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31. Szabo P, Dam TK, Smetana K Jr, Dvoránková B, Kübler D, Brewer CF, Gabius HJ: Phosphorylated human lectin galectin-3: analysis of ligand binding by histochemical monitoring of normal/malignant squamous epithelia and by isothermal titration calorimetry. Anat Histol Embryol; 2009 Feb;38(1):68-75
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  • [Title] Phosphorylated human lectin galectin-3: analysis of ligand binding by histochemical monitoring of normal/malignant squamous epithelia and by isothermal titration calorimetry.
  • We monitored normal and malignant squamous epithelia.
  • Basal cell carcinomas were invariably negative.
  • In all cases, binding was inhibitable by the presence of lactose, prompting further investigation of the activity of the lectin site by a sensitive biochemical method, i.e. isothermal titration calorimetry.
  • [MeSH-major] Epithelial Cells / chemistry. Epithelium / metabolism. Galectin 3 / metabolism. Neoplasms, Squamous Cell / metabolism. Phosphorylation

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  • (PMID = 18983621.001).
  • [ISSN] 1439-0264
  • [Journal-full-title] Anatomia, histologia, embryologia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anat Histol Embryol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Galectin 3
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32. Carless MA, Griffiths LR: Cytogenetics of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer. Adv Exp Med Biol; 2008;624:227-40
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  • [Title] Cytogenetics of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer.
  • Cytogenetic analysis of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers has revealed recurrent aberrations, the frequency of which is reflective of malignant potential.
  • Highly aberrant karyotypes are seen in melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, solar keratosis and Merkel cell carcinoma with more stable karyotypes seen in basal cell carcinoma, keratoacanthoma, Bowen's disease, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans and cutaneous lymphomas.
  • Some aberrations were common amongst a number of skin cancer types including rearrangements and numerical abnormalities of chromosome 1, -3p, +3q, partial or entire trisomy 6, trisomy 7, +8q, -9p, +9q, partial or entire loss of chromosome 10, -17p, +17q and partial or entire gain of chromosome 20.
  • Combination of cytogenetic analysis with other molecular genetic techniques has enabled the identification of not only aberrant chromosomal regions, but also the genes that contribute to a malignant phenotype.
  • This review provides a comprehensive summary of the pertinent cytogenetic aberrations associated with a variety of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers.
  • [MeSH-major] Chromosome Aberrations. Cytogenetics. Melanoma / genetics. Skin Neoplasms / genetics

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  • (PMID = 18348460.001).
  • [ISSN] 0065-2598
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in experimental medicine and biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv. Exp. Med. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 104
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33. Banerjee S: Cutaneous manifestations in renal failure patients: a case series. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol; 2007 Mar-Apr;73(2):106-8
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  • [Title] Cutaneous manifestations in renal failure patients: a case series.
  • Cutaneous involvement in renal disease is due to a host of factors ranging from metabolic disturbances to immunosuppressive drugs.
  • Herein we report a series of six cases of renal failure with varied cutaneous manifestations ranging from infections to neoplasms due to prolonged immunosuppression.
  • Our first case had cutaneous cryptococcosis where skin lesions gave a clue to the diagnosis of altered sensorium and underlying meningitis.
  • The second case initially presented with florid warts and was treated successfully but later presented with an explosive recurrence of skin lesions due to malignant transformation.
  • Our third case had basal cell carcinoma over the presternal region that was successfully treated with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy.
  • Our fourth case had diabetic nephropathy that presented with septicemia and purpura fulminans.
  • The last case had cutaneous manifestations of drug therapy because of heparin infusion.
  • To conclude, cutaneous manifestations in patients with renal failure are varied and a high degree of suspicion is needed for early diagnosis and aggressive treatment to effectively combat mortality and morbidity.
  • [MeSH-major] Renal Insufficiency / complications. Skin Diseases / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Kidney Injury / complications. Adolescent. Adult. Carcinoma, Basal Cell / etiology. Condylomata Acuminata / etiology. Cryptococcosis / etiology. Dermatomycoses / etiology. Female. Humans. Kidney Failure, Chronic / complications. Male. Middle Aged. Parapsoriasis / chemically induced. Skin Neoplasms / etiology

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  • (PMID = 17456917.001).
  • [ISSN] 0973-3922
  • [Journal-full-title] Indian journal of dermatology, venereology and leprology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
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3
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4. Laska MJ, Nexø BA, Vistisen K, Poulsen HE, Loft S, Vogel U: Polymorphisms in RAI and in genes of nucleotide and base excision repair are not associated with risk of testicular cancer. Cancer Lett; 2005 Jul 28;225(2):245-51
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  • [Title] Polymorphisms in RAI and in genes of nucleotide and base excision repair are not associated with risk of testicular cancer.
  • Testicular cancer has been suggested to be primed in utero and there is familiar occurrence, particularly brothers and sons of men with testicular cancer have increased risk.
  • Although no specific causative genotoxic agents have been identified, variations in DNA repair capacity could be associated with the risk of testicular cancer.
  • A case-control study of 184 testicular cancer cases and 194 population-based controls living in the Copenhagen Greater Area in Denmark was performed.
  • We found that neither polymorphisms in several DNA repair genes nor alleles of several polymorphisms in the chromosomal of region 19q13.2-3, encompassing the genes ASE, ERCC1, RAI and XPD, were associated with risk of testicular cancer in Danish patients.
  • This is in contrast to other cancers, where we reported strong associations between polymorphisms in ERCC1, ASE and RAI and occurrence of basal cell carcinoma, breast cancer and lung.
  • To our knowledge this is the first study of DNA repair gene polymorphisms and risk of testicular cancer.
  • [MeSH-minor] Case-Control Studies. Denmark. Genetic Predisposition to Disease / genetics. Humans. Male. Repressor Proteins

