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1. Seol HJ, Kim SS, Kim JE, Lee SH, Won JY: Inflammatory pseudotumor in the epidural space of the thoracic spine: a case report and literature review of MR imaging findings. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol; 2005 Nov-Dec;26(10):2667-70
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Whereas the exact pathogenesis of this lesion is unknown, it has been regarded as an unusual response to insults such as trauma or acute infection, a post-inflammatory reparative process, or low-grade malignancy.
  • [MeSH-major] Granuloma, Plasma Cell / diagnosis. Spinal Diseases / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Diagnosis, Differential. Epidural Space / pathology. Epidural Space / radiography. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Thoracic Vertebrae / pathology. Thoracic Vertebrae / radiography. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 16286421.001).
  • [ISSN] 0195-6108
  • [Journal-full-title] AJNR. American journal of neuroradiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AJNR Am J Neuroradiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 19
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2. Zuna RE, Wang SS, Schiffman M, Solomon D: Comparison of human papillomavirus distribution in cytologic subgroups of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion. Cancer; 2006 Oct 25;108(5):288-97
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  • [Title] Comparison of human papillomavirus distribution in cytologic subgroups of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion.
  • BACKGROUND: Low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) subsumes the formerly delineated cytologic categories of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cell changes (koilocytotic atypia) and low-grade dysplasia/cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) Grade 1 (CIN1).
  • In this study, the objective was to determine whether these 2 morphologic subcategories are characterized by differences in risk for CIN3 and/or HPV type distribution.
  • METHODS: Within the Atypical Squamous Cells of Undetermined Significance/Low-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion Triage Study, all cytologic interpretations of HPV cellular changes and CIN1 rendered by any of the pathology reviewers (community laboratory, clinical center, or Pathology Quality-Control Group) on referral Papanicolaou (Pap) tests or enrollment ThinPrep Pap tests were included for analysis.
  • The absolute risks of cumulative detection of CIN3 or cancer (CIN3 +) and CIN2 or worse (CIN2 +) over 2 years of follow-up were calculated for the various cytologic interpretations.
  • HPV type 16 (HPV-16) was the most common HPV type and was identified in 21% to 24% of CIN1 and in 14% to 18% of HPV cellular changes.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Both cytologic subcategories of LSIL were associated predominantly with oncogenic HPV types; however, the proportion of nononcogenic HPV types was lower and the absolute risks for CIN3 + were higher for CIN1 compared with HPV cellular changes.
  • The concordance in subcategorizing LSIL was low, and the authors concluded that the diagnostic distinction is of limited clinical utility for individual patient management.
  • [MeSH-major] Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / virology. Human papillomavirus 16 / isolation & purification. Papillomavirus Infections / complications. Precancerous Conditions / virology. Tumor Virus Infections / complications. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / virology
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Humans. Papanicolaou Test. Papillomaviridae / isolation & purification. Pathology, Surgical / standards. Reproducibility of Results. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction. Risk Factors. Vaginal Smears

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2006 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 16952155.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CN / CN-55105; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CN / CN-55153; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CN / CN-55154; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CN / CN-55155; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CN / CN-55156; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CN / CN-55157; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CN / CN-55158; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CN / CN-55159
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
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3. Cho KR, Shih IeM: Ovarian cancer. Annu Rev Pathol; 2009;4:287-313
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  • [Title] Ovarian cancer.
  • Ovarian carcinomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms and are traditionally subclassified based on type and degree of differentiation.
  • Although current clinical management of ovarian carcinoma largely fails to take this heterogeneity into account, it is becoming evident that each major histological type has characteristic genetic defects that deregulate specific signaling pathways in the tumor cells.
  • Moreover, within the most common histological types, the molecular pathogenesis of low-grade versus high-grade tumors appears to be largely distinct.
  • Mouse models of ovarian carcinoma have been developed that recapitulate many of the morphological features, biological behavior, and gene-expression patterns of selected subtypes of ovarian cancer.
  • Such models will likely prove useful for studying ovarian cancer biology and for preclinical testing of molecularly targeted therapeutics, which may ultimately lead to better clinical outcomes for women with ovarian cancer.

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  • (PMID = 18842102.001).
  • [ISSN] 1553-4014
  • [Journal-full-title] Annual review of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Annu Rev Pathol
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA129080-01A1; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA 129080; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA 103937; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA 94172; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA103937-05; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA103937-05; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA129080-01A1; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA129080; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA103937
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 144
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS85735; NLM/ PMC2679364
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4. Serrano ML, Sánchez-Gómez M, Bravo MM: Cervical scrapes levels of insulin-like growth factor-II and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 in women with squamous intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancer. Horm Metab Res; 2010 Dec;42(13):977-81
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cervical scrapes levels of insulin-like growth factor-II and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 in women with squamous intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancer.
  • A growing number of studies have demonstrated an association between serum levels of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and increased risk for various cancers.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between levels of IGF-II or IGFBP-3 in cervical scrapes with cervical cancer and precancerous lesions: low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL).
  • 4 groups of cases were examined: LSIL (n=20), HSIL (n=28), cervical cancer (n=45), and controls (n=51).
  • Control subjects were women with normal, HPV DNA-negative Papanicolau (Pap) test.
  • Results show that median protein levels of IGF-II were significantly lower in cervical cancer cases vs. controls (446.5 ng/mg vs. 1,168.6 ng/mg, p<0.001).
  • Significantly higher values of IGFBP-3 were found in HSIL vs. controls (median: 549.5 ng/mg vs. 216 ng/mg; p=0.018), and were not affected by HR HPV infection, meanwhile no significant differences were observed in IGFBP-3 levels between LSIL or cervical cancer as compared to controls.
  • These data suggests that the progression to cervical cancer is associated with alterations in the IGF system and not affected by HR HPV infection.
  • [MeSH-major] Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / metabolism. Cervix Uteri / pathology. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins / metabolism. Insulin-Like Growth Factor II / metabolism. Neoplasms, Squamous Cell / metabolism. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Female. Humans. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Vaginal Smears

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  • [Copyright] © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.
  • (PMID = 20945273.001).
  • [ISSN] 1439-4286
  • [Journal-full-title] Hormone and metabolic research = Hormon- und Stoffwechselforschung = Hormones et métabolisme
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Horm. Metab. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / IGF2 protein, human; 0 / IGFBP3 protein, human; 0 / Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3; 0 / Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins; 67763-97-7 / Insulin-Like Growth Factor II
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5. Gabr AH, Gdor Y, Roberts WW, Wolf JS Jr: Radiographic surveillance of minimally and moderately complex renal cysts. BJU Int; 2009 Apr;103(8):1116-9
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  • Eventually seven patients had surgery (laparoscopic partial nephrectomy in five and laparoscopic radical nephrectomy in two), which revealed renal cancer in five.
  • Surgical intervention was prompted by growth alone in two patients, growth and worsening of cyst characteristics in two, new onset of flank pain in one, and appearance of an enhancing nodule in the wall or septa in two.
  • Malignant lesions can be identified and removed while still of low grade and contained, and surgery can be avoided in most patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / diagnosis. Kidney Diseases, Cystic / diagnosis. Kidney Neoplasms / diagnosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies


6. Ahn JS, Park S, Im SA, Yoon SS, Lee JS, Kim BK, Bang SM, Cho EK, Lee JH, Jung CW, Kim HC, Seong CM, Lee MH, Kim CS, Lee KS, Lee JA, Ahn MJ: High-dose versus low-dose cyclophosphamide in combination with G-CSF for peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization. Korean J Intern Med; 2005 Sep;20(3):224-31
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  • [Title] High-dose versus low-dose cyclophosphamide in combination with G-CSF for peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization.
  • BACKGROUND: To compare the mobilizing effects and toxicities of two different doses of cyclophosphamide (CY) plus lenograstim (glycosylated G-CSF), we performed a prospective randomized study by enrolling patients suffering with either high-risk Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) or breast cancer undergoing ablative chemotherapy.
  • METHODS: The NHL patients received 4 cycles of CHOP and the breast cancer patients received 2-3 cycles of FAC (FEC) adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Large volume leukapheresis was carried out and it was continued daily until the target cell dose of 2 x 10(6) CD34+ cell/kg was reached.
  • The target cell dose was obtained with the median number of one leukapheresis session in both arms of the study (p=0.09).
  • The collected number of CD34+ cells in the leukapheresis products was higher in arm A than arm B (22.4 vs. 9.9 x 10(6)/kg, respectively, p=0.05).
  • Grade III or IV leukopenia was present in 14/15 patients (94%) in arm A and in 1/12 patients (8%) in arm B (p<0.0001).
  • Grade Ill or IV thrombocytopenia was present in 8/15 patients (54%) in arm A, but this was not present in any patients of arm B (p=0.0004).
  • CONCLUSION: Low-dose CY plus lenograstim is a safe and effective mobilizing regimen.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Cyclophosphamide / administration & dosage. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / administration & dosage. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / drug therapy. Myeloablative Agonists / administration & dosage. Stem Cells / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Leukapheresis. Male. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies. Recombinant Proteins / administration & dosage. Recombinant Proteins / pharmacology. Transplantation Conditioning

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  • (PMID = 16295781.001).
  • [ISSN] 1226-3303
  • [Journal-full-title] The Korean journal of internal medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Korean J. Intern. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Myeloablative Agonists; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 143011-72-7 / Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor; 6WS4C399GB / lenograstim; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3891157
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7. Vogt N, Schönegg R, Gschossmann JM, Borovicka J: Benefit of baseline cytometry for surveillance of patients with Barrett's esophagus. Surg Endosc; 2010 May;24(5):1144-50
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  • Using endoscopic brush cytology, this study prospectively investigated whether digital image cytometry (DICM) is of additional benefit over regular histology as a predictor for progression to high-grade dysplasia or cancer during a surveillance of at least 3 years.
  • High-grade dysplasia (HGD) and adenocarcinoma were defined as primary end points.
  • RESULTS: Of the 93 patients, 11 presented with the diagnosis of HGD and adenocarcinoma at baseline endoscopy.
  • Of these 82 patients, 9 (11%) had low-grade dysplasia (LGD) at baseline histology: One of two patients with LGD and aneuploid DICM showed HGD at follow-up assessment, whereas none of seven patients with LGD and diploid DICM had development of HGD.
  • Whereas an aneuploid/intermediate DICM warrants an early re-endoscopy, a diploid DICM underscores the low-risk status especially of patients with low-grade dysplasia.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Biopsy. Diagnosis, Differential. Endoscopes, Gastrointestinal. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Incidence. Male. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies. Reproducibility of Results. Switzerland / epidemiology. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19997751.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-2218
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgical endoscopy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg Endosc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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8. Bell DA: Origins and molecular pathology of ovarian cancer. Mod Pathol; 2005 Feb;18 Suppl 2:S19-32
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  • [Title] Origins and molecular pathology of ovarian cancer.
  • Epithelial ovarian cancer comprises the majority of malignant ovarian tumors in adult women.
  • These neoplasms are classified into distinct morphologic categories based on the appearance of the epithelium into tumors of serous, mucinous, endometrioid, clear cell, transitional, squamous, mixed and undifferentiated type.
  • Current data indicate that each of these histologic subtypes is associated with distinct morphologic and molecular genetic alterations: high-grade serous and possibly endometrioid carcinomas most probably arise from surface epithelial inclusion glands with TP53 mutations and dysfunction of BRCA1 and/or BRCA2; low-grade serous carcinomas probably arise in a stepwise fashion in an adenoma-borderline tumor-carcinoma sequence from typical to micropapillary borderline tumors to low-grade invasive serous carcinoma via activation of the RAS-RAF signaling pathway secondary to mutations in KRAS and BRAF; mucinous carcinomas arise via an adenoma-borderline tumor-carcinoma sequence with mutations in KRAS; low-grade endometrioid carcinomas arise from endometriosis via mutations in CTNNB1 (the gene encoding beta-catenin) and PTEN.
  • Although the morphologic data strongly support an origin of clear cell carcinoma from endometriosis, there is limited data on the genetic alterations in these uncommon tumors.
  • Thus it is likely that most low-grade, relatively indolent ovarian carcinomas of serous, mucinous and endometrioid type arise from pre-existing cystadenomas or endometriosis whereas most high-grade serous carcinomas arise without an easily identifiable precursor lesion.
  • [MeSH-major] Ovarian Neoplasms / genetics. Ovarian Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] BRCA1 Protein / genetics. BRCA2 Protein / genetics. Female. Humans. Mutation. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / genetics


9. Hartmann LC, Keeney GL, Lingle WL, Christianson TJ, Varghese B, Hillman D, Oberg AL, Low PS: Folate receptor overexpression is associated with poor outcome in breast cancer. Int J Cancer; 2007 Sep 1;121(5):938-42
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  • [Title] Folate receptor overexpression is associated with poor outcome in breast cancer.
  • The high affinity folate receptor is a membrane-associated glycoprotein that is preferentially expressed in cancers of epithelial origin and rarely expressed in normal cells.
  • We examined its expression pattern in breast cancer, utilizing a tissue microarray containing samples from 63 invasive breast cancers from women with divergent clinical outcomes.
  • Thirty women, the good outcome group, were free of recurrence for a minimum of 7 years after diagnosis.
  • After adjustment for tumor size, nodal status, ER status, adjuvant therapy, histology and tumor grade, strong staining for the folate receptor remained significantly associated with poor outcome, p < 0.001.
  • Our work requires validation in a larger cohort, but supports the possibility of using folate receptor-targeted approaches in the management of breast cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / metabolism. Carrier Proteins / metabolism. Receptors, Cell Surface / metabolism

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 17487842.001).
  • [ISSN] 0020-7136
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA89581
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carrier Proteins; 0 / Folate Receptors, GPI-Anchored; 0 / Receptors, Cell Surface
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10. Jaberipour M, Habibagahi M, Hosseini A, Habibabad SR, Talei A, Ghaderi A: Increased CTLA-4 and FOXP3 transcripts in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with breast cancer. Pathol Oncol Res; 2010 Dec;16(4):547-51
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  • [Title] Increased CTLA-4 and FOXP3 transcripts in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with breast cancer.
  • Generation of Regulatory T cells (Tregs) is known to play a major role in progression and modulation of the immune escape mechanisms in cancer.
  • These cells express Forkhead/winged helix transcription factor (FOXP3) and also Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), as a negative regulatory molecule which, is a potential target for immunotherapy.
  • We, therefore, evaluated FOXP3 and CTLA-4 transcripts in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 55 women with histologically-confirmed infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast.
  • Blood samples from 40 healthy volunteer women without a history of malignancies or autoimmune disorders were also obtained as a control.
  • Compared to healthy individuals, significantly higher amounts of these transcripts were found in the mononuclear cells from breast cancer patients.
  • Among patients with early stage, nonmetastatic or low-grade disease, the relative expression of CTLA-4 was about 10-fold as much as in the control group.
  • The results of this investigation point to functional activity of Treg cells in early stages of breast cancer, a finding which emphasizes the significance of Tregs as an imminent target for breast cancer immunotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD / genetics. Breast Neoplasms / blood. Forkhead Transcription Factors / genetics. Leukocytes, Mononuclear / metabolism. RNA, Messenger / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. CTLA-4 Antigen. Case-Control Studies. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Statistics, Nonparametric. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20306312.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-2807
  • [Journal-full-title] Pathology oncology research : POR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathol. Oncol. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / CTLA-4 Antigen; 0 / CTLA4 protein, human; 0 / FOXP3 protein, human; 0 / Forkhead Transcription Factors; 0 / RNA, Messenger
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11. Barkholt L, Alici E, Conrad R, Sutlu T, Gilljam M, Stellan B, Christensson B, Guven H, Björkström NK, Söderdahl G, Cederlund K, Kimby E, Aschan J, Ringdén O, Ljunggren HG, Dilber MS: Safety analysis of ex vivo-expanded NK and NK-like T cells administered to cancer patients: a phase I clinical study. Immunotherapy; 2009 Sep;1(5):753-64
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  • [Title] Safety analysis of ex vivo-expanded NK and NK-like T cells administered to cancer patients: a phase I clinical study.
  • The chimeric state after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation provides a platform for adoptive immunotherapy using donor-derived immune cells.
  • The major risk with donor lymphocyte infusions (DLIs) is the development of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD).
  • Development of new DLI products with antitumor reactivity and reduced GvHD risk represents a challenging task in cancer immunotherapy.
  • Although natural killer (NK) and NK-like T cells are promising owing to their antitumor activity, their low concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells reduces their utility in DLIs.
  • We have recently developed a system that allows expansion of clinical-grade NK and NK-like T cells in large numbers.
  • In this study, the safety of donor-derived long-term ex vivo-expanded human NK and NK-like T cells given as DLIs was investigated as immunotherapy for cancer in five patients following allogeneic stem cell infusion.
  • Infusion of the cells was safe whether administered alone or with IL-2 subcutaneously.
  • One patient with hepatocellular carcinoma showed markedly decreased serum alpha-fetoprotein levels following cell infusions.
  • These findings suggest that the use of ex vivo-expanded NK and NK-like T cells is safe and appears an attractive approach for further clinical evaluation in cancer patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Colorectal Neoplasms / therapy. Graft vs Host Disease / etiology. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Killer Cells, Natural / metabolism. Lymphocyte Transfusion. Natural Killer T-Cells / metabolism. Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Proliferation. Cytotoxicity, Immunologic. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Tumor Burden / immunology

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  • (PMID = 20636021.001).
  • [ISSN] 1750-7448
  • [Journal-full-title] Immunotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Immunotherapy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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12. Kirchner T, Jung A: [Pathological diagnosis for individualized therapy of colorectal cancer]. Pathologe; 2010 Feb;31(1):16-21
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  • [Title] [Pathological diagnosis for individualized therapy of colorectal cancer].
  • Pathological diagnosis is essential today for the individualized therapy of colorectal cancer.
  • In the routine analysis of colorectal carcinomas the molecular-pathological detection of a KRAS mutation predicts unresponsiveness to EGFR-targeted antibody therapies.
  • Colorectal carcinomas with high-grade microsatellite instability and their associated morphologic subtypes, such as the medullary carcinoma, exhibit a low risk of distant metastasis and might be considered as carcinomas with low need for adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Colorectal Neoplasms / genetics. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal / adverse effects. Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Cetuximab. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. DNA Mismatch Repair / genetics. DNA Mutational Analysis. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm / genetics. Fluorouracil / adverse effects. Fluorouracil / therapeutic use. Gene Expression Profiling. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic / drug effects. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic / genetics. Humans. Leucovorin / adverse effects. Leucovorin / therapeutic use. Microsatellite Instability. Nerve Tissue Proteins / genetics. Organoplatinum Compounds / adverse effects. Organoplatinum Compounds / therapeutic use. Pharmacogenetics. Practice Guidelines as Topic. Prognosis. Proto-Oncogene Proteins / genetics. Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras). RNA-Binding Proteins / genetics. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / antagonists & inhibitors. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / genetics. ras Proteins / genetics

