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6. Candura SM, Binarelli A, Ragno G, Scafa F: Two cases of asbestosis and one case of rounded atelectasis due to non-occupational asbestos exposure. Monaldi Arch Chest Dis; 2008 Mar;69(1):35-8
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  • [Title] Two cases of asbestosis and one case of rounded atelectasis due to non-occupational asbestos exposure.
  • Asbestos is a well-known cause of several neoplastic (malignant mesothelioma, lung cancer) and non-neoplastic (asbestosis, pleuropathies) occupational diseases.
  • We present two patients (a 68-year-old man and a 72-year-old woman) who developed asbestosis (in association with pleural plaques and calcifications), and a 78-year-old man who developed rounded atelectasis (with pleural plaques and benign effusion), after living for several decades in the proximity of large Italian asbestos-cement plant.
  • None of them had been exposed to asbestos occupationally.
  • Besides living in a contaminated area, the woman used to clean the work clothes of her brother, who was employed in the local asbestos factory.
  • The three cases indicate that non-neoplastic, long-latency asbestos-related diseases which are usually observed as a consequence of occupational exposures, may rarely develop in subjects living in contaminated geographical sites and buildings.

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  • (PMID = 18507198.001).
  • [ISSN] 1122-0643
  • [Journal-full-title] Monaldi archives for chest disease = Archivio Monaldi per le malattie del torace
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Monaldi Arch Chest Dis
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
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7. Guglielmi G, Ciberti A, Foddis R, Ambrosino N, Chella A, Gattini V, Buselli R, Ottenga F, Cristaudo A: [Medical surveillance of previously asbestos-exposed workers: report of a case of lung cancer with high level of serum mesothelin]. G Ital Med Lav Ergon; 2007 Jul-Sep;29(3 Suppl):345-6
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  • [Title] [Medical surveillance of previously asbestos-exposed workers: report of a case of lung cancer with high level of serum mesothelin].
  • Recently, the number of previously asbestos-exposed workers performing, at our department, medical exams aimed at an early diagnosis of asbestos-related tumors, has been progressively increasing.
  • In this case-report we illustrate the history of a worker who, after having diagnosed a pulmonary asbestosis, developed a Lung Cancer.
  • Nevertheless, serum markers like mesothelin and osteopontin (especially the first) may result very helpful in monitoring and screening the population of workers previously exposed to asbestos.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / adverse effects. Asbestosis / complications. Lung Neoplasms / blood. Lung Neoplasms / etiology. Membrane Glycoproteins / blood. Occupational Exposure / adverse effects. Occupational Exposure / analysis

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  • (PMID = 18409717.001).
  • [ISSN] 1592-7830
  • [Journal-full-title] Giornale italiano di medicina del lavoro ed ergonomia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] G Ital Med Lav Ergon
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / GPI-Linked Proteins; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / mesothelin; 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
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8. Ramos-Nino ME, Testa JR, Altomare DA, Pass HI, Carbone M, Bocchetta M, Mossman BT: Cellular and molecular parameters of mesothelioma. J Cell Biochem; 2006 Jul 1;98(4):723-34
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  • Malignant mesotheliomas (MM) are neoplasms arising from mesothelial cells that line the body cavities, most commonly the pleural and peritoneal cavities.
  • Although traditionally recognized as associated with occupational asbestos exposures, MMs can appear in individuals with no documented exposures to asbestos fibers, and emerging data suggest that genetic susceptibility and simian virus 40 (SV40) infections also facilitate the development of MMs.
  • Both asbestos exposure and transfection of human mesothelial cells with SV40 large and small antigens (Tag, tag) cause genetic modifications and cell signaling events, most notably the induction of cell survival pathways and activation of receptors, and other proteins that favor the growth and establishment of MMs as well as their resistance to chemotherapy.
  • More importantly, serum proteomics has revealed two new candidates (osteopontin and serum mesothelin-related protein or SMRP) potentially useful in screening individuals for MMs.

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  • [Copyright] 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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  • (PMID = 16795078.001).
  • [ISSN] 0730-2312
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cellular biochemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cell. Biochem.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K01 CA104159; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA114047; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA106567-01A1; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA045745; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA045745-12; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K01 CA104159-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA106567-01A1; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA106567; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K01CA104159-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01CA10656; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01CA082657-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA045745-12; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA45745; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA104159-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
  • [Number-of-references] 129
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS150985; NLM/ PMC2766267
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9. Pairon JC, Andujar P, Matrat M, Ameille J: [Etiology, epidemiology, biology. Occupational respiratory cancers]. Rev Mal Respir; 2008 Oct;25(8 Pt 2):3S18-31
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  • Lung cancer and pleural mesothelioma are the most common occupational cancers.
  • Recent epidemiological studies have estimated that the fraction attributable to occupational factors varies from 13 to 29% for lung cancer in men and is about 85% for pleural mesothelioma in men.
  • Previous occupational exposure to asbestos is the most common occupational exposure in these cancers.
  • Mesothelioma immediately leads the clinician to look for past asbestos exposure.
  • In contrast, the search for an occupational exposure that should be routine in all cases of lung cancer, is generally more difficult because of the number of occupational aetiological factors and the absence of criteria that allow distinction of an occupational cancer from a tobacco related one.
  • Therefore attention should be paid to the identification of occupational exposure in order to set up primary prevention programmes to prevent exposure still present in the working environment and, on the other hand, to identify the subjects entitled to the acknowledgement of occupational disease and/or to obtain the compensation available to asbestos victims.


10. Scherpereel A, Lee YC: Biomarkers for mesothelioma. Curr Opin Pulm Med; 2007 Jul;13(4):339-443
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  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Mesothelioma is an incurable cancer and its global incidence continues to increase.
  • Soluble mesothelin-related peptide (SMRP), osteopontin and megakaryocyte potentiating factor have been assessed as markers.
  • The role of SMRP in predicting mesothelioma development in subjects exposed to asbestos has raised interest.

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  • (PMID = 17534183.001).
  • [ISSN] 1070-5287
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in pulmonary medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Pulm Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Wellcome Trust / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
  • [Number-of-references] 48
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11. Rodríguez Portal JA, Rodríguez Becerra E, Rodríguez Rodríguez D, Alfageme Michavila I, Quero Martínez A, Diego Roza C, León Jiménez A, Isidro Montes I, Cebollero Rivas P: Serum levels of soluble mesothelin-related peptides in malignant and nonmalignant asbestos-related pleural disease: relation with past asbestos exposure. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 2009 Feb;18(2):646-50
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  • [Title] Serum levels of soluble mesothelin-related peptides in malignant and nonmalignant asbestos-related pleural disease: relation with past asbestos exposure.
  • BACKGROUND: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) results from malignant transformation of mesothelial cells.
  • Past asbestos exposure represents a major risk factor for MPM and other benign pleural disease.
  • Soluble mesothelin-related peptides (SMRP) have been regarded as a promising serum biomarker for MPM.
  • The aim of this study was to investigate serum levels of SMRP in malignant and nonmalignant asbestos-related pleural disease.
  • PATIENTS: Four groups of patients were investigated: group 1 composed of 48 healthy subjects, group 2 composed of 177 patients with previous asbestos exposure and no pleural disease, group 3 composed of 36 patients with MPM, and group 4 composed of 101 patients with previous asbestos exposure and benign pleural disease.
  • Subjects exposed to asbestos had higher SMRP concentrations than normal control subjects regardless of the presence of pleural disease.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These data attest to good diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of SMRP for the diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma.
  • We have also shown that serum SMRP levels might serve as a marker of asbestos exposure.