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  • (PMID = 15885892.001).
  • [ISSN] 0304-3835
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; 0 / Nucleotides; 0 / PPP1R13L protein, human; 0 / Repressor Proteins
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35. Trzeciak S, Zanotti-Cavazzoni S, Parrillo JE, Dellinger RP: Inclusion criteria for clinical trials in sepsis: did the American College of Chest Physicians/Society of Critical Care Medicine consensus conference definitions of sepsis have an impact? Chest; 2005 Jan;127(1):242-5
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  • Clinical trials published after the consensus conference (ACC; from 1993 to 2001) were compared with trials published before the consensus conference (BCC; from 1976 to 1992).
  • RESULTS: We identified 176 clinical trials (ACC, 119 trials; BCC, 57 trials).
  • The utilization of specified values for WBC count, temperature (T), heart rate (HR), and respiratory rate (RR) was significantly increased in the ACC group compared to the BCC group, as follows: WBC count, 62% vs 26%, respectively (p < 0.001); T, 89% vs 56%, respectively (p < 0.001); HR, 77% vs 26%, respectively (p < 0.001); and RR, respectively 76% vs 28% (p < 0.001).
  • (1) Since 1992 there has been a significant increase in the utilization of predefined sepsis criteria for patient enrollment in clinical trials, and this increase can be attributed to the existence of consensus conference definitions. (2) Compared to inclusion criteria BCC, inclusion criteria ACC were less reliant on blood culture positivity and were more likely to incorporate markers of organ dysfunction.
  • [MeSH-major] Clinical Trials as Topic / standards. Consensus Development Conferences as Topic. Patient Selection. Sepsis / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 15653990.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-3692
  • [Journal-full-title] Chest
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chest
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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81. Papadopoulos O, Konofaos P, Chrisostomidis C, Georgiou P, Frangoulis M, Champsas G, Betsi E, Zapantis-Fragos M: Orbitopalpebral repair after 835 excisions of malignant tumours. Scand J Plast Reconstr Surg Hand Surg; 2005;39(6):353-9
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  • [Title] Orbitopalpebral repair after 835 excisions of malignant tumours.
  • Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common malignant tumour of the eyelids, and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), mixed carcinomas or basosquamous cell carcinomas (BSC), and cutaneous melanomas (CM), also invade the eyelids and periocular zones.
  • The purpose of this study was to document various, simple or complex reconstructive procedures that may be used after excision of malignant tumours of the eyelids and to assess the outcome of surgical treatment.