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  • (PMID = 19957085.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-1963
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Pathologe
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathologe
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / KRAS protein, human; 0 / MSI1 protein, human; 0 / Nerve Tissue Proteins; 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins; 0 / RNA-Binding Proteins; 6A901E312A / panitumumab; EC 2.7.10.1 / EGFR protein, human; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor; EC 3.6.5.2 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras); EC 3.6.5.2 / ras Proteins; PQX0D8J21J / Cetuximab; Q573I9DVLP / Leucovorin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; Folfox protocol
  • [Number-of-references] 41
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13. Tothill RW, Tinker AV, George J, Brown R, Fox SB, Lade S, Johnson DS, Trivett MK, Etemadmoghadam D, Locandro B, Traficante N, Fereday S, Hung JA, Chiew YE, Haviv I, Australian Ovarian Cancer Study Group, Gertig D, DeFazio A, Bowtell DD: Novel molecular subtypes of serous and endometrioid ovarian cancer linked to clinical outcome. Clin Cancer Res; 2008 Aug 15;14(16):5198-208
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  • [Title] Novel molecular subtypes of serous and endometrioid ovarian cancer linked to clinical outcome.
  • PURPOSE: The study aim to identify novel molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer by gene expression profiling with linkage to clinical and pathologic features.
  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Microarray gene expression profiling was done on 285 serous and endometrioid tumors of the ovary, peritoneum, and fallopian tube.
  • Two subtypes represented predominantly serous low malignant potential and low-grade endometrioid subtypes, respectively.
  • The remaining four subtypes represented higher grade and advanced stage cancers of serous and endometrioid morphology.
  • A novel subtype of high-grade serous cancers reflected a mesenchymal cell type, characterized by overexpression of N-cadherin and P-cadherin and low expression of differentiation markers, including CA125 and MUC1.
  • Each subtype displayed distinct levels and patterns of immune cell infiltration.
  • CONCLUSION: Gene expression profiling identified molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer of biological and clinical importance.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Gene Expression Profiling. Ovarian Neoplasms / genetics. Ovarian Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Gene Expression. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Lasers. Microdissection. Middle Aged. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis. Prognosis. Tissue Array Analysis


14. De Pas T, Putzu C, Curigliano G, Noberasco C, Boselli S, Catania C, Orlando L, Milani A, Spaggiari L, de Braud F: A proper schedule of weekly paclitaxel and gemcitabine combination is highly active and very well tolerated in NSCLC patients. Lung Cancer; 2006 Dec;54(3):359-64
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  • BACKGROUND: In a previous phase I dose-escalation study, we showed a weekly administration of paclitaxel (TAX) and gemcitabine (GEM) to be active and very well tolerated in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, with the lack of interaction between drugs.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fifty-four chemo-naïve patients with advanced NSCLC (53 patients: stage IV) received TAX (100mg/m(2) i.v. infusion over 1h) followed by GEM 1500 mg/m(2) over 30 min) on days 1, 8, 15 and 21 of a 28-day cycle.
  • Grade 3 non-haematological toxicities were observed in three patients (asthenia, diarrhoea and neuropathy), and were always reversible.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This weekly schedule of TAX and GEM is highly active in chemo-naïve NSCLC patients and confirms the low toxicity profile already observed in a previous phase I study.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Deoxycytidine / administration & dosage. Deoxycytidine / adverse effects. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Paclitaxel / administration & dosage. Paclitaxel / adverse effects. Treatment Failure. Treatment Outcome

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  • [ErratumIn] Lung Cancer. 2007 Dec;58(3):431. Sabrina, Boselli [corrected to Boselli, Sabrina]
  • (PMID = 17028052.001).
  • [ISSN] 0169-5002
  • [Journal-full-title] Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lung Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
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15. Yuan B, Xu Y, Woo JH, Wang Y, Bae YK, Yoon DS, Wersto RP, Tully E, Wilsbach K, Gabrielson E: Increased expression of mitotic checkpoint genes in breast cancer cells with chromosomal instability. Clin Cancer Res; 2006 Jan 15;12(2):405-10
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  • [Title] Increased expression of mitotic checkpoint genes in breast cancer cells with chromosomal instability.
  • PURPOSE: Most breast cancers have chromosomal instability that seems related to defective mitotic spindle checkpoints.
  • Because the molecular basis of this defect is unknown, we evaluated breast cancer cell lines and tissues for possible defects involving the major mitotic checkpoint genes responsible for maintaining chromosomal stability.
  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We analyzed sequences and expression levels (RNA and protein) of eight major spindle checkpoint genes (MAD1L1, MAD2L1, MAD2L2, BUB1, BUB1B, BUB3, CDC20, and TTK) in a panel of 12 breast cancer cell lines, most with established genetic instability and defective spindle damage checkpoint response. mRNA levels of these genes were also measured in primary tumor samples, and immunohistochemical staining was used to evaluate BUB1B protein levels in a panel of 270 additional cases of breast cancer.
  • RESULTS: No functionally significant sequence variations were found for any of the eight genes in the breast cancer cell lines with chromosomal instability.
  • More surprisingly, the mRNA and protein levels for these checkpoint genes are significantly higher in the genetically unstable breast cancer cell lines and in high-grade primary breast cancer tissues than in the stable (and checkpoint proficient) MCF-10A and normal mammary epithelial cells, or in normal breast tissues.
  • In fact, overexpression of the BUB1B protein is a marker that recognizes nearly 80% of breast cancers in paraffin-embedded tissues.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Defective mitotic spindle checkpoints in breast cancer are most likely not caused by low expression or mutations of these eight checkpoint genes.
  • High levels of these particular transcripts could represent a cellular compensation for defects in other molecular components of the mitotic spindle damage checkpoint, and increased expression of these genes might be markers of breast cancers with chromosomal instability.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / genetics. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Neoplasm Proteins / genetics. Protein Kinases / genetics. Spindle Apparatus / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous / genetics. Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous / metabolism. Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous / pathology. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / genetics. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / metabolism. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / pathology. Carcinoma, Papillary / genetics. Carcinoma, Papillary / metabolism. Carcinoma, Papillary / pathology. Cell Cycle Proteins / genetics. Cell Cycle Proteins / metabolism. Chromosome Fragility. Female. Genetic Variation. Humans. Mitosis / genetics. Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases. RNA, Messenger / genetics. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. RNA, Neoplasm / genetics. RNA, Neoplasm / metabolism. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 16428479.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA 88846-04
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / BUB3 protein, human; 0 / Cell Cycle Proteins; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / RNA, Neoplasm; EC 2.7.- / Protein Kinases; EC 2.7.11.1 / BUB1 protein, human; EC 2.7.11.1 / Bub1 spindle checkpoint protein; EC 2.7.11.1 / Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
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16. Evans DG: Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2): a clinical and molecular review. Orphanet J Rare Dis; 2009;4:16
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  • Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a tumour-prone disorder characterised by the development of multiple schwannomas and meningiomas.
  • Nausea, vomiting or true vertigo are rare symptoms, except in late-stage disease.
  • The other main tumours are schwannomas of the other cranial, spinal and peripheral nerves; meningiomas both intracranial (including optic nerve meningiomas) and intraspinal, and some low-grade central nervous system malignancies (ependymomas).
  • About 70% of NF2 patients have skin tumours (intracutaneous plaque-like lesions or more deep-seated subcutaneous nodular tumours).
  • Neurofibromatosis type 2 is a dominantly inherited tumour predisposition syndrome caused by mutations in the NF2 gene on chromosome 22.
  • More than 50% of patients represent new mutations and as many as one-third are mosaic for the underlying disease-causing mutation.
  • Although truncating mutations (nonsense and frameshifts) are the most frequent germline event and cause the most severe disease, single and multiple exon deletions are common.
  • Diagnosis is based on clinical and neuroimaging studies.
  • Prenatal diagnosis and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis is possible.
  • The main differential diagnosis of NF2 is schwannomatosis.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Genes, Neurofibromatosis 2. Humans. Mutation. Prognosis. Young Adult


17. D'Eliseo D, Pisu P, Romano C, Tubaro A, De Nunzio C, Morrone S, Santoni A, Stoppacciaro A, Velotti F: Granzyme B is expressed in urothelial carcinoma and promotes cancer cell invasion. Int J Cancer; 2010 Sep 1;127(6):1283-94
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  • [Title] Granzyme B is expressed in urothelial carcinoma and promotes cancer cell invasion.
  • Granzyme B (GrB) is a serine proteinase known to be expressed by cytotoxic lymphocytes and to induce, in presence of perforin (Pf), apoptosis in target cells.
  • Recently, GrB expression has been shown (often in absence of Pf) in nonlymphoid cells, but its function is not defined.
  • In our study, we investigated GrB and Pf expression in bladder cancer cell lines and in urothelial carcinoma (UC) tissues by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot, ELISA, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry.
  • We also assessed the function of GrB in UC cells; the in vitro function of GrB was examined by loss-of-function experiments.
  • Our results revealed that GrB is expressed, in absence of Pf, in UC cells.
  • Significant differences were found between GrB expression and both increasing pathological tumor spreading and high-grade vs. low-grade pTa tumors.
  • Notably, GrB in UC tissues was concentrated at the cancer invasion front and was expressed in neoplastic cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a key event in carcinoma invasion.
  • Indeed, GrB-positive cells also expressed Snail, N-cadherin or were negative for E-cadherin.
  • GrB expressed in tumor cell lines was enzymatically active and capable of vitronectin cleavage, implying extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling by GrB.
  • Inhibition of GrB activity or Stealth RNA interference-mediated GrB gene silencing markedly suppressed bladder cancer cell invasion through matrigel.
  • This data provides the first evidence for a role of GrB in promoting cancer cell invasion.
  • [MeSH-major] Granzymes / metabolism. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / enzymology
  • [MeSH-minor] Base Sequence. Blotting, Western. Cell Line, Tumor. DNA Primers. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. RNA Interference. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 20027633.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0215
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA Primers; EC 3.4.21.- / Granzymes
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18. Vermeulen J, De Preter K, Naranjo A, Vercruysse L, Van Roy N, Hellemans J, Swerts K, Bravo S, Scaruffi P, Tonini GP, De Bernardi B, Noguera R, Piqueras M, Cañete A, Castel V, Janoueix-Lerosey I, Delattre O, Schleiermacher G, Michon J, Combaret V, Fischer M, Oberthuer A, Ambros PF, Beiske K, Bénard J, Marques B, Rubie H, Kohler J, Pötschger U, Ladenstein R, Hogarty MD, McGrady P, London WB, Laureys G, Speleman F, Vandesompele J: Predicting outcomes for children with neuroblastoma using a multigene-expression signature: a retrospective SIOPEN/COG/GPOH study. Lancet Oncol; 2009 Jul;10(7):663-71
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  • A multigene-expression signature was built using 30 training samples, tested on 313 test samples, and subsequently validated in a blind study on an independent set of 236 tumours.
  • Multivariate analysis indicates that the signature is a significant independent predictor of overall survival and progression-free survival after controlling for currently used risk factors: patients with high molecular risk have a higher risk of death from disease and higher risk of relapse or progression than patients with low molecular risk (odds ratio 19.32 [95% CI 6.50-57.43] and 3.96 [1.97-7.97] for overall survival and progression-free survival, respectively, both p<0.0001).
  • These results were confirmed in the validation study, in which the signature was also independently statistically significant in a model adjusted for MYCN status, age, International Neuroblastoma Staging System stage, ploidy, International Neuroblastoma Pathology Classification grade of differentiation, and mitosis karyorrhexis index (odds ratios between 4.81 and 10.53 depending on the model for overall survival and 3.68 [95% CI 2.01-6.71] for progression-free survival).
  • FUNDING: The Belgian Foundation Against Cancer, the Children Cancer Fund Ghent, the Belgian Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology, the Belgian Kid's Fund and the Fondation Nuovo-Soldati (JV), the Fund for Scientific Research Flanders (KDP, JH), the Fund for Scientific Research Flanders, the Institute for the Promotion of Innovation by Science and Technology in Flanders, Strategisch basisonderzoek, the Fondation Fournier Majoie pour l'Innovation, the Instituto Carlos III, the Italian Neuroblastoma Foundation, the European Community under the FP6, and the Belgian programme of Interuniversity Poles of Attraction.

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  • [CommentIn] Lancet Oncol. 2009 Jul;10(7):641-2 [19573794.001]
  • (PMID = 19515614.001).
  • [ISSN] 1474-5488
  • [Journal-full-title] The Lancet. Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lancet Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U24 CA114766-05; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA114766-05; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA098413; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U24 CA114766; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA098543-08; None / None / / U10 CA098543-08; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA098543; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA098413-08; None / None / / U10 CA098413-08
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS264157; NLM/ PMC3045079
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19. Varchalama E, Rodolakis A, Strati A, Papageorgiou T, Valavanis C, Vorgias G, Lianidou E, Antsaklis A: Quantitative analysis of heparanase gene expression in normal cervical, cervical intraepithelial neoplastic, and cervical carcinoma tissues. Int J Gynecol Cancer; 2009 Dec;19(9):1614-9
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  • [Title] Quantitative analysis of heparanase gene expression in normal cervical, cervical intraepithelial neoplastic, and cervical carcinoma tissues.
  • Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that specifically cleaves heparan sulfate side chains of heparan sulfate proteoglycans, the major proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix and cell surfaces.
  • Traditionally, heparanase activity was implicated in cellular invasion associated with angiogenesis, inflammation, and cancer metastasis.
  • More recently, heparanase up-regulation was documented in an increasing number of primary human tumors.
  • Iotan this study, we sought to investigate the expression of heparanase messenger RNA (mRNA) in normal cervical tissue and intraepithelial cervical lesion and its clinicopathologic importance in invasive cervical cancer.
  • Gene expression of heparanase was assessed by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in 28 normal cervical, 26 intraepithelial neoplastic, and 48 cervical cancer tissue samples.
  • Heparanase mRNA expression was different between the 3 groups and lower in normal cervical specimens in relationship with intraepithelial cervical lesions and invasive cervical cancer tissue samples (P = 0.048).
  • Gradually increasing expression of heparanase was evident as the cells progressed from low-grade to high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (P = 0.002).
  • In invasive cervical cancer cases, there was a direct correlation between heparanase expression and tumor size (P = 0.002).
  • In cases treated with radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy, the heparanase mRNA expression was significantly higher in tumors exhibiting lymph vascular space invasion (P = 0.044) and in cases with big tumor size (P = 0.005).
  • In our study, we did not find any significant correlation between disease-free and overall survival rates and expression of heparanase (P = 0.396 and P = 0.712, respectively).
  • The results of this study suggest that the gene expression of heparanase in cervical cancer enhances growth, invasion, and angiogenesis of the tumor and may have therapeutic applications.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / genetics. Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / genetics. Cervix Uteri / metabolism. Glucuronidase / genetics. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Cell Proliferation. Female. Gene Expression. Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neovascularization, Pathologic / enzymology. Neovascularization, Pathologic / genetics. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 19955948.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-1438
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of gynecological cancer : official journal of the International Gynecological Cancer Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.2.1.- / heparanase; EC 3.2.1.31 / Glucuronidase
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20. Masi L, Recenti R, Silvestri S, Pinzani P, Pepi M, Paglierani M, Brandi ML, Franchi A: Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in osteosarcoma of bone. Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol; 2007 Mar;15(1):70-6
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  • Several studies indicate that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is overexpressed in human malignancies, where it produces high levels of prostaglandins and contributes to tumor growth.
  • In addition, we examined the effects of the specific COX-2 inhibitor Celecoxib on the growth of the human osteosarcoma cell line SaOS-2.
  • Immunoreactivity for COX-2 was observed in 39 out of 48 tumors (81.2%), 30 (76.9%) of which showed a moderate or diffuse immunostaining.
  • Considering the group of 42 primary osteosarcomas, COX-2 immunoreactivity was significantly higher in high grade osteosarcomas, where moderate or diffuse expression was detected in 23 out of 32 cases (71.8%), than in low grade osteosarcomas, where moderate or diffuse expression was detected in 2 out of 10 cases (20%) (P = 0.008, Fisher exact test).
  • In addition, low COX-2 expression was always associated with a good response to chemotherapy (5 out of 5 cases), whereas moderate or diffuse COX-2 expression was associated with a good response in 11 out of 20 cases (55%) (P = 0.12, Fisher exact test).
  • In SaOS-2 osteosarcoma cells, which express COX-2, treatment with Celecoxib determined inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis.
  • These results indicate that COX-2 is expressed at high levels in high grade osteosarcomas and support the use of COX-2 inhibitors to improve both the tumor response to chemotherapy and the outcome of osteosarcoma patients.

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  • (PMID = 17536311.001).
  • [ISSN] 1541-2016
  • [Journal-full-title] Applied immunohistochemistry & molecular morphology : AIMM
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Appl. Immunohistochem. Mol. Morphol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Pyrazoles; 0 / Sulfonamides; EC 1.14.99.1 / Cyclooxygenase 2; JCX84Q7J1L / Celecoxib
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21. Sapierzyński R, Micuń J, Jagielski D, Jurka P: Cytopathology of canine lymphomas (100 cases). Pol J Vet Sci; 2010;13(4):653-9
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  • Malignant lymphoma is one of the most common malignant tumours occurring in dogs.
  • The determination of the type and subtype of tumour was made on the basis of the updated Kiel classification adopted for dogs.
  • In 29% of dogs the regional or general lymphadenomegaly was the only clinical sign observed, in remaining cases (71%) at least one abnormality connected to lymphoma was found.
  • Among all diagnosed lymphomas, high-grade lymphomas were more prevalent (86% of all cases) than low-grade lymphomas (14% of all cases).
  • The possibility of boxers having a predisposition to T cell lymphoma development could be also suspected.