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  • (PMID = 19190155.001).
  • [ISSN] 1055-9965
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / GPI-Linked Proteins; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / mesothelin
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12. Mirabelli D, Cavone D, Merler E, Gennaro V, Romanelli A, Mensi C, Chellini E, Nicita C, Marinaccio A, Magnani C, Musti M: Non-occupational exposure to asbestos and malignant mesothelioma in the Italian National Registry of Mesotheliomas. Occup Environ Med; 2010 Nov;67(11):792-4
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  • [Title] Non-occupational exposure to asbestos and malignant mesothelioma in the Italian National Registry of Mesotheliomas.
  • BACKGROUND: Malignant mesotheliomas are strictly related to asbestos, but in a proportion of cases no exposure can be recalled.
  • Historical and geographical differences in the fraction of cancer due to any given exposure are to be expected, but incomplete identification of non-occupational exposures may have played a role.
  • METHODS: To assess the role of non-occupational exposures in causing malignant mesotheliomas in Italy, the exposures of cases registered by the national mesothelioma registry (ReNaM) were examined.
  • RESULTS: From 1993 to 2001 ReNaM registered 5173 malignant mesothelioma cases, and exposures were assessed in 3552 of them.
  • 144 and 150 cases with exposures limited to environmental (living in the neighbourhood of an industrial or natural source of asbestos) or familial (living with a person occupationally exposed to asbestos) circumstances, respectively, were identified, accounting for 8.3% of all cases.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Geographical variations in the proportion of cases due to non-occupational exposures may be explained by the past distribution of asbestos-using industries.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / toxicity. Environmental Exposure / adverse effects. Mesothelioma / etiology

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  • (PMID = 20959396.001).
  • [ISSN] 1470-7926
  • [Journal-full-title] Occupational and environmental medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Occup Environ Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
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13. Cree M, Lalji M, Jiang B, Carriere KC, Beach J, Kamruzzaman A: Explaining Alberta's rising mesothelioma rates. Chronic Dis Can; 2009;29(4):144-52
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  • This population-based descriptive study used Alberta Cancer Board Registry data from 1980 to 2004 to develop an age-period-cohort model of male pleural mesothelioma incidence rates over time.
  • The highest-risk cohort comprised men born between 1930 and 1939, reflecting widespread asbestos use and exposure beginning in the 1940s in Canada.
  • In addition to the ongoing efforts that focus on eliminating asbestos-related disease in Alberta, the challenge is to implement surveillance systems to prevent future epidemics of preventable occupational cancers in Alberta.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Age Distribution. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Alberta / epidemiology. Asbestos / adverse effects. Cohort Effect. Cohort Studies. Female. Humans. Incidence. Linear Models. Male. Middle Aged. Registries. Sex Distribution

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  • (PMID = 19804678.001).
  • [ISSN] 1481-8523
  • [Journal-full-title] Chronic diseases in Canada
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chronic Dis Can
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
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4. Lehman EJ, Hein MJ, Estill CF: Proportionate mortality study of the United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipe Fitting Industry. Am J Ind Med; 2008 Dec;51(12):950-63
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  • RESULTS: PMRs for lung cancer and asbestosis were significantly elevated compared to U.S. white males.
  • Elevations were not observed in other a priori causes: laryngeal cancer, lymphatic cancer, and neurological disorders.
  • CONCLUSION: Despite the limitations of a PMR analysis, study results indicate mortality related to asbestos exposure is, and will continue to be, an area of concern for members of the union.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 18942099.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0274
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of industrial medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Ind. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. Murakami S, Nishimura Y, Maeda M, Kumagai N, Hayashi H, Chen Y, Kusaka M, Kishimoto T, Otsuki T: Cytokine alteration and speculated immunological pathophysiology in silicosis and asbestos-related diseases. Environ Health Prev Med; 2009 Jul;14(4):216-22
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  • [Title] Cytokine alteration and speculated immunological pathophysiology in silicosis and asbestos-related diseases.
  • This review is partly composed of the presentation "Cytokine alteration and speculated immunological pathophysiology in silicosis and asbestos-related diseases" delivered during the symposium "Biological effects of fibrous and particulate substances and related areas" organized by the Study Group of Fibrous and Particulate Studies of the Japanese Society of Hygiene and held at the 78th Annual Meeting in Kumamoto, Japan.
  • In this review, we briefly introduce the results of recent immunological analysis using the plasma of silica and asbestos-exposed patients diagnosed with silicosis, pleural plaque, or malignant mesothelioma.
  • Thereafter, experimental background and speculation concerning the immunological pathophysiology of silica and asbestos-exposed patients are discussed.

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  • (PMID = 19568841.001).
  • [ISSN] 1342-078X
  • [Journal-full-title] Environmental health and preventive medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Environ Health Prev Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2711881
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16. Ghio A, Tan RJ, Ghio K, Fattman CL, Oury TD: Iron accumulation and expression of iron-related proteins following murine exposure to crocidolite. J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol; 2009;28(2):153-62
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  • [Title] Iron accumulation and expression of iron-related proteins following murine exposure to crocidolite.
  • We tested the postulate that asbestos exposure alters iron homeostasis in the mouse lung.
  • Crocidolite asbestos (100 microg intratracheally) was instilled into C57BL/6 mice.
  • Using iron staining and immunohistochemistry, concentrations of this metal and expression of several iron transport and storage proteins were evaluated at one day and one month following asbestos exposure.
  • Iron was not stainable one day following asbestos instillation but was increased one month later.
  • While ferroportin (FPN1) expression was increased one day after asbestos exposure, levels of this metal exporter had returned to baseline at one month.
  • TiO2 did not affect changes in either the iron concentration or the expression of these iron-related proteins at one day and one month.
  • We conclude that asbestos exposure alters lung iron homeostasis with an accumulation of the metal resulting.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos, Crocidolite / toxicity. Cation Transport Proteins / metabolism. Cytochromes b / metabolism. Iron / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19817702.001).
  • [ISSN] 2162-6537
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of environmental pathology, toxicology and oncology : official organ of the International Society for Environmental Toxicology and Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Environ. Pathol. Toxicol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cation Transport Proteins; 0 / metal transporting protein 1; 0 / solute carrier family 11- (proton-coupled divalent metal ion transporters), member 2; 12001-28-4 / Asbestos, Crocidolite; 9035-37-4 / Cytochromes b; E1UOL152H7 / Iron
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17. Scarselli A, Scano P, Marinaccio A, Iavicoli S: Occupational cancer in Italy: evaluating the extent of compensated cases in the period 1994-2006. Am J Ind Med; 2009 Nov;52(11):859-67
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  • [Title] Occupational cancer in Italy: evaluating the extent of compensated cases in the period 1994-2006.
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to analyze occupational cancer claims compensated in the industrial sector in Italy between 1994 and 2006.
  • Summary statistics were compiled by sex and age of worker, cancer type, workplace agent and economic sector.
  • The temporal trend in the period 1994-2006 was investigated for the most frequently compensated cancers (mesothelioma and lung cancer from asbestos; nasal cavities cancer from wood and leather dust).
  • RESULTS: Between 1994 and 2006, 6,243 cancer claims were compensated by INAIL due to occupational exposure in the industrial sector.
  • CONCLUSIONS: There is an increasing trend in compensation for work-related cancers in Italy in recent years, even if occupational cancers are still widely underreported.
  • [MeSH-minor] Asbestos / adverse effects. Humans. Italy / epidemiology. Lung Neoplasms / epidemiology. Multivariate Analysis. Nose Neoplasms / epidemiology. Pleural Neoplasms / epidemiology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / epidemiology. Workplace

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 19764072.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0274
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of industrial medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Ind. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
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18. Yiin JH, Silver SR, Daniels RD, Zaebst DD, Seel EA, Kubale TL: A nested case-control study of lung cancer risk and ionizing radiation exposure at the portsmouth naval shipyard. Radiat Res; 2007 Sep;168(3):341-8
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  • [Title] A nested case-control study of lung cancer risk and ionizing radiation exposure at the portsmouth naval shipyard.
  • Results have been inconsistent between studies of lung cancer risk and ionizing radiation exposures among workers at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard (PNS).
  • The purpose of this nested case-control study was to evaluate the relationship between lung cancer risk and external ionizing radiation exposure while adjusting for potential confounders that included gender, radiation monitoring status, smoking habit surrogates (socioeconomic status and birth cohort), welding fumes and asbestos.
  • By incidence density sampling, we age-matched 3,291 controls selected from a cohort of 37,853 civilian workers employed at PNS between 1952 and 1992 with 1,097 lung cancer deaths from among the same cohort.
  • Lung cancer risk was positively associated with occupational dose (OR = 1.02 at 10 mSv; 95% CI 0.99- 1.04) but flattened after the inclusion of work-related medical X-ray doses (OR = 1.00; 95% CI 0.98-1.03) in multivariate analyses.

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  • (PMID = 17705634.001).
  • [ISSN] 0033-7587
  • [Journal-full-title] Radiation research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiat. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Dianzani I, Gibello L, Biava A, Giordano M, Bertolotti M, Betti M, Ferrante D, Guarrera S, Betta GP, Mirabelli D, Matullo G, Magnani C: Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes as risk factors for asbestos-related malignant mesothelioma in a general population study. Mutat Res; 2006 Jul 25;599(1-2):124-34
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  • [Title] Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes as risk factors for asbestos-related malignant mesothelioma in a general population study.
  • This paper describes the results of a case-control epidemiological study designed to determine the genotypes of four of these genes in persons exposed to a single genotoxic factor, i.e. asbestos, who had or had not developed malignant mesothelioma (MM).
  • Our working hypothesis was that an imperfect DNA repair, as revealed by subtle polymorphic variants, could reduce protection against the chronic DNA insult provoked by asbestos and eventually result in mutagenesis and cancer.
  • XRCC1-R399Q-NCBI SNP, XRCC1-R194W, XRCC3-T241M, XRCC3-IVS6-14, XPD-K751Q, XPD-D312N, OGG1-S326C) were investigated in 81 patients and 110 age and sex-matched controls, all residents at Casale Monferrato, a Piedmontese town highly exposed to asbestos pollution.
  • This is the first report of an association between polymorphisms in DNA repair genes and asbestos-associated MM.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / adverse effects. DNA Repair / genetics. Mesothelioma / etiology. Mesothelioma / genetics. Pleural Neoplasms / etiology. Pleural Neoplasms / genetics. Polymorphism, Genetic
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Base Sequence. Case-Control Studies. DNA Glycosylases / genetics. DNA Primers / genetics. DNA, Neoplasm / genetics. DNA-Binding Proteins / genetics. Female. Gene Frequency. Haplotypes. Humans. Italy. Male. Middle Aged. Risk Factors. Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group D Protein / genetics