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  • (PMID = 16298808.001).
  • [ISSN] 0284-4311
  • [Journal-full-title] Scandinavian journal of plastic and reconstructive surgery and hand surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Scand J Plast Reconstr Surg Hand Surg
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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82. Thievessen I, Wolter M, Prior A, Seifert HH, Schulz WA: Hedgehog signaling in normal urothelial cells and in urothelial carcinoma cell lines. J Cell Physiol; 2005 May;203(2):372-7
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  • [Title] Hedgehog signaling in normal urothelial cells and in urothelial carcinoma cell lines.
  • Constitutive activation of hedgehog signaling, often caused by PTCH1 inactivation and leading to inappropriate activation of GLI target genes, is crucial for the development of several human tumors including basal cell carcinoma of the skin and medulloblastoma.
  • The PTCH1 gene at 9q22 is also considered as a candidate tumor suppressor in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), of which >50% show LOH in this region.
  • We have therefore investigated GLI-dependent promoter activity and expression of hedgehog pathway components in TCC cell lines and proliferating normal urothelial cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / metabolism. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / metabolism. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic / physiology. Signal Transduction / physiology. Trans-Activators / metabolism. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / metabolism. Urothelium / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Genes, Tumor Suppressor. Hedgehog Proteins. Humans. Membrane Proteins / genetics. Membrane Proteins / metabolism. Promoter Regions, Genetic / genetics. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. Receptors, Cell Surface / genetics. Receptors, Cell Surface / metabolism. Transcription Factors / genetics. Transcription Factors / metabolism. Veratrum Alkaloids / pharmacology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 15521068.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-9541
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cellular physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cell. Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / GLI1 protein, human; 0 / Hedgehog Proteins; 0 / Membrane Proteins; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Receptors, Cell Surface; 0 / SHH protein, human; 0 / Trans-Activators; 0 / Transcription Factors; 0 / Veratrum Alkaloids; 0 / patched receptors; ZH658AJ192 / cyclopamine
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83. Turkovic L, Gurrin LC, Bahlo M, Dite GS, Southey MC, Hopper JL: Comparing the frequency of common genetic variants and haplotypes between carriers and non-carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 deleterious mutations in Australian women diagnosed with breast cancer before 40 years of age. BMC Cancer; 2010;10:466
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  • [Title] Comparing the frequency of common genetic variants and haplotypes between carriers and non-carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 deleterious mutations in Australian women diagnosed with breast cancer before 40 years of age.
  • BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are found in a proportion of families with multiple early-onset breast cancers.
  • METHODS: DNA sequence data for BRCA1 and BRCA2 was obtained from 571 participants from the Australian Breast Cancer Family Study.
  • All four of the common BRCA1 variants used to form haplotypes occurred more frequently in the deleterious mutation carriers when compared to the non-carriers, but there was no evidence of a difference in the distributions between the two groups (p = 0.34).
  • CONCLUSIONS: We observed differences in the frequency of common genetic variants of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 and their haplotypes between early-onset breast cancer cases who did and did not carry deleterious mutations in these genes.
  • [MeSH-major] BRCA1 Protein / genetics. BRCA2 Protein / genetics. Breast Neoplasms / genetics. Genetic Predisposition to Disease. Germ-Line Mutation / genetics. Haplotypes / genetics. Polymorphism, Genetic / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Australia. Case-Control Studies. Female. Founder Effect. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Risk Factors. Survival Rate. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20807450.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2407
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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84. Silva Idos S, De Stavola B, McCormack V, Collaborative Group on Pre-Natal Risk Factors and Subsequent Risk of Breast Cancer: Birth size and breast cancer risk: re-analysis of individual participant data from 32 studies. PLoS Med; 2008 Sep 30;5(9):e193
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  • [Title] Birth size and breast cancer risk: re-analysis of individual participant data from 32 studies.
  • BACKGROUND: Birth size, perhaps a proxy for prenatal environment, might be a correlate of subsequent breast cancer risk, but findings from epidemiological studies have been inconsistent.
  • We re-analysed individual participant data from published and unpublished studies to obtain more precise estimates of the magnitude and shape of the birth size-breast cancer association.
  • Individual participant data from 32 studies, comprising 22,058 breast cancer cases, were obtained.
  • Birth weight was positively associated with breast cancer risk in studies based on birth records (pooled relative risk [RR] per one standard deviation [SD] [= 0.5 kg] increment in birth weight: 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.09) and parental recall when the participants were children (1.02; 95% CI 0.99-1.05), but not in those based on adult self-reports, or maternal recall during the woman's adulthood (0.98; 95% CI 0.95-1.01) (p for heterogeneity between data sources = 0.003).
  • Birth length and head circumference from birth records were also positively associated with breast cancer risk (pooled RR per one SD increment: 1.06 [95% CI 1.03-1.10] and 1.09 [95% CI 1.03-1.15], respectively).
  • The birth size effects did not appear to be confounded or mediated by established breast cancer risk factors and were not modified by age or menopausal status.
  • The cumulative incidence of breast cancer per 100 women by age 80 y in the study populations was estimated to be 10.0, 10.0, 10.4, and 11.5 in those who were, respectively, in the bottom, second, third, and top fourths of the birth length distribution.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This pooled analysis of individual participant data is consistent with birth size, and in particular birth length, being an independent correlate of breast cancer risk in adulthood.

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  • [CommentIn] PLoS Med. 2008 Sep 30;5(9):e194 [18828668.001]
  • (PMID = 18828667.001).
  • [ISSN] 1549-1676
  • [Journal-full-title] PLoS medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] PLoS Med.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Cancer Research UK / / C14292/A5609; United Kingdom / Cancer Research UK / / C150/A5660
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2553821
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85. Eliassen AH, Missmer SA, Tworoger SS, Spiegelman D, Barbieri RL, Dowsett M, Hankinson SE: Endogenous steroid hormone concentrations and risk of breast cancer among premenopausal women. J Natl Cancer Inst; 2006 Oct 4;98(19):1406-15
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Endogenous steroid hormone concentrations and risk of breast cancer among premenopausal women.
  • BACKGROUND: Higher levels of endogenous sex steroid hormones are associated with increased risks of breast cancer in postmenopausal women.
  • We prospectively evaluated associations between plasma sex hormone levels and breast cancer risk among premenopausal women in a case-control study nested within the Nurses' Health Study II.
  • A total of 197 cases of breast cancer were diagnosed among these women after blood collection and before June 1, 2003; these case subjects were matched to 394 control subjects.
  • Logistic regression models, controlling for breast cancer risk factors, were used to calculate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
  • RESULTS: Women in the highest (versus the lowest) quartiles of follicular total and free estradiol levels had statistically significantly increased risks of breast cancer (RR = 2.1 [95% CI = 1.1 to 4.1], P(trend) = .08, and RR = 2.4 [95% CI = 1.3 to 4.5], P(trend) = .01, respectively); the associations were stronger for invasive breast cancer and for estrogen and progesterone receptor-positive (ER+/PR+) tumors.
  • Luteal estradiol levels were not associated with breast cancer risk.
  • Higher levels of total and free testosterone and androstenedione in both menstrual cycle phases were associated with modest, non-statistically significant increases in overall risk of breast cancer and with stronger, statistically significant increases in risks of invasive and ER+/PR+ cancers (e.g., RR of invasive cancers for the top [versus bottom] quartile of luteal total testosterone levels = 2.0 [95% CI = 1.1 to 3.6], P(trend) = .05, and RR of ER+/PR+ cancers = 2.9 [95% CI = 1.4 to 6.0], P(trend) = .02).
  • Levels of estrone, estrone sulfate, progesterone, and sex hormone-binding globulin were not associated with breast cancer risk.
  • The absolute number of cases observed over 3 years were 30 among women in the lowest 25% of follicular total estradiol levels and 50 among women in the highest 25%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Levels of circulating estrogens and androgens may be important in the etiology of premenopausal breast cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / epidemiology. Breast Neoplasms / metabolism. Gonadal Steroid Hormones / blood. Premenopause
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Androgens / blood. Case-Control Studies. Estradiol / blood. Estradiol / metabolism. Estrogens / blood. Female. Humans. Logistic Models. Nurses / statistics & numerical data. Odds Ratio. Ovarian Follicle / metabolism. Prospective Studies. Risk Assessment. Risk Factors. Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin / metabolism. Surveys and Questionnaires. United States / epidemiology

