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1. Tanno S, Yanagawa N, Habiro A, Koizumi K, Nakano Y, Osanai M, Mizukami Y, Okumura T, Testa JR, Kohgo Y: Serine/threonine kinase AKT is frequently activated in human bile duct cancer and is associated with increased radioresistance. Cancer Res; 2004 May 15;64(10):3486-90
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  • A better understanding of the mechanisms that lead to cellular radioresistance may assist in the development of more effective BDC therapies based on radiotherapy in combination with radiosensitizing agents.
  • First, to examine whether activated AKT is expressed in BDCs, tumor specimens were obtained from 19 consecutive BDC cases.
  • Next, to evaluate the role of AKT activation in the regulation of BDC cell radiosensitivity, clonogenic assays were performed using the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase inhibitor LY294002 with and without irradiation.
  • Only a small decrease in cell viability was observed in cells exposed to LY294002.
  • Collectively, these results indicate that activated AKT in BDC cells is associated with radioresistance and suggest that pharmacological or genetic modulation of AKT activity may have important therapeutic implications in BDC patients treated with radiation.
  • [MeSH-major] Bile Duct Neoplasms / enzymology. Bile Duct Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases / metabolism. Proto-Oncogene Proteins / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Survival / physiology. Cell Survival / radiation effects. Chromones / pharmacology. Enzyme Activation. Enzyme Inhibitors / pharmacology. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Morpholines / pharmacology. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases / metabolism. Phosphorylation / radiation effects. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt. Radiation Tolerance / physiology. Transfection

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  • (PMID = 15150102.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA77429
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Chromones; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Morpholines; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins; 154447-36-6 / 2-(4-morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one; EC 2.7.1.- / Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; EC 2.7.11.1 / AKT1 protein, human; EC 2.7.11.1 / Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases; EC 2.7.11.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt
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2. Liang QH, Zhang HX, Tang T: [The effects of bizhongxiao decotion (BZX) on T-lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis]. Hunan Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao; 2001 Dec 28;26(6):534-6
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  • [Title] [The effects of bizhongxiao decotion (BZX) on T-lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis].
  • OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of BZX on T-lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and study the mechanism of curative effects of BZX in immunization.
  • METHODS: 42 patients with RA in active stage were divided into 1. treatment group with BZX 2. control group with western medicine and twenty healthy control group (HCG) was arranged before treatment.
  • RESULTS: In the peripheral blood of patients with RA, CD4+ was more than that of the HCG. but CD8+ was lower and the ratio of CD4+ cell to CD8+ cells was higher than that of the HCG.
  • CONCLUSION: There were cell immunoregulation disorders in patients with RA.
  • BZX can regulate the disorder of T-lymphocyte subsets, help rebuild the immune steading and have effects of immune suppression similar to MTX combined medicine.
  • [MeSH-major] Arthritis, Rheumatoid / drug therapy. Drugs, Chinese Herbal / therapeutic use. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. T-Lymphocyte Subsets

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  • (PMID = 12536532.001).
  • [ISSN] 1000-5625
  • [Journal-full-title] Hunan yi ke da xue xue bao = Hunan yike daxue xuebao = Bulletin of Hunan Medical University
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hunan Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drugs, Chinese Herbal; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents
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3. Radford KJ, Turtle CJ, Kassianos AJ, Hart DN: CD11c+ blood dendritic cells induce antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes with similar efficiency compared to monocyte-derived dendritic cells despite higher levels of MHC class I expression. J Immunother; 2006 Nov-Dec;29(6):596-605
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  • Dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy for cancer has shown promising results in phase I and II clinical trials.
  • The natural circulating peripheral blood CD11c+ DC precursors (BDCs) may be an attractive alternative to MoDCs, as they can be isolated rapidly in sufficient quantities, and have superior migratory and T helper-1-inducing capacity in vitro.
  • We performed the first comparative analysis of the ability of autologous BDCs and MoDCs in healthy donors to induce tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs).
  • BDCs expressed significantly higher levels of major histocompatibility complex class I and CD83 in the absence of exogenous stimuli compared with MoDCs.
  • After activation with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, BDCs expressed higher levels of major histocompatibility complex class I, CD40, CD80, and CD83, and secreted higher levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, and IL-8 compared with MoDCs.
  • Despite these differences, both preparations secreted similar levels of IL-12 in response to polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid and, importantly, induced CTL responses of similar magnitude and affinity against influenza matrix protein and MART-1.
  • The ability of BDCs to induce efficient CTL responses, combined with their migratory capacity, makes them an appealing alternative to be investigated in clinical immunotherapy research protocols.
  • [MeSH-minor] Antigens, CD / metabolism. Antigens, Differentiation / metabolism. Antigens, Neoplasm / immunology. CD40 Ligand / pharmacology. Cell Line, Tumor. Cytokines / metabolism. Cytokines / pharmacology. Cytotoxicity Tests, Immunologic. HLA-A Antigens / immunology. HLA-A2 Antigen. HLA-DR Antigens / metabolism. Humans. Interferon-gamma / metabolism. Interleukin-12 / metabolism. Leukocytes, Mononuclear / cytology. Leukocytes, Mononuclear / drug effects. Leukocytes, Mononuclear / immunology. Lymphocyte Activation / drug effects. Lymphocyte Activation / immunology. MART-1 Antigen. Monocytes / cytology. Monocytes / drug effects. Monocytes / immunology. Neoplasm Proteins / immunology. Peptide Fragments / immunology. Poly I-C / pharmacology. Toll-Like Receptor 3 / metabolism. Viral Matrix Proteins / immunology

