  • A number of lesions which may be confused with small acinar adenocarcinoma (Cowper's gland, nephrogenic metaplasia, mesonephric glands) and poorly differentiated prostate cancer (urothelial neoplasia, mucinous colon cancer and other metastatic lesions) lacks convincing PSA immunoreactivity.
  • Basal cell markers and the nuclear androgen receptors are important markers to differentiate Gleason grade 5 A und 5 B patterns from prostatic involvement by transitional cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Prostate / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Carcinoma, Basal Cell / pathology. Cell Division / physiology. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Male. Prostatic Hyperplasia / pathology. Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia / pathology






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