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  • [CommentIn] J Natl Cancer Inst. 2007 Mar 7;99(5):408-9; author reply 409-10 [17341734.001]
  • (PMID = 17018787.001).
  • [ISSN] 1460-2105
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the National Cancer Institute
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Natl. Cancer Inst.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA50385; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA67262; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R25 CA098566-02; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA090001-281
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androgens; 0 / Estrogens; 0 / Gonadal Steroid Hormones; 0 / Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin; 4TI98Z838E / Estradiol
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86. Backous DD, DeMonte F, El-Naggar A, Wolf P, Weber RS: Craniofacial resection for nonmelanoma skin cancer of the head and neck. Laryngoscope; 2005 Jun;115(6):931-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Craniofacial resection for nonmelanoma skin cancer of the head and neck.
  • OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: We reviewed our experience with craniofacial resection for advanced, nonmelanoma skin cancer of the head and neck to determine prognostic factors, local control rate, disease free survival, morbidity, and mortality.
  • Histology included 20 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and 15 basal cell carcinomas (BCC).
  • Two- and five- year survival was significantly better (P=.02) with BCC (92% and 76%) than with SCC (54% and 24%).
  • Long-term disease-specific survival was 20%, and 11.4% of our subjects were living with disease.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Acceptable mortality and morbidity is possible using craniofacial resection to treat advanced nonmelanoma skin cancer.
  • Although disease-specific survival remains poor, positive trends were noted in local control beginning at 2 years of follow-up.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / surgery. Skin Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Carcinoma, Basal Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Basal Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Basal Cell / surgery. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Disease-Free Survival. Face. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Head / surgery. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate


87. Smeets R, Kolk A, Gerressen M, Driemel O, Maciejewski O, Hermanns-Sachweh B, Riediger D, Stein JM: A new biphasic osteoinductive calcium composite material with a negative Zeta potential for bone augmentation. Head Face Med; 2009;5:13
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  • The aim of the present study was to analyze the osteogenic potential of a biphasic calcium composite material (BCC) with a negative surface charge for maxillary sinus floor augmentation.
  • In a 61 year old patient, the BCC material was used in a bilateral sinus floor augmentation procedure.
  • The BCC was biocompatible and replaced by new mineralized bone after being resorbed completely.

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  • (PMID = 19523239.001).
  • [ISSN] 1746-160X
  • [Journal-full-title] Head & face medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Head Face Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bone Substitutes; SY7Q814VUP / Calcium
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2706807
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88. Diaconu NC, Kaminska R, Naukkarinen A, Harvima RJ, Harvima IT: The increase in tryptase- and chymase-positive mast cells is associated with partial inactivation of chymase and increase in protease inhibitors in basal cell carcinoma. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol; 2007 Aug;21(7):908-15
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  • [Title] The increase in tryptase- and chymase-positive mast cells is associated with partial inactivation of chymase and increase in protease inhibitors in basal cell carcinoma.
  • BACKGROUND: In basal cell carcinoma (BCC), mast cells accumulate in the peritumoral stroma.
  • The serine proteinases tryptase and chymase are the major mediators in mast cell granules and they may exert their enzymatic activity in the BCC lesion by inducing matrix remodeling and epithelial cell detachment.
  • OBJECTIVE: To analyse the numbers of mast cells showing tryptase enzyme activity, chymase enzyme activity and chymase immunoreactivity as well as the presence of chymase inhibitors alpha(1)-antichymotrypsin (alpha(1)-AC), alpha(1)-proteinase inhibitor (alpha(1)-PI) and squamous cell carcinoma antigen-2 (SCCA-2) in BCC.
  • METHODS: Eleven biopsies were taken from the lesion and healthy-looking skin of 10 patients with superficial spreading BCC.
  • RESULTS: In the BCC lesion, the number of mast cells with tryptase activity and chymase immunoreactivity was significantly increased by 2.2- to 2.3-fold.
  • However, the ratio of cells with chymase activity to those with chymase immunoreactivity was significantly decreased from 49 +/- 19% in the healthy skin to 33 +/- 19% in the BCC lesion.
  • Instead, the percentage of mast cells displaying alpha(1)-AC or alpha(1)-PI immunoreactivity was significantly increased by 1.7-fold in the BCC lesion.
  • SCCA-2 expression was strongly increased in the malignant BCC epithelium but mostly in the suprabasal layers.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Tryptase- and chymase-positive mast cells (MC(TC)) increased in the BCC lesion.
  • SCCA-2 increased in BCC, but was localized mostly to the suprabasal layers, and thus it seems not to be crucial in inhibiting chymase.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Basal Cell / enzymology. Chymases / metabolism. Mast Cells / enzymology. Protease Inhibitors / metabolism. Skin Neoplasms / enzymology. Tryptases / metabolism


