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1. Wang J, Schopfer MP, Puiu SC, Sarjeant AA, Karlin KD: Reductive coupling of nitrogen monoxide (*NO) facilitated by heme/copper complexes. Inorg Chem; 2010 Feb 15;49(4):1404-19
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Variable-temperature (1)H and (2)H NMR spectra reveal a broad peak at delta = 6.05 ppm (pyrrole) at room temperature (RT), which gives rise to asymmetrically split pyrrole peaks at 9.12 and 8.54 ppm at -80 degrees C.
  • A new heme dinitrosyl species, (F(8))Fe(NO)(2), obtained by bubbling (F(8))Fe(NO) with *NO((g)) at -80 degrees C, could be reversibly formed, as monitored by UV-vis (lambda(max) = 426 (Soret), 538 nm in acetone), EPR (silent), and NMR spectroscopies; that is, the mono-NO complex was regenerated upon warming to RT. (F(8))Fe(NO)(2) reacts with [(tmpa)Cu(I)(MeCN)](+) and 2 equiv of acid to give [(F(8))Fe(III)](+), [(tmpa)Cu(II)(solvent)](2+), and N(2)O((g)), fitting the stoichiometric *NO((g)) reductive coupling reaction: 2*NO((g)) + Fe(II) + Cu(I) + 2H(+) --> N(2)O((g)) + Fe(III) + Cu(II) + H(2)O, equivalent to one enzyme turnover.
  • These structural and physical properties suggest that at RT this complex consists of an admixture of high and intermediate spin states.

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  • (PMID = 20030370.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-510X
  • [Journal-full-title] Inorganic chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Inorg Chem
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM060353-09A2; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / GM060353-09A2; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / GM060353-08S1; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM060353-08S1; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM060353; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / GM 60353
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Ferric Compounds; 0 / Pyridines; 0 / tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine; 31C4KY9ESH / Nitric Oxide; 42VZT0U6YR / Heme; 789U1901C5 / Copper; E1UOL152H7 / Iron; EC 1.9.3.1 / Electron Transport Complex IV; S88TT14065 / Oxygen
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS167329; NLM/ PMC2830618
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2. Glik EA, Kinayyigit S, Ronayne KL, Towrie M, Sazanovich IV, Weinstein JA, Castellano FN: Ultrafast excited state dynamics of Pt(II) chromophores bearing multiple infrared absorbers. Inorg Chem; 2008 Aug 4;47(15):6974-83
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  • The paper reports the synthesis, structural characterization, electrochemistry, ultrafast time-resolved infrared (TRIR) and transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy associated with two independent d (8) square planar Pt(II) diimine chromophores, Pt(dnpebpy)Cl 2 ( 1) and Pt(dnpebpy)(C[triple bond]Cnaph) 2 ( 2), where dnpebpy = 4,4'-(CO 2CH 2- (t) Bu) 2-2,2'-bipyridine and CCnaph = naphthylacetylide.
  • Following 400 nm pulsed laser excitation in CH 2Cl 2, the 23 cm (-1) red shift in the nu C=O vibrations in 1 are representative of a complex displaying a lowest charge-transfer-to-diimine (CT) excited state.
  • The decay kinetics in 1 are composed of two time constants assigned to vibrational cooling of the (3)CT excited-state concomitant with its decay to the ground state (tau = 2.2 +/- 0.4 ps), and to cooling of the formed vibrationally hot ground electronic state (tau = 15.5 +/- 4.0 ps); we note that an assignment of the latter to a ligand field state cannot be excluded.
  • The primary intention of this study was to develop a Pt (II) complex ( 2) bearing dual infrared spectroscopic tags (C[triple bond]C attached to the metal and CO (ester) attached to the diimine ligand) to independently track the movement of charge density in different segments of the molecule following pulsed light excitation.
  • The excited-state of 2 is emissive at RT, with an emission maximum at 715 nm, quantum yield of 0.0012, and lifetime of 23 ns.

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  • (PMID = 18597448.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-510X
  • [Journal-full-title] Inorganic chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Inorg Chem
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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3. Klenova A, Georgiev R, Kurtev P, Kurteva G: Short versus conventional preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer: indications. J BUON; 2007 Apr-Jun;12(2):227-32
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  • PURPOSE: Preoperative radiotherapy (RT) at high-dose short-course or at conventional fractions for rectal cancer has proven effect in increasing the tumor control.
  • The aim of this study was to test the impact of 2 different preoperative RT schemes on local recurrence, distant metastasis and survival rates and to defi ne the indications for each of them.
  • Group I patients (n=51) received a total dose of 25 Gy in 5 fractions of 5 Gy each for 5 consecutive days; operation was performed 3-5 days later.
  • Group II patients (n=33) received a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions of 2 Gy each in 5 weeks, followed by surgery after 4-5 weeks.
  • Surgery included abdomino-perineal resection (APR) for tumors of the lower half of distal rectum, abdomino-transanal resection (ATR) for tumors of the upper half of distal rectum and anterior resection (AR) for tumors of the middle rectum.
  • For stage II patients only, OS and DMFS was 100% in both preoperative RT groups.
  • However, the use of short preoperative 5 x 5 Gy scheme for tumors of the lower third of the rectum and sphincter-saving surgery was accompanied with higher rates of local recurrence: 11% after 5 x 5 Gy vs. 0% after 25 x 2 Gy.
  • Partial tumor regression with 50 Gy of conventional RT was achieved in 79% of the cases.
  • Such regression was not possible to assess for the 5 x 5 Gy group since surgery was performed 3-5 days after RT.
  • No late adverse effects on normal tissues were observed with any scheme of preoperative RT.
  • CONCLUSION: The conventional preoperative RT with 50 Gy proved more effective for advanced rectal cancer (T4 or N2) and for sphincter-saving resections for lower-lying tumors.
  • The short scheme 5 x 5 Gy is appropriate for less advanced tumors (T2-3, N0-1), therefore requiring accurate clinical staging.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Disease-Free Survival. Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Radiotherapy Dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 17600877.001).
  • [ISSN] 1107-0625
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of B.U.ON. : official journal of the Balkan Union of Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J BUON
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
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4. Addo-Yobo SO, Straessle J, Anwar A, Donson AM, Kleinschmidt-Demasters BK, Foreman NK: Paired overexpression of ErbB3 and Sox10 in pilocytic astrocytoma. J Neuropathol Exp Neurol; 2006 Aug;65(8):769-75
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • To identify alternative targets of gefitinib in PA, we studied other members of the ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase family that have been identified in brain tumors.
  • Using gene expression microarray and Western blot analyses, we found that ErbB3 is highly overexpressed in PA compared with other pediatric brain tumors (glioblastoma, ependymoma, medulloblastoma, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor, and choroid plexus papilloma).
  • Investigation of Sox10 in PA revealed that it is highly overexpressed relative to other pediatric brain tumors, lending support to the theory that Sox10-regulated overexpression of ErbB3 may be driving growth in PA.
  • [MeSH-major] Astrocytoma / genetics. Biomarkers, Tumor / genetics. Brain Neoplasms / genetics. DNA-Binding Proteins / genetics. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic / genetics. High Mobility Group Proteins / genetics. Receptor, ErbB-3 / genetics. Transcription Factors / genetics


5. Geara FB, Nasr E, Tucker SL, Charafeddine M, Dabaja B, Eid T, Abbas J, Salem Z, Shamseddine A, Issa P, El Saghir N: Breast cancer patients with 10 or more involved axillary lymph nodes treated by multimodality therapy: influence of clinical presentation on outcome. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2007 Jun 1;68(2):364-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • PURPOSE: To analyze tumor control and survival for breast cancer patients with 10 or more positive lymph nodes without systemic disease, treated by adjuvant radiation alone or combined-modality therapy.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: We reviewed the records of 309 consecutive patients with these characteristics who received locoregional radiotherapy (RT) at our institution.
  • Adjuvant therapy consisted of RT alone, with or without chemotherapy, tamoxifen, and/or ovarian castration.
  • Patients treated with a combination therapy had a higher 5-year DFS rate compared with those treated by RT alone (26% vs. 11%; p = 0.03).
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Axilla. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Regression Analysis

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  • (PMID = 17324529.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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6. Tey J, Back MF, Shakespeare TP, Mukherjee RK, Lu JJ, Lee KM, Wong LC, Leong CN, Zhu M: The role of palliative radiation therapy in symptomatic locally advanced gastric cancer. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2007 Feb 1;67(2):385-8
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  • PURPOSE: To review the outcome of palliative radiotherapy (RT) alone in patients with symptomatic locally advanced or recurrent gastric cancer.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: Patients with symptomatic locally advanced or recurrent gastric cancer who were managed palliatively with RT at The Cancer Institute, Singapore were retrospectively reviewed.
  • RESULTS: Between November 1999 and December 2004, 33 patients with locally advanced or recurrent gastric cancer were managed with palliative intent using RT alone.
  • Twenty-one (64%) patients had known distant metastatic disease at time of treatment.
  • A total of 54.3% of patients (13/24) with bleeding responded (median duration of response of 140 days), 25% of patients (2/8) with obstruction responded (median duration of response of 102 days), and 25% of patients (2/8) with pain responded (median duration of response of 105 days).
  • One Grade 3 CTC equivalent toxicity was recorded.
  • CONCLUSION: External beam RT alone is an effective and well tolerated modality in the local palliation of gastric cancer, with palliation lasting the majority of patients' lives.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / radiotherapy. Palliative Care / methods. Stomach Neoplasms / radiotherapy

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  • (PMID = 17118569.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] United States
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7. Shalaby T, von Bueren AO, Hürlimann ML, Fiaschetti G, Castelletti D, Masayuki T, Nagasawa K, Arcaro A, Jelesarov I, Shin-ya K, Grotzer M: Disabling c-Myc in childhood medulloblastoma and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor cells by the potent G-quadruplex interactive agent S2T1-6OTD. Mol Cancer Ther; 2010 Jan;9(1):167-79
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  • [Title] Disabling c-Myc in childhood medulloblastoma and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor cells by the potent G-quadruplex interactive agent S2T1-6OTD.
  • We investigated here the effects of S2T1-6OTD, a novel telomestatin derivative that is synthesized to target G-quadruplex-forming DNA sequences, on a representative panel of human medulloblastoma (MB) and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid (AT/RT) childhood brain cancer cell lines.
  • In remarkable contrast to control cells, short-term (72-hour) treatment with S2T1-6OTD resulted in a dose- and time-dependent antiproliferative effect in all MB and AT/RT brain tumor cell lines tested (IC(50), 0.25-0.39 micromol/L).
  • Long-term treatment (5 weeks) with nontoxic concentrations of S2T1-6OTD resulted in a time-dependent (mainly c-Myc-dependent) telomere shortening.
  • On in vivo animal testing, S2T1-6OTD may well represent a novel therapeutic strategy for childhood brain tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] G-Quadruplexes / drug effects. Medulloblastoma / metabolism. Medulloblastoma / pathology. Oxazoles / pharmacology. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc / metabolism. Rhabdoid Tumor / pathology. Teratoma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Apoptosis / drug effects. Base Sequence. Cell Cycle / drug effects. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Cell Survival / drug effects. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 / metabolism. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Down-Regulation / drug effects. Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor. Humans. Promoter Regions, Genetic / genetics. Protein Binding / drug effects. RNA, Messenger / genetics. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. Telomerase / genetics. Telomerase / metabolism. Time Factors


8. Inanoglu K, Ozcengiz D, Gunes Y, Unlugenc H, Isik G: Epidural ropivacaine versus ropivacaine plus tramadol in postoperative analgesia in children undergoing major abdominal surgery: a comparison. J Anesth; 2010 Oct;24(5):700-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: Following Ethics Committee approval and informed parent consent, 44 children aged between 2 and 12 years, with ASA physical status I or II, who were undergoing major abdominal surgery were included in the study.
  • Patients were randomly divided into two groups to receive either ropivacaine alone (0.2%), 0.7 ml/kg, in group I, or ropivacaine (0.2%) plus tramadol (2 mg/kg), with total volume 0.7 ml/kg, in group II, epidurally in both groups.
  • RESULTS: The duration of analgesia was significantly longer in group RT than in group R (298.6 ± 28 and 867.9 ± 106.8 min in group I and II, respectively) (P < 0.05).
  • CHEOPS scores were significantly lower in group RT at 30 min, 45 min, and 3 h postoperatively than in group R (P < 0.05).
  • Twenty-two patients (100%) in group R and 13 patients (59%) in group RT needed supplemental analgesia postoperatively.

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  • (PMID = 20665055.001).
  • [ISSN] 1438-8359
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of anesthesia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Anesth
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Amides; 0 / Analgesics, Opioid; 0 / Anesthetics, Local; 39J1LGJ30J / Tramadol; 7IO5LYA57N / ropivacaine
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9. Lassaletta A, Lopez-Ibor B, Mateos E, Gonzalez-Vicent M, Perez-Martinez A, Sevilla J, Diaz MA, Madero L: Intrathecal liposomal cytarabine in children under 4 years with malignant brain tumors. J Neurooncol; 2009 Oct;95(1):65-69
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  • [Title] Intrathecal liposomal cytarabine in children under 4 years with malignant brain tumors.
  • Infants and very young children with malignant brain tumors usually have unfavourable locations and are not candidates for craniospinal irradiation.
  • The primary goal of the present study was to report on the safety profile and toxicity of intrathecal administration of liposomal cytarabine in children <4 years with malignant brain tumors.
  • The diagnoses were ependymoma (3), peripheral neuroectodermic tumor (PNET) (2), meduloblastoma, atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATRT), cerebral lymphoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma with CNS invasion.
  • A total of 44 doses (median = 6) of liposomal cytarabine were administered.
  • This study demonstrates the feasibility of using intrathecal liposomal cytarabine in children under 4 years of age with malignant brain tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Cytarabine / therapeutic use. Phospholipids / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 19381444.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-7373
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Phospholipids; 0 / liposom; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine
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10. Yamamoto T, Takeuchi S, Sato Y, Yamashita H: Long-term follow-up results of pars plana vitrectomy for diabetic macular edema. Jpn J Ophthalmol; 2007 Jul-Aug;51(4):285-91
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  • The mean follow-up time was 24.6 +/- 7.3 months.
  • The mean central retinal thickness (RT) at 3 months after surgery was significantly thinner than the preoperative central RT, and was maintained for at least 24 months in the cases followed for this period.
  • The reduction in RT can be maintained for up to 24 months.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Postoperative Period. Retrospective Studies. Time Factors. Tomography, Optical Coherence. Treatment Outcome. Visual Acuity

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  • (PMID = 17660989.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-5155
  • [Journal-full-title] Japanese journal of ophthalmology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Jpn. J. Ophthalmol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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11. Mendizabal S, Zamora I, Serrano A, Sanahuja MJ, Roman E, Dominguez C, Ortega P, García Ibarra F: Renal transplantation in children with posterior urethral valves. Pediatr Nephrol; 2006 Apr;21(4):566-71
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  • The objective of this study was to analyze whether renal transplantation (RT) in children with posterior urethral valves (PUV) constitutes a special group with respect to groups with different etiologies of end-stage renal disease (ESRD).
  • Between 1979 and 2004, 22 RT were performed in 19 children with PUV.
  • The median age at RT was 10 years (range: 1.3-17).
  • RT with PUV constitutes a special group due to the compulsory young age and the need for careful and complex medicosurgical management; nevertheless, the results achieved were similar to those obtained in our general RT population.