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  • (PMID = 21370743.001).
  • [ISSN] 1505-1773
  • [Journal-full-title] Polish journal of veterinary sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pol J Vet Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
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22. Thompson RH, Gillett MD, Cheville JC, Lohse CM, Dong H, Webster WS, Chen L, Zincke H, Blute ML, Leibovich BC, Kwon ED: Costimulatory molecule B7-H1 in primary and metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Cancer; 2005 Nov 15;104(10):2084-91
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  • [Title] Costimulatory molecule B7-H1 in primary and metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma.
  • BACKGROUND: Cancer cell expression of costimulatory molecule B7-H1 has been implicated as a potent inhibitor of T-cell-mediated antitumoral immunity.
  • The authors recently reported that B7-H1 is aberrantly expressed in primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • Blockade of B7-H1, as demonstrated in several murine cancer models, now represents a promising therapeutic target in RCC.
  • In the current study, the authors updated their primary RCC results with additional follow-up and investigated the potential role of B7-H1 in metastatic RCC.
  • METHODS: Between 2000 and 2004, 196 patients underwent nephrectomy and 26 patients had resection of RCC metastases for clear cell RCC.
  • Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on tumor cryosections using a B7-H1 monoclonal antibody (clone 5H1).
  • A urologic pathologist quantified the percentage of B7-H1-positive tumor cells and lymphocytes.
  • RESULTS: Variable levels of B7-H1 were expressed on primary RCC tumor cells (n = 130 [66.3%]) and primary tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (n = 115 [58.7%]).
  • Patients with high expression of B7-H1 on primary tumor cells and/or lymphocytes were significantly more likely to die of RCC compared with patients with low B7-H1 expression (risk ratio [RR] = 4.17; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.97-8.84; P < 0.001) and this risk persisted in multivariate analysis after adjusting for the Mayo Clinic stage, size, grade, and necrosis score (RR = 2.63; 96% CI, 1.23-5.64; P = 0.013).
  • Of the 26 metastatic specimens, cancer cell and lymphocyte B7-H1 expression were demonstrated in 17 (65.4%) and 18 (69.2%) specimens, respectively.
  • In total, 14 (54.3%) metastatic specimens had high aggregate B7-H1 levels compared with 44.4% in primary RCC specimens.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD80 / biosynthesis. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / metabolism. Kidney Neoplasms / metabolism. Membrane Glycoproteins / biosynthesis. Neoplasm Metastasis / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antigens, CD. Antigens, CD274. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Lymphocytes / metabolism. Peptides. Risk Factors


23. Schrader AJ, Rauer-Bruening S, Olbert PJ, Hegele A, Rustemeier J, Timmesfeld N, Varga Z, Hofmann R: Incidence and long-term prognosis of papillary renal cell carcinoma. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol; 2009 Jun;135(6):799-805
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  • [Title] Incidence and long-term prognosis of papillary renal cell carcinoma.
  • OBJECTIVES: Papillary renal cell carcinoma (pRCC) represents the largest subgroup of non-clear-cell kidney cancer.
  • In this study, we assessed tumour characteristics and long-term prognosis of patients with pRCC in comparison with conventional clear-cell cancer (ccRCC).
  • RESULTS: Both groups, pRCC and ccRCC, were alike concerning age, body mass index, and the incidence of regional lymph node or distant metastasis at diagnosis.
  • Even though patients with pRCC presented more often with smaller (p = 0.039) and low-grade tumours (p = 0.006), there was no statistically significant difference in tumour recurrence or tumour related death.
  • Kaplan-Meier curves revealed no differences regarding tumour specific survival between pRCC and ccRCC (p = 0.94; 5-year survival 78 vs. 77%).
  • As we could not confirm a favourable clinical course for pRCC in general, standardised aftercare programmes and-if necessary-systemic treatment, especially in the era of novel targeted drugs, are also needed for this common RCC subtype.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell / pathology. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Carcinoma, Papillary / pathology. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Germany / epidemiology. Humans. Incidence. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Time Factors


24. Rani SB, Mahadevan A, Anilkumar SR, Raju TR, Shankar SK: Expression of nestin--a stem cell associated intermediate filament in human CNS tumours. Indian J Med Res; 2006 Sep;124(3):269-80
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  • [Title] Expression of nestin--a stem cell associated intermediate filament in human CNS tumours.
  • BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: Nestin is an intermediate filament protein expressed in undifferentiated cells during the development of brain and is considered as a marker for neuroepithelial stem cells.
  • Expression of this protein in various CNS tumour cells suggests the possibility of existence of tumour stem cell modulating the evolution.
  • We carried out an immunohistochemical study to demonstrate the expression of nestin and its co-expression with neuronal and glial intermediate filament and correlate with the grade of malignancy.
  • METHODS: Formalin fixed, paraffin processed sections from two human foetuses, 16 brain tumours of both neuronal and glial lineage and two metastatic tumours were immunostained with polyclonal antibody to nestin.
  • Serial sections from primary brain tumours were also stained with monoclonal antibody to neurofilament (NF) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP).
  • Fluorescent double labeling was carried out on four cases using laser confocal microscopy, to document co-localization of nestin with other intermediate filaments in the tumour cells.
  • RESULTS: Nestin expression was observed along the paraventricular zone of human foetuses and in brain tumours of both glial and neuronal lineage, of both high and low grades of malignancy.
  • In addition, mature dysplastic spinal motor neurons adjacent to tumour and cerebellar Purkinje cells also expressed nestin along with neurofilament.
  • INTERPRETATION & CONCLUSION: Nestin expression was noted in both low and high grade brain tumours and dysplastic neurons and did not parallel the malignant grade of the tumour.
  • The expression of nestin in tumour cells and dysplastic neurons suggests aberrant expression of antigenically primitive proteins in cells to facilitate remodelling of the cell and migration.
  • [MeSH-major] Central Nervous System Neoplasms / metabolism. Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein / metabolism. Intermediate Filament Proteins / metabolism. Nerve Tissue Proteins / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Fetus. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Microscopy, Confocal. Middle Aged. Nestin

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  • [CommentIn] Indian J Med Res. 2006 Sep;124(3):229-30 [17085825.001]
  • (PMID = 17085830.001).
  • [ISSN] 0971-5916
  • [Journal-full-title] The Indian journal of medical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Indian J. Med. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein; 0 / Intermediate Filament Proteins; 0 / NES protein, human; 0 / Nerve Tissue Proteins; 0 / Nestin
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25. Lopez-Garcia MA, Geyer FC, Natrajan R, Kreike B, Mackay A, Grigoriadis A, Reis-Filho JS, Weigelt B: Transcriptomic analysis of tubular carcinomas of the breast reveals similarities and differences with molecular subtype-matched ductal and lobular carcinomas. J Pathol; 2010 Sep;222(1):64-75
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  • Tubular carcinoma (TC) is an uncommon special type of breast cancer characterized by an indolent clinical course.
  • Although described as part of a spectrum of related lesions named 'low-grade breast neoplasia family' due to immunophenotypical and genetic similarities, TCs, low-grade invasive ductal carcinomas of no special type (IDC-NSTs), and classic invasive lobular carcinomas (ILCs) significantly differ in terms of histological features and clinical outcome.
  • The aim of this study was to investigate whether pure TCs constitute an entity distinct from low-grade IDC-NSTs and from classic ILCs.
  • To define the transcriptomic differences between TCs and IDC-NSTs and ILCs whilst minimizing the impact of histological grade and molecular subtype on their profiles, we subjected a series of grade- and molecular subtype-matched TCs and IDC-NSTs and molecular subtype-matched TCs and classic ILCs to genome-wide gene expression profiling using oligonucleotide microarrays.
  • Unsupervised and supervised analysis revealed that TCs are similar at the transcriptomic level to grade- and molecular subtype-matched IDC-NSTs.
  • Transcriptomic differences between TCs and molecular subtype-matched classic ILCs were more overt, predominantly due to lower expression of proliferation and cell cycle genes in TCs and down-regulation of cell adhesion/extracellular matrix-related genes in classic ILCs.
  • Our results support the existence of a 'low-grade breast neoplasia family'; however, the transcriptomes of these lesions display small, yet important differences, which, together with their distinct biological behaviour, warrant their separation as discrete entities.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / genetics. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / genetics. Carcinoma, Lobular / genetics

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  • (PMID = 20593406.001).
  • [ISSN] 1096-9896
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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26. Raitanen MP, FinnBladder Group: The role of BTA stat Test in follow-up of patients with bladder cancer: results from FinnBladder studies. World J Urol; 2008 Feb;26(1):45-50
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  • [Title] The role of BTA stat Test in follow-up of patients with bladder cancer: results from FinnBladder studies.
  • OBJECTIVES: To summarize the results of the FinnBladder studies of the BTA stat Test in follow-up of bladder cancer and more importantly to provide guidelines for daily clinical practise.
  • The overall sensitivity and specificity for the BTA stat Test were calculated, factors interfering with testing and the role of false positive test result were evaluated.
  • RESULTS: Out of 501 patients 133 (26.5%) had a bladder cancer recurrence at cystoscopy, of which BTA stat Test detected 71 (53.4%).
  • In the remaining 368 patients, 96 (26.1%) had a positive BTA stat Test result.
  • The overall sensitivities and specificities for the BTA stat Test and cytology were 56.0, 19.2 and 85.7%, and 98.3%, respectively.
  • Urine infection and past BCG instillations and present instillations of any type caused false positive test result.
  • Out of 79 patients with positive BTA stat Test and negative cystoscopy, 6 (7.6%) had recurrence at next scheduled follow-up cystoscopy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although BTA stat Test cannot replace cystoscopy in the follow-up of patients with bladder cancer, it could replace routine cytology especially in patients with low-grade disease.
  • Test should not be used in patients with urine infection, in those having received BCG, or in those with present instillation of any type.
  • In case of positive test result but negative cystoscopy, urine cytology should be obtained as the first line examination.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, Neoplasm / urine. Biomarkers, Tumor / urine. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / diagnosis. Urinalysis / methods. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Biopsy. Complement Factor H. Cystoscopy. Diagnosis, Differential. Disease Progression. Female. Finland / epidemiology. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Morbidity / trends. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / epidemiology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / urine. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Prospective Studies. Reproducibility of Results. Sensitivity and Specificity. Time Factors

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  • [Cites] Eur Urol. 1999 Jan;35(1):52-6 [9933795.001]
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  • (PMID = 18180926.001).
  • [ISSN] 0724-4983
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / bladder tumor-associated antigen; 80295-65-4 / Complement Factor H
  • [Investigator] Ala-Opas M; Tuhkanen K; Forssel T; Granback P; Palmberg C; Liukkonen T; Juusela H; Korhonen H; Hellström P; Lukkarinen O; Nurmi M; Rajala P; Permi J; Puolakka VM; Talja M; Tammela T; Raitanen MP; Leppilahti M; Leskinen M; Marttila T; Raitanen MP; Kaasinen E; Ervasti J; Mehik A; Kauppinen R; Rauvala M; Viitanen J; Hansson E; Nylund P
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27. Yokoyama T, Kawahara A, Kage M, Kojiro M, Takayasu H, Sato T: Image analysis of irregularity of cluster shape in cytological diagnosis of breast tumors: cluster analysis with 2D-fractal dimension. Diagn Cytopathol; 2005 Aug;33(2):71-7
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  • [Title] Image analysis of irregularity of cluster shape in cytological diagnosis of breast tumors: cluster analysis with 2D-fractal dimension.
  • To establish diagnostic criteria using comparison of cell cluster shapes, between benign and malignant tumors, breast tumors demonstrating weak cellular atypia in low grade invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) were compared.
  • Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) specimens of breast tumors were obtained from 37 patients.
  • Among these, 16 were histologically diagnosed as IDC low-grade and the other 21 as benign fibroadenoma (FA).
  • Nine image morphometric parameters were studied, including the cluster area, circumference, maximal length, maximal breadth, ratio of length to breadth, cluster roundness, cluster size, and the edge and distribution image fractal dimensions for cluster analysis.
  • We evaluated the irregularity in cell cluster shape using fractal dimension analysis, and determined the correlation to cluster size.
  • The average cell cluster area of the FA with irregular shape was found to be about three times larger than that of IDC clusters.
  • When the differential diagnosis between IDC and FA is difficult, it is important to focus on irregularities in the shape and on overall size of the cell clusters.
  • For accurate diagnosis, the cell cluster shape is as important as the individual cellular atypia.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenofibroma / pathology. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / pathology. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy, Fine-Needle. Cluster Analysis. Female. Humans. Image Processing, Computer-Assisted. Predictive Value of Tests

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 16007648.001).
  • [ISSN] 8755-1039
  • [Journal-full-title] Diagnostic cytopathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Diagn. Cytopathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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28. Mirri MA, Arcangeli G, Benassi M, d'Angelo A, Pinzi V, Caterino M, Rinaldi M, Ceribelli A, Strigari L: Hypofractionated Conformal Radiotherapy (HCRT) for primary and metastatic lung cancers with small dimension : efficacy and toxicity. Strahlenther Onkol; 2009 Jan;185(1):27-33
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  • [Title] Hypofractionated Conformal Radiotherapy (HCRT) for primary and metastatic lung cancers with small dimension : efficacy and toxicity.
  • PURPOSE: : To report on the clinical outcome of hypofractionated conformal radiotherapy (HCRT) for medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) or limited pulmonary metastases </= 5 cm in diameter.
  • To evaluate target displacement under respiratory activity, two additional CT scans were performed with breath-holding during the expiratory and inspiratory phases.
  • RESULTS: : Local response to the treatment was complete response, partial response, no change, and progressive disease as seen in 29%, 43%, 14%, and 7% of tumors, respectively.
  • Lung toxicities > or = grade 2 were observed in 4/40 patients, but no grade 4.
  • CONCLUSION: : HCRT is an effective and low-toxic treatment for medically inoperable early-stage lung cancers and pulmonary metastases for all clinicians lacking the aid of a dedicated stereotactic system.
  • [MeSH-major] Lung Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Radiotherapy, Conformal / methods

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  • (PMID = 19224144.001).
  • [ISSN] 1439-099X
  • [Journal-full-title] Strahlentherapie und Onkologie : Organ der Deutschen Rontgengesellschaft ... [et al]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Strahlenther Onkol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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29. Ma Y, Yuan RQ, Fan S, Hu C, Goldberg ID, Laterra JJ, Rosen EM: Identification of genes that modulate sensitivity of U373MG glioblastoma cells to cis-platinum. Anticancer Drugs; 2006 Aug;17(7):733-51
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  • [Title] Identification of genes that modulate sensitivity of U373MG glioblastoma cells to cis-platinum.
  • Scatter factor (hepatocyte growth factor) and its receptor c-Met are increasingly expressed during progression from low-grade to high-grade gliomas.
  • Scatter factor/c-Met signaling induces glioma cell motility, invasion, angiogenesis and resistance to DNA-damaging agents.
  • The goal of this study was to identify a set of genes that may contribute to scatter factor-mediated protection of U373MG cells against cis-platinum, a DNA cross-linking agent.
  • We used DNA microarray assays, confirmatory semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis and functional assays to identify genes involved in the scatter factor-induced resistance of U373MG to cis-platinum.
  • We identified a group of genes that are overexpressed in cells treated with scatter factor plus cis-platinum relative to cells treated with cis-platinum alone and confirmed some of these gene expression alterations by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.
  • Inhibiting the expression of three of these genes--polycystic kidney disease 1, amplified in breast cancer 1 and DEAD/H box helicase 21--using small interfering RNAs reduced survival of cis-platinum-treated cells and partially reversed the scatter factor protection against cis-platinum.
  • The Akt and nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitors had no effect on amplified in breast cancer 1 expression.
  • These studies implicate DEAD/H box helicase 21, polycystin (PKD1) and amplified in breast cancer 1 as novel transcription-dependent regulators of scatter factor-mediated glioma cell protection against cytotoxic death, and identify other potential regulators for future study.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Brain Neoplasms / genetics. Cisplatin / therapeutic use. Glioblastoma / drug therapy. Glioblastoma / genetics. Hepatocyte Growth Factor / physiology. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-met / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Blotting, Western. Cell Line, Tumor. DNA Fingerprinting. Down-Regulation / drug effects. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic / drug effects. Genetic Vectors. Humans. NF-kappa B / genetics. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis. Oncogene Protein v-akt / genetics. RNA, Neoplasm / isolation & purification. RNA, Small Interfering. Transfection


30. Marschner N, Rüttinger D, Zugmaier G, Nemere G, Lehmann J, Obrist P, Baeuerle PA, Wolf A, Schmidt M, Abrahamsson PA, Reinhardt C, Heidenreich A: Phase II study of the human anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule antibody adecatumumab in prostate cancer patients with increasing serum levels of prostate-specific antigen after radical prostatectomy. Urol Int; 2010;85(4):386-95
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  • [Title] Phase II study of the human anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule antibody adecatumumab in prostate cancer patients with increasing serum levels of prostate-specific antigen after radical prostatectomy.
  • BACKGROUND: Rising serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) after radical prostatectomy are indicative of recurrent prostate cancer.
  • This double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II study evaluated the anti-tumour activity of the anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibody adecatumumab in delaying biochemical disease progression.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Prostate cancer patients with increasing serum PSA levels following radical prostatectomy were randomized to low- (2 mg/kg) or high-dose adecatumumab (6 mg/kg) or placebo.
  • The primary efficacy endpoint was the mean change from baseline in total serum PSA at week 24.
  • Secondary endpoints included PSA response rate, prolongation of serum PSA doubling time and time to biochemical disease progression.
  • RESULTS: The primary and secondary endpoints of the study were not met in the predefined analyses.
  • Most frequent treatment-related clinical adverse events were gastrointestinal (diarrhoea and nausea) or general events (chills), showing a dose dependency but no grade 3/4 intensity in any patient.
  • CONCLUSION: In men with rising PSA levels after radical prostatectomy and no evidence of clinical relapse, adecatumumab delayed disease progression in a subgroup of patients with baseline PSA levels ≤ 1 ng/ml and high EpCAM-expressing tumours.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Cell Adhesion Molecules / antagonists & inhibitors. Cell Adhesion Molecules / therapeutic use. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Prostatectomy. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antigens, Neoplasm / immunology. Double-Blind Method. Europe. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Placebo Effect. Retrospective Studies. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome. Up-Regulation


31. Sriprasert I, Kietpeerakool C, Cheewakriangkrai C, Siriaree S, Tantipalakorn C, Srisomboon J: Treatment of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions in an area of Thailand with a high incidence of cervical cancer. Int J Gynaecol Obstet; 2010 Dec;111(3):253-5
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  • [Title] Treatment of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions in an area of Thailand with a high incidence of cervical cancer.
  • OBJECTIVE: To audit the treatment of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) at Chiang Mai University Hospital based on 12 standard requirements of the National Health Service Cervical Screening Programme.
  • RESULTS: Four of the standard requirements were not met: not all women underwent colposcopy before definitive treatment; the rate of specimen fragmentation was high; among women with ectocervical lesions, the rate of tissue removal to a depth of greater than 7 mm was low; and among women aged over 50 years with endocervical-margin involvement, the rate of repeat excision was low.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / surgery. Medical Audit. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Colposcopy. Electrosurgery. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Practice Guidelines as Topic. Precancerous Conditions / diagnosis. Precancerous Conditions / surgery. Thailand. Vaginal Smears. Young Adult