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  • (PMID = 16564556.001).
  • [ISSN] 0027-5107
  • [Journal-full-title] Mutation research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mutat. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA Primers; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / X-ray repair cross complementing protein 1; 0 / X-ray repair cross complementing protein 3; 1332-21-4 / Asbestos; EC 3.2.2.- / DNA Glycosylases; EC 3.2.2.- / oxoguanine glycosylase 1, human; EC 3.6.4.12 / Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group D Protein; EC 5.99.- / ERCC2 protein, human
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20. Bianchi C, Bianchi T: Malignant mesothelioma: global incidence and relationship with asbestos. Ind Health; 2007 Jun;45(3):379-87
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  • [Title] Malignant mesothelioma: global incidence and relationship with asbestos.
  • A lot of data indicate a relationship between mesothelioma and asbestos.
  • The hot areas for mesothelioma exactly correspond to the sites of industries with high asbestos use, such as shipbuilding and asbestos-cement industry.
  • However, in many countries with high asbestos consumption, mesothelioma incidence is low.
  • The latency periods elapsing between first exposure to asbestos and development of mesothelioma are mostly longer than 40 yr.
  • An inverse relationship exists between intensity of asbestos exposure and length of the latency period.
  • Mesothelioma generally develops after long-time exposures to asbestos.
  • Possible co-factors in the pathogenesis of asbestos-related mesothelioma include genetic predisposition, diets poor in fruit and vegetables, viruses, immune impairment, recurrent serosal inflammation.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / toxicity. Developed Countries / statistics & numerical data. Environmental Exposure / adverse effects. Global Health. Mesothelioma / epidemiology


21. Brauer C, Baandrup U, Jacobsen P, Krasnik M, Olsen JH, Pedersen JH, Rasmussen TR, Schlünssen V, Sherson D, Svolgaard B, Sørensen JB, Omland O: [Screening for asbestos-related conditions]. Ugeskr Laeger; 2009 Feb 2;171(6):433-6
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  • [Title] [Screening for asbestos-related conditions].
  • Screening programs for early detection of asbestos-related cancer have been considered.
  • Conventional X-ray, computed tomography of the thorax, and the biomarkers osteopontin and mesothelin have been critically reviewed in the literature, together with survival data from screening programs in asbestos-exposed populations.
  • Data do not currently support implementation of screening programs for asbestos-exposed persons in Denmark.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / adverse effects. Lung Neoplasms / etiology. Mesothelioma / etiology. Occupational Diseases / etiology

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  • (PMID = 19208334.001).
  • [ISSN] 1603-6824
  • [Journal-full-title] Ugeskrift for laeger
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ugeskr. Laeg.
  • [Language] dan
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
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22. Creaney J, Robinson BW: Serum and pleural fluid biomarkers for mesothelioma. Curr Opin Pulm Med; 2009 Jul;15(4):366-70
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  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Malignant mesothelioma is an asbestos-induced, aggressive tumour.
  • In centres across the world, research has focused on evaluating biomarkers for malignant mesothelioma screening, diagnosis, prognostication and monitoring.
  • With the incidence of malignant mesothelioma expected to increase, it is timely to review the current status of biomarkers in this field.
  • Studies have clarified that soluble-shed mesothelin as well as mesothelin-related peptide are targets of the assay.
  • In a prospective screen of 538 asbestos-exposed workers, 2.8% were positive; one had lung cancer that was subsequently successfully treated.
  • SUMMARY: To date, soluble mesothelin remains the best available biomarker for malignant mesothelioma.
  • However, a lack of sensitivity for early-stage disease and for all malignant mesothelioma histologies provides motivation for the search of novel malignant mesothelioma biomarkers with greater sensitivity, especially for very early disease.

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  • (PMID = 19417672.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-6971
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in pulmonary medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Pulm Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / GPI-Linked Proteins; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / mesothelin; 106441-73-0 / Osteopontin
  • [Number-of-references] 52
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23. Weber DG, Johnen G, Taeger D, Weber A, Gross IM, Pesch B, Kraus T, Brüning T, Gube M: Assessment of Confounding Factors Affecting the Tumor Markers SMRP, CA125, and CYFRA21-1 in Serum. Biomark Insights; 2010 Jan 28;5:1-8
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  • The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate if serum levels of potential tumor markers for the diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma and lung cancer are affected by confounding factors in a surveillance cohort of workers formerly exposed to asbestos.
  • SMRP, CA125, and CYFRA21-1 concentrations were determined in about 1,700 serum samples from 627 workers formerly exposed to asbestos.
  • Levels differed by study centers and were higher after 40 years of asbestos exposure.
  • Tumor marker concentrations are influenced by subject-related factors, sample handling, and storage.

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  • (PMID = 20130785.001).
  • [ISSN] 1177-2719
  • [Journal-full-title] Biomarker insights
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biomark Insights
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2814766
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; CA125 / CYFRA21-1 / SMRP / lung cancer / mesothelin / mesothelioma / screening
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24. McCoy MJ, Nowak AK, Lake RA: Chemoimmunotherapy: an emerging strategy for the treatment of malignant mesothelioma. Tissue Antigens; 2009 Jul;74(1):1-10
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  • [Title] Chemoimmunotherapy: an emerging strategy for the treatment of malignant mesothelioma.
  • Whether the immune system can recognize malignant and premalignant cells and eliminate them to prevent the development of cancer is still a matter of open debate, but in our view, the balance of evidence favours this concept.
  • Nonetheless, the International Agency for Research on Cancer has now predicted that cancer will overtake heart disease as the leading cause of death worldwide by 2010, showing that this protective mechanism often fails.
  • Malignant mesothelioma has traditionally been considered a relatively non-immunogenic cancer.
  • Over recent years, there has been increasing interest in the possibility of combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy in the fight against cancer.
  • Here, we discuss the rationale behind combining these two, long considered antagonistic, treatment options in the context of malignant mesothelioma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, Neoplasm / immunology. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Immunosuppression. Mesothelioma / therapy. Neoplasms, Mesothelial / therapy


25. Vehmas T, Hiltunen A, Leino-Arjas P, Piirilä P: [Relation between atherosclerotic calcifications detected in chest computed tomography and lung function]. Arch Bronconeumol; 2009 Aug;45(8):376-82
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  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Male construction workers originally screened for occupational lung cancer with CT had their chest atherosclerosis (aorta, the origins of its cervical branches, the coronary arteries and heart valves) visually classified.
  • The relation between the atherosclerotic calcification scores and lung function (total lung capacity [TLC], forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1%], forced vital capacity [FVC%], maximal expiratory flow when 50% of FVC remains to be exhaled, total and specific diffusing capacities; all above expressed as percent of predicted value, and the FEV1/FVC% ratio) were studied with the general linear model adjusted for smoking, exposure years for asbestos, and body mass index (n=432).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Aortic atherosclerosis seems to be related with poor lung function.