89. Dong X, Reddy GB: Soil bacterial communities in constructed wetlands treated with swine wastewater using PCR-DGGE technique. Bioresour Technol; 2010 Feb;101(4):1175-82
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  • The results showed that the bacterial colony forming units (CFU) and the average concentrations of total nitrogen, NH(4)(+), total phosphorous (TP) and PO(4)(3-) from the influent to the effluent decreased.
  • The NH(4)(+) and the PO(4)(3-) concentrations showed the most dramatic changes, with decreases of 39.97% and 16.92%, respectively.
  • Bacterium species distributions strongly correlated with the concentrations of TP, NH(4)(+) and the PO(4)(3-).

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  • (PMID = 19822421.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-2976
  • [Journal-full-title] Bioresource technology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bioresour. Technol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Ribosomal, 16S
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90. Scheithauer BK, Wos-Oxley ML, Ferslev B, Jablonowski H, Pieper DH: Characterization of the complex bacterial communities colonizing biliary stents reveals a host-dependent diversity. ISME J; 2009 Jul;3(7):797-807
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  • [Title] Characterization of the complex bacterial communities colonizing biliary stents reveals a host-dependent diversity.
  • This study provides a comprehensive survey of the spatial and temporal bacterial composition of biliary stent biofilms.
  • The bacterial diversity, distribution and dynamics of 59 biliary and 4 pancreatic stent communities from 40 patients being treated at two different hospitals, which implant stents either simultaneously or consecutively, were characterized by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis.
  • Co-colonization of Veillonella sp., Streptococcus anginosus and organisms closely related to Fusobacterium nucleatum revealed a potentially important attachment and survival strategy that has yet to be reported in biliary stents.
  • This work reveals a more complete survey of the identities of bacterial species that form biofilms in biliary stents, their co-colonization patterns and the natural variation in species composition between different patients, hospitals and locations along the stent.

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  • (PMID = 19360025.001).
  • [ISSN] 1751-7370
  • [Journal-full-title] The ISME journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] ISME J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] GENBANK/ EU704129/ EU704130/ EU704131/ EU704132/ EU704133/ EU704134/ EU704135/ EU704136/ EU704137/ EU704138/ EU704139/ EU704140/ EU704141/ EU704142/ EU704143/ EU704144/ EU704145/ EU704146/ EU704147/ EU704148/ EU704149/ EU704150/ EU704151/ EU704152/ EU704153/ EU704154/ EU704155/ EU704156/ EU704157/ EU704158/ EU704159/ EU704160/ EU704161/ EU704162/ EU704163/ EU704164/ EU704165/ EU704166/ EU704167/ EU704168/ EU704169/ EU704170/ EU704171/ EU704172/ EU704173/ EU704174/ EU704175/ EU704176/ EU704177/ EU704178/ EU704179/ EU704180/ EU704181/ EU704182/ EU704183/ EU704184/ EU704185/ EU704186/ EU704187/ EU704188/ EU704189/ EU704190/ EU704191/ EU704192/ EU704193/ EU704194/ EU704195/ EU704196/ EU704197/ EU704198/ EU704199/ EU704200/ EU704201/ EU704202/ EU704203/ EU704204/ EU704205/ EU704206/ EU704207/ EU704208/ EU704209/ EU704210/ EU704211/ EU704212/ EU704213/ EU704214/ EU704215/ EU704216/ EU704217/ EU704218/ EU704219/ EU704220/ EU704221/ EU704222/ EU704223/ EU704224/ EU704225/ EU704226/ EU704227/ EU704228/ EU704229/ EU704230/ EU704231/ EU704232/ EU704233/ EU704234/ EU704235/ EU704236/ EU704237/ EU704238/ EU704239/ EU704240/ EU704241/ EU704242/ EU704243/ EU704244/ EU704245/ EU704246/ EU704247/ EU704248/ EU704249/ EU704250/ EU915501/ EU915502/ EU915503/ EU915504
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Ribosomal; 0 / RNA, Ribosomal, 16S
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91. Wang Z, Xu Y, Tang J, Ma H, Qin J, Lu C, Wang X, Hu Z, Wang X, Shen H: A polymorphism in Werner syndrome gene is associated with breast cancer susceptibility in Chinese women. Breast Cancer Res Treat; 2009 Nov;118(1):169-75
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  • [Title] A polymorphism in Werner syndrome gene is associated with breast cancer susceptibility in Chinese women.
  • RecQ helicases play a central role in maintaining genome stability and may interact with some important cancer-related proteins such as BRCA1.
  • Mutations of the human RecQ helicase genes WRN and BLM lead to rare autosomal recessive disorders, Werner and Bloom syndromes, which are associated with premature aging and cancer predisposition, including breast cancer.
  • In this case-control study of 1,004 breast cancer cases and 1,008 controls, we tested the hypothesis that non-conservative amino acid exchanges in WRN (leu1074Phe), BLM (Met298Thr) and BRCA1 (Pro871Leu) are independently or jointly associated with the risk of breast cancer in Chinese women.
  • We found that the variant genotype of WRN Leu1074Phe was associated with a 1.36-fold significantly increased risk of breast cancer (OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.06-1.74).
  • Subjects carrying Phe/Phe genotype and with earlier age at menarche had 3.58-fold increased risk of breast cancer (OR = 3.58, 95% CI = 2.54-5.05).
  • These findings indicate that WRN leu1074Phe variant may contribute to the susceptibility of breast cancer in Chinese women.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / genetics. Exodeoxyribonucleases / genetics. Genes, Neoplasm. Menarche / genetics. Neoplasm Proteins / genetics. Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide. RecQ Helicases / genetics. Werner Syndrome / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Amino Acid Substitution. Case-Control Studies. China / epidemiology. Female. Genes, BRCA1. Genetic Predisposition to Disease. Genotype. Humans. Menopause. Middle Aged. Receptors, Estrogen / analysis. Receptors, Progesterone / analysis. Risk