32. Köbel M, Kalloger SE, Santos JL, Huntsman DG, Gilks CB, Swenerton KD: Tumor type and substage predict survival in stage I and II ovarian carcinoma: insights and implications. Gynecol Oncol; 2010 Jan;116(1):50-6
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  • [Title] Tumor type and substage predict survival in stage I and II ovarian carcinoma: insights and implications.
  • OBJECTIVE: An ability to predict survival is of crucial importance in determining the need for cancer therapy.
  • Recent advances in tumor typing of ovarian carcinomas lead to a classification which is more reproducible and reflects underlying biology more accurately than grade.
  • We tested whether updated tumor type predicts outcome for patients with low-stage ovarian carcinoma.
  • Recursive partitioning analysis and univariate models were used to identify subsets with an excellent outcome, i.e., disease-specific survival at 10 years (DSS10y) > or =95%.
  • RESULTS: Seventy-seven ovarian carcinomas of endometrioid and mucinous type, stage Ia or Ib, were associated with an excellent outcome [DSS10y=95%].
  • No subset of the high-grade serous type with an excellent outcome could be identified.
  • Clear cell carcinomas of stage Ia or Ib had a favorable outcome [DSS10y=87%] compared to stage Ic-II [DSS10y=66%].
  • CONCLUSIONS: A subset of ovarian carcinoma patients with an excellent outcome can be identified based on tumor type (endometrioid or mucinous) and stage (Ia or Ib).
  • Type is more reproducibly assigned than grade and identifies a larger cohort of women with stage I/II ovarian carcinoma with favorable outcomes (12.2% vs. 6.5%), and therefore is superior to grade in estimating risk of death from ovarian carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous / pathology. Carcinoma, Endometrioid / pathology. Ovarian Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Cohort Studies. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Predictive Value of Tests. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 19822358.001).
  • [ISSN] 1095-6859
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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33. Staats PN, Clement PB, Young RH: Primary endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the vagina: a clinicopathologic study of 18 cases. Am J Surg Pathol; 2007 Oct;31(10):1490-501
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  • [Title] Primary endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the vagina: a clinicopathologic study of 18 cases.
  • Vaginal adenocarcinoma is the second most common primary cancer of the vagina, yet there has been very little study of most subtypes other than clear cell carcinoma.
  • We reviewed 18 cases of primary vaginal endometrioid adenocarcinoma, in our experience the second most common subtype.
  • The tumors were at the vaginal apex in 10 cases, in the posterior wall in 3, the lateral wall in 3, and the anterior wall in 1.
  • On microscopic examination, each of the tumors had a pure or predominant component of typical endometrioid adenocarcinoma.
  • The tumors were grade 1 of 3 in 4 cases, grade 2 in 13, and grade 3 in 1.
  • Vaginal endometriosis was identified in 14 cases, and is important in indicating a primary vaginal tumor, rather than secondary spread from the endometrium.
  • Other subtypes of adenocarcinoma (such as serous when the tumor has a papillary pattern) and atypical forms of endometriosis, including polypoid endometriosis, are the most common other differential diagnostic considerations.
  • The prognosis seems to be good in low-stage patients, with 11 patients alive and well and 2 alive with recurrent disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Endometrioid / pathology. Vaginal Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Combined Modality Therapy. Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous / diagnosis. Diagnosis, Differential. Endometriosis / complications. Endometriosis / pathology. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Neoplasm Staging. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17895749.001).
  • [ISSN] 0147-5185
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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34. Seligson DB, Rajasekaran SA, Yu H, Liu X, Eeva M, Tze S, Ball W Jr, Horvath S, deKernion JB, Rajasekaran AK: Na,K-adenosine triphosphatase alpha1-subunit predicts survival of renal clear cell carcinoma. J Urol; 2008 Jan;179(1):338-45
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  • [Title] Na,K-adenosine triphosphatase alpha1-subunit predicts survival of renal clear cell carcinoma.
  • PURPOSE: Na,K-adenosine triphosphatase, which is composed of a catalytic alpha-subunit and a regulatory beta-subunit, generates an electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane.
  • Previous studies demonstrated altered Na,K-adenosine triphosphatase subunit expression in renal clear cell carcinoma and an association of subunit levels with the prediction of recurrent bladder cancer.
  • We determined the clinical association of protein expression patterns of the Na,K-adenosine triphosphatase alpha1 and beta1-subunits in renal clear cell carcinoma using tissue microarrays with linked clinicopathological data.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: The UCLA kidney cancer tissue microarray was used to investigate the protein expression of Na,K-adenosine triphosphatase alpha1 and beta1-subunits by immunohistochemistry in 342 patients with renal clear cell carcinoma who were treated with radical nephrectomy.
  • RESULTS: We found that the alpha1-subunit was a significant and independent predictor of disease specific death from renal clear cell carcinoma on multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis that included established prognostic factors Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, pT status, metastasis status and tumor grade.
  • Significance was found when examining all patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma as well as patient substrata with low or high grade tumors and localized or metastatic disease, suggesting that the Na,K-adenosine triphosphatase alpha1-subunit could be used as a new prognosticator for disease specific death from renal clear cell carcinoma.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that Na,K-adenosine triphosphatase alpha1-subunit expression patterns may be a useful clinical prognosticator for renal clear cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / biosynthesis. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / enzymology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / mortality. Kidney Neoplasms / enzymology. Kidney Neoplasms / mortality. Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Predictive Value of Tests. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 18006011.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-3792
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 2 P30 CA16042-29; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R0-1 DK56216
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; EC 3.6.3.9 / Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase
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35. Steinau M, Rajeevan MS, Lee DR, Ruffin MT, Horowitz IR, Flowers LC, Tadros T, Birdsong G, Husain M, Kmak DC, Longton GM, Vernon SD, Unger ER: Evaluation of RNA markers for early detection of cervical neoplasia in exfoliated cervical cells. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 2007 Feb;16(2):295-301
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  • [Title] Evaluation of RNA markers for early detection of cervical neoplasia in exfoliated cervical cells.
  • Numerous molecular biomarkers have been suggested for early detection of cervical cancer, but their usefulness in routinely collected exfoliated cells remains uncertain.
  • We used quantitative reverse transcription-PCR to evaluate expression of 40 candidate genes as markers for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in exfoliated cervical cells collected at the time of colposcopy.
  • Samples from the 93 women with CIN3 or cancer were compared with those from 186 women without disease matched (1:2) for age, race, and high-risk human papillomavirus status.
  • Six markers were confirmed by an area under the curve >0.6 in both sample sets: claudin 1 (0.75), minichromosome maintenance deficient 5 (0.71) and 7 (0.64), cell division cycle 6 homologue (0.71), antigen identified by monoclonal antibody Ki-67 (0.66), and SHC SH2-domain binding protein 1 (0.61).
  • The sensitivity for individual markers was relatively low and a combination of five genes to a panel resulted in 60% sensitivity with 76% specificity, not positively increasing this performance.
  • Although the results did not indicate superiority of RNA markers for cervical cancer screening, their performance in detecting disease in women referred for colposcopy suggests that the genes and pathways they highlight could be useful in alternative detection formats or in combination with other screening indicators.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Colposcopy. Female. Gene Expression Profiling. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Genetic Markers. Genome, Human. Genomics / methods. Humans. Papillomavirus Infections / pathology. RNA. ROC Curve. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction. Sensitivity and Specificity. Statistics, Nonparametric. Urban Population

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  • (PMID = 17301262.001).
  • [ISSN] 1055-9965
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CN / Y1-CN-0101-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CN / Y1-CN-5005-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Genetic Markers; 63231-63-0 / RNA
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36. Abdel-Fatah TM, Powe DG, Hodi Z, Reis-Filho JS, Lee AH, Ellis IO: Morphologic and molecular evolutionary pathways of low nuclear grade invasive breast cancers and their putative precursor lesions: further evidence to support the concept of low nuclear grade breast neoplasia family. Am J Surg Pathol; 2008 Apr;32(4):513-23
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  • [Title] Morphologic and molecular evolutionary pathways of low nuclear grade invasive breast cancers and their putative precursor lesions: further evidence to support the concept of low nuclear grade breast neoplasia family.
  • We have previously provided evidence showing an association between some precursor lesions with low nuclear grade breast carcinomas (LNGBCs).
  • Precursor lesions including columnar cell lesions, atypical ductal hyperplasia, ductal carcinoma in situ, usual epithelial hyperplasia, and lobular neoplasia were compared with matching "morphologically normal" terminal lobular duct units and matching invasive carcinoma.
  • The epithelial cells in the putative precursor flat epithelial atypia, atypical ductal hyperplasia, lobular neoplasia, ductal carcinoma in situ lesions, and their coexisting LNGBC were negative for basal and myoepithelial markers, but positive for CK19/18/8, estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha, Bcl-2, and cyclin D1.
  • The ER-alpha/ER-beta expression ratio increased during carcinogenesis, as did expression of cyclin D1 and Bcl-2. p53 immunopositivity was found 3% in LNGBC versus 43% in high nuclear grade breast carcinoma (HNGBC), whereas ataxia telangiectasia mutated expression was absent or reduced in 22% of LNGBC versus 53% of HNGBC cases.
  • These may represent a family of precursor, in situ and invasive neoplastic lesions belonging to the luminal "A" subclass of breast cancer.
  • Ataxia telangiectasia mutated may be one of the alternative regulatory mechanisms to TP53 mutation or dysfunction in low-grade and high-grade breast carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / chemistry. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Mammary Glands, Human / chemistry. Mammary Glands, Human / pathology. Precancerous Conditions / chemistry. Precancerous Conditions / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / chemistry. Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / chemistry. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / pathology. Carcinoma, Lobular / chemistry. Carcinoma, Lobular / pathology. Cell Cycle Proteins / analysis. Cyclin D. Cyclins / analysis. DNA-Binding Proteins / analysis. Estrogen Receptor alpha / analysis. Estrogen Receptor beta / analysis. Evolution, Molecular. Female. Humans. Hyperplasia. Immunohistochemistry. Keratin-18 / analysis. Keratin-19 / analysis. Keratin-8 / analysis. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Staging. Phenotype. Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases / analysis. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 / analysis. Tissue Array Analysis. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / analysis. Tumor Suppressor Proteins / analysis

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  • (PMID = 18223478.001).
  • [ISSN] 0147-5185
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cell Cycle Proteins; 0 / Cyclin D; 0 / Cyclins; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / Estrogen Receptor alpha; 0 / Estrogen Receptor beta; 0 / KRT18 protein, human; 0 / KRT8 protein, human; 0 / Keratin-18; 0 / Keratin-19; 0 / Keratin-8; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2; 0 / TP53 protein, human; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins; EC 2.7.11.1 / ATM protein, human; EC 2.7.11.1 / Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins; EC 2.7.11.1 / Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
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37. Hisaoka M, Okamoto S, Aoki T, Yokoyama K, Hashimoto H: Spinal epithelioid hemangioendothelioma with epithelioid angiosarcomatous areas. Skeletal Radiol; 2005 Nov;34(11):745-9
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  • [Title] Spinal epithelioid hemangioendothelioma with epithelioid angiosarcomatous areas.
  • Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma is a distinctive vascular tumor rarely involving bones.
  • We report a case of epithelioid hemangioendothelioma in the cervical spine with angiosarcomatous areas.
  • Histologically, a laminectomy specimen exhibited areas of ordinary epithelioid hemangioendothelioma together with foci of more atypical epithelioid cell proliferation, closely resembling epithelioid angiosarcoma.
  • This phenomenon has been exceptionally described in cases with skeletal lesions, which are typically of low-grade malignancy.
  • [MeSH-major] Cervical Vertebrae / pathology. Hemangioendothelioma, Epithelioid / diagnosis. Hemangiosarcoma / diagnosis. Spinal Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy. Diagnosis, Differential. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Middle Aged

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  • [ISSN] 0364-2348
  • [Journal-full-title] Skeletal radiology
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  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
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38. Lawson W, Schlecht NF, Brandwein-Gensler M: The role of the human papillomavirus in the pathogenesis of Schneiderian inverted papillomas: an analytic overview of the evidence. Head Neck Pathol; 2008 Jun;2(2):49-59
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  • What is the relationship between low-risk (LR) and high-risk (HR) HPV types and HPV detection rates in IP?
  • Is there a relationship between the presence and type of HPV in IP and recurrence and malignant progression?
  • A preponderance of HPV 6/11 is found in IP as compared to HPV 16/18; the overall unadjusted ratio of LR to high-risk HR HPV types is 2.8:1 The HPV detection rates significantly increase (Wald t-test P < 0.02) in IPs with high-grade dysplasia (WP 55.8%, 95%CI 30.5-81.0%) and carcinoma (WP 55.1%, 95%CI 37.0-73.2%) as compared to IPs with no dysplasia or mild dysplasia (WP 22.3%, 95%CI 15.9-28.6%).
  • Furthermore, the preponderance of LR HPV in benign IP (ratio LR/HR = 4.8:1) shifts in dysplastic and malignant IP.
  • The LR/HR ratio is 1.1:1 for IPs with high-grade dysplasias, this ratio is inverted to favor HR HPV (1:2.4) for malignant IP.
  • The presence of HPV was significantly associated with the likelihood of developing recurrence (weighted OR of 10.2, 95%CI 3.2-32.8).
  • CONCLUSIONS: We hypothesize that LR HPV may induce IP formation, and then are lost as infected cells are shed, as a "hit and run" phenomenon.
  • That is, if one series contains a higher frequency of dysplastic and malignant IP, it may have a higher detection rate than another series which contains only nondysplastic IP.
  • We hypothesize that the higher rates of HPV detection in dysplastic and malignant IP may be related to HPV integration.
  • The implication of this is that HPV sub-type testing may identify patients at risk for recurrence, or progression to dysplasia and malignancy, and thus may impact surveillance protocols.
  • [MeSH-major] Alphapapillomavirus / isolation & purification. Nose Neoplasms / virology. Papilloma, Inverted / virology

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  • (PMID = 20614323.001).
  • [ISSN] 1936-0568
  • [Journal-full-title] Head and neck pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Head Neck Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Viral
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2807546
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Dysplasia / HPV detection / High-risk / Inverted papilloma / Recurrence
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39. D'Elios MM, Amedei A, Benagiano M, Azzurri A, Del Prete G: Helicobacter pylori, T cells and cytokines: the "dangerous liaisons". FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol; 2005 May 1;44(2):113-9
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  • [Title] Helicobacter pylori, T cells and cytokines: the "dangerous liaisons".
  • Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of gastroduodenal pathologies, but only a minority of infected patients develop chronic and life threatening diseases, as peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, B-cell lymphoma, or autoimmune gastritis.
  • Gastric T cells from MALT lymphoma exhibit abnormal help for autologous B-cell proliferation and reduced perforin- and Fas-Fas ligand-mediated killing of B cells.
  • In H. pylori-infected patients with autoimmune gastritis cytolytic T cells infiltrating the gastric mucosa cross-recognize different epitopes of H. pylori proteins and H+K+ ATPase autoantigen.
  • These data suggest that peptic ulcer can be regarded as a Th1-driven immunopathological response to some H. pylori antigens, whereas deregulated and exhaustive H. pylori-induced T cell-dependent B-cell activation can support the onset of low-grade B-cell lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-minor] Autoimmune Diseases / immunology. Autoimmune Diseases / microbiology. Humans. Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / immunology. Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / microbiology. Peptic Ulcer / immunology. Peptic Ulcer / microbiology. Stomach Neoplasms / immunology. Stomach Neoplasms / microbiology. T-Lymphocytes / immunology

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  • (PMID = 15866204.001).
  • [ISSN] 0928-8244
  • [Journal-full-title] FEMS immunology and medical microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] FEMS Immunol. Med. Microbiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cytokines
  • [Number-of-references] 48
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40. Zhou L, Jiang Y, Yan T, Di G, Shen Z, Shao Z, Lu J: The prognostic role of cancer stem cells in breast cancer: a meta-analysis of published literatures. Breast Cancer Res Treat; 2010 Aug;122(3):795-801
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  • [Title] The prognostic role of cancer stem cells in breast cancer: a meta-analysis of published literatures.
  • CD44+/CD24-/low tumor cells or aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) positive tumor cells are considered cancer stem cells (CSCs) that possess the properties of self-renewal and tumorigenicity.
  • However, their clinical value and significance in breast cancer remain controversial.
  • CSC positive breast cancers, in particular those positive for ALDH1, were significantly associated with high histological grade, estrogen receptor (ER) negativity, progesterone receptor (PR) negativity, and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) positivity.
  • However, the presence of cancer stem cells was not associated with tumor size or nodal status.
  • ALDH1 positive (RR = 2.83, 95% CI: 2.16-3.67, P < 0.001) and CD44+/CD24-/low tumor cells (RR = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.51-3.60, P < 0.001) were significantly associated with poor overall survival (OS).
  • The stem cell markers are prognostic factors in breast cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / diagnosis. Neoplastic Stem Cells / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aldehyde Dehydrogenase / metabolism. Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Female. Humans. Isoenzymes / metabolism. Prognosis. Receptor, ErbB-2 / metabolism. Receptors, Estrogen / metabolism. Receptors, Progesterone / metabolism. Retinal Dehydrogenase


41. Chumworathayi B, Srisupundit S, Lumbiganon P, Limpaphayom KK: One-year follow-up of single-visit approach to cervical cancer prevention based on visual inspection with acetic acid wash and immediate cryotherapy in rural Thailand. Int J Gynecol Cancer; 2008 Jul-Aug;18(4):736-42
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  • [Title] One-year follow-up of single-visit approach to cervical cancer prevention based on visual inspection with acetic acid wash and immediate cryotherapy in rural Thailand.
  • The aim is to evaluate 1) the visibility of cervical squamocolumnar junction (SCJ) after cryotherapy treatment and 2) to evaluate the effectiveness of cryotherapy treatment originally performed as part of a safety, acceptability, and feasibility (SAFE) demonstration project evaluating the SAFE of visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) followed by immediate offer of cryotherapy among those who were tested positive and eligible for treatment.
  • At 1 year, VIA nurses assessed 42 of 648 referred women (6.5%) as abnormal (test positive or suspected cancer).
  • Among 42 women assessed as abnormal by the nurses, colposcopic findings were abnormal in 83.3% (35/42), with one low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, two high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), and one adenocarcinoma confirmed later by biopsy.
  • The disease negative rate after cryotherapy (no human papillomavirus infection, no cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, and no cancer) at 1 year after treatment was 85.5% (554/648).
  • [MeSH-major] Acetic Acid / therapeutic use. Ambulatory Care. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / prevention & control. Cryotherapy. Physical Examination. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Algorithms. Education, Medical, Continuing. Feasibility Studies. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Health Services Accessibility. Humans. Middle Aged. Patient Acceptance of Health Care. Professional Competence. Rural Population. Thailand. Vaginal Douching / adverse effects. Vaginal Douching / methods


42. Health Quality Ontario: Clinical utility of vitamin d testing: an evidence-based analysis. Ont Health Technol Assess Ser; 2010;10(2):1-93
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  • This report from the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) was intended to evaluate the clinical utility of vitamin D testing in average risk Canadians and in those with kidney disease.
  • It stimulates intestinal calcium absorption and is important in maintaining adequate phosphate levels for bone mineralization, bone growth, and remodelling.
  • It's also believed to be involved in the regulation of cell growth proliferation and apoptosis (programmed cell death), as well as modulation of the immune system and other functions.
  • However, in a comprehensive systematic review, inconsistent results were found concerning the effects of vitamin D in conditions such as cancer, all-cause mortality, and cardiovascular disease.
  • Given the uncertainties surrounding the effects of vitamin D in non-bone health related outcomes, it was decided that this evaluation should focus on falls and the effects of vitamin D in bone health and exclusively within average-risk individuals and patients with kidney disease.
  • Since it is usually difficult to obtain sufficient vitamin D from non-fortified foods, either due to low content or infrequent use, most vitamin D is obtained from fortified foods, exposure to sunlight, and supplements.
  • CLINICAL NEED: CONDITION AND TARGET POPULATION Vitamin D deficiency may lead to rickets in infants and osteomalacia in adults.
  • Factors believed to be associated with vitamin D deficiency include: darker skin pigmentation,winter season,living at higher latitudes,skin coverage,kidney disease,malabsorption syndromes such as Crohn's disease, cystic fibrosis, andgenetic factors.Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at a higher risk of vitamin D deficiency due to either renal losses or decreased synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.
  • Vitamin D status is assessed by measuring the serum 25(OH)D levels, which can be assayed using radioimmunoassays, competitive protein-binding assays (CPBA), high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).
  • These may yield different results with inter-assay variation reaching up to 25% (at lower serum levels) and intra-assay variation reaching 10%.
  • According to the Ontario Schedule of Benefits, the billing cost of each test is $51.7 for 25(OH)D (L606, 100 LMS units, $0.517/unit) and $77.6 for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (L605, 150 LMS units, $0.517/unit).
  • EVIDENCE-BASED ANALYSIS: The objective of this report is to evaluate the clinical utility of vitamin D testing in the average risk population and in those with kidney disease.
  • The specific research questions addressed were thus: What is the clinical utility of vitamin D testing in the average risk population and in subjects with kidney disease?What is the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the average risk population in Canada?What is the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients with kidney disease in Canada?Clinical utility was defined as the ability to improve bone health outcomes with the focus on the average risk population (excluding those with osteoporosis) and patients with kidney disease.
  • Reference lists were also examined for any additional relevant studies not identified through the search.
  • The quality of evidence was assessed as high, moderate, low or very low according to GRADE methodology.
  • INCLUSION CRITERIA: Studies published in EnglishPublications that reported the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in CanadaStudies that included subjects from the general population or with kidney diseaseStudies in children or adultsStudies published between January 1998 and July 17(th) 2009 EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Studies that included subjects defined according to a specific disease other than kidney diseaseLetters, comments, and editorialsStudies that measured the serum vitamin D levels but did not report the percentage of subjects with serum levels below a given threshold OUTCOMES OF INTEREST: Prevalence of serum vitamin D less than 25 nmol/LPrevalence of serum vitamin D less than 40 to 50 nmol/LSerum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was the metabolite used to assess vitamin D status.
  • Results from adult and children studies were reported separately.
  • The overall quality of the trials was examined according to the GRADE Working Group criteria. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)