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  • (PMID = 19394744.001).
  • [ISSN] 1579-2129
  • [Journal-full-title] Archivos de bronconeumología
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Bronconeumol.
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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26. Thomas DD, Espey MG, Pociask DA, Ridnour LA, Donzelli S, Wink DA: Asbestos redirects nitric oxide signaling through rapid catalytic conversion to nitrite. Cancer Res; 2006 Dec 15;66(24):11600-4
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  • [Title] Asbestos redirects nitric oxide signaling through rapid catalytic conversion to nitrite.
  • Asbestos exposure is strongly associated with the development of malignant mesothelioma, yet the mechanistic basis of this observation has not been resolved.
  • Carcinogenic transformation or tumor progression mediated by asbestos may be related to the generation of free radical species and perturbation of cell signaling and transcription factors.
  • We report here that exposure of human mesothelioma or lung carcinoma cells to nitric oxide (NO) in the presence of crocidolite asbestos resulted in a marked decrease in intracellular nitrosation and diminished NO-induced posttranslational modifications of tumor-associated proteins (hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha and p53).
  • Nitrated protein adducts are a prominent feature of asbestos-induced lung injury.
  • These data highlight the ability of asbestos to induce phenotypic cellular changes through two processes: (a) by directly reducing bioactive NO levels and preventing its subsequent interaction with target molecules and (b) by increasing oxidative damage and protein modifications through NO(2) production and 3-nitrotyrosine formation.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / pharmacology. Nitric Oxide / physiology. Nitrites / metabolism. Serum Albumin, Bovine / drug effects. Signal Transduction / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 17178853.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / HIF1A protein, human; 0 / Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit; 0 / Nitrites; 0 / Serum Albumin, Bovine; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; 1332-21-4 / Asbestos; 17885-08-4 / Phosphoserine; 31C4KY9ESH / Nitric Oxide
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27. Berman DW, Crump KS: A meta-analysis of asbestos-related cancer risk that addresses fiber size and mineral type. Crit Rev Toxicol; 2008;38 Suppl 1:49-73
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  • [Title] A meta-analysis of asbestos-related cancer risk that addresses fiber size and mineral type.
  • Quantitative estimates of the risk of lung cancer or mesothelioma in humans from asbestos exposure made by the U.S.
  • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) make use of estimates of potency factors based on phase-contrast microscopy (PCM) and obtained from cohorts exposed to asbestos in different occupational environments.
  • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) models for asbestos-related lung cancer and mesothelioma are expanded to allow the potency of fibers to depend upon their mineralogical types and sizes.
  • These category-specific potencies are estimated in a meta-analysis that fits the expanded models to potencies for lung cancer (KL's) or mesothelioma (KM's) based on PCM that were calculated for multiple epidemiological studies in our previous paper (Berman and Crump, 2008).
  • The fraction of total asbestos exposure in a given environment respectively represented by chrysotile and amphibole asbestos is also estimated from information in the literature for that environment.
  • Each such metric defined by width was composed of four categories of fibers: chrysotile or amphibole asbestos with lengths between 5 microm and 10 microm or longer than 10 microm.
  • Using these metrics three parameters were estimated for lung cancer and, separately, for mesothelioma: KLA, the potency of longer (length > 10 microm) amphibole fibers; rpc, the potency of pure chrysotile (uncontaminated by amphibole) relative to amphibole asbestos; and rps, the potency of shorter fibers (5 microm < length < 10 microm) relative to longer fibers.
  • For mesothelioma, the hypothesis that chrysotile and amphibole asbestos are equally potent (rpc = 1) was strongly rejected by every metric and the hypothesis that (pure) chrysotile is nonpotent for mesothelioma was not rejected by any metric.
  • Best estimates for the relative potency of chrysotile ranged from zero to about 1/200th that of amphibole asbestos (depending on metric).
  • For lung cancer, the hypothesis that chrysotile and amphibole asbestos are equally potent (rpc = 1) was rejected (p < or = .05) by the two metrics based on thin fibers (length < 0.4 microm and < 0.2 microm) but not by the metrics based on thicker fibers.
  • The "all widths" and widths < 0.4 microm metrics provide the best fits to both the lung cancer and mesothelioma data over the other metrics evaluated, although the improvements are only marginal for lung cancer.
  • That these two metrics provide equivalent (for mesothelioma) and nearly equivalent (for lung cancer) fits to the data suggests that the available data sets may not be sufficiently rich (in variation of exposure characteristics) to fully evaluate the effects of fiber width on potency.
  • Compared to the metric with widths > 0.2 microm with both rps and rpc fixed at 1 (which is nominally equivalent to the traditional PCM metric), the "all widths" and widths < 0.4 microm metrics provide substantially better fits for both lung cancer and, especially, mesothelioma.
  • Expansion of these metrics to include a category for fibers with lengths < 5 microm did not find any consistent evidence for any potency of these shortest fibers for either lung cancer or mesothelioma.
  • Unresolved in particular is the discrepancy in potency factors for lung cancer from Quebec chrysotile miners and workers at the Charleston, SC, textile mill, which mainly processed chrysotile from Quebec.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos, Amphibole / toxicity. Asbestos, Serpentine / toxicity. Carcinogens, Environmental / toxicity. Lung Neoplasms / chemically induced. Mesothelioma / chemically induced

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  • (PMID = 18686078.001).
  • [ISSN] 1547-6898
  • [Journal-full-title] Critical reviews in toxicology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Crit. Rev. Toxicol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Meta-Analysis; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Asbestos, Amphibole; 0 / Asbestos, Serpentine; 0 / Carcinogens, Environmental
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28. Janssen JH: [Wonder matter and assassin. The perception of the asbestos danger as a mirror of the time 1930-1990]. Gewina; 2005;28(1):38-53
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  • [Title] [Wonder matter and assassin. The perception of the asbestos danger as a mirror of the time 1930-1990].
  • In the seventies and eighties of the twentieth century the ideas of the dangers concerning the use of asbestos changed dramatically.
  • Asbestos became known as a 'silent killer' and 'the blue sand of death', and as a symbol of the hidden hazards of a deteriorating environment caused by unscrupulous companies and indolent authorities.
  • Asbestos seems to fit perfectly into the ubiquitous hazards which Ulrich Beck defines in his concept of the 'risk society' as the dangerous side effects of industrial production.
  • Yet the perception of the risk associated with asbestos depended more on socio-cultural characteristics than on scientifically risk assessments.
  • In the first half of the twentieth century the use of asbestos was limited and therefore did not cause any concern.
  • Economic crisis and war silenced the first alarming signals of asbestos related disease from foreign experts and a handful of Dutch physicians.
  • The asbestos workers themselves were held responsible for their own health and safety.
  • Preventive measures with regard to the industrial use of asbestos were prescribed by law.
  • Among asbestos workers the use of protective clothes and dust masks was generally seen as unmanly.
  • In the sixties the foreign literature on the connection between the exposure to asbestos and the occurrence of lung cancer and mesothelioma became known among Dutch specialists.
  • At the same time the trade unions rejected the idea of a shared responsibility and formulated the unilateral 'right to a safe working environment', with the implication that, in their view, all unhealthy and unsafe procedures should unconditionally be banned from the workshops, including the use of asbestos.
  • Asbestos was pointed out as a threat to the public health, tracked down all of its hiding places and ultimately removed.
  • The ban on asbestos was one of the results of democratisation and emancipation movement of the late sixties and seventies.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / history. Occupational Diseases / history

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  • (PMID = 15991441.001).
  • [ISSN] 0928-303X
  • [Journal-full-title] Gewina
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gewina
  • [Language] dut
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Historical Article; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
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29. Hosoda Y, Hiraga Y, Sasagawa S: Railways and asbestos in Japan (1928-1987)--epidemiology of pleural plaques, malignancies and pneumoconioses-. J Occup Health; 2008;50(4):297-307
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  • [Title] Railways and asbestos in Japan (1928-1987)--epidemiology of pleural plaques, malignancies and pneumoconioses-.
  • Asbestos has been an indispensable insulating material for railway industries, especially steam locomotives (SLs).
  • 1) Pleural plaques: Since the 1970s, pleural plaques have been regarded as evidence of past asbestos inhalation, and more recently recognized as a risk factor of asbestos-related malignancies.
  • The manifestation of pleural plaques was more correlated to years since the onset of the asbestos exposure than the sum of asbestos work years, although the result was not significant.
  • 2) Asbestos-related malignancies: Five retrospective cohort studies 1960-1970 were made on primary lung cancer incidence and mortality among 350,000 active railway men with smoking information.
  • 3) Pneumoconioses: Most studies (1928-1975) had relatively low prevalence rates among SL-related workers.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / adverse effects. Lung Neoplasms / epidemiology. Occupational Exposure. Pleural Diseases / epidemiology. Pneumoconiosis / epidemiology. Railroads


30. Nymark P, Wikman H, Ruosaari S, Hollmén J, Vanhala E, Karjalainen A, Anttila S, Knuutila S: Identification of specific gene copy number changes in asbestos-related lung cancer. Cancer Res; 2006 Jun 1;66(11):5737-43
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  • [Title] Identification of specific gene copy number changes in asbestos-related lung cancer.
  • Asbestos is a well-known lung cancer-causing mineral fiber.
  • In vitro and in vivo experiments have shown that asbestos can cause chromosomal damage and aberrations.
  • To investigate whether a distinct chromosomal aberration profile could be detected in the lung tumors of heavily asbestos-exposed patients, we analyzed the copy number profiles of 14 lung tumors from highly asbestos-exposed patients and 14 matched tumors from nonexposed patients using classic comparative genomic hybridization (CGH).
  • Classic CGH showed, on average, more aberrations in asbestos-exposed than in nonexposed patients, and an altered region in chromosome 2 seemed to occur more frequently in the asbestos-exposed patients.
  • Furthermore, 11 fragile sites coincided with the 18 asbestos-associated regions (P = 0.08), which may imply preferentially caused DNA damage at these sites.
  • Our findings are the first evidence, indicating that asbestos exposure may produce a specific DNA damage profile.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / adverse effects. Chromosome Aberrations / chemically induced. Lung Neoplasms / etiology. Lung Neoplasms / genetics

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  • (PMID = 16740712.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
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36. Fujimoto N, Aoe K, Gemba K, Kato K, Yamazaki K, Kishimoto T: Clinical investigation of malignant mesothelioma in Japan. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol; 2010 Nov;136(11):1755-9
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  • [Title] Clinical investigation of malignant mesothelioma in Japan.
  • PURPOSE: The asbestos-related problems caused much social concern; however, no large-scale study was conducted about clinical features of MM in Japan.
  • Patients with MM who have a history of occupational asbestos exposure (AE) are provided worker's compensation in Japan.
  • RESULTS: Between January 2005 and December 2007, 105 cases (median age: 63 years, range 35-80, male/female: 88/17) were diagnosed with MM in the Rosai Hospital group and related facilities.
  • Three patients had no history of occupational AE, but lived with someone who was in an occupation that handled asbestos.