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  • (PMID = 19205873.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-7217
  • [Journal-full-title] Breast cancer research and treatment
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Breast Cancer Res. Treat.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / Receptors, Estrogen; 0 / Receptors, Progesterone; EC 3.1.- / Exodeoxyribonucleases; EC 3.6.1.- / Bloom syndrome protein; EC 3.6.1.- / WRN protein, human; EC 3.6.4.12 / RecQ Helicases
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92. Kuo WH, Yen AM, Lee PH, Chen KM, Wang J, Chang KJ, Chen TH, Tsau HS: Cumulative survival in early-onset unilateral and bilateral breast cancer: an analysis of 1907 Taiwanese women. Br J Cancer; 2009 Feb 24;100(4):563-70
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  • [Title] Cumulative survival in early-onset unilateral and bilateral breast cancer: an analysis of 1907 Taiwanese women.
  • As the epidemiological pattern of breast cancer in modernising Asian countries differs greatly from that in Western countries, it is worthwhile to investigate the long-term prognoses of unilateral and bilateral breast cancer in these nations.
  • A retrospective cohort study composed of 1907 Taiwanese women was conducted to follow 1863 unilateral and 44 bilateral cases of breast cancer.
  • Time-dependent Cox regression was used to assess the risk of breast cancer death by considering the time course of unilateral and bilateral tumour development.
  • The 15-year survival rates were 68.37, 62.63, and 26.42% for unilateral, synchronous bilateral, and metachronous bilateral breast cancer, respectively.
  • After adjusting for significant prognostic factors, the risk of death for overall bilateral breast cancer was 2.50-fold greater (95% CI, 1.43-4.37) compared to unilateral breast cancer.
  • The corresponding figures were 1.12-fold (95% CI, 0.42-3.02) and 6.11-fold (95% CI, 3.14-11.89) for synchronous and metachronous bilateral breast cancer, respectively.
  • Taiwanese women, who are frequently diagnosed with breast cancer before 50 years of age, showed poorer survival for metachronous bilateral than for synchronous bilateral or unilateral breast cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / mortality. Breast Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 19190627.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-1827
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2653740
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93. Melchor L, Honrado E, Huang J, Alvarez S, Naylor TL, García MJ, Osorio A, Blesa D, Stratton MR, Weber BL, Cigudosa JC, Rahman N, Nathanson KL, Benítez J: Estrogen receptor status could modulate the genomic pattern in familial and sporadic breast cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 2007 Dec 15;13(24):7305-13
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  • [Title] Estrogen receptor status could modulate the genomic pattern in familial and sporadic breast cancer.
  • PURPOSE: Familial breast cancer represents 5% to 10% of all breast tumors.
  • Mutations in the two known major breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, account for a minority of familial breast cancer, whereas families without mutations in these genes (BRCAX group) account for 70% of familial breast cancer cases.
  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: To better characterize and define the genomic differences between the three classes of familial tumors and sporadic malignancies, we have analyzed 19 BRCA1, 24 BRCA2, and 31 BRCAX samples from familial breast cancer patients and 19 sporadic breast tumors using a 1-Mb resolution bacterial artificial chromosome array-based comparative genomic hybridization.
  • There were common genomic alterations present in all breast cancer groups, such as gains of 1q and 16p or losses of 8ptel-p12 and 16q.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / genetics. Breast Neoplasms / metabolism. Genes, BRCA1. Genes, BRCA2. Genomic Instability. Receptors, Estrogen / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Chromosomes, Artificial, Bacterial. Female. Genetic Predisposition to Disease. Humans. Mutation. Nucleic Acid Hybridization