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  • (PMID = 23074397.001).
  • [ISSN] 1915-7398
  • [Journal-full-title] Ontario health technology assessment series
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ont Health Technol Assess Ser
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3377517
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43. Mell LK, Schomas DA, Salama JK, Devisetty K, Aydogan B, Miller RC, Jani AB, Kindler HL, Mundt AJ, Roeske JC, Chmura SJ: Association between bone marrow dosimetric parameters and acute hematologic toxicity in anal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2008 Apr 1;70(5):1431-7
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  • [Title] Association between bone marrow dosimetric parameters and acute hematologic toxicity in anal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy.
  • PURPOSE: To test the hypothesis that the volume of pelvic bone marrow (PBM) receiving 10 and 20 Gy or more (PBM-V(10) and PBM-V(20)) is associated with acute hematologic toxicity (HT) in anal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: We analyzed 48 consecutive anal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy.
  • The median radiation dose to gross tumor and regional lymph nodes was 50.4 and 45 Gy, respectively.
  • Endpoints included the white blood cell count (WBC), absolute neutrophil count (ANC), hemoglobin, and platelet count nadirs.
  • Regression models with multiple independent predictors were used to test associations between dosimetric parameters and HT.
  • RESULTS: Twenty patients (42%) had Stage T3-4 disease; 15 patients (31%) were node positive.
  • Overall, 27 (56%), 24 (50%), 4 (8%), and 13 (27%) experienced acute Grade 3-4 leukopenia, neutropenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia, respectively.
  • On multiple regression analysis, increased PBM-V(5), V(10), V(15), and V(20) were significantly associated with decreased WBC and ANC nadirs, as were female gender, decreased body mass index, and increased lumbosacral bone marrow V(10), V(15), and V(20) (p < 0.05 for each association).
  • Lymph node positivity was significantly associated with a decreased WBC nadir on multiple regression analysis (p < 0.05).
  • CONCLUSION: This analysis supports the hypothesis that increased low-dose radiation to PBM is associated with acute HT during chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer.
  • Techniques to limit bone marrow irradiation may reduce HT in anal cancer patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / drug therapy. Anus Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Bone Marrow / radiation effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Anemia / etiology. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy / methods. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Leukopenia / etiology. Male. Middle Aged. Mitomycin / administration & dosage. Neutropenia / etiology. Pelvis. Radiotherapy Dosage. Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated. Regression Analysis. Retrospective Studies. Thrombocytopenia / etiology

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  • (PMID = 17996390.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 50SG953SK6 / Mitomycin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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44. Li B, Qi XQ, Chen X, Huang X, Liu GY, Chen HR, Huang CG, Luo C, Lu YC: Expression of targeting protein for Xenopus kinesin-like protein 2 is associated with progression of human malignant astrocytoma. Brain Res; 2010 Sep 17;1352:200-7
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  • [Title] Expression of targeting protein for Xenopus kinesin-like protein 2 is associated with progression of human malignant astrocytoma.
  • In humans, the targeting protein for Xenopus kinesin-like protein 2 (TPX2) is a cell cycle-associated protein, and altered TPX2 expression has been found in various malignancies.
  • The aim of this study was to investigate TPX2 expression in human astrocytoma samples and cell lines.
  • Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of TPX2 were higher in high-grade astrocytoma tissues and cell lines than that in low-grade astrocytoma tissues and normal cell lines.
  • Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissues from 52 patients with astrocytoma showed that TPX2 over-expression was significantly associated with decreased patient survival.
  • In addition, down-regulation of the TPX2 gene by RNA interference inhibited proliferation of U87 cells.
  • TPX2 gene silencing also increased early-stage apoptosis in U87 cells.
  • Western blotting and real-time PCR showed changes in the protein and mRNA expression of Aurora A, Ran, p53, c-Myc and cyclin B1 in U87 cells that had been transfected with pSUPER/TPX2/siRNA.
  • These data suggest that TPX2 expression is associated with the progression of malignant astrocytoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Astrocytoma / genetics. Brain Neoplasms / genetics. Cell Cycle Proteins / genetics. Microtubule-Associated Proteins / genetics. Nuclear Proteins / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Apoptosis. Aurora Kinases. Brain / metabolism. Cell Division. Cell Line, Tumor. Cyclin B1 / genetics. Cyclin D1 / genetics. Disease Progression. Down-Regulation. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases / genetics. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc / genetics. Survival Rate. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / genetics

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  • (PMID = 20599806.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-6240
  • [Journal-full-title] Brain research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Brain Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cell Cycle Proteins; 0 / Cyclin B1; 0 / Microtubule-Associated Proteins; 0 / Nuclear Proteins; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc; 0 / TPX2 protein, human; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; 136601-57-5 / Cyclin D1; EC 2.7.11.1 / Aurora Kinases; EC 2.7.11.1 / Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
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45. Sequist LV, Besse B, Lynch TJ, Miller VA, Wong KK, Gitlitz B, Eaton K, Zacharchuk C, Freyman A, Powell C, Ananthakrishnan R, Quinn S, Soria JC: Neratinib, an irreversible pan-ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor: results of a phase II trial in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2010 Jun 20;28(18):3076-83
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  • [Title] Neratinib, an irreversible pan-ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor: results of a phase II trial in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.
  • PURPOSE: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have had a significant impact on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) outcomes, particularly for patients with EGFR mutations.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with advanced NSCLC underwent EGFR sequencing of available tumor tissue at enrollment.
  • The primary end point was objective response rate (RR).
  • Diarrhea was the most common toxicity; grade 3 incidence was 50% at 320 mg but improved to 25% after dose reduction.
  • Notably, three of four patients with an exon 18 G719X EGFR mutation had a partial response and the fourth had stable disease lasting 40 weeks.
  • CONCLUSION: Neratinib had low activity in patients with prior benefit from TKIs and in TKI-naïve patients, potentially because of insufficient bioavailability from diarrhea-imposed dose limitation.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Quinolines / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. International Agencies. Male. Middle Aged. Mutation / genetics. Prospective Studies. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / genetics. Receptor, ErbB-2 / antagonists & inhibitors. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult


51. Chen D, Law ME, Theis JD, Gamez JD, Caron LB, Vrana JA, Dogan A: Clinicopathologic features of CDK6 translocation-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Am J Surg Pathol; 2009 May;33(5):720-9
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  • [Title] Clinicopathologic features of CDK6 translocation-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.
  • Cyclin-dependent protein kinase 6 (CDK6), in cooperation with cyclin Ds, drives cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase through phosphorylation and subsequent inactivation of retinoblastoma 1 protein.
  • Alteration of this pathway results in both nonhematologic and hematologic malignancies, which include a small subset of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (BLPDs).
  • Common clinical characteristics included marked neoplastic lymphocytosis, systemic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and bone marrow involvement.
  • Three patients were diagnosed with low-grade B-cell lymphoma and had an indolent clinical course, and 2 patients (one who transformed to large B-cell lymphoma, and the other who was initially diagnosed with a high-grade B-cell lymphoma) had an aggressive clinical course.
  • Immunophenotypically, the neoplastic B cells expressed CD5, CDK6, and cytoplasmic retinoblastoma 1 protein in all cases, expressed phospho-RB, p27kip1, and cyclin D2 in most cases, and uniformly lacked expression of all other cyclins.
  • These distinct clinicopathologic and cytogenetic features distinguish the CDK6 translocation-associated BLPDs (CDK6-BLPDs) from other mature B-cell lymphomas.

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  • (PMID = 19145199.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-0979
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA097274-069001; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA097274; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA97274; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA097274-069001
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD5; 0 / CCND2 protein, human; 0 / CDKN1B protein, human; 0 / Cyclin D2; 0 / Cyclins; 0 / Immunoglobulin kappa-Chains; 0 / Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; 0 / Retinoblastoma Protein; 147604-94-2 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27; EC 2.7.11.22 / CDK6 protein, human; EC 2.7.11.22 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 6
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS87263; NLM/ PMC2674112
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52. Blazy A, Hennequin C, Gornet JM, Furco A, Gérard L, Lémann M, Maylin C: Anal carcinomas in HIV-positive patients: high-dose chemoradiotherapy is feasible in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Dis Colon Rectum; 2005 Jun;48(6):1176-81
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: Anal carcinoma, a common disease in HIV-positive patients, is usually treated with chemoradiotherapy.
  • Six cancers were Stage I, two were Stage II, and one was Stage III.
  • CD4+ cell counts were <200/ml for four patients, between 200/ml and 500/ml for four, and >500/ml for one.
  • Grade 3 hematologic or skin toxicity occurred in four patients.
  • No association was observed between high-grade toxicity and CD4+ cell count.
  • Eight patients were disease-free after a median follow-up of 33 months.
  • One patient with T4N2 disease relapsed locally one year after treatment and underwent salvage abdominoperineal excision.
  • CONCLUSION: High-dose chemoradiotherapy for anal carcinomas is feasible with low toxicity in HIV-positive patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapies.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Anus Neoplasms / therapy. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / therapy. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. HIV Infections / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Anti-Retroviral Agents / administration & dosage. Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. Combined Modality Therapy. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Feasibility Studies. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15906137.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-3706
  • [Journal-full-title] Diseases of the colon and rectum
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dis. Colon Rectum
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Retroviral Agents; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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53. Lanigan F, Gremel G, Hughes R, Brennan DJ, Martin F, Jirström K, Gallagher WM: Homeobox transcription factor muscle segment homeobox 2 (Msx2) correlates with good prognosis in breast cancer patients and induces apoptosis in vitro. Breast Cancer Res; 2010;12(4):R59
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  • [Title] Homeobox transcription factor muscle segment homeobox 2 (Msx2) correlates with good prognosis in breast cancer patients and induces apoptosis in vitro.
  • However, the clinical implications of Msx2 expression in breast cancer are unclear.
  • The aims of this study were to investigate the potential clinical value of Msx2 as a breast cancer biomarker and to clarify its functional role in vitro.
  • METHODS: Msx2 gene expression was first examined in a well-validated breast cancer transcriptomic dataset of 295 patients.
  • Msx2 protein expression was then evaluated by immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 281 invasive breast tumours.
  • Finally, to assess the functional role of Msx2 in vitro, Msx2 was ectopically expressed in a highly invasive breast tumour cell line (MDA-MB-231) and an immortalised breast cell line (MCF10a), and these cell lines were examined for changes in growth rate, cell death and cell signalling.
  • RESULTS: Examination of Msx2 mRNA expression in a breast cancer transcriptomic dataset demonstrated that increased levels of Msx2 were associated with good prognosis (P = 0.011).
  • Evaluation of Msx2 protein expression on a TMA revealed that Msx2 was detectable in both tumour cell nuclei and cytoplasm.
  • Cytoplasmic Msx2 expression was associated with low grade tumours (P = 0.012) and Ki67 negativity (P = 0.018).
  • Nuclear Msx2 correlated with low-grade tumours (P = 0.015), estrogen receptor positivity (P = 0.038), low Ki67 (P = 0.005) and high cyclin D1 expression (P = 0.037).
  • Increased cytoplasmic Msx2 expression was associated with a prolonged breast cancer-specific survival (P = 0.049), recurrence-free survival (P = 0.029) and overall survival (P = 0.019).
  • Ectopic expression of Msx2 in breast cell lines resulted in radically decreased cell viability mediated by induction of cell death via apoptosis.
  • Further analysis of Msx2-expressing cells revealed increased levels of p21 and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and decreased levels of Survivin and the 'split ends' (SPEN) protein family member RBM15.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that increased Msx2 expression results in improved outcome for breast cancer patients, possibly by increasing the likelihood of tumour cell death by apoptosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis. Breast Neoplasms / metabolism. Homeodomain Proteins / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Blotting, Western. Cell Cycle. Cell Line. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Nucleus / metabolism. Cytoplasm / metabolism. Female. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. HEK293 Cells. Humans. Immunohistochemistry / statistics & numerical data. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models. Signal Transduction. Tissue Array Analysis


54. Dall'Oglio MF, Ribeiro-Filho LA, Antunes AA, Crippa A, Nesrallah L, Gonçalves PD, Leite KR, Srougi M: Microvascular tumor invasion, tumor size and Fuhrman grade: a pathological triad for prognostic evaluation of renal cell carcinoma. J Urol; 2007 Aug;178(2):425-8; discussion 428
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  • [Title] Microvascular tumor invasion, tumor size and Fuhrman grade: a pathological triad for prognostic evaluation of renal cell carcinoma.
  • PURPOSE: The biological behavior and clinical outcome of renal cell carcinoma are difficult to predict.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied 230 patients with renal cell carcinoma (stages T(1-4) N(x) M(0)) who underwent radical nephrectomy and/or nephron sparing surgery, and were followed for a median of 48 months (range 3 to 140).
  • Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed, and the influence of clinical presentation, histological tumor size, tumor grade, lymph node involvement and microvascular tumor invasion on disease-free and cancer specific survival curves was determined.
  • A composition model based on independent prognostic variables was then created to stratify tumors into low, intermediate and high risk of progression.
  • RESULTS: The tumor recurrence rate was 17% (39 of 230) and the cancer specific mortality rate was 13% (31 of 230).
  • Multivariate analyses determined that microvascular tumor invasion, tumor grade and tumor size were the only independent prognostic factors.
  • Disease-free survival rates for low, intermediate and high risk tumors were 94.7%, 56.8% and 13.1%, respectively.
  • Cancer specific survival rates were 94.7%, 61.7% and 32.0%, respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Tumor size, Fuhrman grade and microvascular tumor invasion are strong and independent predictors of survival of patients with renal cell carcinoma.
  • Risk assessment and stratification based on this triad of pathological features may allow better individualization of followup schedules and trials of adjuvant treatment for patients with renal cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Microcirculation / pathology. Neovascularization, Pathologic / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Child. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Kidney / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Staging. Nephrectomy. Prognosis. Survival Analysis

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  • [CommentIn] Nat Clin Pract Urol. 2008 Feb;5(2):74-5 [18059390.001]
  • (PMID = 17561167.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-5347
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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55. Okonda S, Wright C, Michelow P: The status of cervical cytology in Swaziland, Southern Africa: a descriptive study. Cytojournal; 2009;6:14
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  • BACKGROUND: Cancer of the cervix is the most common cancer in women in Swaziland where most women never undergo cervical screening.
  • The extremely high prevalence of HIV/AIDS in Swaziland complicates the management of preinvasive and invasive cervical cancer.
  • The percentages of abnormalities were as follows: atypical squamous cells of undermined significance (ASC-US), 19.8%; atypical squamous cells, cannot exclude HSILs (ASC-H), 8.8%; low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), 9.0%; high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), 4.6%; squamous cell carcinomas, 0.5%; atypical endocervical cells, 0.6%; and atypical endometrial cells, 0.4%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study underscores the need to reduce the incidence of cervical cancer and its precursor lesions in Swaziland women.
  • Based on studies of human papillomavirus (HPV) types in other Southern African countries, current HPV vaccines would reduce the incidence and mortality from cervical cancer in the future, but cervical screening would still be required, both for women already infected with the HPV and for HPV subtypes not covered by current vaccines.
  • Cervical cancer reduction needs to be managed within the greater framework of the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

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  • (PMID = 19826481.001).
  • [ISSN] 1742-6413
  • [Journal-full-title] CytoJournal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cytojournal
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2758303
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Cervical screening / HPV / low resource communities
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56. Fredlund E, Ovenberger M, Borg K, Påhlman S: Transcriptional adaptation of neuroblastoma cells to hypoxia. Biochem Biophys Res Commun; 2008 Feb 22;366(4):1054-60
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  • [Title] Transcriptional adaptation of neuroblastoma cells to hypoxia.
  • Low oxygen pressure (hypoxia) is a physiological condition that has been linked to tumor progression and increased malignancy in several cancer forms.
  • Cells of the childhood neoplasm neuroblastoma respond to hypoxia by attaining a lower grade of differentiation, which clinically is associated with poor prognosis.
  • In this report we have by microarray analysis studied transcriptional changes in seven neuroblastoma cell lines subjected to long term hypoxia.
  • We find the gene regulatory response to be highly dependent on cell line background, however, a set of genes was coherently regulated by hypoxia and these genes are correlated to known hypoxia-induced transcriptional profiles.
  • [MeSH-major] Adaptation, Physiological. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Neuroblastoma / genetics. Neuroblastoma / pathology. Transcription, Genetic
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Hypoxia. Cell Line, Tumor. Gene Expression Profiling. Humans. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 / metabolism. Mice

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  • (PMID = 18155155.001).
  • [ISSN] 1090-2104
  • [Journal-full-title] Biochemical and biophysical research communications
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1
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57. Tsimberidou AM, Keating MJ: Hyperuricemic syndromes in cancer patients. Contrib Nephrol; 2005;147:47-60
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  • [Title] Hyperuricemic syndromes in cancer patients.
  • BACKGROUND/AIMS: Tumor lysis syndrome is a challenging complication of cancer therapy.
  • RESULTS: Both host-related and tumor-related factors predispose cancer patients to hyperuricemic syndromes.
  • Host-related factors include low urinary flow, pre-existing hyperuricemia, renal failure, dehydration, acidic urine, and suppressed renal uric acid excretion.
  • Tumor-related risk factors include a high tumor cell proliferation rate, large tumor burden, and tumor chemosensitivity.
  • Acute renal failure may occur after cytoreductive chemotherapy in patients with active disease and a high tumor burden.
  • Patients with advanced Burkitt's leukemia/lymphoma, high-grade lymphoma, or acute leukemia with elevated leukocyte counts are at high risk for complications of hyperuricemia.
  • CONCLUSION: Early recognition of metabolic abnormalities in cancer patients at risk for hyperuricemia is essential for proper therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Hyperuricemia / etiology. Neoplasms / complications