12. Timmermann B, Kortmann RD, Kühl J, Rutkowski S, Dieckmann K, Meisner C, Bamberg M: Role of radiotherapy in anaplastic ependymoma in children under age of 3 years: results of the prospective German brain tumor trials HIT-SKK 87 and 92. Radiother Oncol; 2005 Dec;77(3):278-85
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  • [Title] Role of radiotherapy in anaplastic ependymoma in children under age of 3 years: results of the prospective German brain tumor trials HIT-SKK 87 and 92.
  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To evaluate the outcome of very young children with anaplastic ependymoma after delayed or omitted radiotherapy (RT).
  • After surgery, low-risk patients (R0, M0) received maintenance chemotherapy until elective RT at age of three.
  • In high-risk patients (R+, M+) intensive induction chemotherapy was followed by maintenance chemotherapy and subsequently delayed RT.
  • RT was administered in non-responders only.
  • In 13 children, no RT was administered.
  • Preventive RT after chemotherapy was given in nine, and salvage RT in 12 children.
  • Without RT only 3/13, children survived.
  • CONCLUSION: Delaying RT jeopardizes survival even after intensive chemotherapy.
  • Predominant site of failure is the primary tumor site.
  • RT of the neuraxis should be omitted in localized disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Ependymoma / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Age Factors. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Child, Preschool. Female. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Male. Methotrexate / administration & dosage. Prospective Studies. Risk Factors. Salvage Therapy. Survival Analysis. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome


13. Terao Y, Furubayashi T, Okabe S, Mochizuki H, Arai N, Kobayashi S, Ugawa Y: Modifying the cortical processing for motor preparation by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. J Cogn Neurosci; 2007 Sep;19(9):1556-73
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  • To investigate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the central processing of motor preparation, we had subjects perform a precued-choice reaction time (RT) task.
  • A precue preceding this signal conveyed full, partial, or no advance information (hand and/or button), such that RT shortened with increasing amount of information.
  • We applied 1200 to 2400 pulses of 1-Hz rTMS over various cortical areas and compared the subjects' performances at various times before and after this intervention. rTMS delayed RT at two distinct phases after stimulation, one within 10 min and another with a peak at 20 to 30 min and lasting for 60 to 90 min, with no significant effects on error rates or movement time.
  • RT was prominently delayed over the premotor and motor cortices with similar effects across different conditions of advance information, suggesting that preparatory processes relatively close to the formation of motor output were influenced by rTMS.
  • The primary motor area, especially of the left hemisphere, may take over this processing, implementing motor output based on the information processed in other areas.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Mapping. Motor Cortex / physiology. Movement / physiology. Psychomotor Performance / physiology. Reaction Time / physiology. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
  • [MeSH-minor] Cues. Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation. Electric Stimulation. Evoked Potentials, Motor / physiology. Functional Laterality. Humans. Male. Reference Values. Task Performance and Analysis. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 17714016.001).
  • [ISSN] 0898-929X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cognitive neuroscience
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Cogn Neurosci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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14. Hooning MJ, Aleman BM, van Rosmalen AJ, Kuenen MA, Klijn JG, van Leeuwen FE: Cause-specific mortality in long-term survivors of breast cancer: A 25-year follow-up study. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2006 Mar 15;64(4):1081-91
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  • Radiotherapy (RT) as compared with surgery was associated with a 1.7-fold (95% CI, 1.2-2.5) increased mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD).
  • After postlumpectomy RT, no increased mortality from CVD was observed (hazard ratio, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.5-1.9).
  • Postmastectomy RT administered before 1979 and between 1979 and 1986 was associated with a 2-fold (95% CI, 1.2-3.4) and 1.5-fold (95% CI, 0.9-2.7) increase, respectively.
  • Patients treated before age 45 experienced a higher SMR (2.0) for both solid tumors (95% CI, 1.6-2.7) and CVD (95% CI, 1.3-3.1).
  • CONCLUSION: Currently, a large population of breast cancer survivors is at increased risk of death from CVDs and second cancers, especially when treated with RT at a young age.
  • Patients irradiated after 1979 experience low (postmastectomy RT) or no (postlumpectomy RT) excess mortality from CVD.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / mortality. Cardiovascular Diseases / mortality. Neoplasms, Second Primary / mortality. Survivors

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  • (PMID = 16446057.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil; YL5FZ2Y5U1 / Methotrexate; CMF regimen
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15. Koivula MK, Richardson J, Leino A, Valleala H, Griffiths K, Barnes A, Konttinen YT, Garrity M, Risteli J: Validation of an automated intact N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PINP) assay. Clin Biochem; 2010 Dec;43(18):1453-7
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  • OBJECTIVES: N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen assay (PINP) reflects the rate of type I collagen synthesis DESIGN AND METHODS: Different sera were fractioned by gel filtration and analyzed with intact and total PINP assays.
  • The thermal stability was tested at +37°C, +4°C and room temperature (RT).
  • In haemodialysis patients intact and total PINP assays gave significantly different results.
  • PINP were thermally stable at least 7 days at +4°C and at RT but the results of both assays were decreased similarly at +37°C.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20923676.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-2933
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical biochemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Biochem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Collagen Type I
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16. Artiglia L, Diemant T, Hartmann H, Bansmann J, Behm RJ, Gavioli L, Cavaliere E, Granozzi G: Stability and chemisorption properties of ultrathin TiO(x)/Pt(111) films and Au/TiO(x)/Pt(111) model catalysts in reactive atmospheres. Phys Chem Chem Phys; 2010 Jul 7;12(25):6864-74
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  • 1) ambient, while the reduced films undergo an oxidative dewetting process at RT in the latter atmosphere.

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  • (PMID = 20461242.001).
  • [ISSN] 1463-9084
  • [Journal-full-title] Physical chemistry chemical physics : PCCP
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Phys Chem Chem Phys
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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17. Conter C, Carrie C, Bernier V, Geoffray A, Pagnier A, Gentet JC, Lellouch-Tubiana A, Chabaud S, Frappaz D: Intracranial ependymomas in children: society of pediatric oncology experience with postoperative hyperfractionated local radiotherapy. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2009 Aug 1;74(5):1536-42
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  • PURPOSE: To prospectively investigate the role of local hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) after surgical resection in the treatment of intracranial ependymomas in children.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Postoperative local hyperfractionated RT was proposed for every child (>5 years old at diagnosis) with localized intracranial ependymoma.
  • The World Health Organization grade was anaplastic in 10 of the 24 patients (not assessable in 1).
  • After a retrospective central review, a CR was reported in 16 patients, partial resection in 4, and doubtful resection in 4.
  • The histological grade and extent of resection were not prognostic factors.
  • More than 3 in 4 children had no sequelae of RT at a median follow-up of 7 years (95% confidence interval, 66.4-90.0 months).
  • CONCLUSION: The results of our study have shown that hyperfractionated RT is safe but provides no outcome benefit compared with other strategies of RT such as standard fractionated regimens.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Ependymoma / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Dose Fractionation. Feasibility Studies. Female. France / epidemiology. Hearing / radiation effects. Humans. Intelligence / radiation effects. Male. Medical Oncology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Prospective Studies. Psychomotor Performance / radiation effects. Radiotherapy / adverse effects. Societies, Medical. Survival Rate. Vision, Ocular / radiation effects

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  • (PMID = 19362789.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-355X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Chen HL, Zhu R, Chen HT, Li HJ, Ju SP: Ab initio study on mechanisms and kinetics for reaction of NCS with NO. J Phys Chem A; 2008 Jun 19;112(24):5495-501
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  • The mechanisms and kinetics of the reaction of a thiocyanato radical (NCS) with NO were investigated by a high-level ab initio molecular orbital method in conjunction with variational RRKM calculations.
  • The predicted total rate constants, k total, at a 2 torr He pressure can be represented by the following equations: k total = 9.74 x 10 (26) T (-13.88) exp(-6.53 (kcal mol (-1))/ RT) at T = 298-950 K and 1.17 x 10 (-22) T (2.52) exp(-6.86 (kcal mol (-1))/ RT) at T = 960-3000 K, in units of cm (3) molecule (-1) s (-1), and the predicted values are in good agreement with the experimental results in the temperature range of 298-468 K.

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  • (PMID = 18481840.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-5215
  • [Journal-full-title] The journal of physical chemistry. A
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Phys Chem A
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Hasselblatt M, Oyen F, Gesk S, Kordes U, Wrede B, Bergmann M, Schmid H, Frühwald MC, Schneppenheim R, Siebert R, Paulus W: Cribriform neuroepithelial tumor (CRINET): a nonrhabdoid ventricular tumor with INI1 loss and relatively favorable prognosis. J Neuropathol Exp Neurol; 2009 Dec;68(12):1249-55
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  • [Title] Cribriform neuroepithelial tumor (CRINET): a nonrhabdoid ventricular tumor with INI1 loss and relatively favorable prognosis.
  • Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors are malignant embryonal tumors characterized by the presence of rhabdoid cells, genetic alterations affecting the SMARCB1 gene (hSNF5/INI1), and a poor prognosis.
  • Whether INI1 plays a role in the pathogenesis of other central nervous system tumors is uncertain.
  • We report on cases of 2 young children with unusual intracranial nonrhabdoid neuroectodermal tumors within and around the third or fourth ventricle that are characterized by cribriform strands and trabeculae and well-defined epithelial membrane antigen-immunopositive surfaces and show INI1 protein loss.
  • Histological and immunohistochemical features did not correspond to established tumor types, including atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors, medulloepithelioma, choroid plexus carcinoma, and ependymoma.
  • Fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses failed to identify chromosomal alterations affecting the SMARCB1 locus, but sequencing revealed a homozygous 4-bp duplication in exon 4 (492duplCCTT) in one of the tumors.
  • We suggest that cribriform neuroepithelial tumor (CRINET) is a nonrhabdoid ventricular tumor that shows loss of tumoral INI1 protein and has a relatively favorable prognosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / genetics. Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone / genetics. DNA-Binding Proteins / genetics. Fourth Ventricle / pathology. Neoplasms, Neuroepithelial / genetics. Third Ventricle / pathology. Transcription Factors / genetics

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  • (PMID = 19915490.001).
  • [ISSN] 1554-6578
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuropathology and experimental neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neuropathol. Exp. Neurol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / SMARCB1 protein, human; 0 / Transcription Factors
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20. Koral K, Gargan L, Bowers DC, Gimi B, Timmons CF, Weprin B, Rollins NK: Imaging characteristics of atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumor in children compared with medulloblastoma. AJR Am J Roentgenol; 2008 Mar;190(3):809-14
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  • [Title] Imaging characteristics of atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumor in children compared with medulloblastoma.
  • OBJECTIVE: The purpose of our study was to compare the imaging characteristics of atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumor with medulloblastoma and seek distinguishing features that can aid in preoperative diagnosis.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Preoperative MRI examinations of 55 patients (36 medulloblastomas and 19 atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumors) were analyzed retrospectively.
  • Imaging characteristics of atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumor and medulloblastoma were assessed with conventional MRI and CT.
  • Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was available in 27 patients (19 medulloblastomas and eight atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumors).
  • Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated for 14 medulloblastomas and six atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumors.
  • RESULTS: Both atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumors in general and infratentorial atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumors presented at a younger age than medulloblastomas.
  • Eleven of 19 atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumors were infratentorial.
  • Cerebellopontine angle (CPA) involvement was more frequent (8/11, 72.7%) in atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumor than in medulloblastoma (4/36, 11.1%) (p < 0.001).
  • Intratumoral hemorrhage was more common in atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumor (9/19, 47.4%) than in medulloblastoma (2/36, 5.6%) (p < 0.0001).
  • All atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumors and all medulloblastomas for which DWI was available displayed increased signal intensity on DWI compared with normal brain parenchyma.
  • The mean ADC values for tumor types were not significantly different.
  • CONCLUSION: Atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumor presents at a younger age than medulloblastoma.
  • Although atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumor and medulloblastoma display similar imaging characteristics on conventional MRI, CPA involvement and intratumoral hemorrhage are more common in atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumor.
  • If a pediatric posterior fossa mass that displays restricted diffusion is involving the CPA, atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumor is a more likely consideration than medulloblastoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Cerebellar Neoplasms / diagnosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Medulloblastoma / diagnosis. Rhabdoid Tumor / diagnosis. Teratoma / diagnosis. Tomography, X-Ray Computed


21. Beschorner R, Mittelbronn M, Koerbel A, Ernemann U, Thal DR, Scheel-Walter HG, Meyermann R, Tatagiba M: Atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumor spreading along the trigeminal nerve. Pediatr Neurosurg; 2006;42(4):258-63
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  • [Title] Atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumor spreading along the trigeminal nerve.
  • We here describe the case of a boy with an atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumor (ATRT) of the 4th ventricle at 1 year of age and a local tumor recurrence at 19 months of age.
  • Due to brainstem infiltration, only incomplete tumor resection was possible each time.
  • High-dose chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation and irradiation resulted in complete tumor remission on a control MRI.
  • At 8 years of age, another tumor appeared extending from the cerebellopontine angle along the right trigeminal nerve through Meckel's cave into the cavernous sinus.
  • The trigeminal tumor was not in continuity with the primary ATRT but was located within the field of prior irradiation, neuroradiologically mimicking a schwannoma or a meningioma.
  • The origin of the trigeminal tumor as a late metastasis of the former ATRT or as a less likely irradiation-induced secondary ATRT and the operative approach are discussed.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / diagnosis. Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / diagnosis. Rhabdoid Tumor / diagnosis. Teratoma / diagnosis. Trigeminal Nerve Diseases / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Fourth Ventricle / pathology. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy. Stem Cell Transplantation

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  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 16714870.001).
  • [ISSN] 1016-2291
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Neurosurg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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22. Athale UH, Duckworth J, Odame I, Barr R: Childhood atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor of the central nervous system: a meta-analysis of observational studies. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2009 Sep;31(9):651-63
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  • [Title] Childhood atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor of the central nervous system: a meta-analysis of observational studies.
  • PURPOSE: Therapy for central nervous system (CNS) atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATRT) is controversial.
  • RESULTS: The median OS for patients treated with multiagent chemotherapy (n=79) was 17.3 months (range, 1.5-93 mo); unrelated to age at diagnosis, sex, tumor site, and extent of resection.
  • Patients (n=30) treated with intrathecal (IT) chemotherapy had significantly higher 2-year OS [64% (95% confidence interval, 46.5-82.0) vs. 17.3% (95% confidence interval, 5.4-29.3); P<0.0001] and lower prevalence of distant CNS metastasis compared with those without IT therapy (n=49) (20% vs. 59.2%; P=0.001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Despite dismal OS, multimodal therapy can induce remission even in metastatic CNS ATRT with partial resection.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / epidemiology. Rhabdoid Tumor / epidemiology. Teratoma / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 19707161.001).
  • [ISSN] 1536-3678
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Meta-Analysis
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1CC1JFE158 / Dactinomycin; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 8N3DW7272P / Cyclophosphamide; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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23. Wang XB, Werhahn JC, Wang LS, Kowalski K, Laubereau A, Xantheas SS: Observation of a remarkable temperature effect in the hydrogen bonding structure and dynamics of the CN(-)(H2O) cluster. J Phys Chem A; 2009 Sep 3;113(35):9579-84
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  • [Title] Observation of a remarkable temperature effect in the hydrogen bonding structure and dynamics of the CN(-)(H2O) cluster.
  • The observed PES spectra of CN(-)(H2O) display a remarkable temperature effect, namely that the T = 12 K spectrum shows an unexpectedly large blue shift of 0.25 eV in the electron binding energy relative to the room temperature (RT) spectrum.
  • As a result, at T = 12 K the cluster adopts a structure that is close to the minimum energy CN(-)(H2O) configuration, while at RT it can effectively access regions of the PEF close to the transition state for pathway ii, explaining the surprisingly large spectral shift between the 12 K and RT PES spectra.

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  • (PMID = 19708691.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-5215
  • [Journal-full-title] The journal of physical chemistry. A
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Phys Chem A
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Letter
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. López-Hernández FJ, Ortiz MA, Piedrafita FJ: The extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways are differentially affected by temperature upstream of mitochondrial damage. Apoptosis; 2006 Aug;11(8):1339-47
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  • Thus, incubation at room temperature (RT) has been shown to induce apoptosis in hematopoietic cells, including Jurkat T leukemia cells.
  • To further understand the apoptotic events that can be activated at RT, we compared the induction of apoptosis by several apoptotic insults in Jurkat cells stimulated at 37 degrees C or RT.
  • Retinoid-related molecules, which induce apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway, failed to induce apoptosis when cells were treated at RT, as determined by various apoptotic parameters including cytochrome c release and activation of caspase 3.
  • Ultraviolet radiation produced partial effects at RT, correlating with its capacity to activate both pathways.
  • Experiments using purified recombinant caspases and cell-free assays confirmed that caspases are fully functional at RT.
  • Other hallmark events of apoptosis, such as phosphatidylserine externalization and formation of apoptotic bodies were variably affected by RT in a stimulus-dependent manner, suggesting the existence of critical steps that are sensitive to temperature.
  • Thus, analysis of apoptosis at RT might be useful to (i) discriminate between the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways in Jurkat cells treated with prospective stimuli, and (ii) to unravel temperature-sensitive steps of apoptotic signaling cascades.