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  • (PMID = 20213099.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-1335
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cancer research and clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cancer Res. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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37. Darnton AJ, McElvenny DM, Hodgson JT: Estimating the number of asbestos-related lung cancer deaths in Great Britain from 1980 to 2000. Ann Occup Hyg; 2006 Jan;50(1):29-38
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  • [Title] Estimating the number of asbestos-related lung cancer deaths in Great Britain from 1980 to 2000.
  • INTRODUCTION: Inhalation of asbestos fibres is known to cause two main kinds of cancer-mesothelioma and lung cancer.
  • While the vast majority of mesothelioma cases are generally accepted as being caused by asbestos, the proportion of asbestos-related lung cancers is less clear and cannot be determined directly because cases are not clinically distinguishable from those due to other causes.
  • The aim of this study was to estimate the number of asbestos-related lung cancers among males by modelling their relative lung cancer mortality among occupations within Great Britain in terms of smoking habits, mesothelioma mortality (as an index of asbestos exposure) and occupation type (as a proxy for socio-economic factors).
  • METHODS: Proportional mortality ratios for lung cancer and mesothelioma for the 20-year period from 1980 to 2000 (excluding 1981) were calculated for occupational groups.
  • Poisson regression models were used to estimate the number of asbestos-related lung cancers by estimating the number of lung cancer deaths in each occupation assuming no asbestos exposure and subtracting this from the actual predicted number of lung cancer deaths.
  • RESULTS: The effect of asbestos exposure in predicting lung cancer mortality was weak in comparison to smoking habits and occupation type.
  • Our estimate of the number of asbestos-related lung cancers was between two-thirds and one death for every mesothelioma death: equivalent to between 11 500 and 16 500 deaths during the time period studied.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Asbestos-related lung cancer is likely to have accounted for 2-3% of all lung cancer deaths among males in Great Britain over the last two decades of the 20th century.
  • Asbestos-related lung cancers are likely to remain an important component of the total number of lung cancer deaths in the future as part of the legacy of past asbestos exposures in occupational settings.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / toxicity. Lung Neoplasms / etiology. Lung Neoplasms / mortality. Occupational Exposure / adverse effects. Occupations


38. Dammann R, Strunnikova M, Schagdarsurengin U, Rastetter M, Papritz M, Hattenhorst UE, Hofmann HS, Silber RE, Burdach S, Hansen G: CpG island methylation and expression of tumour-associated genes in lung carcinoma. Eur J Cancer; 2005 May;41(8):1223-36
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  • In this study, microarray analysis was used to identify tumour-related genes that were down regulated in lung carcinoma.
  • In lung cancer cell lines, CpG island methylation was frequently detected for TIMP4 (64%), SOX18 (73%), EGF-like domain 7 (56%), CD105 (71%), SEMA2 (55%), RASSF1A (71%), p16 (56%) SLIT2 (100%) and TIMP3 (29%).
  • Methylation of several CpG islands was frequently found in normal lung tissue of cancer patients and this may have been attributed to epigenetic field defect and/or infiltrating tumour cells.
  • Interestingly, inactivation of RASSF1A and p16 correlated well with an extended smoking habit (P=0.02), and exposure to asbestos (P=0.017) or squamous cell carcinoma (P=0.011), respectively.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Cell Line, Tumor. Female. Humans. Male. Microarray Analysis. RNA, Neoplasm / analysis. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases / genetics. Tumor Suppressor Proteins / genetics

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  • (PMID = 15911247.001).
  • [ISSN] 0959-8049
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RASSF1 protein, human; 0 / RNA, Neoplasm; 0 / Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins; 0 / tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-4
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39. Marier M, Charney W, Rousseau R, Lanthier R, van Raalte J: Exploratory sampling of asbestos in residences near Thetford Mines: the public health threat in Quebec. Int J Occup Environ Health; 2007 Oct-Dec;13(4):386-97
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  • [Title] Exploratory sampling of asbestos in residences near Thetford Mines: the public health threat in Quebec.
  • In 2003-2004, the Asbestos Victims Association of Quebec undertook an exploratory sampling of the air and soil in the residential community of asbestos mining towns.
  • The risk of developing asbestos-related cancer following such in-home exposures over 30 years is estimated at 1 in 10,000.
  • [MeSH-major] Air Pollutants / analysis. Asbestos / analysis. Consumer Participation / methods. Environmental Exposure / analysis. Mining. Residence Characteristics

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  • (PMID = 18085052.001).
  • [ISSN] 1077-3525
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of occupational and environmental health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Occup Environ Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Air Pollutants; 0 / Mineral Fibers; 0 / Soil Pollutants; 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
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40. Pass HI, Wali A, Tang N, Ivanova A, Ivanov S, Harbut M, Carbone M, Allard J: Soluble mesothelin-related peptide level elevation in mesothelioma serum and pleural effusions. Ann Thorac Surg; 2008 Jan;85(1):265-72; discussion 272
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  • [Title] Soluble mesothelin-related peptide level elevation in mesothelioma serum and pleural effusions.
  • BACKGROUND: Soluble mesothelin-related peptide (SMRP) is a potential marker for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), which may be useful for screening high-risk asbestos-exposed individuals.
  • METHODS: We evaluated SMRP in serum from MPM patients (n = 90), lung cancer patients (n = 170), age and tobacco-matched asbestos-exposed individuals (n = 66), and in MPM pleural effusions (n = 45), benign effusions (n = 30), and non-MPM effusions (n = 20) using the MesoMark enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit (Fujirebio Diagnostics, Malvern, PA).
  • RESULTS: Mean serum SMRP levels were higher in MPM compared with lung cancer (5.67 +/- 0.82 nM [mean +/- standard error of the mean vs 1.99 +/- 0.43 nM, p < 0.001), and stage I MPM SMRP levels (n = 12; 2.09 +/- 0.41 nM) were significantly higher than those in asbestos-exposed individuals (0.99 +/- 0.09 nM, p = 0.02, respectively).
  • The area under the ROC curve for serum SMRP was 0.81 for differentiating MPM and asbestos-exposed individuals; cutoff = 1.9 nM (sensitivity = 60%, specificity = 89%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: These data support SMRP as a promising marker for MPM in both serum and pleural effusion fluid, and justify prospective screening studies of SMRP in combination with other markers for screening of asbestos-exposed cohorts.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Membrane Glycoproteins / blood. Mesothelioma / blood. Pleural Effusion, Malignant / blood. Pleural Neoplasms / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Analysis of Variance. Area Under Curve. Asbestosis / blood. Asbestosis / complications. Asbestosis / mortality. Asbestosis / pathology. Case-Control Studies. Female. GPI-Linked Proteins. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. ROC Curve. Retrospective Studies. Risk Assessment. Sensitivity and Specificity. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 18154821.001).
  • [ISSN] 1552-6259
  • [Journal-full-title] The Annals of thoracic surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Thorac. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / GPI-Linked Proteins; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / mesothelin
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41. Graziano G, Bilancia M, Bisceglia L, de Nichilo G, Pollice A, Assennato G: [Statistical analysis of the incidence of some cancers in the province of Taranto 1999-2001]. Epidemiol Prev; 2009 Jan-Apr;33(1-2):37-44
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  • DESIGN: incidence data in 29 municipalities of the Taranto province were extracted from the Jonico Salentino Cancer Registry (RTJS) for the following cancer sites: lung (ICDX C33-C34); pleura, pleuric mesothelioma (ICDX C45.0); bladder, malignancies only (ICDX C67); brain (ICDX C70-72); non-Hodgkin lymphoma (ICDX C82-85, C96); leukaemia (ICDX C91-5).
  • RESULTS: an increased risk of lung, pleura and bladder cancer was observed among male residents in the city of Taranto (respectively: SIR 1.24, p-value < 0.01; SIR: 2.21, p-value < 0.01; SIR 1.28, p-value < 0.01).
  • An unexpected increased risk of brain cancer was found in both sexe risk (especially among males) of lung, pleura and bladder cancer is likely related to the chemical pollutants and asbestos, due to the presence of many industries and shipyards in the city of Taranto.