94. Homaei-Shandiz F, Ghavam-Nassiri MR, Sharifi N, Homaei-Shandiz AH, Taghizadeh-Kermani A, Torshizi SA, Ghafarzadegan K: Evaluation of the relationship between human epidermal growth factor receptor-2/neu (c-erbB-2) amplification and pathologic grading in patients with breast cancer. Saudi Med J; 2006 Dec;27(12):1810-4
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  • [Title] Evaluation of the relationship between human epidermal growth factor receptor-2/neu (c-erbB-2) amplification and pathologic grading in patients with breast cancer.
  • OBJECTIVE: The human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2)/neu is a proto-oncogene that is amplified in 10-30% of breast cancers.
  • We studied the relationship between its amplification and different histological gradings of breast cancer.
  • METHODS: We studied 196 patients diagnosed with breast cancer in 2005 at the Omid and Ghaem Training Hospital, Mashhad Medical University, Iran.
  • RESULTS: Sixty-seven (34.2%) cases were HER-2/neu positive and 129 (65.8%) cases were HER-2/neu negative.
  • Overexpression of HER-2/neu was significantly higher in breast cancer patients <30 years (50% versus 33.3%, p=0.034).
  • Twelve (17.5%) of HER-2/neu positive cases were metastatic and only 4 (3.1%) of HER-2/neu negative cases had metastasis (p=0.051).
  • CONCLUSION: HER-2/neu gene amplification or its overexpression is detected in approximately 34.2% of breast cancer cases.
  • Patients with HER-2/neu positive breast cancer have higher stage and grade diseases.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / genetics. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Gene Amplification. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic / genetics. Receptor, ErbB-2 / genetics


95. Kleinerman RA: Radiation-sensitive genetically susceptible pediatric sub-populations. Pediatr Radiol; 2009 Feb;39 Suppl 1:S27-31
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  • Major advances in pediatric cancer treatment have resulted in substantial improvements in survival.
  • However, concern has emerged about the late effects of cancer therapy, especially radiation-related second cancers.
  • Studies of childhood cancer patients with inherited cancer syndromes can provide insights into the interaction between radiation and genetic susceptibility to multiple cancers.
  • Children with retinoblastoma (Rb), neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) are at substantial risk of developing radiation-related second and third cancers.
  • Studies of NF1 patients irradiated for optic pathway gliomas have reported increased risks of developing another cancer associated with radiotherapy.
  • Children with NBCCS are very sensitive to radiation and develop multiple basal cell cancers in irradiated areas.
  • [MeSH-major] Genetic Predisposition to Disease. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / genetics. Neoplasms, Second Primary / genetics. Neoplastic Syndromes, Hereditary / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome / genetics. Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome / radiotherapy. Child. Humans. Li-Fraumeni Syndrome. Neurofibromatosis 1 / genetics. Neurofibromatosis 1 / radiotherapy. Radiation Dosage. Retinal Neoplasms / genetics. Retinal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Retinoblastoma / genetics. Retinoblastoma / radiotherapy

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  • (PMID = 19083227.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-0449
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Radiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / Z01 CP010131-12
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Number-of-references] 39
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS75740; NLM/ PMC2656401
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96. Gurgel CA, Ramos EA, Azevedo RA, Sarmento VA, da Silva Carvalho AM, dos Santos JN: Expression of Ki-67, p53 and p63 proteins in keratocyst odontogenic tumours: an immunohistochemical study. J Mol Histol; 2008 Jun;39(3):311-6
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  • METHODS: Immunohistochemical technique was performed using the EnVision System in 37 cases of KOTs.
  • No difference in the immunostaining for these proteins was observed between primary and recurrent KOTs (Ki-67: P = 0.5591; p53: P = 0.9847; p63: P = 0.9127), or between KOTs associated with Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) and sporadic KOTs (Ki-67: P = 0.7013; p53: P = 0.3197; p63: P = 0.2427).
  • In addition, p63 immunostaining may represent immaturity of keratinocytes in KOTs, and suggests that this protein may participate in the regulation of epithelial cell differentiation.
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies. Cell Count. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Transcription Factors

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  • (PMID = 18256893.001).
  • [ISSN] 1567-2379
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of molecular histology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Mol. Histol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies; 0 / Ki-67 Antigen; 0 / TP63 protein, human; 0 / Trans-Activators; 0 / Transcription Factors; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins
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97. Zhang G, Luo X, Sumithran E, Pua VS, Barnetson RS, Halliday GM, Khachigian LM: Squamous cell carcinoma growth in mice and in culture is regulated by c-Jun and its control of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 expression. Oncogene; 2006 Nov 23;25(55):7260-6
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  • [Title] Squamous cell carcinoma growth in mice and in culture is regulated by c-Jun and its control of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 expression.
  • Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is an invasive malignancy of epidermal keratinocytes.
  • The transcription factor c-Jun is expressed in human SCC and another common form of invasive skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma together with the mitogenic marker-proliferating cell nuclear antigen.
  • These findings demonstrate that c-Jun regulates SCC growth and suggest that DNAzymes targeting this transcription factor may potentially be useful as inhibitors of cutaneous carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Cell Division / physiology. Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 / metabolism. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 / metabolism. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-jun / physiology