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  • (PMID = 17063122.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-9557
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of immunotherapy (Hagerstown, Md. : 1997)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Immunother.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / Antigens, CD11c; 0 / Antigens, Differentiation; 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm; 0 / CMRF-56 antigen; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / HLA-A Antigens; 0 / HLA-A*02:01 antigen; 0 / HLA-A2 Antigen; 0 / HLA-DR Antigens; 0 / Histocompatibility Antigens Class I; 0 / MART-1 Antigen; 0 / MLANA protein, human; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / Peptide Fragments; 0 / TLR3 protein, human; 0 / Toll-Like Receptor 3; 0 / Viral Matrix Proteins; 0 / influenza matrix peptide (58-66); 147205-72-9 / CD40 Ligand; 187348-17-0 / Interleukin-12; 24939-03-5 / Poly I-C; 82115-62-6 / Interferon-gamma
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4. Rao R, Shenoi SD: Acrokeratosis paraneoplastica (Bazex syndrome): an atypical presentation. Dermatol Online J; 2004;10(1):21
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  • [Title] Acrokeratosis paraneoplastica (Bazex syndrome): an atypical presentation.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / complications. Foot Dermatoses / etiology. Hand Dermatoses / etiology. Neoplasms, Unknown Primary / complications. Paraneoplastic Syndromes / etiology. Rectal Neoplasms / complications. Sigmoid Neoplasms / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Antifungal Agents / therapeutic use. Fluconazole / therapeutic use. Humans. Hyperpigmentation / etiology. Male. Middle Aged. Occult Blood. Onychomycosis / complications. Onychomycosis / drug therapy. Pruritus / etiology. Sigmoidoscopy

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  • (PMID = 15347503.001).
  • [ISSN] 1087-2108
  • [Journal-full-title] Dermatology online journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dermatol. Online J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antifungal Agents; 8VZV102JFY / Fluconazole
  • [Number-of-references] 8
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5. Bennett SJ, Perkins SM, Lane KA, Forthofer MA, Brater DC, Murray MD: Reliability and validity of the compliance belief scales among patients with heart failure. Heart Lung; 2001 May-Jun;30(3):177-85
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  • BACKGROUND: Lack of medication and dietary compliance leads to troublesome symptoms and hospitalization in patients with heart failure.
  • OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Beliefs about Medication Compliance Scale (BMCS) and the Beliefs about Dietary Compliance Scale (BDCS) among patients with heart failure.
  • METHODS: A convenience sample of 234 patients with heart failure completed the BMCS and the BDCS.
  • Both the BMCS and the BDCS had benefits and barriers scales with clear factor loadings.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The BMCS and the BDCS have documented reliability and validity.
  • Future work should be directed at evaluating the responsiveness of the scales to changing patient conditions and testing interventions to improve medication and dietary compliance through changing beliefs.

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  • (PMID = 11343003.001).
  • [ISSN] 0147-9563
  • [Journal-full-title] Heart & lung : the journal of critical care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Heart Lung
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / AG07631; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK37994
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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6. Oğuz S, Enç N, Yiğit Z: [Adaptation of the compliance and belief scales to Turkish for patients with chronic heart failure]. Turk Kardiyol Dern Ars; 2010 Oct;38(7):480-5
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  • OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the validity and reliability of the Turkish versions of the Beliefs about Medication Compliance Scale (BMCS), Beliefs about Dietary Compliance Scale (BDCS), and Beliefs about Self-Monitoring Scale (BSMS) for patients with chronic heart failure (CHF).
  • Cronbach alpha coefficients of the benefit and barrier subscales at the first interview were 0.74 and 0.59 for the BMCS, 0.71 and 0.58 for the BDCS, and 0.77 and 0.68 for the BSMS, respectively.
  • Interclass correlation coefficients for test-retest reliability for the benefit and barrier subscales were as follows: 0.90 and 0.91 for the BMCS, 0.86 and 0.86 for the BDCS, and 0.90 and 0.93 for the BSMS, respectively.