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  • (PMID = 16703261.001).
  • [ISSN] 1360-8185
  • [Journal-full-title] Apoptosis : an international journal on programmed cell death
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Apoptosis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 55681; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 75033
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD95; 0 / Phosphatidylserines; 9007-43-6 / Cytochromes c; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspase 3; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspase 8; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspase 9
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25. Fakih MG, Bullarddunn K, Yang GY, Pendyala L, Toth K, Andrews C, Rustum YM, Ross ME, Levea C, Puthillath A, Park YM, Rajput A: Phase II study of weekly intravenous oxaliplatin combined with oral daily capecitabine and radiotherapy with biologic correlates in neoadjuvant treatment of rectal adenocarcinoma. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2008 Nov 1;72(3):650-7
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  • PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy of a combination of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiotherapy (RT) in the neoadjuvant treatment of Stage II and III rectal cancers.
  • METHODS: Capecitabine was given at 725 mg/m(2) orally twice daily Monday through Friday concurrently with RT.
  • Oxaliplatin was given intravenously at 50 mg/m(2) once weekly five times starting the first day of RT.
  • Endorectal tumor biopsies were obtained before treatment and on the third day of treatment to explore the effects of treatment on thymidine phosphorylase, thymidylate synthase, excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair deficiency complementation group 1 (ERCC1), and apoptosis.
  • RESULTS: A total of 25 patients were enrolled in this study; 6 patients (24%) had a complete pathologic response.
  • Grade 3 diarrhea was the most common Grade 3-4 toxicity, occurring in 20% of patients.
  • Thymidylate synthase, thymidine phosphorylase, ERCC1, and apoptosis did not vary significantly between the pretreatment and Day 3 tumor biopsies, nor did they predict for T-downstaging or a complete pathologic response.
  • CONCLUSION: Capecitabine at 725 mg/m(2) orally twice daily, oxaliplatin 50 mg/m(2)/wk, and RT at 50.4 Gy is an effective neoadjuvant combination for Stage II and III rectal cancer and results in a greater rate of complete pathologic responses than historically shown in fluoropyrimidine plus RT controls.
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / toxicity. Apoptosis / drug effects. Apoptosis / radiation effects. Capecitabine. Combined Modality Therapy. DNA-Binding Proteins / genetics. Deoxycytidine / administration & dosage. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Deoxycytidine / toxicity. Drug Administration Schedule. Endonucleases / genetics. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Fluorouracil / analogs & derivatives. Fluorouracil / toxicity. Humans. Injections, Intravenous. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Organoplatinum Compounds / administration & dosage. Organoplatinum Compounds / therapeutic use. Organoplatinum Compounds / toxicity. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 18565686.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-355X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 04ZR38536J / oxaliplatin; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; 6804DJ8Z9U / Capecitabine; EC 3.1.- / ERCC1 protein, human; EC 3.1.- / Endonucleases; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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26. Sołtyszewski I, Pepiński W, Dobrzyńska-Tarasiuk A, Janica J: DNA typeability in liquid urine and urine stains using AmpFISTR SGM Plus. Adv Med Sci; 2006;51:36-8
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  • PURPOSE: Urine specimens are usually collected for biochemical and toxicological tests and for doping control.
  • Liquid specimens were stored at room temperature (RT), 4 degrees C and -20 degrees C up to 28 days.
  • Experimental stains were prepared by applying 3 ml urine on sterile cloth 30 x 30 cm, air-dried and stored at RT up to 360 days.
  • Typing of a experimental sample was considered successful when the full profile was obtained matching that of a reference sample.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Liquid urine samples and urine stains can be considered as a potential source of DNA in disputable specimen individualization and in forensic casework using the fluorescent multiplex PCR system AmpFLSTR SGM Plus.

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  • (PMID = 17357274.001).
  • [ISSN] 1896-1126
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in medical sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv Med Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 9007-49-2 / DNA
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27. Robergs RA, Gordon T, Reynolds J, Walker TB: Energy expenditure during bench press and squat exercises. J Strength Cond Res; 2007 Feb;21(1):123-30
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  • Despite the popularity of resistance training (RT), an accurate method for quantifying its metabolic cost has yet to be developed.
  • We applied indirect calorimetry during bench press (BP) and parallel squat (PS) exercises for 5 consecutive minutes at several steady state intensities for 23 (BP) and 20 (PS) previously trained men.
  • Tests were conducted in random order of intensity and separated by 5 minutes.
  • Resultant steady state VO2 data, along with the independent variables load and distance lifted, were used in multiple regression to predict the energy cost of RT at higher loads.
  • Using those equations to predict caloric cost, our resultant values were significantly larger than caloric costs of RT reported in previous investigations.
  • Despite a potential limitation of our equations to maintain accuracy during very high-intensity RT, we propose that they currently represent the most accurate method for predicting the caloric cost of bench press and parallel squat.

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  • (PMID = 17313290.001).
  • [ISSN] 1064-8011
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of strength and conditioning research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Strength Cond Res
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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28. Rupp TL, Acebo C, Seifer R, Carskadon MA: Effects of a moderate evening alcohol dose. II: performance. Alcohol Clin Exp Res; 2007 Aug;31(8):1365-71
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  • [Title] Effects of a moderate evening alcohol dose. II: performance.
  • BACKGROUND: This second of a pair of papers investigates the effects of a moderate dose of alcohol and staying up late on driving simulation performance and simple visual reaction time (RT) at a known circadian phase in well-rested young adults.
  • Breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) readings were taken before all test sessions.
  • RESULTS: Driving simulation and PVT variables significantly deteriorated with increasing time awake.
  • [MeSH-major] Central Nervous System Depressants / pharmacology. Ethanol / pharmacology. Psychomotor Performance / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Arousal / drug effects. Automobile Driving. Breath Tests. Circadian Rhythm / drug effects. Female. Humans. Male. Melatonin / metabolism. Reaction Time / drug effects. Saliva / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17550362.001).
  • [ISSN] 0145-6008
  • [Journal-full-title] Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAAA NIH HHS / AA / AA13252
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Central Nervous System Depressants; 3K9958V90M / Ethanol; JL5DK93RCL / Melatonin
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29. Fouladi M, Blaney SM, Poussaint TY, Freeman BB 3rd, McLendon R, Fuller C, Adesina AM, Hancock ML, Danks MK, Stewart C, Boyett JM, Gajjar A: Phase II study of oxaliplatin in children with recurrent or refractory medulloblastoma, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors: a pediatric brain tumor consortium study. Cancer; 2006 Nov 1;107(9):2291-7
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  • [Title] Phase II study of oxaliplatin in children with recurrent or refractory medulloblastoma, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors: a pediatric brain tumor consortium study.
  • BACKGROUND: An open-label Phase II study of oxaliplatin was conducted to evaluate its safety and efficacy in children with recurrent or refractory medulloblastoma (MB), supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (SPNET), and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATRT).
  • The primary objective was to estimate the sustained response rate in stratum 1A.
  • RESULTS: A total of 43 patients with a median age of 8.5 years (range, 0.6-18.9 years) were enrolled.
  • The most frequent Grade 3 and 4 toxicities included thrombocytopenia (25.6%), neutropenia (16.3%), leukopenia (12%), increase in serum alanine transaminase (ALT) (7%), vomiting (4.7%), and sensory neuropathy (4.7%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Oxaliplatin was well tolerated in children but has limited activity in children with recurrent CNS embryonal tumors previously treated with platinum compounds.
  • [MeSH-major] Medulloblastoma / drug therapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive / drug therapy. Organoplatinum Compounds / therapeutic use. Rhabdoid Tumor / drug therapy. Supratentorial Neoplasms / drug therapy. Teratoma / drug therapy


30. Stefanov I, Baeten V, Abbas O, Colman E, Vlaeminck B, De Baets B, Fievez V: Analysis of milk odd- and branched-chain fatty acids using Fourier transform (FT)-Raman spectroscopy. J Agric Food Chem; 2010 Oct 27;58(20):10804-11
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  • Fourier transform (FT)-Raman spectra of pure C13:0, C15:0, C17:0, iso C14:0, iso C15:0, and ante C15:0 fatty acid methyl ester standards (FAMESs) and 75 milk fat samples from 6 different dietary experiments were acquired at room temperature (RT) and immediately after freezing at -80 °C (FT).
  • The latter generally included much more well-defined and sharper scattering bands than those obtained at RT.
  • In general, most individual (C15:0, ante C15:0, iso C17:0, and ante C17:0) and grouped (ODD, ANTE, and total OBCFAs) fatty acids were favorably (coefficient of determination, R(2) > 0.65) predicted using models with FT spectra only or a combination of RT and FT spectra (RFT), when compared to models with spectra analyzed at RT only.

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  • (PMID = 20886895.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-5118
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of agricultural and food chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Agric. Food Chem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fatty Acids
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31. Yamamoto M, Ishikawa T, Taira T, Li GF, Matsuda K, Uemura T: Effect of defects in Heusler alloy thin films on spin-dependent tunnelling characteristics of Co2MnSi/MgO/Co2MnSi and Co2MnGe/MgO/Co2MnGe magnetic tunnel junctions. J Phys Condens Matter; 2010 Apr 28;22(16):164212
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  • The tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) ratios at both 4.2 K and room temperature (RT) increased systematically with increasing α in Co(2)Mn(α)Si electrodes from Mn-deficient compositions (α < 1) up to a certain Mn-rich composition (α > 1), demonstrating high TMR ratios of 1135% at 4.2 K and 236% at RT for MTJs with Mn-rich Co(2)Mn(α)Si electrodes with α = 1.29.
  • Identically fabricated Co(2)Mn(β)Ge(δ)/MgO/Co(2)Mn(β)Ge(δ) (δ = 0.38) MTJs showed similar dependence of the TMR ratio on Mn composition β, demonstrating relatively high TMR ratios of 650% at 4.2 K and 220% at RT for β = 1.40.
  • The Mn composition dependence of the TMR ratio at both 4.2 K and RT observed commonly for both Co(2)MnSi/MgO/Co(2)MnSi and Co(2)MnGe/MgO/Co(2)MnGe MTJs can be attributed to suppressed minority-spin in-gap states around the Fermi level for Mn-rich Co(2)MnSi and Co(2)MnGe electrodes.

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  • (PMID = 21386418.001).
  • [ISSN] 1361-648X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of physics. Condensed matter : an Institute of Physics journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Phys Condens Matter
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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32. Bianco M, Ferri M, Fabiano C, Scardigno A, Tavella S, Caccia A, Manili U, Faina M, Casasco M, Zeppilli P: Comparison of baseline neuropsychological testing in amateur versus professional boxers. Phys Sportsmed; 2008 Dec;36(1):95-102
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  • b) undergo a computerized neuropsychological (NP) test (CogSport) measuring simple and complex reaction time (RT).
  • Professionals were significantly (P < 0.0001) older (29.4 +/- 4.19 years) and started boxing at a younger age (14.5 +/- 3.94 vs 20.3 +/- 4.77 years, P < 0.0001) than debutants (24.1 +/- 5.13 years).
  • Debutants showed significantly shorter simple RTs than professionals, both at the beginning (0.244 +/- 0.007 vs 0.249 +/- 0.007 s, P = 0.005) and the end (0.247 +/- 0.007 vs 0.251 +/- 0.008 s, P = 0.028) of NP test.
  • Complex RTs did not differ between groups.
  • Professionals showed a positive significant correlation between simple RT at the beginning of NP test and the total number of disputed (P = 0.043) and won (P = 0.035) bouts.
  • In conclusion, professionals show a longer simple RT compared with debutants, with no difference regarding more complex cognitive tasks.
  • KEYWORDS: boxing; CogSport; reaction time; neuropsychological test.

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  • (PMID = 20048477.001).
  • [ISSN] 0091-3847
  • [Journal-full-title] The Physician and sportsmedicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Phys Sportsmed
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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33. Lin H, Zhang HF, Du R, Gu XH, Zhang ZY, Buyse J, Decuypere E: Thermoregulation responses of broiler chickens to humidity at different ambient temperatures. II. Four weeks of age. Poult Sci; 2005 Aug;84(8):1173-8
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  • The effects of humidity on rectal temperature (RT) and plumage temperature at back (PBAT) and skin temperature at breast (SBRT) were determined at 1, 4, 8, 16, and 24 h after exposure.
  • The RT, PBAT, and SBRT were all significantly increased by high temperature (35 degrees C).
  • Humidity had a significant influence on RT at 35 degrees C but not at 30 degrees C.
  • The disturbance of thermal balance could not be determined only by changes in RT or peripheral temperature at a single time point but could be determined by mean body temperature within a certain time frame.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aging. Animals. Housing, Animal. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 16156199.001).
  • [ISSN] 0032-5791
  • [Journal-full-title] Poultry science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Poult. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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34. Ardon H, De Vleeschouwer S, Van Calenbergh F, Claes L, Kramm CM, Rutkowski S, Wolff JE, Van Gool SW: Adjuvant dendritic cell-based tumour vaccination for children with malignant brain tumours. Pediatr Blood Cancer; 2010 Apr;54(4):519-25
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  • [Title] Adjuvant dendritic cell-based tumour vaccination for children with malignant brain tumours.
  • BACKGROUND: A large experience with dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccination for malignant brain tumours has been gained in adults.
  • Here we focus on the results obtained in children with relapsed malignant brain tumours.
  • PROCEDURE: In total 45 children were vaccinated: 33 high grade glioma (HGG), 5 medulloblastoma (MB)/primitive neuro-ectodermal tumour (PNET), 4 ependymoma and 3 atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumour (ATRT).
  • Autologous, monocyte-derived DC were generated and loaded with tumour lysate, which was used as source of tumour-associated antigens.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / therapy. Cancer Vaccines / therapeutic use. Dendritic Cells / transplantation

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  • [CommentIn] Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2010 Apr;54(4):495-6 [19998471.001]
  • (PMID = 19852061.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-5017
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric blood & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Blood Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Cancer Vaccines
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35. Strauss B, Brix C, Fischer S, Leppert K, Füller J, Roehrig B, Schleussner C, Wendt TG: The influence of resilience on fatigue in cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT). J Cancer Res Clin Oncol; 2007 Aug;133(8):511-8
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  • [Title] The influence of resilience on fatigue in cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT).
  • PURPOSE: The primary goal of the study was to determine if resilience influences fatigue in a consecutive sample of cancer patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) at the beginning and at the end of the treatment.
  • METHODS: Out of an initial sample of 250 patients, 239 could be assessed at the beginning of their RT.
  • Two hundred and eight patients were reassessed at the end of RT 4-8 weeks later.
  • Fatigue increased during RT.
  • Changes of fatigue scores during RT depended on initial scores, decrease in Hb and the patients' experience with RT.
  • Resilience could not be determined as a predictor of changes in fatigue during RT.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The study confirmed that fatigue is an important problem among RT patients.
  • Resilience turned out to powerfully predict the patients' fatigue at least early in RT.
  • On the other hand, resilience seems to have little influence on treatment related fatigue during RT.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adaptation, Psychological. Adult. Aged. Female. Health Status. Humans. Karnofsky Performance Status. Male. Middle Aged. Predictive Value of Tests. Radiotherapy / adverse effects. Radiotherapy Dosage. Regression Analysis. Surveys and Questionnaires

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  • (PMID = 17576595.001).
  • [ISSN] 0171-5216
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cancer research and clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cancer Res. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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36. Aboud S, Nilsson C, Karlén K, Marovich M, Wahren B, Sandström E, Gaines H, Biberfeld G, Godoy-Ramirez K: Strong HIV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocyte proliferative responses in healthy individuals immunized with an HIV-1 DNA vaccine and boosted with recombinant modified vaccinia virus ankara expressing HIV-1 genes. Clin Vaccine Immunol; 2010 Jul;17(7):1124-31
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  • We investigated HIV-1 vaccine-induced lymphoproliferative responses in healthy volunteers immunized intradermally or intramuscularly (with or without adjuvant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF] protein) with DNA expressing HIV-1 gag, env, rev, and rt at months 0, 1, and 3 using a Biojector and boosted at 9 months with modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing heterologous HIV-1 gag, env, and pol (HIV-MVA).