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  • (PMID = 19585874.001).
  • [ISSN] 1120-9763
  • [Journal-full-title] Epidemiologia e prevenzione
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Epidemiol Prev
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carcinogens, Environmental; 0 / Water Pollutants, Chemical
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42. Watterson A, Gorman T, Malcolm C, Robinson M, Beck M: The economic costs of health service treatments for asbestos-related mesothelioma deaths. Ann N Y Acad Sci; 2006 Sep;1076:871-81
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  • [Title] The economic costs of health service treatments for asbestos-related mesothelioma deaths.
  • This article explores the complex and neglected picture of occupational and environmental disease healthcare costs specifically relating to asbestos.
  • Data from UK sources on asbestos disease types recorded in 2000 and their disease treatment costs were obtained.
  • One hundred and twenty diagnosed, recorded, and treated cases of asbestos-related diseases occurred in 2000 in Scotland.
  • Many lung cancer cases due to asbestos exposure occur globally for each mesothelioma case.
  • Hence figures provided in this article are certain to be gross underestimates of the total health service and personal economic costs of asbestos illness and treatment in Scotland.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / toxicity. Hospital Costs. Mesothelioma / therapy

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  • (PMID = 17119263.001).
  • [ISSN] 0077-8923
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
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43. Roe OD, Creaney J, Lundgren S, Larsson E, Sandeck H, Boffetta P, Nilsen TI, Robinson B, Kjaerheim K: Mesothelin-related predictive and prognostic factors in malignant mesothelioma: a nested case-control study. Lung Cancer; 2008 Aug;61(2):235-43
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  • [Title] Mesothelin-related predictive and prognostic factors in malignant mesothelioma: a nested case-control study.
  • Soluble mesothelin-related protein (SMRP) in serum is potentially a sensitive marker of malignant mesothelioma (MM) diagnosis and progression, and may be useful as screening marker.
  • The association between biomarker level and mesothelioma risk and survival was analysed, adjusting for asbestos exposure.
  • Survival related to tumor mesothelin expression, age, sex, histological type, location, asbestos exposure and pre-clinical SMRP was analysed.
  • Mesothelin expression in <50% of tumor cells was a significant negative prognostic marker in all cases of malignant mesothelioma (median survival=6 months vs. 12 months, hazard ratio (HR)=2.49, 95%CI 1.17-5.27), and also when only epithelial mesothelioma was analysed (median=6 months vs. 14 months, HR=2.36, 95%CI 1.07-5.22).
  • High age (>65 years) was an independent negative prognostic factor that was related to both mesothelin expression and asbestos exposure.
  • Mesothelioma of the epithelial type of the peritoneum had a significantly longer survival than epithelial type in pleura and was also related to mesothelin expression.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, Neoplasm / blood. Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Keratins / blood. Membrane Glycoproteins / blood. Mesothelioma / diagnosis. Peritoneal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Pleural Neoplasms / diagnosis. Proteins / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Asbestos / adverse effects. Case-Control Studies. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. GPI-Linked Proteins. Humans. Infant. Keratin-19. Male. Occupational Exposure / adverse effects. Prognosis. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 18281122.001).
  • [ISSN] 0169-5002
  • [Journal-full-title] Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lung Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / GPI-Linked Proteins; 0 / Keratin-19; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / NBR1 protein, human; 0 / Proteins; 0 / antigen CYFRA21.1; 0 / mesothelin; 1332-21-4 / Asbestos; 68238-35-7 / Keratins
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44. Matławska I: [Vitamin and tobacco smoking]. Przegl Lek; 2005;62(10):1190-1
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  • According to World Health Organization (WHO), there are nearly 5 million tobacco- related deaths worldwide each year and nearly half of the smokers in the world today will die as a result of their addiction and the main cause will be the lung cancer.
  • Some studies have suggested that intake of the carotenoids might reduce cancer risk.
  • Unfortunately, supplementation with vitamins: beta-carotene alone or in combination with alpha-tocopherol or retinol increased risk of lung cancer incidence and mortality in cigarette smokers and individuals with occupational exposure to asbestos.

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  • (PMID = 16521989.001).
  • [ISSN] 0033-2240
  • [Journal-full-title] Przegla̧d lekarski
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prz. Lek.
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Vitamins; 36-88-4 / Carotenoids
  • [Number-of-references] 7
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45. Paris C, Maurel M, Luc A, Stoufflet A, Pairon JC, Letourneux M: CT scan screening is associated with increased distress among subjects of the APExS. BMC Public Health; 2010;10:647
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  • BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess the psychological consequences of HRCT scan screening in retired asbestos-exposed workers.
  • METHODS: A HRCT-scan screening program for asbestos-related diseases was carried out in four regions of France.
  • Multivariate analyses were adjusted for gender, age, smoking, asbestos exposure and counseling.
  • This increase concerned patients with an abnormal HRCT-scan result, regardless of the abnormalities, but also patients with normal HRCT-scans after adjustment for age, gender, smoking status, asbestos exposure and counseling visit.
  • CONCLUSION: This study suggests that HRCT-scan screening may be associated with increased distress in asbestos-exposed subjects.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos. Mass Screening / psychology. Occupational Exposure. Patients / psychology. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / psychology

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  • (PMID = 20977751.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2458
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC public health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Public Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2988732
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46. Burdett G, Bard D: Exposure of UK industrial plumbers to asbestos, Part I: Monitoring of exposure using personal passive samplers. Ann Occup Hyg; 2007 Mar;51(2):121-30
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  • [Title] Exposure of UK industrial plumbers to asbestos, Part I: Monitoring of exposure using personal passive samplers.
  • Epidemiological data suggest that there has been and may continue to be a significant risk to maintenance workers, who through their work may disturb asbestos-containing materials (ACM).
  • The asbestos exposure of industrial plumbers was measured using personal passive samplers developed at the Health and Safety Laboratory (HSL).
  • The light-weight samplers, which collect particles by electrostatic attraction, are simple to use and do not require prior knowledge that asbestos is to be disturbed as does conventional sampling.
  • The strategy was found to be a reasonably efficient and cost-effective way to obtain data on maintenance worker's exposure to asbestos.
  • The results of the TEM analysis of the passive samplers showed that the percentage of workers exposed to >5 microm long asbestos fibres was 62% in Round 1 and 58% in Round 2.
  • For phase contrast microscopy equivalent (PCME) asbestos fibres, the values were 46 and 29%, respectively.
  • The three samples with the highest numbers of fibres were followed up and were associated with plumbers working in areas which had supposedly been stripped of asbestos just prior to their starting work, suggesting that poor removal, clean-up and clearance practice presents a significant part of the risk to plumbers.
  • This gave an average exposure to regulated PCME fibres of 0.009 f ml-1 for amphibole asbestos and 0.049 f ml-1 for chrysotile.
  • If representative, the estimated lifetime risk of death from an asbestos related cancer for an exposure from age 20 for 40 years would be 68 per 100,000, which equates to an annual risk of death of the order of 10 per million.
  • [MeSH-major] Air Pollutants, Occupational / toxicity. Asbestos / toxicity. Carcinogens, Environmental / toxicity. Environmental Monitoring / instrumentation. Occupational Exposure / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Asbestos, Amphibole / analysis. Asbestos, Amphibole / toxicity. Asbestos, Serpentine / analysis. Asbestos, Serpentine / toxicity. Dust / analysis. Equipment Design. Great Britain. Hazardous Substances / analysis. Hazardous Substances / toxicity. Humans. Inhalation Exposure / adverse effects. Microscopy, Electron / methods. Microscopy, Phase-Contrast / methods. Particle Size. Population Surveillance / methods. Risk Assessment / methods

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  • (PMID = 17189281.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-4878
  • [Journal-full-title] The Annals of occupational hygiene
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Occup Hyg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Air Pollutants, Occupational; 0 / Asbestos, Amphibole; 0 / Asbestos, Serpentine; 0 / Carcinogens, Environmental; 0 / Dust; 0 / Hazardous Substances; 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
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47. Moore S, Darlison L, Tod AM: Living with mesothelioma. A literature review. Eur J Cancer Care (Engl); 2010 Jul;19(4):458-68
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  • Mesothelioma is an asbestos-related cancer that affects mainly the pleura.
  • The findings suggest the impact of mesothelioma is multidimensional on: physical symptoms (especially pain, breathlessness, fatigue, cough, sleep disturbance, appetite loss and sweating), emotional functioning (anxiety, depression, fear and isolation), social consequences (changes in roles and relationships) and interventions (the necessity of frequent anti-cancer treatments and admissions for symptom control).