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  • (PMID = 15604605.001).
  • [ISSN] 0302-5144
  • [Journal-full-title] Contributions to nephrology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Contrib Nephrol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 1.7.3.3 / Urate Oxidase; EC 1.7.3.3. / rasburicase
  • [Number-of-references] 85
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58. Papa F, Delia M, Trentadue R, Panelli D, Bellomo F, Serpico R, Petruzzi M, De Benedittis M, Scacco S: Differential effects of all-trans retinoic acid on the growth of human keratinocytes and mouth carcinoma epidermoid cultures. Involvement of GRIM-19 and complex I of the respiratory chain. Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol; 2007 Oct-Dec;20(4):719-29
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  • [Title] Differential effects of all-trans retinoic acid on the growth of human keratinocytes and mouth carcinoma epidermoid cultures. Involvement of GRIM-19 and complex I of the respiratory chain.
  • Squamous cell carcinoma (SSC) is the most frequent malignant tumor of the oral cavity.
  • A study on the effect of all-trans retinoic acid (RA) on cell growth, expression of GRIM-19 and content and activity of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in normal human keratinocytes (NHEK) and mouth carcinoma cells with low (HN) and high (KB) transformation grade was carried out.
  • In NHEK cells, RA treatment resulted in growth suppression, significant overexpression of GRIM-19 protein, enhanced content of complex I but depressed activity of NADH-UQ oxidoreductase activity of the complex.
  • In HN cells, RA treatment depressed cell growth, inhibited the enzymatic activity of complex I but had no significant effect on the levels of GRIM-19 and complex I.
  • In KB cells RA had no effect on cell growth, GRIM-19 expression, content and activity of complex I.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins / physiology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Electron Transport / physiology. Electron Transport Complex I / physiology. Keratinocytes / drug effects. Keratolytic Agents / pharmacology. Mouth Neoplasms / pathology. NADH, NADPH Oxidoreductases / physiology. Tretinoin / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Acid Sequence. Apoptosis / drug effects. Cell Division / drug effects. Cell Line. Cell Line, Tumor. Cytochromes c / metabolism. Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel. Glutathione Peroxidase / metabolism. Humans. Molecular Sequence Data. Subcellular Fractions / drug effects. Subcellular Fractions / metabolism. Superoxide Dismutase / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 18179744.001).
  • [ISSN] 0394-6320
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of immunopathology and pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins; 0 / Keratolytic Agents; 5688UTC01R / Tretinoin; 9007-43-6 / Cytochromes c; EC 1.11.1.9 / Glutathione Peroxidase; EC 1.15.1.1 / Superoxide Dismutase; EC 1.6.- / NADH, NADPH Oxidoreductases; EC 1.6.5.- / GRIM19 protein, human; EC 1.6.5.3 / Electron Transport Complex I
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59. Roth MJ, Abnet CC, Hu N, Wang QH, Wei WQ, Green L, D'Alelio M, Qiao YL, Dawsey SM, Taylor PR, Woodson K: p16, MGMT, RARbeta2, CLDN3, CRBP and MT1G gene methylation in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and its precursor lesions. Oncol Rep; 2006 Jun;15(6):1591-7
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  • [Title] p16, MGMT, RARbeta2, CLDN3, CRBP and MT1G gene methylation in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and its precursor lesions.
  • Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is a common cancer with a very poor prognosis.
  • New methods are needed to screen high-risk populations and identify curable tumors and precursor lesions early.
  • This study was designed to determine the prevalence of p16, MGMT, RARbeta2, CLDN3, CRBP and MT1G gene methylation in patients with ESCC to evaluate the variation of gene methylation across a spectrum of preneoplastic lesions, and assess the feasibility of using gene methylation in a primary screening test utilizing frozen esophageal cells collected by balloon cytology samplers.
  • These samples included 11 foci of histologically normal mucosa, 8 foci of low-grade squamous dysplasia, 7 foci of high-grade squamous dysplasia, and 13 foci of ESCC from 6 fully embedded resection specimens; endoscopic biopsies from 6 individuals with no histological evidence of disease; and frozen esophageal balloon samples from 12 asymptomatic subjects.
  • Promoter CpG site-specific hypermethylation status was determined for each gene using real-time methylation-specific PCR (qMS-PCR) based on Taqman chemistry.
  • For most genes, methylation occurred with increasing frequency during neoplastic progression, with the largest increase found between low- and high-grade dysplasia.
  • There was considerable variation in methylation patterns among different foci of the same histological grade, even within individual patients, but 16/20 (80%) of high-grade dysplastic and cancer foci had >or= 2 methylated genes, while 17/19 (89%) of normal and low-grade dysplastic foci had <2 methylated genes.
  • Gene methylation was common and easily detectable in the frozen esophageal cells collected by balloon cytology samplers.
  • Our data suggest that methylation of p16, MGMT, RARbeta2, CLDN3, CRBP, and MT1G is common in the esophageal mucosa of patients with ESCC in this high-risk population, and tends to increase in prevalence in foci with increasing histological severity of disease.
  • Methylation data from panels of genes may be able to identify patients with high-grade lesions.
  • Balloon cytology may be able to screen the length of the esophagus effectively for a subset of cells with abnormal methylation, and may be useful in a primary screening test for ESCC and its precursor lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / genetics. DNA Methylation. Esophageal Neoplasms / genetics. Precancerous Conditions / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Claudin-3. DNA Modification Methylases. DNA Repair Enzymes. Female. Genes, p16. Humans. Male. Membrane Proteins / genetics. Metallothionein / genetics. Middle Aged. Receptors, Retinoic Acid / genetics. Retinol-Binding Proteins / genetics. Retinol-Binding Proteins, Cellular. Tumor Suppressor Protein p14ARF / genetics. Tumor Suppressor Proteins

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  • (PMID = 16685400.001).
  • [ISSN] 1021-335X
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncol. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / SC / N01-SC-91019; United States / Intramural NIH HHS / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CLDN3 protein, human; 0 / Claudin-3; 0 / Membrane Proteins; 0 / Receptors, Retinoic Acid; 0 / Retinol-Binding Proteins; 0 / Retinol-Binding Proteins, Cellular; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p14ARF; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins; 0 / retinoic acid receptor beta; 9038-94-2 / Metallothionein; EC 2.1.1.- / DNA Modification Methylases; EC 2.1.1.63 / MGMT protein, human; EC 6.5.1.- / DNA Repair Enzymes
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60. Brennan SE, Kuwano Y, Alkharouf N, Blackshear PJ, Gorospe M, Wilson GM: The mRNA-destabilizing protein tristetraprolin is suppressed in many cancers, altering tumorigenic phenotypes and patient prognosis. Cancer Res; 2009 Jun 15;69(12):5168-76
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  • [Title] The mRNA-destabilizing protein tristetraprolin is suppressed in many cancers, altering tumorigenic phenotypes and patient prognosis.
  • Many targeted transcripts encode factors that control processes such as cell division, apoptosis, and angiogenesis, suggesting that dysregulated ARE-BP expression could dramatically influence oncogenic phenotypes.
  • Using several approaches, we evaluated the expression of four well-characterized ARE-BPs across a variety of human neoplastic syndromes.
  • AUF1, TIA-1, and HuR mRNAs were not systematically dysregulated in cancers; however, tristetraprolin mRNA levels were significantly decreased across many tumor types, including advanced cancers of the breast and prostate.
  • Restoring tristetraprolin expression in an aggressive tumor cell line suppressed three key tumorgenic phenotypes: cell proliferation, resistance to proapoptotic stimuli, and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA.
  • However, the cellular consequences of tristetraprolin expression varied across different cell models.
  • Analyses of gene array data sets revealed that suppression of tristetraprolin expression is a negative prognostic indicator in breast cancer, because patients with low tumor tristetraprolin mRNA levels were more likely to present increased pathologic tumor grade, vascular endothelial growth factor expression, and mortality from recurrent disease.
  • Collectively, these data establish that tristetraprolin expression is frequently suppressed in human cancers, which in turn can alter tumorigenic phenotypes that influence patient outcomes.

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  • (PMID = 19491267.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-7445
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA102428-05; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA102428; United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / Z01 AG000392-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA102428-05
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Complementary; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Tristetraprolin; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; 0 / ZFP36 protein, human
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS112644; NLM/ PMC2724875
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61. Raz DJ, Tedesco P, Herbella FA, Nipomnick I, Way LW, Patti MG: Side-to-side stapled intra-thoracic esophagogastric anastomosis reduces the incidence of leaks and stenosis. Dis Esophagus; 2008;21(1):69-72
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  • Trans-hiatal esophagectomy with a hand-sewn anastomosis was for 2 decades the preferred approach in our institution for patients with esophageal cancer.
  • In our experience, this anastomotic technique was associated with a 12% leak rate and a 48% rate of stricture requiring dilatation.
  • We sought to determine if a side-to-side intra-thoracic anastomosis was associated with a lower rate of anastomotic stricture and leak.
  • Thirty-three consecutive patients with distal esophageal cancer or Barrett's esophagus with high grade dysplasia underwent a trans-thoracic esophagectomy with a side-to-side stapled intra-thoracic anastomosis.
  • Trans-thoracic esophagectomy with a side-to-side stapled anastomosis is safe and it is associated with a very low rate of anastomotic complications.
  • We consider this to be the procedure of choice for patients with distal esophageal cancers.

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  • (PMID = 18197942.001).
  • [ISSN] 1442-2050
  • [Journal-full-title] Diseases of the esophagus : official journal of the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dis. Esophagus
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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62. Zarogoulidis K, Mylonaki E, Kakavelas P, Zarogoulidis P, Tsiouda T, Rapti E, Lithoxopoulou H, Zarogoulidou V, Kontakiotis T, Hellenic Pulmonary Oncology Study Group (HE.P.O.G.): Topotecan-carboplatin-etoposide combination as 1st line treatment in patients with small cell lung cancer. Lung Cancer; 2009 Nov;66(2):226-30
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  • [Title] Topotecan-carboplatin-etoposide combination as 1st line treatment in patients with small cell lung cancer.
  • PURPOSE: To test toxicity, tolerability, time to progression, survival and response rate in the 3-day administration of topotecan (T) followed by carboplatin (C), and then etoposide (E) in a study for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) treatment.
  • Responders received radiotherapy to the primary site (50 Gy) after the 4th cycle and complete responders also received PCI.
  • RESULTS: Complete response (CR) was achieved in 4 patients, partial response (PR) in 18, stable disease in 10 and PD in 12.
  • 11 patients developed grade 3/4 neutropenia and 3 patients grade 3/4 anaemia.
  • The T/C/E combination was well tolerated and with low toxicity, but without improvement in the ORR and survival in comparison to platinum analogue regimes.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Small Cell Lung Carcinoma / drug therapy. Topotecan / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Disease Progression. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Tolerance. Female. Humans. Male. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19321222.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-8332
  • [Journal-full-title] Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lung Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 7M7YKX2N15 / Topotecan; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin
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63. Zheng J, Chen Y, Zhang J: [Basal cell adenocarcinoma of nasal septum: a case report and review of literatures]. Lin Chung Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2009 Mar;23(5):209-10
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  • [Title] [Basal cell adenocarcinoma of nasal septum: a case report and review of literatures].
  • OBJECTIVE: To summarize clinical features, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of basal cell adenocarcinoma.
  • METHOD: A retrospective study were subjected to one case with basal cell adenocarcinoma of the nasal septum, and the related literature were reviewed.
  • RESULT: Basal cell adenocarcinoma often occurred in the salivary glands and minor salivary glands of salivary palate and other parts.
  • CONCLUSION: Basal cell adenocarcinoma is rare seen in the salivary gland tumors.
  • It has a tendency of low-grade malignancy but need long-term follow-up of a large samples.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma. Nasal Septum / pathology. Nose Neoplasms

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  • (PMID = 19522187.001).
  • [ISSN] 1001-1781
  • [Journal-full-title] Lin chuang er bi yan hou tou jing wai ke za zhi = Journal of clinical otorhinolaryngology, head, and neck surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lin Chung Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] China
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64. Al-Lawati T, Granero LE, Berger F, Khaled M, Bobin JY: Inflammatory pseudotumor of the liver--another case report. Is this the beginning of an established hepatic entity? Med Sci Monit; 2005 Oct;11(10):CS60-3
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  • BACKGROUND: Inflammatory pseudotumor of the liver is an infrequent, fibroinflammatory non-neoplastic process of unknown etiology, generally following a benign inflammatory condition.
  • The importance of knowledge of it resides in its similar presentation to other hepatic tumors in clinical picture, radiological appearance, and macroscopic pattern.
  • Ultrasonography and a computerized tomography (CT) scan showed a 3.2 cm hepatic tumor (segment IV) and a CT-guided liver biopsy revealed possible histological features of hepatic fibrosarcoma.
  • The pathologist identified a well-defined, 4-cm inflammatory pseudotumor of the liver associated with possible sclerosing cholangitis lesion.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Inflammatory pseudotumor is a fibroinflammatory non-neoplastic process that should be suspected in patients with a hepatic tumor with significant infectious-inflammatory history.
  • Percutaneous hepatic biopsy does not provide certainty in confirming the lesion since it does not discard focuses of hidden malignancy.
  • The treatment is surgical resection followed by histopatological study to eliminate a hepatocarcinoma, a low-grade fibrosarcoma, or a hidden focus of adenocarcinoma.
  • The inflammatory pseudotumor of the liver has changed from being an extremely rare pathology to becoming an established liver disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Granuloma, Plasma Cell / diagnosis. Liver Neoplasms / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 16192904.001).
  • [ISSN] 1234-1010
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical science monitor : international medical journal of experimental and clinical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Sci. Monit.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
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65. Li AH, Phanuphak N, Sahasrabuddhe VV, Chaithongwongwatthana S, Vermund SH, Jenkins CA, Shepherd BE, Teeratakulpisarn N, van der Lugt J, Avihingsanon A, Ruxrungtham K, Shikuma C, Phanuphak P, Ananworanich J: Anal squamous intraepithelial lesions among HIV positive and HIV negative men who have sex with men in Thailand. Sex Transm Infect; 2009 Dec;85(7):503-7
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  • OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the prevalence and risk factors of anal squamous intraepithelial lesions (ASIL), the putative anal cancer precursor, in Asian HIV positive and HIV negative men who have sex with men (MSM).
  • Overall, 27% had abnormal anal cytology: 13.2% had atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US), 11.5% had low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) and 2.3% had high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL).
  • Highly active antiretroviral therapy use and CD4+ T cell count were not associated with ASIL.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / epidemiology. Carcinoma in Situ / epidemiology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / epidemiology. HIV Seronegativity / physiology. HIV Seropositivity / epidemiology. Homosexuality, Male / statistics & numerical data
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Asia / ethnology. Cross-Sectional Studies. Humans. Male. Prevalence. Risk Factors. Sexual Partners. Thailand

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  • (PMID = 19525263.001).
  • [ISSN] 1472-3263
  • [Journal-full-title] Sexually transmitted infections
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Sex Transm Infect
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / P30 AI050410; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / TL1 RR024978
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS527353; NLM/ PMC3875384
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66. Chaux A, Soares F, Rodríguez I, Barreto J, Lezcano C, Torres J, Velazquez EF, Cubilla AL: Papillary squamous cell carcinoma, not otherwise specified (NOS) of the penis: clinicopathologic features, differential diagnosis, and outcome of 35 cases. Am J Surg Pathol; 2010 Feb;34(2):223-30
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  • [Title] Papillary squamous cell carcinoma, not otherwise specified (NOS) of the penis: clinicopathologic features, differential diagnosis, and outcome of 35 cases.
  • There is a group of low-grade papillomatous squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the penis, collectively designated as "verruciform," that are difficult to classify.
  • A proposal of classification grouped these tumors in warty (condylomatous), verrucous, and papillary carcinomas.
  • Papillary SCC, not otherwise specified is the third distinctive type of penile low-grade verruciform neoplasms.
  • Papillary carcinomas were large (mean 5.6 cm) exophytic low-grade squamous neoplasms with hyperkeratosis and papillomatosis.
  • The interface between tumor and stroma was characteristically jagged and a moderate stromal reaction was evident in most cases.
  • The majority of the tumors (94%) showed a low-grade histology with focally present poorly differentiated areas in 6% of the cases.
  • The mean thickness of the tumor was 9.4 mm.
  • Frequent associated lesions were squamous hyperplasia, differentiated penile intraepithelial neoplasia, and lichen sclerosus (74%, 46%, and 34%, respectively).
  • Of the 20 patients followed, 18 were either with no evidence of disease (15 cases) or died from unrelated causes (3 cases).
  • One patient was alive with evidence of systemic metastases and 1 died from disseminated penile cancer 32 months after original penectomy.
  • In conclusion, papillary carcinomas were exophytic albeit, often deeply invasive low-grade neoplasms, with a low rate of nodal metastasis characterized by complex papillae, irregular fibrovascular cores, and jagged tumor base.
  • Papillary SCC should be distinguished from other penile verruciform tumors, including verrucous and variants, warty and papillary basaloid carcinomas, and carcinoma cuniculatum.
  • Helpful morphologic features for differential diagnosis are provided.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Papillary / pathology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Verrucous / pathology. Penile Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Disease-Free Survival. Humans. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 20061934.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-0979
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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67. Forssell J, Oberg A, Henriksson ML, Stenling R, Jung A, Palmqvist R: High macrophage infiltration along the tumor front correlates with improved survival in colon cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 2007 Mar 1;13(5):1472-9
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  • [Title] High macrophage infiltration along the tumor front correlates with improved survival in colon cancer.
  • PURPOSE: The role of macrophages in tumorigenesis is complex because they can both prevent and promote tumor development.
  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Four hundred forty-six colorectal cancer specimens were stained with the pan-monocyte/macrophage marker CD68, and average infiltration along the tumor front was semiquantitatively evaluated using a four-grade scale.
  • Some aspects of macrophage-tumor cell interactions were also studied using in vitro coculture systems.
  • RESULTS: Including all patients, regardless of surgical outcome and localization, survival increased incrementally with CD68TF(Mean) infiltration grade (P = 0.0001) but not in curatively resected colon cancers (P = 0.28).
  • CD68 hotspot score (CD68TF(Hotspot)) was divided into high and low.
  • A high hotspot score conferred a highly significant survival advantage also in curatively resected colon cancer cases (n = 199, P = 0.0002) but not in rectal cancers.
  • CD68TF(Hotspot) high turned out as an independent prognostic marker for colon cancer in multivariate analyses including gender, age, localization, grade, stage, tumor type, and lymphocytes at the tumor front, conferring a relative risk of 0.49 (P = 0.007).
  • In vitro coculture experiments, using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-activated U937 cells as macrophage model, revealed that a high ratio of macrophages to colon cancer cells inhibited cancer cell growth.
  • This was partially dependent on cell-to-cell contact, whereas Boyden chamber cocultivation without cell-to-cell contact promoted cancer cell spread.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, our data indicate that a dense macrophage infiltration at the tumor front positively influences prognosis in colon cancer and that the degree of cell-to-cell contact may influence the balance between protumorigenic and antitumorigenic properties of macrophages.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / immunology. Adenocarcinoma / mortality. Colorectal Neoplasms / immunology. Colorectal Neoplasms / mortality. Macrophages / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antigens, CD / metabolism. Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic / metabolism. Cells, Cultured. Female. Flow Cytometry. Fluorescent Antibody Technique. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 17332291.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic; 0 / CD68 antigen, human
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68. Rugge M, Fassan M, Zaninotto G, Pizzi M, Giacomelli L, Battaglia G, Rizzetto C, Parente P, Ancona E: Aurora kinase A in Barrett's carcinogenesis. Hum Pathol; 2010 Oct;41(10):1380-6
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  • Eighty-seven esophageal biopsy samples representative of all the phenotypic lesions occurring in the multistep process of Barrett's carcinogenesis (gastric metaplasia in 25, intestinal metaplasia in 25, low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia in 16, high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia in 11, and Barrett's adenocarcinoma in 10) were obtained from long segments of Barrett's mucosa.
  • AURKA overexpression is significantly associated with Barrett's mucosa progressing to Barrett's adenocarcinoma and contributes to esophageal carcinogenesis via chromosome instability.
  • The identification of AURKA as a novel molecular target of cancer progression in Barrett's mucosa provides a lead for the development of new therapeutic approaches in Barrett's mucosa patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / enzymology. Barrett Esophagus / enzymology. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / metabolism. Esophageal Neoplasms / enzymology. Esophagus / enzymology. Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Aurora Kinase A. Aurora Kinases. Carcinoma in Situ / enzymology. Carcinoma in Situ / pathology. Cell Nucleus Size. Gastric Mucosa / enzymology. Gastric Mucosa / pathology. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Intestinal Mucosa / enzymology. Intestinal Mucosa / pathology. Metaplasia. Mucous Membrane / enzymology. Mucous Membrane / pathology. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis. Retrospective Studies. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / biosynthesis