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  • (PMID = 20463104.001).
  • [ISSN] 1556-679X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical and vaccine immunology : CVI
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Vaccine Immunol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / AIDS Vaccines; 0 / DNA, Viral; 83869-56-1 / Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2897257
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37. Sun Z, Bello-Roufai M, Wang X: RNAi inhibition of mineralocorticoid receptors prevents the development of cold-induced hypertension. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol; 2008 Apr;294(4):H1880-7
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  • Three groups were exposed to cold (6.7 degrees C), whereas the remaining three groups were kept at room temperature (RT;.
  • The blood pressure (BP) of the mice treated with ControlshRNA or PBS increased significantly during exposure to cold, whereas the BP of the cold-exposed MRshRNA-treated mice did not increase and remained at the level of the control group kept at RT.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aldosterone / blood. Animals. Blood Pressure. Body Weight. Cold Temperature / adverse effects. Dependovirus / genetics. Disease Models, Animal. Down-Regulation. Drinking. Eating. Genetic Vectors. Immunohistochemistry. Kidney / pathology. Male. Mice. Norepinephrine / blood. RNA, Small Interfering / genetics. RNA, Small Interfering / metabolism. Renin / blood. Time Factors. Transduction, Genetic. Urination. Viral Proteins / biosynthesis

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  • (PMID = 18296563.001).
  • [ISSN] 0363-6135
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of physiology. Heart and circulatory physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL077490; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01-HL-077490
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Small Interfering; 0 / Receptors, Mineralocorticoid; 0 / Viral Proteins; 4964P6T9RB / Aldosterone; EC 3.4.23.15 / Renin; X4W3ENH1CV / Norepinephrine
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38. Wilms MC, Stanzel S, Reinert RR, Burckhardt I: Effects of preincubation temperature on the detection of fastidious organisms in delayed-entry samples in the BacT/ALERT 3D blood culture system. J Microbiol Methods; 2009 Nov;79(2):194-8
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  • [Title] Effects of preincubation temperature on the detection of fastidious organisms in delayed-entry samples in the BacT/ALERT 3D blood culture system.
  • This study evaluates the effect of preincubation on delayed-entry samples for fastidious organisms including the HACEK group, Streptococcus species, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus species and Corynebacterium species for the BacT/ALERT 3D System (bioMérieux) using the FA (aerobic) medium.
  • Bottles were inoculated with two different concentrations (0.5 McFarland and a 1:100,000 dilution) of each organism and either loaded into the system immediately or stored at 4 degrees C, room temperature (RT) or 37 degrees C for 24 hours (h) prior to loading.
  • The detection rate (DR) was 92.5% for bottles loaded immediately for both concentrations with a mean time to detection (TTD) of 26.7 h (standard deviation (SD): 14.7 h) for the low concentration and 9.21 h (SD: 5.3 h) for the high concentration.
  • The DR at RT was 90.0% for the low concentration and 83.6% for the high concentration.
  • [MeSH-minor] Colony Count, Microbial. Humans. Sensitivity and Specificity. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 19733598.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-8359
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of microbiological methods
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Microbiol. Methods
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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39. Allan DS, Morgan SC, Birch PE, Yang L, Halpenny MJ, Gunanayagam A, Li Y, Eapen L: Mobilization of circulating vascular progenitors in cancer patients receiving external beam radiation in response to tissue injury. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2009 Sep 1;75(1):220-4
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  • [Title] Mobilization of circulating vascular progenitors in cancer patients receiving external beam radiation in response to tissue injury.
  • PURPOSE: Endothelial-like vascular progenitor cells (VPCs) are associated with the repair of ischemic tissue injury in several clinical settings.
  • Because the endothelium is a principal target of radiation injury, VPCs may be important in limiting toxicity associated with radiotherapy (RT) in patients with cancer.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: We studied 30 patients undergoing RT for skin cancer (n = 5), head-and-neck cancer (n = 15), and prostate cancer (n = 10) prospectively, representing a wide range of irradiated mucosal volumes.
  • Vascular progenitor cell levels were enumerated from peripheral blood at baseline, midway through RT, at the end of treatment, and 4 weeks after radiation.
  • Acute toxicity was graded at each time point by use of the National Cancer Institute's Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0.
  • RESULTS: Significant increases in the proportion of CD34(+)/CD133(+) VPCs were observed after completion of RT, from 0.012% at baseline to 0.048% (p = 0.029), and the increase in this subpopulation was most marked in patients with Grade 2 peak toxicity or greater after RT (p = 0.034).
  • Similarly, CD34(+)/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-positive VPCs were increased after the completion of radiation therapy in comparison to baseline (from 0.014% to 0.027%, p = 0.043), and there was a trend toward greater mobilization in patients with more significant toxicity (p = 0.08).
  • Interventions that increase baseline VPC levels or enhance their mobilization and recruitment in response to RT may prove useful in facilitating more rapid and complete tissue healing.
  • [MeSH-major] Endothelial Cells / physiology. Endothelium, Vascular / radiation effects. Radiation Injuries. Stem Cells / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antigens, CD34 / analysis. Cell Count / methods. Cell Movement / physiology. Cell Proliferation. Female. Flow Cytometry. Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Humans. Leukocytes, Mononuclear / radiation effects. Male. Mucous Membrane / cytology. Mucous Membrane / radiation effects. Prospective Studies. Prostatic Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Radiotherapy Dosage. Skin Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 / analysis

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  • (PMID = 19695439.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-355X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD34; EC 2.7.10.1 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2
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40. Chen Z, Ishizuka O, Imamura T, Aizawa N, Igawa Y, Nishizawa O, Andersson KE: Role of alpha1-adrenergic receptors in detrusor overactivity induced by cold stress in conscious rats. Neurourol Urodyn; 2009;28(3):251-6
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  • METHODS: Continuous cystometry was performed at room temperature (RT, 28 +/- 2 degrees C) and for 40 min at cold temperature (CT, 4 +/- 2 degrees C).
  • RESULTS: At RT, none of the AR antagonists caused significant change in the cystometric parameters.


41. Choi YL, Kim CJ, Matsuo T, Gaetano C, Falconi R, Suh YL, Kim SH, Shin YK, Park SH, Chi JG, Thiele CJ: HUlip, a human homologue of unc-33-like phosphoprotein of Caenorhabditis elegans; Immunohistochemical localization in the developing human brain and patterns of expression in nervous system tumors. J Neurooncol; 2005 May;73(1):19-27
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  • [Title] HUlip, a human homologue of unc-33-like phosphoprotein of Caenorhabditis elegans; Immunohistochemical localization in the developing human brain and patterns of expression in nervous system tumors.
  • HUlip is a human homologue of a C. elegans gene, unc-33, that is developmentally regulated during maturation of the nervous system.
  • HUlip is highly expressed only in the fetal brain and spinal cord, and is undetected in the adult brain.
  • The purpose of this study was to investigate the pattern of hUlip expression in the developing human brain and nervous system tumors.
  • Ten human brains at different developmental stages and 118 cases of nervous system tumor tissues were examined by immunohistochemistry.
  • Twelve related tumor cell lines were also analyzed by northern blotting and immunoblotting.
  • HUlip was expressed in late fetal and early postnatal brains; strongly in the neurons of the brain stem, basal ganglia/thalamus, and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, and relatively weakly in the cerebral and cerebellar cortex.
  • Among tumors, hUlip expression was easily detected in tumor cells undergoing neuronal differentiation such as ganglioneuroblastomas and ganglioneuromas.
  • Furthermore, hUlip immunoreactivity was also found in various brain tumors showing neuronal differentiation: central neurocytomas (6 of 6 cases were positive), medulloblastomas (5/11), atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (1/1) and gangliogliomas (4/7).
  • Some astrocytic tumors also showed weak positivity: astrocytomas (1 of 5 cases), anaplastic astrocytomas (2/5), and glioblastomas (3/11).
  • The results of this study indicate that the expression of hUlip protein is distinctly restricted to the late fetal and early postnatal periods of human nervous system development and to certain subsets of nervous system tumors.
  • The exact function of hUlip needs to be further clarified; yet the results of our study strongly imply that hUlip function is important in human nervous system development and its aberrant expression in various types of nervous system tumors suggests a role of hUlip as an oncofetal neural antigen.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain / metabolism. Brain Neoplasms / metabolism. Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental / physiology. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic / physiology. Muscle Proteins / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Astrocytes / cytology. Astrocytes / metabolism. Cell Differentiation / genetics. Cell Differentiation / physiology. Cell Line, Tumor. Female. Gestational Age. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Neuroblastoma / genetics. Neuroblastoma / metabolism. Neurons / cytology. Neurons / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 15933812.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-594X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DPYSL3 protein, human; 0 / Muscle Proteins
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42. Ghasemi M, Minier M, Tatoulian M, Arefi-Khonsari F: Determination of amine and aldehyde surface densities: application to the study of aged plasma treated polyethylene films. Langmuir; 2007 Nov 6;23(23):11554-61
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  • The aim of this work was to test and to compare different methods reported in the literature to quantify amine and aldehyde functions on the surface of polyethylene (PE) films treated by ammonia plasma and to specify their stability against time.
  • Two methods using (i) sulfosuccinimidyl 6-[3'-(2-pyridyldithio)-propionamido] hexanoate (sulfo-LC-SPDP) and (ii) 2-iminothiolane (ITL) associated with bicinchoninic acid (BCA) have been proved to be reliable and sensitive enough to estimate the surface concentration of primary amine functions.
  • The amount of primary amino groups on the functionalized polyethylene films was found to be between 1.2 and 1.4 molecules/nm2.
  • The concentration of GA was found to be in the same range as primary amine concentration.
  • The influence of aging time on the density of available amino and aldehyde groups on the surfaces were evaluated under different storage conditions.
  • The results showed that 50% of the initial density of primary amine functions remained available after storage during 6 days of the PE samples in PBS (pH 7.6) at 4 degrees C.
  • In the case of aldehyde groups, the same percentage of the initial density (50%) remained active after storage in air at RT over a longer period, i.e., 15 days.
  • [MeSH-minor] Glutaral / chemistry. Hydrogen-Ion Concentration. Imidoesters / chemistry. Pyridines / chemistry. Quinolines / chemistry. Spectrophotometry. Succinates / chemistry. Surface Properties. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 17915893.001).
  • [ISSN] 0743-7463
  • [Journal-full-title] Langmuir : the ACS journal of surfaces and colloids
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Langmuir
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Aldehydes; 0 / Amines; 0 / Biocompatible Materials; 0 / Imidoesters; 0 / Polyethylenes; 0 / Pyridines; 0 / Quinolines; 0 / Succinates; 0 / sulfosuccinimidyl 6-(3'-(2-pyridyldithio)propionamido)hexanoate; 1245-13-2 / bicinchoninic acid; 64821-63-2 / methyl 4-mercaptobutyrimidate; 7664-41-7 / Ammonia; T3C89M417N / Glutaral
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43. Jagsi R, Griffith KA, Koelling T, Roberts R, Pierce LJ: Rates of myocardial infarction and coronary artery disease and risk factors in patients treated with radiation therapy for early-stage breast cancer. Cancer; 2007 Feb 15;109(4):650-7
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  • BACKGROUND: Radiation therapy (RT), a critical component of breast-conserving therapy for breast cancer, has been associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) in numerous older studies, but the risk may be lower with modern techniques.
  • METHODS: Observed rates of cardiac events in 828 patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and RT at the University of Michigan were compared with expected rates.
  • Median interval from RT to occurrence of the first cardiac event was 3.7 years (range, 13 days to 15.4 years).
  • On multivariate analysis, age, diabetes mellitus, active smoking, and laterality of RT were significant predictors of MI.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Humans. Incidence. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Radiation Injuries / mortality. Radiation Injuries / pathology. Risk Assessment. Risk Factors. Survival Rate


44. Mannathan S, Cheng CH: Cobalt-catalyzed regio- and stereoselective intermolecular enyne coupling: an efficient route to 1,3-diene derivatives. Chem Commun (Camb); 2010 Mar 21;46(11):1923-5
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  • The reaction of alkynes with vinyl arenes or vinyl trimethyl silane in the presence of a cobalt(II) complex, Zn and ZnI(2) in CH(2)Cl(2) at rt to 50 degrees C provides 1,3-dienes in good to excellent yields.

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  • (PMID = 20198254.001).
  • [ISSN] 1364-548X
  • [Journal-full-title] Chemical communications (Cambridge, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chem. Commun. (Camb.)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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45. Bhaskar K, Anbu J, Ravichandiran V, Venkateswarlu V, Rao YM: Lipid nanoparticles for transdermal delivery of flurbiprofen: formulation, in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo studies. Lipids Health Dis; 2009;8:6
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  • They are characterized for particle size, for all the formulations, more than 50% of the particles were below 300 nm after 90 days of storage at RT.
  • The Cmax and AUC of the B1 formulation were 1.8 and 2.5 times higher than the A1 gel formulation respectively.
  • The bioavailability of flurbiprofen with reference to oral administration was found to increase by 4.4 times when gel formulations were applied.

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  • (PMID = 19243632.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-511X
  • [Journal-full-title] Lipids in health and disease
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lipids Health Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 0 / Drug Carriers; 0 / Hydrogels; 0 / Lipids; 5GRO578KLP / Flurbiprofen
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2651881
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46. Makuria AT, Rushing EJ, McGrail KM, Hartmann DP, Azumi N, Ozdemirli M: Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) in adults: review of four cases. J Neurooncol; 2008 Jul;88(3):321-30
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  • [Title] Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) in adults: review of four cases.
  • Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid (AT/RT) tumor is a rare, highly malignant tumor of the central nervous system (CNS) most commonly found in children less than 5 years of age.
  • Since its histological appearance can be confused with other tumors, especially in adults, separating AT/RT from other neoplasms may be difficult.
  • Radiographically, two tumors were localized in the right fronto-parietal region, one was frontal and the other was found in the left temporal lobe.
  • Immunohistochemical staining showed that the tumor cells were positive for vimentin and reacted variably for keratin, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), synaptophysin, neurofilament protein, CD34, and smooth muscle actin (SMA).
  • In adult examples of AT/RT, the diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion, with early tissue diagnosis and a low threshold for investigation with INI1 immunohistochemistry to differentiate this entity from other morphologically similar tumors.
  • Although the prognosis is dismal in pediatric population, long term survival is possible in adult AT/RT cases after surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / metabolism. Brain Neoplasms / pathology. Rhabdoid Tumor / metabolism. Rhabdoid Tumor / pathology

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  • (PMID = 18369529.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-594X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / SMARCB1 Protein; 0 / SMARCB1 protein, human; 0 / Transcription Factors
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47. Al-Dgither S, Alvi SN, Hammami MM: Development and validation of an HPLC method for the determination of gatifloxacin stability in human plasma. J Pharm Biomed Anal; 2006 Apr 11;41(1):251-5
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  • The mobile phase, 0.025 M disodium hydrogen phosphate (pH 3.0) and acetonitrile (80:20 v/v), were delivered at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min.
  • Plasma samples were deproteinized using Amicon Centrifree system.
  • Gatifloxacin was found to be stable for at least 5 h at RT, 7 weeks at -20 degrees C, and after 3 freeze-thaw cycles in plasma; 16 h at RT and 48 h at -20 degrees C in deproteinized plasma; and 24 h at RT and 7 weeks at -20 degrees C in phosphate buffer.
  • [MeSH-minor] Acetonitriles / chemistry. Calibration. Ciprofloxacin / analysis. Ciprofloxacin / pharmacokinetics. Humans. Models, Chemical. Phosphoric Acids / chemistry. Quality Control. Reproducibility of Results. Spectrophotometry / methods. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 16311002.001).
  • [ISSN] 0731-7085
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pharmaceutical and biomedical analysis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Pharm Biomed Anal
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Acetonitriles; 0 / Fluoroquinolones; 0 / Phosphoric Acids; 5E8K9I0O4U / Ciprofloxacin; E4GA8884NN / phosphoric acid; L4618BD7KJ / gatifloxacin; Z072SB282N / acetonitrile
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48. Wang Z, Fan QH, Yu MN, Zhang WM: [Clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical study of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor of central nervous system]. Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi; 2006 Aug;35(8):458-61
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  • [Title] [Clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical study of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor of central nervous system].
  • OBJECTIVE: To study the clinicopathologic features and differential diagnosis of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) occurring in the central nervous system.
  • METHODS: Two cases of AT/RT were studied by hematoxylin-eosin, reticulin and immunohistochemical staining.
  • RESULTS: Histologically, AT/RT was characterized by the presence of rhabdoid cells associated with various degrees of primitive neuroectodermal, epithelial or mesenchymal differentiation.
  • The tumor cells were positive for vimentin, CD99, epithelial membrane antigen, cytokeratin, glial fibrillary acidic protein, S-100 protein, neurofilament, desmin and smooth muscle actin.
  • CONCLUSIONS: AT/RT is a highly malignant tumor occurring in the central nervous system.
  • The tumor is characterized by a heterogeneous histologic and immunohistochemical phenotype.
  • It needs to be distinguished from a number of central nervous system tumors, including medulloblastoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor, germ cell neoplasm and rhabdoid meningioma.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / pathology. Rhabdoid Tumor / pathology. Teratoma / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17069697.001).
  • [ISSN] 0529-5807
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua bing li xue za zhi = Chinese journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Actins; 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / CD99 protein, human; 0 / Cell Adhesion Molecules; 0 / Desmin; 0 / Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein; 0 / Mucin-1; 0 / Neurofilament Proteins; 0 / S100 Proteins; 0 / Vimentin; 68238-35-7 / Keratins
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49. MacDonald TJ: Aggressive infantile embryonal tumors. J Child Neurol; 2008 Oct;23(10):1195-204
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  • [Title] Aggressive infantile embryonal tumors.
  • Embryonal tumors are the most common brain tumors in infants less than 36 months.
  • Histologically characterized as undifferentiated small, round cell tumors with divergent patterns of differentiation, these include medulloblastoma, the most common form of embryonal tumor, as well as supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor, medulloepithelioma, ependymoblastoma, medullomyoblastoma, melanotic medulloblastoma, and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor.
  • All are similarly aggressive and have a tendency to disseminate throughout the central nervous system.
  • Because of efforts to avoid craniospinal irradiation in an attempt to lessen treatment-related neurotoxicity, management of these tumors in infants is unique.
  • Outcomes remain similarly poor among all the tumor types and, therefore, identification of specific molecular targets that have prognostic and therapeutic implications is crucial.
  • The molecular and clinical aspects of the 3 most common aggressive infantile embryonal tumors, medulloblastoma, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor, and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor, are the focus of this review.