48. Veglia F, Vineis P, Overvad K, Boeing H, Bergmann M, Trichopoulou A, Trichopoulos D, Palli D, Krogh V, Tumino R, Linseisen J, Steindorf K, Raaschou-Nielsen O, Tjonneland A, Gonzalez CA, Martinez C, Dorronsoro M, Barricarte A, Cirera L, Quiros JR, Day NE, Saracci R, Riboli E: Occupational exposures, environmental tobacco smoke, and lung cancer. Epidemiology; 2007 Nov;18(6):769-75
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  • [Title] Occupational exposures, environmental tobacco smoke, and lung cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: There is uncertainty regarding the association of occupational exposures with lung cancer.
  • We have studied the association between 52 high-risk job titles and lung cancer incidence in a large prospective study, with more than 200,000 participants followed for more than 6 years and 809 incident cases of lung cancer.
  • RESULTS: Eighteen occupations, mainly related with agriculture, constructions, and metal processing, were associated with increased risk.
  • When the occupations were classified according to the presumed exposure to specific carcinogenic agents, the hazard ratios were 1.5 (95% confidence interval = 1.2-1.9) for asbestos, 1.4 (1.1-1.8) for heavy metals, 1.4 (1.1-1.8) for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and 1.6 (1.2-2.1) for work-related environmental tobacco smoke.


49. Szeszenia-Dabrowska N: [Asbestos as a risk factor for pulmonary diseases]. Przegl Lek; 2008;65 Suppl 2:26-34
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  • [Title] [Asbestos as a risk factor for pulmonary diseases].
  • Asbestos is a recognised carcinogen, one of the most dangerous pollutants in the human environment.
  • This is associated with a huge accumulation of asbestos-containing materials that, as a result of their degradation, release fibres that are practically indestructible.
  • It is estimated that in recent years, asbestos was responsible for ca.
  • The pathogenic effects of asbestos on the respiratory system (the target organ) result from the inhalation of the respirable asbestos fibres suspended in the ambient air.
  • A specific feature of asbestos activity is that the pathologies appear even after cessation of the exposure; another feature is the development of mesotheliomas associated with the environmental exposure.
  • In Poland, the Act of 1997 banning the use of asbestos products has solved the problems associated with the occupational exposure in the asbestos processing industry, and prevented further accumulation of asbestos products.
  • However, problems of the environmental exposures to asbestos remain unsolved.
  • In spite that no worker has been occupationally exposed to asbestos during the recent 10 years, new cases of asbestosis, lung cancer pleural mesothelioma, non-malignant pleural diseases continue to be detected each year among the former workers of asbestos processing industry ("Amiantus" project).
  • This paper reports on the current status of asbestos-related diseases in Poland and worldwide, risk of the development of lung cancers and asbestos-specific mesotheliomas and gives recent recommendations for diagnosing and certification of asbestos-related diseases.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / adverse effects. Occupational Exposure / prevention & control. Respiratory Tract Diseases / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 19621651.001).
  • [ISSN] 0033-2240
  • [Journal-full-title] Przegla̧d lekarski
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prz. Lek.
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
  • [Number-of-references] 17
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50. Bianchi C, Bianchi T: Susceptibility and resistance in the genesis of asbestos-related mesothelioma. Indian J Occup Environ Med; 2008 Aug;12(2):57-60
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  • [Title] Susceptibility and resistance in the genesis of asbestos-related mesothelioma.
  • Asbestos is the principal agent in the etiology of malignant mesothelioma.
  • However, a small proportion of people exposed to asbestos develop mesothelioma.
  • A genetic susceptibility is suggested by the occurrence of more mesothelioma cases among blood-related members of a single family.
  • This indicates a particular vulnerability to cancer in people with mesothelioma.
  • Not rarely, very old persons heavily exposed to asbestos remain free from asbestos-related cancer, a fact indicating an absolute resistance to the oncogenic effects of asbestos.
  • A relative resistance may be recognized in people severely exposed to asbestos who develop mesothelioma only after 60 years or more since the onset of the exposure.
  • The natural history of mesothelioma shows that a resistance to the oncogenic effects of asbestos does exist.
  • To strengthen the defence mechanisms may represent a way for preventing mesothelioma among people exposed to asbestos.

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  • (PMID = 20040979.001).
  • [ISSN] 1998-3670
  • [Journal-full-title] Indian journal of occupational and environmental medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Indian J Occup Environ Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2796755
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Asbestos / familial cancer / host factors / immune impairment / mesothelioma / resistance / susceptibility
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51. Fuster A, Picó C, Sánchez J, Oliver P, Zingaretti MC, Murano I, Morroni M, Hoeller U, Goralczyk R, Cinti S, Palou A: Effects of 6-month daily supplementation with oral beta-carotene in combination or not with benzo[a]pyrene on cell-cycle markers in the lung of ferrets. J Nutr Biochem; 2008 May;19(5):295-304
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  • Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that people who eat more fruits and vegetables (rich in carotenoids) and people who have higher serum beta-carotene (BC) levels have a lower risk of cancer, particularly lung cancer.
  • However, the two main human intervention studies of BC supplementation (the ATBC and the CARET trials) revealed an increased risk of lung cancer among smokers and asbestos workers.
  • Previous studies carried out in the ferret have reported that BC effects are related to dose.


52. Kauppinen T, Saalo A, Pukkala E, Virtanen S, Karjalainen A, Vuorela R: Evaluation of a national register on occupational exposure to carcinogens: effectiveness in the prevention of occupational cancer, and cancer risks among the exposed workers. Ann Occup Hyg; 2007 Jul;51(5):463-70
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  • [Title] Evaluation of a national register on occupational exposure to carcinogens: effectiveness in the prevention of occupational cancer, and cancer risks among the exposed workers.
  • OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance and effectiveness of a register of employees exposed to carcinogens (the ASA Register) which has been in operation in Finland since 1979, and to study cancer risks among the notified workers.
  • The cancer incidence of 35,138 workers notified to ASA in 1979-1988 was followed up through the files of the Finnish Cancer Register for the period 1980-2003.
  • Other benefits of ASA included the saving of the treatment costs of prevented cancers, the prevention of other health outcomes of carcinogens, improved safety behaviour of exposed workers and avoidance of human suffering among cancer patients and their families.
  • These benefits should be considered against the annual costs, mainly due to 7-8 person-years of work required by tasks related to ASA.
  • The results of the cancer incidence study among notified workers were based on a relatively short follow-up (on average 19 years).
  • The incidence of mesothelioma was significantly increased in the ASA cohort, probably due to exposure to asbestos.

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  • (PMID = 17625219.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-4878
  • [Journal-full-title] The Annals of occupational hygiene
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Occup Hyg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carcinogens
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53. Mahjub H, Sadri GH: Meta-analysis of case-referent studies of specific environmental or occupational pollutants on lung cancer. Indian J Cancer; 2006 Oct-Dec;43(4):169-73
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  • [Title] Meta-analysis of case-referent studies of specific environmental or occupational pollutants on lung cancer.
  • The present investigation was initiated to investigate case-referent studies of lung cancer risk from specific environmental and occupational pollutants, using detailed individual exposure data.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: To examine the risk of lung cancer associated with environmental and occupational pollutants, a meta-analysis of published case-control studies was undertaken using a random effects model.
  • The principal outcome measure was the odds ratio for the risk of lung cancer.
  • Twelve study reports detailing the relationship between the lung cancer and the type of exposure were identified.
  • RESULTS: The odds ratio of asbestos, cooking fuel, cooking fumes, motor and diesel exhaust related to lung cancer were 1.67, 1.99, 2.52 and 1.42 (P < 0.001), respectively.
  • The odds ratio of metal fumes related to lung cancer was 1.28 (0.001 P < 0.01).
  • The combined odds ratio for the environmental and occupational exposure related to lung cancer was 1.67 (P < 0.001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The meta-analysis of the present study shows the magnitude association between asbestos, cooking fumes, cooking fuels, motor and diesel exhaust, with lung cancer risk.
  • Lung cancer risk may be reduced by controlling exposure levels.


54. Gao F, Kinnula VL, Myllärniemi M, Oury TD: Extracellular superoxide dismutase in pulmonary fibrosis. Antioxid Redox Signal; 2008 Feb;10(2):343-54
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  • Hence, antioxidant enzymes play key roles in controlling or preventing pulmonary diseases related to oxidative stress.