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20656315.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-8392
  • [Journal-full-title] Human pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hum. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / TP53 protein, human; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; EC 2.7.11.1 / AURKA protein, human; EC 2.7.11.1 / Aurora Kinase A; EC 2.7.11.1 / Aurora Kinases; EC 2.7.11.1 / Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
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69. Ellsworth RE, Hooke JA, Love B, Ellsworth DL, Shriver CD: Molecular changes in primary breast tumors and the Nottingham Histologic Score. Pathol Oncol Res; 2009 Dec;15(4):541-7
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  • [Title] Molecular changes in primary breast tumors and the Nottingham Histologic Score.
  • Pathological grade is routinely used to stratify breast cancer patients into favorable and less favorable outcome groups.
  • Mechanisms by which genomic changes in breast tumors specifically contribute to the underlying components of tumor grade - tubule formation, nuclear pleomorphism, and mitoses - are unknown.
  • This study examined 26 chromosomal regions known to be altered in breast cancer in 256 invasive breast carcinomas.
  • Differences in overall levels and patterns of allelic imbalance (AI) at each chromosomal region were compared for tumors with favorable (=1) and unfavorable (=3) scores for tubule formation, nuclear pleomorphism and mitotic count.
  • Levels of AI were significantly different between samples with high and low scores for tubule formation (P < 0.001), nuclear pleomorphism (P < 0.001) and mitotic count (P < 0.05).
  • Significantly higher levels of AI were detected at regions 11q23 and 13q12 for tumors with reduced tubule formation, chromosomes 9p21, 11q23, 13q14, 17p13 and 17q12 for those with high levels of nuclear atypia, and chromosomes 1p36, 11q23, and 13q14 for those with high mitotic counts.
  • Region 16q11-q22 showed significantly more AI events in samples with low nuclear atypia.
  • Patterns of genetic changes associated with poorly-differentiated breast tumors were recapitulated by the individual components of the Nottingham Histologic Score.
  • While frequent alteration of 11q23 is common for reduced tubule formation, high nuclear atypia and high mitotic counts, suggesting that this is an early genetic change in the development of poorly-differentiated breast tumors, alterations at the other seven loci associated with poorly-differentiated tumors may specifically influence cell structure, nuclear morphology and cellular proliferation.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / genetics. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / genetics. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / pathology. DNA, Neoplasm / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Allelic Imbalance / genetics. Cell Proliferation. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1 / genetics. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11 / genetics. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 13 / metabolism. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17 / genetics. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9 / genetics. Female. Humans. Microsatellite Repeats / genetics. Middle Aged. Mitosis / genetics. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 19194786.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-2807
  • [Journal-full-title] Pathology oncology research : POR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathol. Oncol. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Neoplasm
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70. de Paula AA, Netto JC, Freitas R Jr, de Paula LP, Mota ED, Alencar RC: Penile carcinoma: the role of koilocytosis in groin metastasis and the association with disease specific survival. J Urol; 2007 Apr;177(4):1339-43; discussion 1343
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  • [Title] Penile carcinoma: the role of koilocytosis in groin metastasis and the association with disease specific survival.
  • PURPOSE: We evaluated the influence of koilocytosis, and other clinical and pathological variables in the risk of groin metastasis and death in penile cancer patients.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: From January 1994 to January 2004, 172 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the penis were treated at a single cancer center.
  • Of these patients 144 were retrospectively studied to analyze prognostic factors and establish the role of koilocytosis in penile cancer.
  • Koilocytosis was present in 91 patients (63.1%) and it was associated with low and moderate primary tumor grade on univariate analysis (p = 0.0005).
  • Although koilocytosis statistically correlated with Jackson stage (p = 0.017) and tumor grade (p = 0.002), it had no impact on disease specific survival (p = 0.912).
  • Metastatic inguinal disease correlated with patient age, Jackson and disease specific survival.
  • CONCLUSIONS: According to all studied variables only patient age and Jackson stage correlated with an increased risk of groin disease.
  • Koilocytosis was rarely found in high grade penile tumors and it did not correlate with a high risk of metastatic groin disease or death.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / secondary. Penile Neoplasms / mortality. Penile Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17382728.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-5347
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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71. Lee H, Kim JJ, Kim JH, Lee JH, Son HJ, Rhee PL, Rhee JC, Ko YH: [Microsatellite instability in gastric B-cell lymphoma]. Korean J Gastroenterol; 2006 Mar;47(3):205-12
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  • [Title] [Microsatellite instability in gastric B-cell lymphoma].
  • BACKGROUND/AIMS: Microsatellite instability (MSI) reflects the defect in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathways and plays an important role in certain malignancies.
  • However, the role of MSI in the development of gastric B-cell lymphomas remains unsettled.
  • We aimed to investigate the clinical significance of MSI in patients with gastric B-cell lymphoma.
  • Microsatellite genotypes were categorized as microsatellite stable (MSS, no positive marker), low frequency MSI (MSI-L,<40% positive marker) and high frequency MSI (MSI-H, >40% positive marker).
  • Among the gastric B-cell lymphoma patients who underwent MSI analysis between September 2002 and May 2003, twenty-two patients were enrolled.
  • Between MSS group and MSI-L group, there was no significant difference in age, tumor stage, location, grade of large cell component, H. pylori infection, bulk of tumor and proportion of regression or recurrence.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The current study suggests that the role of MSI is questionable in the development of gastric B-cell lymphoma due to their low incidence.
  • [MeSH-major] Lymphoma, B-Cell / genetics. Microsatellite Repeats / genetics. Stomach Neoplasms / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Helicobacter Infections / genetics. Helicobacter pylori. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • [CommentIn] Korean J Gastroenterol. 2006 Mar;47(3):238-40 [16554680.001]
  • (PMID = 16554674.001).
  • [ISSN] 1598-9992
  • [Journal-full-title] The Korean journal of gastroenterology = Taehan Sohwagi Hakhoe chi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Korean J Gastroenterol
  • [Language] kor
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
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72. Stewart CJ, Brennan BA, Crook ML, Doherty DA, Hammond IG, Leuverink E, Ruba S: Comparison of proliferation indices in primary adult-type granulosa cell tumors of the ovary and their corresponding metastases: an analysis of 14 cases. Int J Gynecol Pathol; 2009 Sep;28(5):423-31
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  • [Title] Comparison of proliferation indices in primary adult-type granulosa cell tumors of the ovary and their corresponding metastases: an analysis of 14 cases.
  • Adult-type granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the ovary are generally low-grade malignancies, but late metastases are relatively common.
  • Limited data suggest that recurrent GCTs may exhibit altered morphology and/or biologic behavior, but few studies have directly compared primary and recurrent tumors in individual patients.
  • Fourteen GCTs in which histologic material was available from both the primary tumor and one or more metastases were reviewed, and the mitotic index (MI) and Ki-67 labelling index (KI) were evaluated using carefully specified methodology.
  • The findings were also correlated with the time interval to tumor recurrence.
  • There were only minor differences in tumor morphology between the primary and metastatic GCTs.
  • None of the cases exhibited high-grade (sarcomatoid) transformation.
  • There was a wide range in MI and KI in the GCTs and no consistent correlation was seen between these indices in the paired primary and recurrent neoplasms.
  • In conclusion, metastatic GCTs generally maintain their morphologic features even after multiple recurrences over many years.
  • Cellular proliferation in GCT is variable, and there is no uniform alteration in proliferation indices between paired primary and metastatic lesions.
  • Therefore, data derived from the analysis of primary GCT may not always be applicable to recurrent tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Granulosa Cell Tumor / pathology. Mitotic Index. Neoplasm Metastasis / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Ovarian Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Ki-67 Antigen / metabolism. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging

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  • (PMID = 19696611.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-7151
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of gynecological pathology : official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Pathologists
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Gynecol. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Ki-67 Antigen
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73. Kron K, Pethe V, Briollais L, Sadikovic B, Ozcelik H, Sunderji A, Venkateswaran V, Pinthus J, Fleshner N, van der Kwast T, Bapat B: Discovery of novel hypermethylated genes in prostate cancer using genomic CpG island microarrays. PLoS One; 2009;4(3):e4830
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  • [Title] Discovery of novel hypermethylated genes in prostate cancer using genomic CpG island microarrays.
  • BACKGROUND: Promoter and 5' end methylation regulation of tumour suppressor genes is a common feature of many cancers.
  • Such occurrences often lead to the silencing of these key genes and thus they may contribute to the development of cancer, including prostate cancer.
  • METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to identify methylation changes in prostate cancer, we performed a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation using Agilent human CpG island arrays.
  • Using computational and gene-specific validation approaches we have identified a large number of potential epigenetic biomarkers of prostate cancer.
  • Further validation of candidate genes on a separate cohort of low and high grade prostate cancers by quantitative MethyLight analysis has allowed us to confirm DNA hypermethylation of HOXD3 and BMP7, two genes that may play a role in the development of high grade tumours.
  • We also show that promoter hypermethylation is responsible for downregulated expression of these genes in the DU-145 PCa cell line.
  • CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study identifies novel epigenetic biomarkers of prostate cancer and prostate cancer progression, and provides a global assessment of DNA methylation in prostate cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7 / genetics. DNA Methylation / genetics. Genes, Tumor Suppressor. Homeodomain Proteins / genetics. Prostatic Neoplasms / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / pharmacology. Azacitidine / analogs & derivatives. Azacitidine / pharmacology. Cell Line, Tumor. CpG Islands. Down-Regulation. Epigenesis, Genetic. Gene Expression. Gene Silencing. Genetic Markers. Humans. Male. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis / methods

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  • (PMID = 19283074.001).
  • [ISSN] 1932-6203
  • [Journal-full-title] PloS one
  • [ISO-abbreviation] PLoS ONE
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / BMP7 protein, human; 0 / Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7; 0 / Genetic Markers; 0 / Homeodomain Proteins; 127609-92-1 / HOXA4 protein, human; 776B62CQ27 / decitabine; M801H13NRU / Azacitidine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2653233
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74. Makhlouf HR, Abdul-Al HM, Wang G, Goodman ZD: Calcifying nested stromal-epithelial tumors of the liver: a clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular genetic study of 9 cases with a long-term follow-up. Am J Surg Pathol; 2009 Jul;33(7):976-83
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  • [Title] Calcifying nested stromal-epithelial tumors of the liver: a clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular genetic study of 9 cases with a long-term follow-up.
  • There is a rare primary liver tumor that has been reported as "ossifying stromal-epithelial tumor" (3 cases), "desmoplastic nested spindle cell tumor" (4 cases), and "nested stromal-epithelial tumor" (6 cases).
  • Herein we report 9 cases of this tumor, including 3 previously reported, from the files of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology.
  • All tumors were discovered incidentally in patients between 2 and 33 years of age.
  • The tumors ranged from 5.5 to 20 cm and had a characteristic histologic appearance with irregular, sharply circumscribed nests and islands of bland-appearing spindled to focally epithelioid cells, surrounded by a cellular desmoplastic stroma.
  • The tumor nests had focal psammoma-like calcifications with or without ossification.
  • Immunohistochemistry demonstrated at least focal positivity for keratin cocktail AE1/AE3/LP34 in all 9 cases, and Wilms tumor suppressor gene (7/7) with variable staining for other epithelial (except keratins 7 and 20), neural, and mesenchymal markers.
  • None of the tumors was positive for Ewing sarcoma-primitive neuroectodermal tumors, desmoplastic small round cell tumor, and SYT-SSX fusion transcript.
  • We propose the name "calcifying nested stromal and epithelial tumor" for this rare but distinctive clinicopathologic entity of uncertain histogenesis.
  • On the basis of currently available information, this tumor is best considered a low-grade malignancy.
  • [MeSH-major] Liver Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasms, Complex and Mixed / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Calcinosis. Child, Preschool. Epithelial Cells / pathology. Female. Hepatectomy. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Liver Transplantation. Male. Stromal Cells / pathology. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19363442.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-0979
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
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75. Shen Z, Wu Q, Yue L, Li HC, Shen ZZ, Shao ZM: [Function and prognostic value of tumor suppressor gene LKB1 in human breast carcinoma]. Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi; 2005 Jan 5;85(1):15-8
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  • [Title] [Function and prognostic value of tumor suppressor gene LKB1 in human breast carcinoma].
  • OBJECTIVE: To study the function and prognostic value of the recently identified tumor suppressor gene LKB1 in human breast cancer.
  • METHODS: Estrogen receptor-positive human breast cancer cells of MCF-7 line and estrogen receptor-negative human breast cancer cells of the lines MDA-MB-435 and MDA-MB-231 were cultured and tested for the LKB1 expression.
  • Plasmid pcDNA4 TOPO HisMAX/LKB1 expressing LKB1 was constructed and transfected into the MDA-MB-435 cells.
  • Flow cytometry was used to determine the cell cycle.
  • PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the expressions of LKB1 mRNA and protein in 121 human breast cancer samples.
  • The association with relapse free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) was assessed by univariate analysis (log-rank test and Kaplan-Meier method).
  • RESULTS: Human breast cells of MCF-7 line expressed LKB1 and the cells of MDA-MB-435 and MDA-MB-231 lines did not.
  • LKB1 was lowly expressed in 43 out of the 121 cases of breast cancer (35.4%) and highly expressed in 78 cases (64.6%).
  • Low expression of LKB1 was correlated with pathological grade (P = 0.013), cancer size (P = 0.001), status of estrogen receptor (P = 0.048), and status of lymph nodes metastasis (P = 0.003).
  • Univariate analysis showed that low expression of LKB1 was significantly correlated with shorter RFS (P = 0.048) and low OS (P = 0.003).
  • CONCLUSION: Reintroducing LKB1 into breast cell of the lines lacking LKB1 expression restores LKB1 activity and induces growth suppression by G(1) cell cycle block.
  • The LKB1 mediated G(1) cell cycle arrest is caused by up-regulation of the expression of p21(WAF1/CIP1) in MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / genetics. Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers, Tumor. Cell Line, Tumor. Cyclin D1 / metabolism. Cyclin E / metabolism. Female. Humans. Prognosis. RNA, Messenger / biosynthesis. RNA, Messenger / genetics. Transfection

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  • (PMID = 15808068.001).
  • [ISSN] 0376-2491
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua yi xue za zhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Cyclin E; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 136601-57-5 / Cyclin D1; EC 2.7.1.- / STK11 protein, human; EC 2.7.11.1 / Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
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76. Kresse SH, Ohnstad HO, Paulsen EB, Bjerkehagen B, Szuhai K, Serra M, Schaefer KL, Myklebost O, Meza-Zepeda LA: LSAMP, a novel candidate tumor suppressor gene in human osteosarcomas, identified by array comparative genomic hybridization. Genes Chromosomes Cancer; 2009 Aug;48(8):679-93
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  • [Title] LSAMP, a novel candidate tumor suppressor gene in human osteosarcomas, identified by array comparative genomic hybridization.
  • Osteosarcomas are the most common primary malignant tumor of bone, and almost all conventional osteosarcomas are high-grade tumors with complex karyotypes.
  • We have examined DNA copy number changes in 36 osteosarcoma tumors and 20 cell lines using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization.
  • The most frequent minimal recurrent regions of gain identified in the tumor samples were in 1q21.2-q21.3 (78% of the samples), 1q21.3-q22 (78%), and 8q22.1 (72%).
  • A small region in 3q13.31 (2.1 Mb) containing the gene limbic system-associated membrane protein (LSAMP) was frequently deleted (56%).
  • LSAMP has previously been reported to be a candidate tumor suppressor gene in other cancer types.
  • LSAMP showed low expression compared to two normal bone samples in 6/15 tumors and 5/9 cell lines with deletion of 3q13.31, and also in 5/14 tumors and 3/11 cell lines with normal copy number or gain.
  • Partial or full methylation of the investigated CpG island was identified in 3/30 tumors and 7/20 cell lines.
  • Statistical analyses revealed that loss of 11p15.4-p15.3 and low expression of LSAMP (both P = 0.011) were significantly associated with poor survival.
  • Our results show that LSAMP is a novel candidate tumor suppressor gene in osteosarcomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Neoplasms / genetics. Cell Adhesion Molecules, Neuronal / genetics. Comparative Genomic Hybridization / methods. Genes, Tumor Suppressor. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis / methods. Osteosarcoma / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Cell Line, Tumor. Child. Chromosome Aberrations. Cluster Analysis. CpG Islands / genetics. DNA Methylation. Data Interpretation, Statistical. Female. GPI-Linked Proteins. Gene Dosage. Gene Expression Profiling. Humans. In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Male. Middle Aged. Reproducibility of Results. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 19441093.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-2264
  • [Journal-full-title] Genes, chromosomes & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Genes Chromosomes Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cell Adhesion Molecules, Neuronal; 0 / GPI-Linked Proteins; 0 / limbic system-associated membrane protein
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77. Kourelis K, Vandoros G, Kourelis T, Papadas T, Goumas P, Sotiropoulou-Bonikou G: Low COX2 in tumor and upregulation in stroma mark laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma progression. Laryngoscope; 2009 Sep;119(9):1723-9
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  • [Title] Low COX2 in tumor and upregulation in stroma mark laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma progression.
  • OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Invasive squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the larynx, like most solid tumors, are surrounded by a reactive stroma, in which cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are the predominant cell type.
  • This mesenchymal reaction may affect cancer progression multiply.
  • The proinflammatory enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been correlated with head and neck cancer.
  • METHODS: Double immunohistochemistry of COX-2 and the CAF marker alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) was utilized in 97 laryngeal cancer patients.
  • RESULTS: Low COX-2 immunostaining in cancer cells was associated with advanced grade (P = .044) and shorter recurrence-free period (P = .035).
  • CAF expression was positively correlated with the grade of the infiltrating tumor (P = .030).
  • CONCLUSIONS: In laryngeal SCCs, COX-2 may exert its deleterious effect by alterations in the tumor microenvironment.
  • CAF-derived, COX-2-mediated paracrine influences on malignant cells possibly facilitate cancer progression.
  • Overlooking the stromal remodeling could account for unsuccessful treatments of epithelial neoplasms.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / metabolism. Cyclooxygenase 2 / metabolism. Laryngeal Neoplasms / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Disease Progression. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Male. Middle Aged. Up-Regulation / physiology