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  • (PMID = 18952586.001).
  • [ISSN] 1708-8283
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of child neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Child Neurol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / R13 NS040925; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / 5R13NS040925-09
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
  • [Number-of-references] 70
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS473079; NLM/ PMC3674573
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50. Chang WE, Takeda T, Raman EP, Klimov DK: Molecular dynamics simulations of anti-aggregation effect of ibuprofen. Biophys J; 2010 Jun 2;98(11):2662-70
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  • As a result, ibuprofen interference modifies the free energy landscape of fibril growth and reduces the free energy gain of Abeta peptide binding to the fibril by approximately 2.5 RT at 360 K.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 20513411.001).
  • [ISSN] 1542-0086
  • [Journal-full-title] Biophysical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biophys. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / R01 AG028191
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Amyloid; 0 / Amyloid beta-Peptides; 0 / Peptide Fragments; 059QF0KO0R / Water; WK2XYI10QM / Ibuprofen
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2877328
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51. Paris KA, Haq O, Felts AK, Das K, Arnold E, Levy RM: Conformational landscape of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase non-nucleoside inhibitor binding pocket: lessons for inhibitor design from a cluster analysis of many crystal structures. J Med Chem; 2009 Oct 22;52(20):6413-20
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  • Clustering of 99 available X-ray crystal structures of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) at the flexible non-nucleoside inhibitor binding pocket (NNIBP) provides information about features of the conformational landscape for binding non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs), including effects of mutation and crystal forms.
  • The ensemble of NNIBP conformations is separated into eight discrete clusters based primarily on the position of the functionally important primer grip, the displacement of which is believed to be one of the mechanisms of inhibition of RT.

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  • (PMID = 19827836.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-4804
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of medicinal chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Med. Chem.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM030580; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R37 AI027690; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / AI27690; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / GM30580
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Ligands; 0 / Nucleosides; 0 / Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors; EC 2.7.7.- / reverse transcriptase, Human immunodeficiency virus 1; EC 2.7.7.49 / HIV Reverse Transcriptase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS144565; NLM/ PMC3182518
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52. Reddy AT: Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors of the central nervous system. J Neurooncol; 2005 Dec;75(3):309-13
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  • [Title] Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors of the central nervous system.
  • Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) is a highly malignant central nervous system neoplasm that usually affects very young children and is typically deadly despite very aggressive treatment.
  • Considered rare, the tumor was not recognized as a distinct entity until the 80's, due to its similar features with other primitive tumors.
  • Although AT/RT has become increasingly recognized, published data has been based on small series and are retrospective.
  • AT/RT is the first pediatric brain tumor for which a candidate tumor suppressor gene has been identified.
  • A mutation or deletion in the INI1 gene occurs in the majority of AT/RT tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Central Nervous System Neoplasms / genetics. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / pathology. Genes, Tumor Suppressor. Rhabdoid Tumor / genetics. Rhabdoid Tumor / pathology. Teratoma / genetics. Teratoma / pathology

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  • [ISSN] 0167-594X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
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53. Martineau C, Whyte LG, Greer CW: Stable isotope probing analysis of the diversity and activity of methanotrophic bacteria in soils from the Canadian high Arctic. Appl Environ Microbiol; 2010 Sep;76(17):5773-84
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  • Results showed that most of the soils had the capacity to oxidize CH(4) at 4 degrees C and at room temperature (RT), but the oxidation rates were greater at RT than at 4 degrees C and were significantly enhanced by nutrient amendment.

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  • (PMID = 20622133.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-5336
  • [Journal-full-title] Applied and environmental microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] GENBANK/ HM564340/ HM564341/ HM564342/ HM564343/ HM564344/ HM564345/ HM564346/ HM564347/ HM564348/ HM564349/ HM564350/ HM564351/ HM564352/ HM564353/ HM564354/ HM564355/ HM564356/ HM564357/ HM564358/ HM564359/ HM564360/ HM564361/ HM564362/ HM564363/ HM564364/ HM564365/ HM564366/ HM564367/ HM564368/ HM564369/ HM564370/ HM564371/ HM564372/ HM564373/ HM564374/ HM564375/ HM564376/ HM564377/ HM564378
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Bacterial; 0 / DNA, Ribosomal; 0 / Isotopes; 0 / RNA, Ribosomal, 16S; OP0UW79H66 / Methane
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2935073
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54. Intergroup Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial 9402, Cairncross G, Berkey B, Shaw E, Jenkins R, Scheithauer B, Brachman D, Buckner J, Fink K, Souhami L, Laperierre N, Mehta M, Curran W: Phase III trial of chemotherapy plus radiotherapy compared with radiotherapy alone for pure and mixed anaplastic oligodendroglioma: Intergroup Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial 9402. J Clin Oncol; 2006 Jun 20;24(18):2707-14
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  • PURPOSE: Anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO) and anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA) are treated with surgery and radiotherapy (RT) at diagnosis, but they also respond to procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine (PCV), raising the possibility that early chemotherapy will improve survival.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with AO and AOA were randomly assigned to PCV chemotherapy followed by RT versus postoperative RT alone.
  • The primary end point was overall survival.
  • RESULTS: Two hundred eighty-nine eligible patients were randomly assigned to either PCV plus RT (n = 147) or RT alone (n = 142).
  • At progression, 80% of patients randomly assigned to RT had chemotherapy.
  • With 3-year follow-up on most patients, the median survival times were similar (4.9 years after PCV plus RT v 4.7 years after RT alone; hazard ratio [HR] = 0.90; 95% CI, 0.66 to 1.24; P = .26).
  • Progression-free survival time favored PCV plus RT (2.6 years v 1.7 years for RT alone; HR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.91; P = .004), but 65% of patients experienced grade 3 or 4 toxicity, and one patient died.
  • Patients with tumors lacking 1p and 19q (46%) compared with tumors not lacking 1p and 19q had longer median survival times (> 7 v 2.8 years, respectively; P < or = .001); longer progression-free survival was most apparent in this subset.
  • CONCLUSION: For patients with AO and AOA, PCV plus RT does not prolong survival.
  • Longer progression-free survival after PCV plus RT is associated with significant toxicity.
  • Tumors lacking 1p and 19q alleles are less aggressive or more responsive or both.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Brain Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Oligodendroglioma / drug therapy. Oligodendroglioma / radiotherapy


55. Desai SS, Paulino AC, Mai WY, Teh BS: Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2006 Jul 15;65(4):1222-7
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  • PURPOSE: The moyamoya syndrome is an uncommon late complication after radiotherapy (RT).
  • RESULTS: The series included 54 patients with a median age at initial RT of 3.8 years (range, 0.4 to 47).
  • Age at RT was less than 5 years in 56.3%, 5 to 10 years in 22.9%, 11 to 20 years in 8.3%, 21 to 30 years in 6.3%, 31 to 40 years in 2.1%, and 41 to 50 years in 4.2%.
  • The most common tumor treated with RT was low-grade glioma in 37 tumors (68.5%) of which 29 were optic-pathway glioma.
  • The average RT dose was 46.5 Gy (range, 22-120 Gy).
  • For NF-1-positive patients, the average RT dose was 46.5 Gy, and for NF-1-negative patients, it was 58.1 Gy.
  • The median latent period for development of moyamoya syndrome was 40 months after RT (range, 4-240).
  • Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome occurred in 27.7% of patients by 2 years, 53.2% of patients by 4 years, 74.5% of patients by 6 years, and 95.7% of patients by 12 years after RT.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Patients who received RT to the parasellar region at a young age (<5 years) are the most susceptible to moyamoya syndrome.
  • The incidence for moyamoya syndrome continues to increase with time, with half of cases occurring within 4 years of RT and 95% of cases occurring within 12 years.

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  • (PMID = 16626890.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 40
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56. Ma HI, Kao CL, Lee YY, Chiou GY, Tai LK, Lu KH, Huang CS, Chen YW, Chiou SH, Cheng IC, Wong TT: Differential expression profiling between atypical teratoid/rhabdoid and medulloblastoma tumor in vitro and in vivo using microarray analysis. Childs Nerv Syst; 2010 Mar;26(3):293-303
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  • [Title] Differential expression profiling between atypical teratoid/rhabdoid and medulloblastoma tumor in vitro and in vivo using microarray analysis.
  • OBJECTIVES: Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) and medulloblastoma (MB) are the most malignant primary brain tumors in early childhood.
  • AT/RT is frequently misdiagnosed as primitive neuroectodermal tumor/medulloblastoma.
  • The biological features and clinical outcomes of AT/RT and MB are extremely different.
  • In this study, we used microarray as a platform to distinguish these two tumors with the definitive diagnostic marker as well as the profiling of expression genes.
  • METHODS: In order to clarify the pathogenesis and find the biological markers for AT/RT, we established a derivative AT/RT primary cell culture.
  • The differential profiling between AT/RT and MB were analyzed by using microarray method.
  • RESULTS: With the use of the microarray method, we demonstrated that 15 genes were significantly changed (at least 5-fold in upregulation and 1/5-fold in downregulation) between AT/RT and MB in tissues and cell lines.
  • The quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses further confirmed that mRNA expression levels of SERPINI1 and osteopontin were highly expressed in AT/RT cells and tissues than those in MB.
  • Importantly, our microarray result suggested that AT/RT presents the stemness-like pattern and expression profiling of embryonic stem cells as well as high mRNA expressions of Oct-4, Nanog, Sox-2, and c-Myc.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrated the differential gene expression profiling between AT/RT and MB.
  • Based on the microarray findings, AT/RTs present embryonic stem-like gene recapitulation and further provide novel insights into their underlying biology.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / metabolism. Medulloblastoma / metabolism. Rhabdoid Tumor / metabolism. Teratoma / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19902219.001).
  • [ISSN] 1433-0350
  • [Journal-full-title] Child's nervous system : ChNS : official journal of the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Childs Nerv Syst
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / RNA, Messenger
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57. Ferrigno R, Nakamura RA, Dos Santos Novaes PE, Pellizzon AC, Maia MA, Fogarolli RC, Salvajoli JV, Filho WJ, Lopes A: Radiochemotherapy in the conservative treatment of anal canal carcinoma: retrospective analysis of results and radiation dose effectiveness. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2005 Mar 15;61(4):1136-42
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  • External radiotherapy (RT) was delivered at the whole pelvis followed by a boost at the primary tumor.
  • The median dose of RT at the whole pelvis and at the primary tumor was 45 Gy and 55 Gy, respectively.
  • Chemotherapy was carried out during the first and last 4 days of RT with continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (1000 mg/m(2)) and bolus mitomycin C (10 mg/m(2)).
  • Median overall treatment time was 51 days (range, 30-129 days).
  • Thirty-four patients (79%) did not receive elective RT at the inguinal region.
  • Patient's age, tumor stage, overall treatment time, and RT dose at primary tumor were variables analyzed for survival and local control.
  • RESULTS: Median follow-up time was 42 months (range, 4-116 months).
  • According to the RT dose, local control was higher among patients who received more than 50 Gy at primary tumor (86.5% vs. 34%, p = 0.012).
  • Inguinal failure was observed in 5 patients (15%) who did not receive inguinal elective RT.
  • Local control was higher in patients treated with doses of more than 50 Gy at primary tumor.
  • The high incidence of inguinal failure implies the need for elective RT in this region.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Mitomycin / administration & dosage. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Radiotherapy Dosage. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15752894.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 50SG953SK6 / Mitomycin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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58. Huyghebaert N, Vermeire A, Neirynck S, Steidler L, Remaut E, Remon JP: Evaluation of extrusion/spheronisation, layering and compaction for the preparation of an oral, multi-particulate formulation of viable, hIL-10 producing Lactococcus lactis. Eur J Pharm Biopharm; 2005 Jan;59(1):9-15
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  • The viability in the mini-tablets and pellets, stored for 1 week at RT and 10% RH was reduced to 23 and 0.5% of initial viability, respectively.
  • Storage for 1 week at RT and 60% RH resulted in complete loss of viability.
  • Layering of L. lactis on inert pellets resulted in low viability (4.86%), but 1 week after storage at RT and 10% RH, 68% of initial viability was maintained.

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  • (PMID = 15567296.001).
  • [ISSN] 0939-6411
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of pharmaceutics and biopharmaceutics : official journal of Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Pharmazeutische Verfahrenstechnik e.V
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Pharm Biopharm
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 130068-27-8 / Interleukin-10
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59. Crook J, Ludgate C, Malone S, Perry G, Eapen L, Bowen J, Robertson S, Lockwood G: Final report of multicenter Canadian Phase III randomized trial of 3 versus 8 months of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy before conventional-dose radiotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2009 Feb 1;73(2):327-33
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  • PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of 3 vs. 8 months of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before conventional-dose radiotherapy (RT) on disease-free survival for localized prostate cancer.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between February 1995 and June 2001, 378 men were randomized to either 3 or 8 months of flutamide and goserelin before 66 Gy RT at four participating centers.
  • CONCLUSION: A longer period of NHT before standard-dose RT did not alter the patterns of failure when combined with 66-Gy RT.

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  • (PMID = 18707821.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-355X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase III; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androgen Antagonists; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0F65R8P09N / Goserelin; 76W6J0943E / Flutamide; EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
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60. Zwahlen DR, Martin JM, Millar JL, Schneider U: Effect of radiotherapy volume and dose on secondary cancer risk in stage I testicular seminoma. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2008 Mar 1;70(3):853-8
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  • PURPOSE: To estimate and compare the secondary cancer risk (SCR) due to para-aortic (PA), dogleg field (DLF), or extensive field (EF) radiotherapy (RT) at different dose levels for Stage I testicular seminoma.
  • RESULTS: The estimated cumulative SCR for a 75-year-old patient treated with PA-RT at age 35 was 23.3% (linear model), 20.9% (plateau model), and 20.8% (linear-exponential model) compared with 19.8% for the general population.
  • Dependent on the model, PA-RT compared with DLF-RT reduced the SCR by 48-63% or 64-69% when normalized to EF-RT.
  • For PA-RT, the linear dose-response model predicted a decrease of 45% in the SCR, using 20 Gy instead of 30 Gy; the linear-exponential dose-response model predicted no change in SCR.
  • CONCLUSION: Our model suggested that the SCR after PA-RT for Stage I testicular seminoma is reduced by approximately one-half to two-thirds compared with DLF-RT, independent of the dose-response model.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / prevention & control. Neoplasms, Second Primary / prevention & control. Seminoma / radiotherapy. Testicular Neoplasms / radiotherapy

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  • (PMID = 18164856.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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61. Renden R, von Gersdorff H: Synaptic vesicle endocytosis at a CNS nerve terminal: faster kinetics at physiological temperatures and increased endocytotic capacity during maturation. J Neurophysiol; 2007 Dec;98(6):3349-59
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  • [Title] Synaptic vesicle endocytosis at a CNS nerve terminal: faster kinetics at physiological temperatures and increased endocytotic capacity during maturation.
  • The rate of endocytosis at the calyx of Held nerve terminal has been measured directly using membrane capacitance measurements from immature postnatal day P7-P10 rat pups at room temperature (RT: 23-24 degrees C).
  • This rate has an average time constant of tens of seconds and becomes slower when the amount of exocytosis (measured as capacitance jump) increases.
  • Here we perform time-resolved membrane capacitance measurements from the mouse calyx of Held in brain stem slices at physiological temperature (PT: 35-37 degrees C), and also from more mature calyces after the onset of hearing (P14-P18).
  • Our results show that the rate of endocytosis is strongly temperature dependent, whereas the endocytotic capacity of a nerve terminal is dependent on developmental stage.
  • At PT we find that endocytosis accelerates due to the addition of a kinetically fast component (time constant: tau = 1-2 s) immediately after exocytosis.
  • Surprisingly, we find that at RT the rate of endocytosis triggered by short (1- to 5-ms) or long (> or =10-ms) depolarizing pulses in P14-P18 mice are similar (tau approximately 15 s).
  • [MeSH-major] Aging / physiology. Central Nervous System / growth & development. Central Nervous System / physiology. Endocytosis / physiology. Presynaptic Terminals / physiology. Synaptic Vesicles / physiology

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  • (PMID = 17942618.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3077
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurophysiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurophysiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / DC06768
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
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62. Almaşi D, Alonso DA, Gómez-Bengoa E, Nájera C: Chiral 2-aminobenzimidazoles as recoverable organocatalysts for the addition of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds to nitroalkenes. J Org Chem; 2009 Aug 21;74(16):6163-8
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  • Chiral trans-cyclohexanediamine-benzimidazole organocatalysts promote the conjugate addition of a wide variety of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds such as malonates, ketoesters, and 1,3-diketones to nitroolefins in the presence of TFA as cocatalyst in toluene as solvent at rt or 0 degrees C.