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  • (PMID = 21206201.001).
  • [ISSN] 1016-5169
  • [Journal-full-title] Türk Kardiyoloji Derneği arşivi : Türk Kardiyoloji Derneğinin yayın organıdır
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Turk Kardiyol Dern Ars
  • [Language] tur
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] Turkey
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7. Facci MR, Auray G, Buchanan R, van Kessel J, Thompson DR, Mackenzie-Dyck S, Babiuk LA, Gerdts V: A comparison between isolated blood dendritic cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells in pigs. Immunology; 2010 Mar;129(3):396-405
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  • Various dendritic cell (DC) populations exist that differ in phenotype and ability to present antigen to T cells.
  • For example, plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) are less potent T cell activators compared with conventional DCs (cDCs).
  • Here, we compared porcine blood DCs (BDCs), containing pDCs and cDCs, and monocyte-derived DCs (MoDC), consisting of cDCs, in their phenotype, ability to uptake antigen, activation and maturation and their ability to present antigen to autologous T cells.
  • Although basal and post-stimulation protein concentrations of interleukins 6 and 8 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha were higher in MoDCs, protein concentrations showed a higher fold increase in BDCs.
  • Antigen-specific proliferation of autologous T cells was induced by MoDCs and BDCs.
  • These results demonstrate that isolated porcine BDCs are highly responsive to stimulation with lipopolysaccharide and are functionally able to drive primed T-cell proliferation to the same extent as MoDCs.

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  • (PMID = 19922422.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2567
  • [Journal-full-title] Immunology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Immunology
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] Canada / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / /
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / CCR7 protein, human; 0 / Chemokines; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Lipopolysaccharides; 0 / Receptors, CCR7; 0 / fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran; 9006-59-1 / Ovalbumin; I223NX31W9 / Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate; K3R6ZDH4DU / Dextrans
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2826684
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8. Arshad R, Farooq S, Iqbal N, Ali SS: Mutagenic effect of acridine orange on the expression of penicillin G acylase and beta-lactamase in Escherichia coli. Lett Appl Microbiol; 2006 Feb;42(2):94-101
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  • METHODS AND RESULTS: Three wild E. coli strains BDCS-N-FMu10, BDCS-N-S21 and BDCS-N-W50, producing both the enzymes PGA and beta-lactamase were treated by AO.
  • One of the mutant strains (BDCS-N-M36) exhibited very negligible expression of beta-lactamase activity and twofold increase in PGA activity [12.7 mg 6-amino-penicillanic acid (6-APA) h(-1) mg(-1) wet cells] compared with that in the wild-type strain (6.3 mg 6-APA h(-1) mg(-1) wet cells).
  • [MeSH-major] Acridine Orange / pharmacology. Escherichia coli / drug effects. Escherichia coli / enzymology. Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial / drug effects. Penicillin Amidase / metabolism. beta-Lactamases / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Enzyme Induction / drug effects. Mutagenesis

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  • (PMID = 16441371.001).
  • [ISSN] 0266-8254
  • [Journal-full-title] Letters in applied microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lett. Appl. Microbiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.5.1.11 / Penicillin Amidase; EC 3.5.2.6 / beta-Lactamases; F30N4O6XVV / Acridine Orange
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9. Liang Q, Tang T, Zhang H: [Clinical investigation of effects of bizhongxiao decoction (BZX) on rheumatoid arthritis on active phase]. Hunan Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao; 2000 Oct 28;25(5):449-52
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  • [Title] [Clinical investigation of effects of bizhongxiao decoction (BZX) on rheumatoid arthritis on active phase].
  • Ninety-six patients with rheumatoid arthritis(RA) on active phase were divided into BZX-treated group(BZXG) and methotrexate-treated group(MTXG).
  • The results showed that after 1-month treatment, symptoms and signs, such as joint tenderness, arthralgia, arthroncus, of patients in BZXG improved notably(P < 0.01 or P < 0.05), while those of patients in MTXG did not improve, there was significant difference between these two groups(P < 0.01 or P < 0.05).
  • After 3-month treatment, these symptoms and signs improved in both groups(P < 0.01 or P < 0.05), but BZX had a better effect than MTX.
  • ESR, CRP, RF, C3, IgG, IgA and IgM decreased significantly in both groups after treatment(P < 0.01 or P < 0.05), ESR, CRP in BZXG decreased more and faster than those in MTXG.
  • It is indicated that BZX can improve symptoms and signs of patients with RA, has better and faster effects on acute phase reaction than MTX; and it has anti-immunologic effects similar to MTX, and has no obvious side effect.
  • [MeSH-major] Arthritis, Rheumatoid / drug therapy. Drugs, Chinese Herbal / therapeutic use. Phytotherapy. Plants, Medicinal
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Drug Combinations. Female. Humans. Male. Methotrexate / adverse effects. Methotrexate / therapeutic use. Middle Aged






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