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  • (PMID = 16785994.001).
  • [ISSN] 0950-9232
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncogene
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncogene
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Catalytic; 0 / Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-jun; EC 3.4.24.24 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 2; EC 3.4.24.35 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 9
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98. Riemann L, Leitet C, Pommier T, Simu K, Holmfeldt K, Larsson U, Hagström A: The native bacterioplankton community in the central baltic sea is influenced by freshwater bacterial species. Appl Environ Microbiol; 2008 Jan;74(2):503-15
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  • [Title] The native bacterioplankton community in the central baltic sea is influenced by freshwater bacterial species.
  • The Baltic Sea is one of the largest brackish environments on Earth.
  • Despite extensive knowledge about food web interactions and pelagic ecosystem functioning, information about the bacterial community composition in the Baltic Sea is scarce.
  • We hypothesized that due to the eutrophic low-salinity environment and the long water residence time (>5 years), the bacterioplankton community from the Baltic proper shows a native "brackish" composition influenced by both freshwater and marine phylotypes.
  • The bacterial community composition in surface water (3-m depth) was examined at a single station throughout a full year.
  • Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed that the community composition changed over the year.
  • Further, it indicated that at the four extensive samplings (16S rRNA gene clone libraries and bacterial isolates from low- and high-nutrient agar plates and seawater cultures), different bacterial assemblages associated with different environmental conditions were present.
  • Overall, the sequencing of 26 DGGE bands, 160 clones, 209 plate isolates, and 9 dilution culture isolates showed that the bacterial assemblage in surface waters of the central Baltic Sea was dominated by Bacteroidetes but exhibited a pronounced influence of typical freshwater phylogenetic groups within Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Betaproteobacteria and a lack of typical marine taxa.
  • This first comprehensive analysis of bacterial community composition in the central Baltic Sea points to the existence of an autochthonous estuarine community uniquely adapted to the environmental conditions prevailing in this brackish environment.
  • [MeSH-major] Bacteria / growth & development. Fresh Water / microbiology. Plankton / growth & development. Seawater / microbiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Actinobacteria / classification. Actinobacteria / genetics. Actinobacteria / growth & development. Animals. Bacteroidetes / classification. Bacteroidetes / genetics. Bacteroidetes / growth & development. Betaproteobacteria / classification. Betaproteobacteria / genetics. Betaproteobacteria / growth & development. Ecosystem. Molecular Sequence Data. Phylogeny. Polymerase Chain Reaction. RNA, Ribosomal, 16S / genetics. Sequence Analysis, DNA

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  • (PMID = 18039821.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-5336
  • [Journal-full-title] Applied and environmental microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
  • [Language] eng
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  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Ribosomal, 16S
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2223248
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99. Moskalik K, Kozlov A, Demin E, Boiko E: The efficacy of facial skin cancer treatment with high-energy pulsed neodymium and Nd:YAG lasers. Photomed Laser Surg; 2009 Apr;27(2):345-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The efficacy of facial skin cancer treatment with high-energy pulsed neodymium and Nd:YAG lasers.
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the curative and cosmetic efficacy of treatment for facial skin cancer using neodymium laser irradiation.
  • BACKGROUND DATA: Due to the complex anatomy of the area, therapy for facial skin cancer is difficult.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Laser irradiation was used for the treatment of 3461 patients with 3624 facial skin cancer lesions of stages T(1-2)N(0)M(0:) 3346 basal cell skin cancers, 188 limited basal cell skin cancer recurrences, and 90 squamous cell skin cancers.
  • RESULTS: Patients with basal cell skin cancer treated by irradiation with the Nd laser developed recurrences in 1.8% of cases, and patients treated with the Nd:YAG laser had a recurrence rate of 2.5%.
  • Recurrences following treatment for basal cell skin cancer, and those of squamous cell skin cancer, after irradiation with the Nd laser appeared in 3.7% and 4.4% of patients, respectively.
  • Overall, the frequency of facial skin cancer recurrences after treatment with laser irradiation was 2.1% of all the irradiated tumors.
  • CONCLUSION: Neodymium laser irradiation is an effective method to treat facial skin cancer of stages T(1-2)N(0)M(0), and results in acceptable cosmetic results.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Basal Cell / radiotherapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / radiotherapy. Facial Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Skin Neoplasms / radiotherapy

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Facial Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Skin Cancer.
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  • (PMID = 19382838.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-8550
  • [Journal-full-title] Photomedicine and laser surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Photomed Laser Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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100. Soysal HG, Soysal E, Markoç F, Ardiç F: Basal cell carcinoma of the eyelids and periorbital region in a Turkish population. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg; 2008 May-Jun;24(3):201-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Basal cell carcinoma of the eyelids and periorbital region in a Turkish population.
  • PURPOSE: To review the clinical and histopathologic features, treatment, and outcomes of eyelid basal cell carcinomas.
  • METHODS: The clinical records and histopathologic specimens of 311 patients with eyelid basal cell carcinomas were reviewed and analyzed retrospectively.
  • The most common histologic subtypes were infiltrative, nodular, and basosquamous basal cell carcinomas.
  • Recurrent basal cell carcinomas were larger, with longer duration of lesion and a higher rate of orbital and perineural invasion.
  • Basosquamous basal cell carcinomas were more likely to have prior recurrences, larger lesion size, and the highest rate of orbital invasion.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In this large case series from a single center, the outcomes were worse than previously reported due to delay in treatment and previous inadequate treatments.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Basal Cell / pathology. Eyelid Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Orbital Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome. Turkey / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 18520835.001).
  • [ISSN] 0740-9303
  • [Journal-full-title] Ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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