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  • (PMID = 19627118.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-6904
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of organic chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Org. Chem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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63. Penuelas J, Andreazza P, Andreazza-Vignolle C, Tolentino HC, De Santis M, Mottet C: Controlling structure and morphology of CoPt nanoparticles through dynamical or static coalescence effects. Phys Rev Lett; 2008 Mar 21;100(11):115502
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  • The structure and morphology of 1 to 3 nm size CoPt nanoparticles have been investigated in situ and in real time under different conditions: growth at 500 degrees C or at room temperature (RT) followed by annealing at 500 degrees C.
  • If icosahedra are systematically detected at the first growth stages at RT, annealing at 500 degrees C yields the decahedral structure from the quasistatic coalescence of icosahedral morphology.

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  • (PMID = 18517793.001).
  • [ISSN] 0031-9007
  • [Journal-full-title] Physical review letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Phys. Rev. Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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64. Wong CY, Azizi AB, Shareena I, Rohana J, Boo NY, Isa MR: Brain herniation in a neonate. Singapore Med J; 2010 Oct;51(10):e166-8
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  • [Title] Brain herniation in a neonate.
  • Brain herniation is generally thought to be unlikely to occur in newborns due to the presence of the patent fontanelles and cranial sutures.
  • A review of the literature published from 1993 to 2008 via MEDLINE search revealed no reports on neonatal brain herniation from intracranial tumour.
  • We report a preterm Malay male infant born via elective Caesarean section for antenatally diagnosed intracerebral tumour, which subsequently developed herniation.
  • Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging showed features that were compatible with a large complex intracranial tumour causing mass effect and gross hydrocephalus.
  • Tumour excision was scheduled when the infant was two weeks old.
  • Unfortunately, on the morning of the surgery, he developed signs of brain herniation and had profuse tumour haemorrhage during the attempted excision.
  • Histopathological examination revealed an embryonal tumour, possibly an atypical rhabdoid/teratoid tumour.
  • This case illustrates that intracranial tumours in newborns can herniate and should therefore be closely monitored.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain / pathology. Hernia / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Brain Neoplasms / pathology. Cranial Fontanelles / anatomy & histology. Female. Humans. Hydrocephalus / pathology. Infant, Newborn. Intracranial Hemorrhages. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Male. Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal / pathology. Rhabdoid Tumor / pathology. Skull / pathology. Teratoma / pathology

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  • (PMID = 21103805.001).
  • [ISSN] 0037-5675
  • [Journal-full-title] Singapore medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Singapore Med J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Singapore
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65. Dallorso S, Dini G, Ladenstein R, Cama A, Milanaccio C, Barra S, Cappelli B, Garrè ML, EBMT-PDWP: Evolving role of myeloablative chemotherapy in the treatment of childhood brain tumours. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2005 Mar;35 Suppl 1:S31-4
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  • [Title] Evolving role of myeloablative chemotherapy in the treatment of childhood brain tumours.
  • Primary brain tumours, a heterogeneous group of cancer that constitute the second most common cancer in childhood, were historically treated with neurosurgical resection and radiation therapy.
  • Patients with high-grade glial tumours, primitive neuroectodermal tumours and high-risk medulloblastoma usually fare poorly.
  • Rare cancers such as ependymoblastoma, atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumour and choroid plexus carcinoma have a dismal prognosis regardless of the above-mentioned indicators.
  • Ependymoma and brain stem tumours, for which the available data discourage the use of MAT, are excluded.

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  • (PMID = 15812527.001).
  • [ISSN] 0268-3369
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 24
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66. Sheng YF, Gu Q, Zhang AJ, You SL: Chiral Brønsted acid-catalyzed asymmetric Friedel-Crafts alkylation of pyrroles with nitroolefins. J Org Chem; 2009 Sep 4;74(17):6899-901
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  • With 5 mol % of catalyst, reactions conducted at rt afforded the 2-substituted or 2,5-disubstituted pyrroles in up to 94% ee for a wide range of substrates.

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  • (PMID = 19639942.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-6904
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of organic chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Org. Chem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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67. Navarro C, Csákÿ AG: Stereoselective RhI-catalyzed tandem conjugate addition of boronic acids-Michael cyclization. Org Lett; 2008 Jan 17;10(2):217-9
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  • The reaction is carried out in dioxane-H2O at rt, and 1,2,3-trisubstituted indans are obtained in a highly regio- and stereoselective fashion.

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  • (PMID = 18081303.001).
  • [ISSN] 1523-7060
  • [Journal-full-title] Organic letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Org. Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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68. Handrup MM, Schrøder H: [Rare brain tumour in 6-month-old girl]. Ugeskr Laeger; 2009 Feb 2;171(6):437
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  • [Title] [Rare brain tumour in 6-month-old girl].
  • Computertomography showed a tumour in the third ventricle.
  • Histology showed an atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour (AT/RT).
  • AT/RT is a very rare tumor of the brain.
  • AT/RT is a very aggressive and rapidly progressing tumour.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / radiography. Rhabdoid Tumor / radiography. Teratoma / radiography

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  • (PMID = 19208337.001).
  • [ISSN] 1603-6824
  • [Journal-full-title] Ugeskrift for laeger
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ugeskr. Laeg.
  • [Language] dan
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
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69. Huang Z, Zhang Y, Fang L, Zhang Z, Lai Y, Ding Y, Cao F, Zhang J, Peng S: Nanometre-sized titanium dioxide-catalyzed reactions of nitric oxide with aliphatic cyclic and aromatic amines. Chem Commun (Camb); 2009 Apr 7;(13):1763-5
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  • Activated on the surface of nanometre-sized TiO2, NO gas can easily react with aliphatic cyclic amines and aryl free radicals at RT under atmospheric pressure to offer NONOates and cupferron sodiums, respectively.

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  • (PMID = 19294288.001).
  • [ISSN] 1359-7345
  • [Journal-full-title] Chemical communications (Cambridge, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chem. Commun. (Camb.)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Amines; 15FIX9V2JP / titanium dioxide; 31C4KY9ESH / Nitric Oxide; D1JT611TNE / Titanium
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70. De Padua M, Reddy V, Reddy M: Cerebral atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumour arising in a child treated for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. BMJ Case Rep; 2009;2009
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  • [Title] Cerebral atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumour arising in a child treated for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.
  • Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumours (ATRT) are rare, arising typically in childhood.
  • ATRT arising as a secondary tumour in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia have not been reported so far.

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  • [Cites] Lancet. 1999 Jul 3;354(9172):34-9 [10406363.001]
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  • (PMID = 21686729.001).
  • [ISSN] 1757-790X
  • [Journal-full-title] BMJ case reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMJ Case Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3030102
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71. Rayz VL, Boussel L, Ge L, Leach JR, Martin AJ, Lawton MT, McCulloch C, Saloner D: Flow residence time and regions of intraluminal thrombus deposition in intracranial aneurysms. Ann Biomed Eng; 2010 Oct;38(10):3058-69
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  • [Title] Flow residence time and regions of intraluminal thrombus deposition in intracranial aneurysms.
  • In our previous work, patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were constructed from MRI data for three patients who had fusiform basilar aneurysms that were thrombus-free and then proceeded to develop intraluminal thrombus.
  • In this study, we investigated the effect of increased flow residence time (RT) by modeling passive scalar advection in the same aneurysmal geometries.
  • Non-Newtonian pulsatile flow simulations were carried out in base-line geometries and a new postprocessing technique, referred to as "virtual ink" and based on the passive scalar distribution maps, was used to visualize the flow and estimate the flow RT.
  • The flow RT at different locations adjacent to aneurysmal walls was calculated as the time the virtual ink scalar remained above a threshold value.
  • The RT values obtained in different areas were then correlated with the location of intra-aneurysmal thrombus observed at a follow-up MR study.
  • The correlation analysis determined a significant relationship between regions where CFD predicted either an increased RT or low WSS and the regions where thrombus deposition was observed to occur in vivo.
  • A model including both low WSS and increased RT predicted thrombus-prone regions significantly better than the models with RT or WSS alone.

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  • (PMID = 20499185.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-9686
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of biomedical engineering
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Biomed Eng
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / K25 NS059891; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / R01 NS059944; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / K25NS059891; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / R01NS059944
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2940011
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72. Grimes KR, Warren GW, Fang F, Xu Y, St Clair WH: Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, nimesulide, improves radiation treatment against non-small cell lung cancer both in vitro and in vivo. Oncol Rep; 2006 Oct;16(4):771-6
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  • We hypothesize that the COX-2 inhibitor, nimesulide, will improve the efficacy of radiation therapy (RT), at least in part, via the suppression of NF-kappaB mediated cytoprotective pathways.
  • In this study we used the COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide to improve the efficacy of RT when measured by tumor regrowth assays in vivo and clonegenic survival in vitro.
  • For the in vivo assay, A549 tumor cells representing NSCLC were subcutaneously injected into the right flanks of female athymic nude mice (n=10/group).
  • Mice were given nimesulide via drinking water at a concentration of 5 microg/g body weight (b.w.) and the water was replenished daily.
  • Tumors were treated with 30 Gy fractionated radiation and measured bi-weekly.
  • In vivo, mice that received combined treatments of 5 microg/g b.w. nimesulide and 30 Gy radiation (3 Gy/fraction, 10 daily fractions) had significant reduction in tumor size in comparison to the 30 Gy radiation control group (p<0.05).
  • In vitro, our results suggest that the radiosensitization of A549 tumor cells by nimesulide is mediated by the suppression of NF-kappaB-mediated, radiation-induced cytoprotective genes.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line, Tumor. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. In Vitro Techniques. Mice. Mice, Nude. NF-kappa B / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 16969492.001).
  • [ISSN] 1021-335X
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncol. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / T32 DK07778
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors; 0 / NF-kappa B; 0 / Sulfonamides; EC 1.14.99.1 / Cyclooxygenase 2; V4TKW1454M / nimesulide
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73. Gyure KA: Newly defined central nervous system neoplasms. Am J Clin Pathol; 2005 Jun;123 Suppl:S3-12
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  • [Title] Newly defined central nervous system neoplasms.
  • In recent years, numerous new entities or variants of recognized central nervous system tumors have been described in the literature, and the morphologic spectrum of these neoplasms is delineated incompletely.
  • The clinicopathologic features and differential diagnosis of 4 new entities, including the chordoid glioma of the third ventricle, cerebellar liponeurocytoma, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor, and papillary glioneuronal tumor, are discussed in this review.
  • [MeSH-major] Central Nervous System Neoplasms / classification. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Cerebellar Neoplasms / classification. Cerebellar Neoplasms / diagnosis. Child. Chordoma / classification. Chordoma / diagnosis. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Ganglioglioma / classification. Ganglioglioma / diagnosis. Glioma / diagnosis. Glioma / pathology. Humans. Hypothalamic Neoplasms / classification. Hypothalamic Neoplasms / diagnosis. Male. Medulloblastoma / classification. Medulloblastoma / diagnosis. Prognosis. Rhabdoid Tumor / classification. Rhabdoid Tumor / diagnosis. Teratoma / classification. Teratoma / diagnosis. Third Ventricle / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16100866.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-9173
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of clinical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Clin. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 81
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74. Klenova A, Parvanova V, Georgiev R, Gesheva N: Preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer: treatment results of three different dose regimens. J BUON; 2006 Apr-Jun;11(2):161-6
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  • PURPOSE: Radiotherapy (RT) prior to surgery could benefit patients with advanced rectal adenocarcinoma.
  • This study was designed to examine the preoperative therapeutic effect of RT given in different doses and fractions, depending on clinical (c) TN stage and on tumor site in the rectum.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: From 1997 to 2002, 122 patients with adenocarcinoma of the lower two thirds of the rectum and cT2-4, N0-2, M0, were treated with preoperative RT and then were operated radically.
  • RT was performed using 3 different schemes.
  • Thirty-eight patients received 4 Gy daily in 5 consecutive days and operated within 3-5 days after RT.
  • Doses of 5 Gy daily in 5 consecutive days were delivered to 51 patients who were also operated within 3-5 days post-RT.
  • Another 33 patients received 50 Gy in 25 fractions of 2 Gy each in 5 weeks and were operated not later than 30-45 days post-RT.
  • Conventional and conformal techniques were used for RT.
  • The influence of the different RT dose regimens showed a tendency to reduced local recurrence free survival in patients receiving a dose lower than 40 Gy.
  • A reduction in tumor size with 50 Gy of conventional RT was established and downstaging was achieved in 54% of the cases.
  • No late effects on normal tissues were observed with any scheme of preoperative RT.
  • CONCLUSION: The conventional preoperative RT at 50 Gy dose levels proved more effective for advanced rectal cancer (T4 or N2) and for low anterior resections.
  • The short scheme 5 x 5 Gy was appropriate for less advanced tumors (T2-3, N0-1), something requiring accurate clinical staging.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Preoperative Care

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  • (PMID = 17318965.001).
  • [ISSN] 1107-0625
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of B.U.ON. : official journal of the Balkan Union of Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J BUON
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
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75. McBride SM, Daganzo SM, Banerjee A, Gupta N, Lamborn KR, Prados MD, Berger MS, Wara WM, Haas-Kogan DA: Radiation is an important component of multimodality therapy for pediatric non-pineal supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2008 Dec 1;72(5):1319-23
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  • [Title] Radiation is an important component of multimodality therapy for pediatric non-pineal supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors.
  • PURPOSE: To review a historical cohort of pediatric patients with supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNET), to clarify the role of radiation in the treatment of these tumors.
  • Initial therapy consisted of surgical resection and chemotherapy in all patients and up-front radiotherapy (RT) in 5 patients.
  • Five patients had RT at the time of progression, and 5 received no RT whatever.
  • Of the 5 patients who received up-front RT, all were alive without evidence of disease at a median follow-up of 50 months (range, 25-165 months).
  • Only 5 of the 10 patients who did not receive up-front RT were alive at last follow-up.
  • There was a statistically significant difference in overall survival between the patient group that received up-front RT and the group that did not (p = 0.048).
  • In addition, we found a trend toward a statistically significant improvement in overall survival for those patients who received gross total resections (p = 0.10).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Up-front RT and gross total resection may confer a survival benefit in patients with sPNET.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Age of Onset. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Infant. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Pineal Gland / pathology. Radiotherapy / methods. Spinal Cord / pathology. Stem Cell Transplantation. Survival Analysis. Survivors. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 18485615.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-355X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 82103; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / P01 NS-42927-27A2; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA097257
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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76. Li W, Cao M, Pei L, Ling X, Li B, Yang Z: Study on steady-state kinetics of nucleotide analogues incorporation by non-gel CE. Electrophoresis; 2010 Jan;31(3):507-11
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  • Samples were prepared by single nucleotide incorporation assays catalyzed by Taq DNA polymerase at 58 degrees C and HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) at 37 degrees C, and then were separated using NGCE under optimized conditions: 25 mmol/L Tris-boric-EDTA buffer (pH 8.0) with 7 mmol/L urea in the presence of 20% w/v PEG 35000 at 30 degrees C and -20 kV.
  • K(m(dTTP)), K(m(d4TTP)) and K(m(AZTTP)) were measured by NGCE for the first time and their values for Taq DNA polymerase were 0.29+/-0.04, 32.1+/-3.3 and 74.5+/-6.6 micromol/L, respectively.
  • For HIV RT, the values were 0.15+/-0.05, 0.31+/-0.03 and 0.17+/-0.03 micromol/L, respectively.
  • The trend of data for HIV RT measured by NGCE was consistent with that measured by PAGE.
  • It be employed as a reliable alternative method and further applied in other relative studies of nucleoside analogue substrates and DNA polymerases or RTs.