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  • (PMID = 19554635.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-4995
  • [Journal-full-title] The Laryngoscope
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Laryngoscope
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 1.14.99.1 / Cyclooxygenase 2
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78. Kataoka A, Yuasa T, Kageyama S, Iwaki H, Higuchi K, Tanaka T, Okada Y, Yoshiki T: Expression of thymidine phosphorylase correlates with microvessel density in prostate cancer. Oncol Rep; 2005 Apr;13(4):597-600
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  • [Title] Expression of thymidine phosphorylase correlates with microvessel density in prostate cancer.
  • Angiogenesis in the growth and development of prostate cancer was the focus of this study.
  • Various angiogenic factors and their clinicopathologic correlations with the progression of prostate cancer have been examined.
  • Thymidine phosphorylase is identical to platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (TP/PD-ECGF) and has angiogenic activity.
  • We investigated the expression of TP/PD-ECGF in prostate cancer and its association with angiogenesis or clinicopathologic findings in 81 cases with prostate cancer.
  • Western blot analysis using a specific monoclonal antibody 654-1 revealed the existence of a 55 kDa TP/PD-ECGF protein in human prostate cancer tissue.
  • Cancer tissue showed low-positive immunostaining in 32 cases (39.5%) and high positivity in 49 cases (60.5%).
  • This protein expression indicated a statistically significant association with microvessel density (low vs. high TP/PD-ECGF expression group: mean +/- SD, 37.3+/-27.0 vs. 53.1+/-28.0 microvessels in three fields, p<0.05).
  • No correlation was found between the expression of TP/PD-ECGF and nuclear grade, glandular differentiation, clinical stage or overall survival rate.
  • TP/PD-ECGF may play an important role in tumor angiogenesis in prostate cancer tissues.
  • Although the expression of TP/PD-ECGF was not correlated with clinical outcome in patients with prostate cancer, there remains the possibility that TP/PD-ECGF may support or modify the tumor growth through angiogenesis in cooperation with other factors.
  • [MeSH-major] Microcirculation. Prostatic Neoplasms / blood supply. Prostatic Neoplasms / enzymology. Thymidine Phosphorylase / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antibodies, Monoclonal / chemistry. Blotting, Western. Cell Line, Tumor. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Neovascularization, Pathologic. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15756429.001).
  • [ISSN] 1021-335X
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncol. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; EC 2.4.2.4 / Thymidine Phosphorylase
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79. Cornejo-Juárez P, Volkow-Fernández P, Avilés-Salas A, Calderón-Flores E: AIDS and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Experience at an oncological center in Mexico. Rev Invest Clin; 2008 Sep-Oct;60(5):375-81
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  • BACKGROUND: Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) associated with HIV became an AIDS-defining condition early in the epidemic and remains the second most common malignancy in patients with AIDS.
  • Our objective was to review the clinical spectrum of patients with AIDS-associated NHL and to analyze the impact of HAART on survival at an oncological tertiary center.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: We reviewed all medical records and histopathologic tissue of patients with HIV-associated NHL seen from January 1990 to September 2007 at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia in Mexico City.
  • Survival or follow-up time was calculated from date of diagnosis to death, or to the date on which the patient was last seen.
  • RESULTS: Eighty seven HIV-positive patients were diagnosed with NHL (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma n=69; Burkitt-like n=8; pleomorphic large cell n=7; low-grade n=2, and angiocentric n=1).
  • [MeSH-major] Cancer Care Facilities / statistics & numerical data. Lymphoma, AIDS-Related / epidemiology. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / epidemiology. Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome / drug therapy. Adult. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Male. Mexico / epidemiology. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19227434.001).
  • [ISSN] 0034-8376
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista de investigación clínica; organo del Hospital de Enfermedades de la Nutrición
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev. Invest. Clin.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Mexico
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80. Veltkamp SA, Jansen RS, Callies S, Pluim D, Visseren-Grul CM, Rosing H, Kloeker-Rhoades S, Andre VA, Beijnen JH, Slapak CA, Schellens JH: Oral administration of gemcitabine in patients with refractory tumors: a clinical and pharmacologic study. Clin Cancer Res; 2008 Jun 1;14(11):3477-86
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  • [Title] Oral administration of gemcitabine in patients with refractory tumors: a clinical and pharmacologic study.
  • PURPOSE: To determine the toxicity, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and preliminary antitumor activity of oral gemcitabine (2',2'-difluorodeoxycytidine;.
  • dFdC) in patients with cancer.
  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer refractory to standard therapy were eligible.
  • Patients received one of two dosing schemes: (a) once daily dosing for 14 days of a 21-day cycle or (b) every other day dosing for 21 days of a 28-day cycle.
  • Pharmacokinetics were assessed by measuring concentrations of dFdC and 2',2'-difluorodeoxyuridine (dFdU) in plasma and gemcitabine triphosphate in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and pharmacodynamics by measuring the effect on T-cell proliferation.
  • Mainly moderate gastrointestinal toxicities occurred except for one patient who died after experiencing grade 4 hepatic failure during cycle two.
  • One patient with a leiomyosarcoma had stable disease during 2 years and 7 months.
  • Systemic exposure to dFdC was low with an estimated bioavailability of 10%.
  • Concentrations of dFdCTP in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were low, but high levels of gemcitabine triphosphate, the phosphorylated metabolite of dFdU, were detected.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Systemic exposure to oral gemcitabine was low due to extensive first-pass metabolism to dFdU.
  • Moderate toxicity combined with hints of activity warrant further investigation of the concept of prolonged exposure to gemcitabine.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / pharmacokinetics. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Adult. Aged. Area Under Curve. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Male. Maximum Tolerated Dose. Middle Aged. T-Lymphocytes / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 18519780.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine
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81. Yamada K, Sugiyama Y, Seino K, Kobori H, Ebina T, Shibata S, Kawasaki H, Sasaki M, Tanaka M: [A Case of advanced gastric cancer successfully treated with TS-1/low-dose CDDP as neoadjuvant chemotherapy]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2005 Oct;32(10):1447-51
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  • [Title] [A Case of advanced gastric cancer successfully treated with TS-1/low-dose CDDP as neoadjuvant chemotherapy].
  • TS-1 was introduced into the treatment of advanced or recurrent gastric cancer cases.
  • We report a patient with gastric cancer successfully treated with TS-1 and low-dose CDDP as neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
  • The patient was a 46-year-old man who was diagnosed as type 3 gastric cancer with suspected invasion of the pancreas.
  • Histopathological findings demonstrated the degeneration of cancer cells and fibrosis in the primary tumor.
  • The changes against neoadjuvant chemotherapy were judged to be Grade 3.
  • TS-1 and low-dose CDDP therapy can be one of the effective methods as neoadjuvant chemotherapy without remarkable toxicity.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Signet Ring Cell / drug therapy. Pancreatic Neoplasms / pathology. Stomach Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Combinations. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Oxonic Acid / administration & dosage. Pyridines / administration & dosage. Quality of Life. Radiography, Abdominal. Tegafur / administration & dosage. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 16227746.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Pyridines; 150863-82-4 / S 1 (combination); 1548R74NSZ / Tegafur; 5VT6420TIG / Oxonic Acid; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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82. Kottaridi C, Georgoulakis J, Kassanos D, Pappas A, Spathis A, Margari N, Aninos D, Karakitsos P: Use of flow cytometry as a quality control device for liquid-based cervical cytology specimens. Cytometry B Clin Cytom; 2010 Jan;78(1):37-40
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  • BACKGROUND: Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide comprising a major concern of public health.
  • Liquid-based cytology provides significantly more effective detection of low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia or more severe lesions, without loss of diagnostic specificity and reduces the number of cases classified as unsatisfactory.
  • The objective of the study is the evaluation of flow cytometry as a rapid tool for quality control of the liquid specimen adequacy for the purpose of precise cytological diagnosis in detecting cervical abnormalities.
  • Cells were fixed and run on a Partec CyFlow SL, with front scatter (FSS) and side scatter (SSC) set on logarithmic scale.
  • The forward scatter versus side scatter dot-plot was used for the distinction of ectocervical, endocervical, and polymorphonuclear cells.
  • CONCLUSION: The parallel screening of adequacy by quantification of cell populations with flow cytometry can serve as an internal control for diagnosis and can overall decrease the number of unsatisfactory samples.
  • [MeSH-major] Flow Cytometry / methods. Light. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / diagnosis


83. Räsänen K, Vaheri A: Proliferation and motility of HaCaT keratinocyte derivatives is enhanced by fibroblast nemosis. Exp Cell Res; 2010 Jun 10;316(10):1739-47
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  • The role of paracrine tumor-stroma regulation in the progression of cancer is under intense investigation.
  • Activated fibroblasts are key components of the tumor microenvironment providing the soluble factors mediating the regulation.
  • Nemosis is an experimental model to study these parameters: formation of a multicellular spheroid activates fibroblasts and leads to increased production of soluble factors involved in the promotion of growth and motility.
  • Expression of proliferation marker Ki-67 increased significantly in benign A5 and low-grade malignant II-4 cells, but did not further increase in the metastatic RT3 cells.
  • Expression of p63, keratinocyte stem cell marker linked to cancer progression, was augmented by medium from nemotic fibroblasts; this increase was also seen in RT3 cells.
  • Neutralizing antibodies against growth factors inhibited wound healing to some extent; the response varied between benign and malignant keratinocytes.
  • Migration and invasion were enhanced by conditioned medium from nemotic fibroblasts in benign and low-grade malignant cells.
  • Our data demonstrate that fibroblast nemosis increases proliferation and motility of HaCaT keratinocyte derivatives, and thus nemosis can be used as a model to study the role of soluble factors secreted by fibroblasts in tumor progression.
  • [MeSH-major] Cell Movement / physiology. Keratinocytes / cytology. Keratinocytes / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line. Cell Proliferation. Chemotaxis / physiology. Collagen. Collagen Type I. Culture Media, Conditioned. Drug Combinations. Fibroblasts / physiology. Humans. Ki-67 Antigen / metabolism. Laminin. Paracrine Communication / physiology. Proteoglycans. Skin Neoplasms / etiology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / physiopathology. Trans-Activators / metabolism. Transcription Factors. Tumor Suppressor Proteins / metabolism. Wound Healing / physiology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20097197.001).
  • [ISSN] 1090-2422
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental cell research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp. Cell Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Collagen Type I; 0 / Culture Media, Conditioned; 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Ki-67 Antigen; 0 / Laminin; 0 / Proteoglycans; 0 / TP63 protein, human; 0 / Trans-Activators; 0 / Transcription Factors; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins; 119978-18-6 / matrigel; 9007-34-5 / Collagen
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84. Wang Y, Liu VW, Xue WC, Cheung AN, Ngan HY: Association of decreased mitochondrial DNA content with ovarian cancer progression. Br J Cancer; 2006 Oct 23;95(8):1087-91
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  • [Title] Association of decreased mitochondrial DNA content with ovarian cancer progression.
  • Results show that mtDNA content in tumour cell was significantly higher than that in normal ovary.
  • Change in mtDNA content was not related with patients' age or tumour stages.
  • However, the average mtDNA copy number in pathological low-grade tumours was over two-fold higher than that in high-grade carcinomas (P=0.012).
  • [MeSH-major] DNA, Mitochondrial / genetics. Ovarian Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell / genetics. Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell / pathology. Adult. Aged. Cystadenocarcinoma, Mucinous / genetics. Cystadenocarcinoma, Mucinous / pathology. Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous / genetics. Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous / pathology. DNA Replication / genetics. Disease Progression. Female. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging

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  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2003 Aug 18;89(4):697-701 [12915881.001]
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  • (PMID = 17047655.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0920
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Mitochondrial
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2360719
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85. Tian C, Zhou ZG, Meng WJ, Sun XF, Yu YY, Li L, Luo HZ, Yang L, Zhou B, Gu J: Overexpression of connective tissue growth factor WISP-1 in Chinese primary rectal cancer patients. World J Gastroenterol; 2007 Jul 28;13(28):3878-82
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  • [Title] Overexpression of connective tissue growth factor WISP-1 in Chinese primary rectal cancer patients.
  • AIM: To clarify the expression change of Wnt-induced secreted protein-1 (WISP-1) in human rectal cancer and to determine whether it is correlated with invasion and metastasis of human rectal cancer.
  • METHODS: Eighty-six paired samples of rectal cancer and surgically resected distant normal rectal tissue were collected and allocated into cancer group and control group respectively.
  • RESULTS: WISP-1 gene overexpression was found in 65% (56/86) primary rectal cancers, 2-30 times that of the level in normal matched rectal tissues (P = 0.001).
  • The mRNA expression level was correlated with Duke's staging, histological differentiation grade and lymph node status.
  • The positive degree of immunohistochemical staining in the cancer group (1.40 +/- 0.35) was different from that in control group (1.04 +/- 0.08, P < 0.001).
  • Moreover, in cancer group the positive staining degree in high-level mRNA cancers (1.46 +/- 0.37, n = 56) was higher than that in low-level mRNA (1.28 +/- 0.28, n = 30, P = 0.018).
  • WISP-1 may be used as a specific clinical diagnosis and prognosis marker in rectal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / metabolism. Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / metabolism. Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins / metabolism. Proto-Oncogene Proteins / metabolism. Rectal Neoplasms / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Asian Continental Ancestry Group. CCN Intercellular Signaling Proteins. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Polymerase Chain Reaction. RNA, Messenger / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17657846.001).
  • [ISSN] 1007-9327
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / CCN Intercellular Signaling Proteins; 0 / Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / WISP1 protein, human
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4611224
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86. Goffin JR, Anderson IC, Supko JG, Eder JP Jr, Shapiro GI, Lynch TJ, Shipp M, Johnson BE, Skarin AT: Phase I trial of the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor marimastat combined with carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 2005 May 1;11(9):3417-24
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  • [Title] Phase I trial of the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor marimastat combined with carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.
  • Marimastat (10 or 20 mg oral administration b.i.d.) was administered continuously with paclitaxel (175 or 200 mg/m(2) as a 3-hour i.v. infusion) and carboplatin (at a dose providing an area under the free drug plasma concentration-time curve of 7 mg min/mL) administered each 3 weeks.
  • RESULTS: Twenty-two chemotherapy-naive patients with stage IIIb (27%) or stage IV (73%) non-small cell lung cancer were enrolled.
  • Grade 2 musculoskeletal toxicities were reported in 3 of 12 patients receiving marimastat (20 mg b.i.d.).
  • Nine patients required dose reductions, predominantly related to low-grade myelosuppression.
  • Partial responses occurred in 12 of 21 (57%) evaluable patients with disease stabilization in another 5 (19%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The administration of marimastat (10 mg b.i.d.) with paclitaxel (200 mg/m(2)) and carboplatin at an area under the free drug plasma concentration-time curve of 7 mg min/mL was well tolerated with no apparent pharmacokinetic interaction.
  • Study of this drug combination in the adjuvant setting should be considered if tissue inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase activity can first be shown.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Adult. Aged. Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Carboplatin / adverse effects. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Enzyme Inhibitors / administration & dosage. Enzyme Inhibitors / adverse effects. Female. Hematologic Diseases / chemically induced. Humans. Hydroxamic Acids / administration & dosage. Hydroxamic Acids / adverse effects. Infusions, Intravenous. Male. Metabolic Clearance Rate. Metalloendopeptidases / antagonists & inhibitors. Metalloendopeptidases / metabolism. Middle Aged. Nausea / chemically induced. Paclitaxel / administration & dosage. Paclitaxel / adverse effects. Paclitaxel / pharmacokinetics. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15867243.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase I; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Hydroxamic Acids; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin; D5EQV23TDS / marimastat; EC 3.4.24.- / Metalloendopeptidases; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel
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87. Svotelis A, Gévry N, Grondin G, Gaudreau L: H2A.Z overexpression promotes cellular proliferation of breast cancer cells. Cell Cycle; 2010 Jan 15;9(2):364-70
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  • [Title] H2A.Z overexpression promotes cellular proliferation of breast cancer cells.
  • We recently showed that histone H2A.Z, as well as members of the ATP-dependent p400 chromatin remodeling complex (p400.com), are essential components of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) signaling.
  • RNAi-mediated cellular depletion of H2A.Z and p400.com strongly impedes estrogen-dependent growth of breast cancer cells as well as strongly affect ERalpha-target gene expression.
  • In the current study, we now show that in MCF7 cells, ectopic overexpression of H2A.Z increases proliferation, and such in conditions where estrogen levels are low.
  • Also, immunohistochemical studies of breast cancer biopsies show that the presence of H2A.Z correlates highly with that of ERalpha, but is associated with high-grade ER-negative cancers.
  • Our study provides a possible link between H2A.Z and endocrine resistance by showing that H2A.Z overexpression leads to increased growth, particularly when estrogen levels are very low.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / metabolism. Histones / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Proliferation. Estrogen Receptor alpha / metabolism. Estrogens / metabolism. Female. G1 Phase. Humans. Promoter Regions, Genetic. S Phase

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  • (PMID = 20023423.001).
  • [ISSN] 1551-4005
  • [Journal-full-title] Cell cycle (Georgetown, Tex.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cell Cycle
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] Canada / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Estrogen Receptor alpha; 0 / Estrogens; 0 / Histones
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88. Lee JW, Song SY, Choi JJ, Choi CH, Kim TJ, Kim J, Lee JH, Kim BG, Bae DS: Decreased galectin-3 expression during the progression of cervical neoplasia. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol; 2006 Apr;132(4):241-7
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  • [Title] Decreased galectin-3 expression during the progression of cervical neoplasia.
  • PURPOSE: Galectin-3 is expressed widely in epithelial and immune cells and the level of expression varies in many cancer cells relative to the normal tissues from which they arise.
  • We investigated whether the expression of galectin-3 is associated with the progression of cervical neoplasia.
  • In addition, galectin-3 expression was evaluated at the protein level by immunohistochemistry in 90 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cervical tissues, 10 normal cervical specimens, 20 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs), 20 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs), and 40 invasive squamous cell carcinomas (ISCCs).
  • RESULTS: Real-time quantitative RT-PCR revealed that galectin-3 expressions in tumor cells were significantly downregulated compared with corresponding normal tissue (P=0.005).
  • CONCLUSIONS: These data constitute the first observation that the expression of galectin-3 is downregulated in cervical cancer tissues and suggest that the decreased expression of this galactoside-binding lectin is associated with the progression of cervical neoplasia.
  • [MeSH-major] Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / genetics. Galectin 3 / genetics. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. RNA, Messenger / metabolism