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  • (PMID = 20119962.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-2683
  • [Journal-full-title] Electrophoresis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Electrophoresis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / Buffers; 0 / Nucleotides; EC 2.7.7.- / Taq Polymerase; EC 2.7.7.49 / HIV Reverse Transcriptase; EC 2.7.7.7 / DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase
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77. Arcaro A, Doepfner KT, Boller D, Guerreiro AS, Shalaby T, Jackson SP, Schoenwaelder SM, Delattre O, Grotzer MA, Fischer B: Novel role for insulin as an autocrine growth factor for malignant brain tumour cells. Biochem J; 2007 Aug 15;406(1):57-66
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  • [Title] Novel role for insulin as an autocrine growth factor for malignant brain tumour cells.
  • AT/RTs (atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours) of the CNS (central nervous system) are childhood malignancies associated with poor survival rates due to resistance to conventional treatments such as chemotherapy.
  • We characterized a panel of human AT/RT and MRT (malignant rhabdoid tumour) cell lines for expression of RTKs (receptor tyrosine kinases) and their involvement in tumour growth and survival.
  • When compared with normal brain tissue, AT/RT cell lines overexpressed the IR (insulin receptor) and the IGFIR (insulin-like growth factor-I receptor).
  • Moreover, insulin was secreted by AT/RT cells grown in serum-free medium.
  • Insulin potently activated Akt (also called protein kinase B) in AT/RT cells, as compared with other growth factors, such as epidermal growth factor.
  • Pharmacological inhibitors, neutralizing antibodies, or RNAi (RNA interference) targeting the IR impaired the growth of AT/RT cell lines and induced apoptosis.
  • Inhibitors of the PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt pathway also impaired basal and insulin-stimulated AT/RT cell proliferation.
  • Experiments using RNAi and isoform-specific pharmacological inhibitors established a key role for the class I(A) PI3K p110alpha isoform in AT/RT cell growth and insulin signalling.
  • Taken together, our results reveal a novel role for autocrine signalling by insulin and the IR in growth and survival of malignant human CNS tumour cells via the PI3K/Akt pathway.
  • [MeSH-major] Autocrine Communication. Brain Neoplasms / metabolism. Brain Neoplasms / pathology. Growth Substances / metabolism. Insulin / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Child, Preschool. Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone / metabolism. Culture Media, Serum-Free. DNA-Binding Proteins / metabolism. Down-Regulation / drug effects. Down-Regulation / genetics. Enzyme Activation / drug effects. Female. Humans. Infant. Isoenzymes / metabolism. Male. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases / metabolism. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt / metabolism. RNA, Small Interfering / metabolism. Receptor, IGF Type 1 / metabolism. Receptor, Insulin / genetics. Receptor, Insulin / metabolism. Signal Transduction / drug effects. Transcription Factors / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17506723.001).
  • [ISSN] 1470-8728
  • [Journal-full-title] The Biochemical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biochem. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone; 0 / Culture Media, Serum-Free; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / Growth Substances; 0 / Insulin; 0 / Isoenzymes; 0 / RNA, Small Interfering; 0 / SMARCB1 protein, human; 0 / Transcription Factors; EC 2.7.1.- / Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, IGF Type 1; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Insulin; EC 2.7.11.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1948991
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78. Guadagnolo BA, Zagars GK, Ballo MT: Long-term outcomes for desmoid tumors treated with radiation therapy. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2008 Jun 1;71(2):441-7
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  • [Title] Long-term outcomes for desmoid tumors treated with radiation therapy.
  • PURPOSE: To evaluate long-term outcomes in patients with desmoid fibromatosis treated with radiation therapy (RT), with or without surgery.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between 1965 and 2005, 115 patients with desmoid tumors were treated with RT at our institution.
  • Of the patients, 41 (36%) received RT alone (median dose, 56 Gy) for gross disease, and 74 (64%) received combined-modality treatment (CMT) consisting of a combination of surgery and RT (median dose, 50.4 Gy).
  • On univariate analysis, LC was significantly influenced by tumor size (< or =5 cm vs. 5-10 cm vs. >10 cm) (p = 0.02) and age (< or = 30 vs. >30 years) (p = 0.02).
  • There was no significant difference in LC for patients treated with RT alone for gross disease vs. CMT.
  • For patients treated with CMT, only tumor size significantly influenced LC (p = 0.02).
  • Radiation-related complications occurred in 20 (17%) of patients and were associated with dose >56 Gy (p = 0.001), age < or =30 years (p = 0.009), and receipt of RT alone vs. CMT (p = 0.01).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Desmoid tumors are effectively controlled with RT administered either as an adjuvant to surgery when resection margins are positive or alone for gross disease when surgical resection is not feasible.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Analysis of Variance. Child. Combined Modality Therapy / methods. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Radiation Injuries / complications. Radiotherapy Dosage. Salvage Therapy / methods. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18068311.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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79. Fidlerová H, Kalinová J, Blechová M, Velek J, Raska I: A new epigenetic marker: the replication-coupled, cell cycle-dependent, dual modification of the histone H4 tail. J Struct Biol; 2009 Jul;167(1):76-82
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  • Recently, we described the cold-dependent detection of an epitope, epiC, that was selectively recognized by a monoclonal anti-actin antibody at 4 degrees C, but not at RT, in the early replicating chromatin domains of human fibroblast cell nuclei and chromosomes.
  • Here we identified epiC as a dual post-translational modification on the same histone H4 tail, which was immunodetected for the first time.
  • We show that the antibody selectively recognized a synthetic peptide of the histone H4 region K12-L22 containing acetylated K16 and dimethylated K20 (H4K16ac-K20me2) at 4 degrees C, but not at RT.

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  • (PMID = 19348949.001).
  • [ISSN] 1095-8657
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of structural biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Struct. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Epitopes; 0 / Histones; 0 / Peptides
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80. Nishihira Y, Tan CF, Hirato J, Yoshimura J, Nishiyama K, Takahashi H, Fujii Y, Takahashi H: A case of congenital supratentorial tumor: atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor or primitive neuroectodermal tumor? Neuropathology; 2007 Dec;27(6):551-5
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  • [Title] A case of congenital supratentorial tumor: atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor or primitive neuroectodermal tumor?
  • Two embryonal CNS tumors, atypical teratoid/rabdoid tumor (AT/RT) and primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET), may be confused with each other and misdiagnosed.
  • Here we report an infant with a congenital supratentorial tumor, which was detected by fetal MRI at 37 weeks gestation.
  • On routine histological examination, the tumor was composed mainly of small undifferentiated cells, among which many rhabdoid cells and occasional sickle-shaped embracing cells were observed.
  • Our impression was that the tumor was an atypical example of AT/RT.
  • Immunohistochemically, almost all the tumor cells were strongly positive for vimentin.
  • However, epithelial membrane antigen was notably negative, and most of the tumor cell nuclei were clearly positive for INI1.
  • In addition, many tumor cells were positive for neurofilament protein.
  • There were also occasional small areas containing many tumor cells positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein.
  • Finally, a diagnosis of PNET, with a rhabdoid phenotype and expression of neuronal and glial markers, was made.
  • In the present case, application of INI1 immunostaining was very helpful for distinguishing PNET from AT/RT.
  • [MeSH-major] Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone / metabolism. DNA-Binding Proteins / metabolism. Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive / pathology. Supratentorial Neoplasms / congenital. Supratentorial Neoplasms / pathology. Teratoma / pathology. Transcription Factors / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Infant, Newborn. Pregnancy. Prenatal Diagnosis. Rhabdoid Tumor / congenital. Rhabdoid Tumor / metabolism. Rhabdoid Tumor / pathology

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  • [ErratumIn] Neuropathology. 2008 Feb;28(1):108
  • (PMID = 18021375.001).
  • [ISSN] 0919-6544
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuropathology : official journal of the Japanese Society of Neuropathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuropathology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / SMARCB1 protein, human; 0 / Transcription Factors
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81. Paulino AC, Fowler BZ: Secondary neoplasms after radiotherapy for a childhood solid tumor. Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2005 Mar;22(2):89-101
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  • [Title] Secondary neoplasms after radiotherapy for a childhood solid tumor.
  • This study was conducted to determine the outcome of patients who develop a second neoplasm after radiotherapy (RT) for a childhood solid tumor.
  • From 1956 to 1998, 429 children with a malignant solid tumor were treated at a single radiation oncology facility.
  • The medical records and radiotherapy charts were reviewed to determine if the patient developed a secondary neoplasm after treatment for malignancy.
  • Twenty-three (5.4%) patients developed a secondary neoplasm.
  • There were 12 males and 11 females with a median age at RT of 6.6 years (range, 2 months to 20 years).
  • There were 14 malignant neoplasms in 13 (3.0%) and 14 benign neoplasms in 11 patients (2.6%).
  • The types of initial solid tumors treated with RT were Ewing sarcoma in 6, Wilms tumor in 6, medulloblastoma in 5, neuroblastoma in 3, and other in 3.
  • Median RT dose was 45 Gy (range, 12.3 to 60 Gy) using 4 MV in 9, 1.25 MV in 8, 250 KV in 4, and 6 MV photons in 1 patient.
  • For the 14 malignant neoplasms, the median time interval from initial tumor to second malignancy was 10.1 years.
  • The 14 second malignant neoplasms (SMN) were osteosarcoma in 3, breast carcinoma in 2, melanoma in 2, malignant fibrous histiocytoma in 1, dermatofibrosarcoma in 1, leiomyosarcoma in 1, mucoepidermoid carcinoma in 1, colon cancer in 1, chronic myelogenous leukemia in 1, and basal cell carcinoma in 1.
  • Ten of the 14 SMN (71%) were at the edge or inside the RT field.
  • The 5- and 10-year overall survival rate after diagnosis of an SMN was 69.2%; it was 70% for children with a SMN at the edge or inside the RT field and 66.7% for those outside of the RT field.
  • The 14 benign neoplasms appeared at a median time of 16.9 years and included cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in 3, osteochondroma in 3, thyroid adenoma in 1, duodenal adenoma in 1, lipoma in 1, cherry angioma in 1, uterine leiomyoma in 1, ovarian cystadenofibroma in 1, and giant cell tumor in 1.
  • Only 5 (36%) of the 14 benign tumors occurred in the RT field, with osteochondroma being the most common.
  • Not all SMN in children receiving RT occur in the irradiated field.
  • More than two-thirds of children with a radiation-induced malignancy are alive 10 years after the diagnosis of a SMN.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Neoplasms, Second Primary / etiology. Radiotherapy / adverse effects


82. Prieto JA, Andrade F, Martín S, Sanjurjo P, Elorz J, Aldámiz-Echevarría L: Determination of creatine and guanidinoacetate by GC-MS: study of their stability in urine at different temperatures. Clin Biochem; 2009 Jan;42(1-2):125-8
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  • OBJECTIVES: Evaluation of a GC-MS method using N-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) as the silylating agent for GC-MS.
  • DESIGN AND METHODS: 22 urines were kept at RT, 4 degrees C and -30 degrees C for 15 days.

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  • (PMID = 18992235.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-2933
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical biochemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Biochem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Acetamides; 0 / Fluoroacetates; 0 / Organosilicon Compounds; 77377-52-7 / N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide; E5R8Z4G708 / Trifluoroacetic Acid; GO52O1A04E / glycocyamine; MU72812GK0 / Creatine; TE7660XO1C / Glycine
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83. Rao HS, Sivakumar S: Aroylketene dithioacetal chemistry: facile synthesis of 4-aroyl-3-methylsulfanyl-2-tosylpyrroles from aroylketene dithioacetals and TosMIC. Beilstein J Org Chem; 2007;3:31
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  • The cycloaddition of the von Leusen's reagent (p-tolylsulfonyl)methyl isocyanide (TosMIC) to alpha-aroylketene dithioacetals (AKDTAs) in the presence of sodium hydride in THF at rt resulted in a facile synthesis of the 4-aroyl-3-methylsulfanyl-2-tosylpyrroles 3 in good yield along with a minor amount of 4-[(4-methylphenyl)sulfonyl]-1-[(methylsulfanyl)methyl]-1H-imidazole 4.

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  • [Cites] J Org Chem. 2005 May 27;70(11):4524-7 [15903338.001]
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  • (PMID = 17903258.001).
  • [ISSN] 1860-5397
  • [Journal-full-title] Beilstein journal of organic chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Beilstein J Org Chem
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2176056
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84. Gupta A, Sharma MC, Kochupillai V, Kichendasse G, Gupta A, Atri S, Medhi K: Primary pulmonary rhabdomyosarcoma in adults: case report and review of literature. Clin Lung Cancer; 2007 May;8(6):389-91
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  • [Title] Primary pulmonary rhabdomyosarcoma in adults: case report and review of literature.
  • Chemotherapy using IRS (Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study) IV protocol with radiation therapy (RT) at week 9 was planned.
  • The tumor progressed within 6 weeks of chemotherapy to involve the diaphragm and the pericardium (inoperable disease).
  • Chemotherapy was abandoned, and we referred the patient to receive RT, which the patient refused; and he died of progressive disease 1 month later.
  • The poor response to chemotherapy suggests that alternative treatment modalities including RT/second-look surgery or novel chemotherapeutic strategies should be tried in such a case.

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  • (PMID = 17562241.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-7304
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical lung cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Lung Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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85. Strother D: Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors of childhood: diagnosis, treatment and challenges. Expert Rev Anticancer Ther; 2005 Oct;5(5):907-15
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  • [Title] Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors of childhood: diagnosis, treatment and challenges.
  • Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor of the brain was described as a unique entity in the late 1980s.
  • At presentation, the differential diagnosis includes medulloblastoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor, ependymoma and choroid plexus carcinoma.
  • Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor behaves in a very aggressive manner and while cure is possible for a small minority of patients, no standard or effective therapy has been defined for most patients.
  • Since its first description, considerable pathologic, cytogenetic and molecular characterizations, as described in this review, have been accomplished that provide insight into the possible molecular etiology of the disease and of malignant rhabdoid tumors that occur outside the CNS.
  • Co-operative group clinical trials that focus solely on atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor are needed that incorporate biologic studies along with evaluations of aggressive treatment approaches.
  • The goal of these trials should be to increase the cure rate for children with atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor and further increase our understanding not only of atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor, but also of other pediatric brain tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / diagnosis. Brain Neoplasms / therapy. Rhabdoid Tumor / diagnosis. Rhabdoid Tumor / therapy. Teratoma / diagnosis. Teratoma / therapy

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  • (PMID = 16221059.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-8328
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert review of anticancer therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Rev Anticancer Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 69
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86. Saito K, Nakao Y, Umakoshi K, Sakaki S: Theoretical study of excited states of pyrazolate- and pyridinethiolate-bridged dinuclear platinum(II) complexes: relationship between geometries of excited states and phosphorescence spectra. Inorg Chem; 2010 Oct 4;49(19):8977-85
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  • Dinuclear platinum(II) complexes [Pt(2)(μ-pz)(2)(bpym)(2)](2+) (1; pz = pyrazolate and bpym = 2,2'-bipyrimidine) and [Pt(2)(μ-pyt)(2)(ppy)(2)] (2; pyt = pyridine-2-thiolate and Hppy = 2-phenylpyridine) were theoretically investigated with density functional theory (DFT) to clarify the reasons why the phosphorescence of 1 is not observed in the acetonitrile (CH(3)CN) solution at room temperature (RT) but observed in the solid state at RT and why the phosphorescence of 2 is observed in both the CH(3)CN solution and the solid state at RT.
  • Their geometries are C(2v) symmetrical, in which spin-orbit interaction between the S(1) and T(1) excited states is absent because the direct product of irreducible representations of the singly occupied molecular orbitals (SOMOs) of these excited states and the orbital angular momentum (l) operator involved in the Hamiltonian for spin-orbit interaction does not belong to the a(1) representation.
  • As a result, the S(1) → T(1) intersystem crossing hardly occurs, leading to the absence of T(1) → S(0) phosphorescence in the CH(3)CN solution at RT.
  • Thus, T(1) → S(0) phosphorescence occurs in both the CH(3)CN solution and the solid state at RT, unlike 1.

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  • (PMID = 20804142.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-510X
  • [Journal-full-title] Inorganic chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Inorg Chem
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 0 / Pyrazoles; 0 / Pyridines; 0 / Sulfhydryl Compounds
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87. Gergley JC: Comparison of two lower-body modes of endurance training on lower-body strength development while concurrently training. J Strength Cond Res; 2009 May;23(3):979-87
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  • The most recent American College of Sports Medicine (1998) recommendations for quantity and quality of exercise includes both resistance and endurance exercise components.
  • Skeletal muscle adaptations to resistance-only and endurance-only programs may be different and possibly antagonistic when both types of training are imposed concurrently.
  • The present study examined the effect of two different modes of lower-body endurance exercise (i.e., cycle ergometry and incline treadmill walking) on lower-body strength development with concurrent resistance training designed to improve lower-body strength (i.e., bilateral leg press 1 repetition maximum [RM]).
  • Thirty untrained participants (22 men and 8 women, ages 18-23) were randomly assigned to one of 3 training groups (resistance only [R], N = 10; resistance + cycle ergometry [RC], N = 10; and resistance + incline treadmill [RT], N = 10).
  • Before training began, 3 weeks of training, 6 weeks of training, and after training, the participants also performed a 1RM test for lower-body strength.
  • Analysis of variance comparisons with repeated measures revealed the following statistically significant changes (alpha = 0.05) in the 3 training groups over time: (a) when men and women were combined, body mass of R was significantly greater than RC and RT post-training;.
  • (b) body mass of men only was significantly greater than RC and RT post-training;.
  • (c) body composition of men only was significantly smaller for RC and RT compared with R;.
  • (d) when men and women were combined, percent change in strength revealed significantly greater gains in R compared with RT at 6 weeks;.
  • (e) when men and women were combined, percent change in strength revealed significantly greater gains in R compared with RC and RT post-training;.
  • (f) percent change in strength for men only was significantly greater for R compared with RT at 3 weeks;.
  • (g) percent change in strength for men only was significantly greater for R compared with RC and RT at 6 weeks, and RC was significantly greater than RT at 6 weeks;.
  • (h) percent change in strength in men only was significantly greater for R compared with RC and RT post-training, and RC was significantly greater than RT post-training; and (i) percent change in strength in women was significantly greater in R compared with RT post-training.
  • The findings confirm previous studies that reported attenuated strength development with concurrent resistance and endurance training compared with resistance-only training.

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  • (PMID = 19387377.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-4287
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of strength and conditioning research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Strength Cond Res
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
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88. Abram ME, Parniak MA: Virion instability of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (RT) mutated in the protease cleavage site between RT p51 and the RT RNase H domain. J Virol; 2005 Sep;79(18):11952-61
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  • [Title] Virion instability of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (RT) mutated in the protease cleavage site between RT p51 and the RT RNase H domain.
  • Each of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pol-encoded enzymes, protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN), is active only as a dimer (or higher-order oligomer in the case of IN), but only RT comprises subunits of different masses.
  • RT is a heterodimer of 66-kDa and 51-kDa subunits.
  • The latter is formed by HIV PR-catalyzed cleavage of p66 during virion maturation, resulting in the removal of the RNase H (RNH) domain of a p66 subunit.
  • In order to study the apparent need for RT heterodimers in the context of the virion, we introduced a variety of mutations in the RT p51-RNH protease cleavage site of an infectious HIV-1 molecular clone.
  • Surprisingly, rather than leading to virions with increased RT p66 content, most of the mutations resulted in significantly attenuated virus that contained greatly decreased levels of RT that in many cases was primarily p51 RT.
  • However, most mutants showed normal levels of the Pr160(gag-pol) precursor polyprotein, suggesting that reduced virion RT arose from proteolytic instability rather than decreased incorporation.
  • Repeated passage of MT-2 cells exposed to mutant viruses led to the appearance of virus with improved replication capacity; these virions contained normally processed RT at near-wild-type levels.
  • These results imply that additional proteolytic processing of RT to the p66/p51 heterodimer is essential to provide proteolytic stability of RT during HIV-1 maturation.

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  • (PMID = 16140771.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-538X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of virology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Virol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / P01 GM066671; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / GM066671
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Gene Products, pol; EC 2.7.7.49 / HIV Reverse Transcriptase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1212597
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89. Gangnon RE, Davis MD, Hubbard LD, Aiello LM, Chew EY, Ferris FL 3rd, Fisher MR, Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study Research Group: A severity scale for diabetic macular edema developed from ETDRS data. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci; 2008 Nov;49(11):5041-7
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  • METHODS: From the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS), mean baseline VA scores were tabulated for 7422 eyes cross-classified by (1) location of retinal thickening (RT) and its area within 1 disc diameter of the macular center, and (2) degree of RT at the center.
  • In a model of change in VA as a function of time spent at each DME severity level, VA loss increased progressively from 1 letter per year at level 2 to 17 letters per year at level 5B.

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  • (PMID = 18539929.001).
  • [ISSN] 1552-5783
  • [Journal-full-title] Investigative ophthalmology & visual science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / Z99 EY999999; United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / R03 EY1029-01
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS234823; NLM/ PMC3028439
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90. Hess DR, Pang JM, Camargo CA Jr: A survey of the use of noninvasive ventilation in academic emergency departments in the United States. Respir Care; 2009 Oct;54(10):1306-12
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  • METHODS: A survey instrument was developed by the authors, pilot tested, and distributed to one physician (MD) and one respiratory therapist (RT) at the 132 hospitals with emergency medicine residencies.
  • Ninety-nine percent of RTs and 64% of MDs are very familiar with NIV (P<.001).
  • The reported time needed to initiate NIV was <10 min for 41% of sites (<20 min for 89%).
  • Compared to the time requirement in other clinical areas, 60% of RTs reported that NIV "takes no additional time" in the ED.
  • An RT is always present in 38% the EDs, and equipment for NIV is readily available in 76% of the EDs.
  • Barriers to greater use of NIV in the ED include physician familiarity, availability of RT and equipment in the ED, and time required for NIV.


91. Hinerman RW, Amdur RJ, Morris CG, Kirwan J, Mendenhall WM: Definitive radiotherapy in the management of paragangliomas arising in the head and neck: a 35-year experience. Head Neck; 2008 Nov;30(11):1431-8
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  • BACKGROUND: An evaluation of the treatment results for 104 patients with 121 paragangliomas of the temporal bone, carotid body, and/or glomus vagale who were treated with radiation therapy (RT) at the University of Florida between 1968 and 2004.
  • One recurrence was salvaged with additional RT.
  • CONCLUSION: Fractionated RT offers a high probability of tumor control with minimal risks for patients with paragangliomas of the temporal bone and neck.
  • [MeSH-major] Head and Neck Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / radiotherapy. Paraganglioma, Extra-Adrenal / radiotherapy

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2008.
  • (PMID = 18704974.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0347
  • [Journal-full-title] Head & neck
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Head Neck
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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92. Ma ZY, Dong QN, Yang C, Wei W, Chen JG, Sun YH: [Study of methanol adsorption on zirconia polymorphs by FTIR]. Guang Pu Xue Yu Guang Pu Fen Xi; 2006 Mar;26(3):422-5
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  • But for t-ZrO2, methoxyl could be directly oxygenated to be carbonate at RT, which implied that the surface oxygen ions on t-ZrO2 were more active than those on the two other samples.

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  • (PMID = 16830745.001).
  • [ISSN] 1000-0593
  • [Journal-full-title] Guang pu xue yu guang pu fen xi = Guang pu
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Guang Pu Xue Yu Guang Pu Fen Xi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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93. Chen HJ, Panigrahy A, Dhall G, Finlay JL, Nelson MD Jr, Blüml S: Apparent diffusion and fractional anisotropy of diffuse intrinsic brain stem gliomas. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol; 2010 Nov;31(10):1879-85
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  • [Title] Apparent diffusion and fractional anisotropy of diffuse intrinsic brain stem gliomas.
  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: DIBSGs have the worst prognosis among pediatric brain tumors with no improvement of outcome for several decades.
  • Reference data were obtained from 8 controls with normal brain stem, 6 patients with medulloblastoma, and 7 patients with pilocytic astrocytoma.
  • RESULTS: ADC was higher in untreated DIBSG than in normal brain stem and medulloblastoma (1.14 ± 0.18 [×10⁻³ mm²/s] versus 0.75 ± 0.06 and 0.56 ± 0.05, both P < .001).
  • FA was lower in DIBSG than in normal brain stem (0.24 ± 0.04 versus 0.43 ± 0.02, P < .001) but was higher than that in pilocytic astrocytoma (0.17 ± 0.05, P < .05).
  • ADC decreased and FA increased after RT.
  • Changes of FA after RT at the caudal midbrain correlated with event-free survival.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Baseline ADC and FA of DIBSG revealed hypocellular tumors with extensive edema.
  • [MeSH-major] Astrocytoma / pathology. Brain Stem Neoplasms / pathology. Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Medulloblastoma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Anisotropy. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Medulla Oblongata / pathology. Mesencephalon / pathology. Pons / pathology. Predictive Value of Tests. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 20595371.001).
  • [ISSN] 1936-959X
  • [Journal-full-title] AJNR. American journal of neuroradiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AJNR Am J Neuroradiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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94. Hoppe BS, Stegman LD, Zelefsky MJ, Rosenzweig KE, Wolden SL, Patel SG, Shah JP, Kraus DH, Lee NY: Treatment of nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer with modern radiotherapy techniques in the postoperative setting--the MSKCC experience. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2007 Mar 1;67(3):691-702
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  • PURPOSE: To perform a retrospective analysis of patients with paranasal sinus (PNS) cancer treated with postoperative radiotherapy (RT) at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between January 1987 and July 2005, 85 patients with PNS and nasal cavity cancer underwent postoperative RT.
  • Most patients had squamous cell carcinoma (49%; n = 42), T4 tumors (52%; n = 36), and the maxillary sinus (53%; n = 45) as the primary disease site.
  • Of the 85 patients, 76 underwent CT simulation and 53 were treated with either three-dimensional conformal RT (27%; n = 23) or intensity-modulated RT (35%; n = 30).
  • None of the patients who underwent CT simulation and were treated with modern techniques developed a Grade 3-4 late complication of the eye.
  • CONCLUSION: Complete surgical resection followed by adjuvant RT is an effective and safe approach in the treatment of PNS cancer.
  • Emerging tools, such as three-dimensional conformal treatment and, in particular, intensity-modulated RT for PNS tumors, may minimize the occurrence of late complications associated with conventional RT techniques.

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  • (PMID = 17161557.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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95. Kangarlu A, Gahunia HK: Magnetic resonance imaging characterization of osteochondral defect repair in a goat model at 8 T. Osteoarthritis Cartilage; 2006 Jan;14(1):52-62
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  • The contralateral left stifles served as time zero controls.
  • MR relaxation times, T1 and T2, were measured at the region of repair tissue (RT) and adjacent native cartilage.
  • RESULTS: The high-resolution MR images enabled visualization of cartilage and bone integrity surrounding the implant as well as delineating the margins of RT/implant matrix and the FD.
  • On spin echo sequence, the RT variably appeared as high, intermediate or low MR signal intensity; whereas, the FD always appeared as low signal intensity.
  • In general, the MR signal intensity of 8-week RT was slightly higher compared to 16-week RT; however, there was no difference in RT morphology of stifles implanted with the non-woven matrix or foam matrix.
  • The T2 relaxation time of the RT appears to indicate (inconclusive due to small number of samples) a slight variation in the RT type between 8 weeks and 16 weeks.
  • At both study times, the defects grossly appeared whitish to reddish but did not have the characteristic hyaline appearance typical of articular cartilage (AC).
  • The gross appearance of the MFC and TG RT differed, which was predominantly mottled and recessed with fissuring of adjacent native AC in the MFC.
  • Histologically, the RT of both 8-week and 16-week postsurgical defects predominantly comprised fibrovascular connective tissue with only few samples showing the presence of fibrocartilaginous and/or hypertrophic chondrocytes within the defect RT at 8 weeks.
  • Also, compared to 8-week, the 16-week RT appeared to be more fibrotic.
  • CONCLUSION: Using 8 T scanner, high-resolution MR images of ex vivo encapsulated goat stifles confirmed the capability of high-field MR imaging to distinguish the defect RT from the FD and adjacent joint tissues.

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  • (PMID = 16242360.001).
  • [ISSN] 1063-4584
  • [Journal-full-title] Osteoarthritis and cartilage
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Osteoarthr. Cartil.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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96. Verma A, Morriss C: Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor of the optic nerve. Pediatr Radiol; 2008 Oct;38(10):1117-21
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  • [Title] Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor of the optic nerve.
  • We report a rare case of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor that presented with imaging findings similar to those of optic pathway glioma.
  • The diagnosis of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor was determined following surgical resection of the tumor by collective histologic and immunohistochemical staining, and cytogenetic analysis.
  • [MeSH-major] Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Optic Nerve Neoplasms / diagnosis. Rhabdoid Tumor / diagnosis. Teratoma / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 18696060.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-0449
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Radiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Contrast Media
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97. El Ezzi AA, El-Saidi MA, Kuddus RH: Long-term stability of thyroid hormones and DNA in blood spots kept under varying storage conditions. Pediatr Int; 2010 Aug;52(4):631-9
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  • BACKGROUND: Congenital hypothyroidism is screened using blood spotted on filter paper that may be transported from remote areas to central testing facilities.
  • METHODS: We examined long-term stability of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroxin (TT4) in blood spotted on filter paper, which was stored at room temperature (RT), 4°C and -20°C under continuous or intermittent power supply (six hours on and six hours off around the clock.
  • RESULTS: Our results showed that TT4 was stable for up to 6.1, 5.34 and 5.16 years when stored at -20°C, 4°C and RT, respectively.
  • TSH was stable for up to 2.7 years at RT, and for up to 6.5 and 4.1 years when stored at -20°C and 4°C, respectively, under continuous power supply.
  • However, they can be stored at RT or at 4°C and -20°C under interrupted power supply for at least 2.5 years.

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  • [Copyright] © 2010 Japan Pediatric Society.
  • (PMID = 20202157.001).
  • [ISSN] 1442-200X
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatrics international : official journal of the Japan Pediatric Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Int
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 9002-71-5 / Thyrotropin; 9007-49-2 / DNA; Q51BO43MG4 / Thyroxine
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98. Song J, Zhang C, Liang T, Xu J, Hou GH: [Preparation and biologic activity study of (125);I-labeled anti-MIF monoclonal antibody]. Xi Bao Yu Fen Zi Mian Yi Xue Za Zhi; 2010 Dec;26(12):1223-5
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  • RESULTS: (1)The best reaction condition for labeling was: Mixed 40-100 μg Iodogen with 20-50 μg anti-MIF mAb (Iodogen(m): anti-MIF mAb(m)=2:1); added 15-30 MBq Na(125);I to Iodogen-Ab mix; kept reaction at RT for 10-15 min.

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  • (PMID = 21138688.001).
  • [ISSN] 1007-8738
  • [Journal-full-title] Xi bao yu fen zi mian yi xue za zhi = Chinese journal of cellular and molecular immunology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Xi Bao Yu Fen Zi Mian Yi Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Iodine Radioisotopes; 0 / Macrophage Migration-Inhibitory Factors; EC 5.3.- / Intramolecular Oxidoreductases; EC 5.3.2.1 / Mif protein, mouse
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99. Seetharaman S, Kline L, Dabay M, Kurtz J, Moroff G: The influence of conditions utilized to hold apheresis and whole blood-derived platelet samples before platelet enumeration with three hematology analyzers. Transfusion; 2010 Aug;50(8):1677-84
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  • Samples were stored in K(2) and K(3) ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) tubes at room temperature (RT) and in the cold.
  • RESULTS: A time-dependent increase in PLT counts was observed with AP samples held at RT using the Advia 120, but not with the other two hematology analyzers.
  • AP samples held in the cold did not show a substantial time-dependent increase with any of the hematology analyzers.
  • With the Advia 120, the PLT counts in the immediate samples were approximately 14% lower compared to those in cold or overnight-held RT samples.
  • PC samples with all holding conditions and hematology analyzers did not show any substantial time-dependent increase in counts.
  • CONCLUSIONS: With the Advia 120 hematology analyzer, the time-dependent increase in PLT counts with RT-held samples may be related to the need to have effectively sphered PLTs unlike that with the other two hematology analyzers.
  • The absence of a holding effect with PC samples may indicate that only AP samples have population(s) that are slow to convert to spherical PLTs.

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  • [Copyright] © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.
  • (PMID = 20456678.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-2995
  • [Journal-full-title] Transfusion
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transfusion
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 9G34HU7RV0 / Edetic Acid
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100. Tsoufis T, Tomou A, Gournis D, Douvalis AP, Panagiotopoulos I, Kooi B, Georgakilas V, Arfaoui I, Bakas T: Novel nanohybrids derived from the attachment of FePt nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes. J Nanosci Nanotechnol; 2008 Nov;8(11):5942-51
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  • Mössbauer and magnetization measurements of the MWCNTs-FePt hybrids sample reveal that the part of the FePt particles attached to the MWCNTs surface shows superparamagnetic phenomena at RT even after the annealing process.

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  • (PMID = 19198330.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-4880
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of nanoscience and nanotechnology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Nanosci Nanotechnol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Macromolecular Substances; 49DFR088MY / Platinum; E1UOL152H7 / Iron
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