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  • (PMID = 17999630.001).
  • [ISSN] 1523-0864
  • [Journal-full-title] Antioxidants & redox signaling
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Antioxid. Redox Signal.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIDCR NIH HHS / DE / R01 DE016226-01; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL63700; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL063700-07; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / F32 ES015383; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL063700; United States / NIDCR NIH HHS / DE / DE016226-01; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / F32 ES015383-01; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL063700-07; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / R21 ES013986
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antioxidants; 0 / Oxidants; 0 / Reactive Oxygen Species; 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 1332-21-4 / Asbestos; EC 1.15.1.1 / Superoxide Dismutase
  • [Number-of-references] 146
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS41587; NLM/ PMC2290736
  •  go-up   go-down


55. Hevel JM, Olson-Buelow LC, Ganesan B, Stevens JR, Hardman JP, Aust AE: Novel functional view of the crocidolite asbestos-treated A549 human lung epithelial transcriptome reveals an intricate network of pathways with opposing functions. BMC Genomics; 2008;9:376
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  • [Title] Novel functional view of the crocidolite asbestos-treated A549 human lung epithelial transcriptome reveals an intricate network of pathways with opposing functions.
  • BACKGROUND: Although exposure to asbestos is now regulated, patients continue to be diagnosed with mesothelioma, asbestosis, fibrosis and lung carcinoma because of the long latent period between exposure and clinical disease.
  • Asbestosis is observed in approximately 200,000 patients annually and asbestos-related deaths are estimated at 4,000 annually.
  • Although advances have been made using single gene/gene product or pathway studies, the complexity of the response to asbestos and the many unanswered questions suggested the need for a systems biology approach.
  • The objective of this study was to generate a comprehensive view of the transcriptional changes induced by crocidolite asbestos in A549 human lung epithelial cells.
  • The analyses uniquely document a transcriptome with function-based networks in cell death, cancer, cell cycle, cellular growth, proliferation, and gene expression.
  • These functional modules show signs of a complex interplay between signaling pathways consisting of both novel and previously described asbestos-related genes/gene products.
  • These networks allowed for the identification of novel, putative crocidolite-related genes, leading to several new hypotheses regarding genes that are important for the asbestos response.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos, Crocidolite / toxicity. Gene Regulatory Networks / drug effects. Lung / drug effects. Lung / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 18687144.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2164
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC genomics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Genomics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 12001-28-4 / Asbestos, Crocidolite
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2533023
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56. Adesi FB, Ferrante D, Bertolotti M, Todesco A, Mirabelli D, Terracini B, Magnani C: [Mortality from pleural and peritoneal cancer in a cohort of asbestos workers, many years after start of the exposure: possible role of fibers clearance]. G Ital Med Lav Ergon; 2007 Jul-Sep;29(3 Suppl):346-8
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  • [Title] [Mortality from pleural and peritoneal cancer in a cohort of asbestos workers, many years after start of the exposure: possible role of fibers clearance].
  • The multistage theory of carcinogenesis assumes rates of mesothelioma increasing monotonically as a function of time since first exposure (TSFE) to asbestos.
  • However, some authors have suggested that the increase in mesothelioma rate with TSFE might be attenuated by clearance of asbestos from the lungs.
  • We estimated mortality time trends from pleural and peritoneal cancer in a cohort of 3443 asbestos-cement workers.
  • The role of asbestos clearance was explored using the traditional mesothelioma multistage model, generalized to include a term representing elimination over time.
  • We observed 139 deaths from pleural and 56 from peritoneal cancer during the period 1950-2003.
  • The rate of pleural cancer increased during the first 40 years of TSFE and reached a plateau thereafter.
  • In contrast, the rate of peritoneal cancer increased monotonically with TSFE.
  • The model allowing for asbestos elimination fitted the data better than the traditional model for pleural (p = 0.02) but not for peritoneal cancer (p = 0.22).
  • The risk for pleural cancer, rather than showing an indefinite increase, might reach a plateau when a sufficiently long time has elapsed since exposure.
  • The different trends for pleural and peritoneal cancer might be related to clearance of the asbestos from the workers' lungs.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / adverse effects. Mineral Fibers / adverse effects. Occupational Diseases / etiology. Occupational Diseases / mortality. Occupational Exposure / adverse effects. Peritoneal Neoplasms / etiology. Peritoneal Neoplasms / mortality. Pleural Neoplasms / etiology. Pleural Neoplasms / mortality

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  • (PMID = 18409718.001).
  • [ISSN] 1592-7830
  • [Journal-full-title] Giornale italiano di medicina del lavoro ed ergonomia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] G Ital Med Lav Ergon
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Mineral Fibers; 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
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57. Subramanian J, Govindan R: Lung cancer in never smokers: a review. J Clin Oncol; 2007 Feb 10;25(5):561-70
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  • [Title] Lung cancer in never smokers: a review.
  • Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States.
  • Although tobacco smoking accounts for the majority of lung cancer, approximately 10% of patients with lung cancer in the United States are lifelong never smokers.
  • Lung cancer in the never smokers (LCINS) affects women disproportionately more often than men.
  • Several etiologic factors have been proposed for the development of LCINS, including exposure to radon, cooking fumes, asbestos, heavy metals, and environmental tobacco smoke, human papillomavirus infection, and inherited genetic susceptibility.
  • Striking differences in response rates and outcomes are seen when patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are lifelong never smokers are treated with epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) inhibitors such as gefitinib or erlotinib compared with the outcomes with these agents in patients with tobacco-associated lung cancer.
  • Interestingly, the activating mutations in the EGFR-TK inhibitors have been reported significantly more frequently in LCINS than in patients with tobacco-related NSCLC.

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  • [CommentIn] J Clin Oncol. 2007 Feb 10;25(5):469-71 [17290053.001]
  • (PMID = 17290066.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Environmental Pollutants; 0 / Hormones; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor
  • [Number-of-references] 166
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58. Muller J, Delos M, Panin N, Rabolli V, Huaux F, Lison D: Absence of carcinogenic response to multiwall carbon nanotubes in a 2-year bioassay in the peritoneal cavity of the rat. Toxicol Sci; 2009 Aug;110(2):442-8
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  • Toxicological investigations of carbon nanotubes have shown that they can induce pulmonary toxicity, and similarities with asbestos fibers have been suggested.
  • These inflammatory and genotoxic activities were related to the presence of defects in the structure of the nanotubes.
  • In view of the strong links between inflammation, mutations and cancer, these observations prompted us to explore the carcinogenic potential of these MWCNT in the peritoneal cavity of rats.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Asbestos, Crocidolite / toxicity. Injections, Intraperitoneal. Male. Peritoneal Cavity. Rats. Rats, Wistar. Reference Standards. Risk Assessment. Surface Properties. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 19429663.001).
  • [ISSN] 1096-0929
  • [Journal-full-title] Toxicological sciences : an official journal of the Society of Toxicology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Toxicol. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carcinogens; 0 / Nanotubes, Carbon; 12001-28-4 / Asbestos, Crocidolite
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59. Pass HI, Carbone M: Current status of screening for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg; 2009;21(2):97-104
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  • [Title] Current status of screening for malignant pleural mesothelioma.
  • Malignant mesothelioma is characterized by its association with asbestos, its long latency period, and the propensity for the diagnosis to be obtained in the later stages of the disease.
  • Because the high-risk cohorts for mesothelioma are fairly well defined by the association with asbestos, and the exposure is usually in the workplace, it is hypothesized that early detection of the disease could (1) find patients at an earlier, more treatable stage and (2) result in prolonged survival over the present median 12 months from the start of therapy.
  • Many studies have used standard chest X-ray to characterize changes associated with asbestos-exposed individuals, but the insensitivity of X-ray in screening patients with mesothelioma has never supported the wide-scale adaptation of such an effort.
  • Most recently, serum biomarkers with the potential to discriminate asbestos-exposed, non-cancer-bearing individuals from those with mesothelioma have been investigated both at single institutions and with multi-institutional-blinded trials.
  • These markers, including soluble mesothelin-related protein, osteopontin, and megakaryocyte potentiating factor, may, in the future, be incorporated into a screening algorithm for high-risk asbestos-exposed individuals to help monitor these cohorts in a noninvasive fashion and guide the use of computerized tomography.
  • [MeSH-minor] Asbestos / adverse effects. GPI-Linked Proteins. Humans. Membrane Glycoproteins / blood. Occupational Exposure. Osteopontin / blood. Patient Selection. Predictive Value of Tests. Risk Assessment. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 19822280.001).
  • [ISSN] 1043-0679
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in thoracic and cardiovascular surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Thorac. Cardiovasc. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / GPI-Linked Proteins; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / SPP1 protein, human; 0 / mesothelin; 106441-73-0 / Osteopontin; 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
  • [Number-of-references] 70
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60. Sakai Y, Ohbayashi C, Itami H, Kajimoto K, Sakuma T, Uchino K, Yoshimura M, Matsumoto S, Idei Y, Oka T: Simple quantitative analysis of asbestos body using the sediment of formalin injected into surgically resected lung cancers. Pathol Int; 2010 Feb;60(2):78-86
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  • [Title] Simple quantitative analysis of asbestos body using the sediment of formalin injected into surgically resected lung cancers.
  • A simple screening method for quantitatively analyzing asbestos bodies that can be carried out even in community hospitals, is needed in order for laborers and neighborhoods in the vicinity of asbestos factories to apply for compensation for asbestos-related injury.
  • Eighty-eight consecutive cases of surgically resected primary lung cancer were analyzed for asbestos bodies using two methods, and the correlation between them was statistically examined.
  • The overall correlation coefficient of the concentration of asbestos bodies between the authors' method (C(AB/SED)) and the conventional method (C(AB/DLT)) was 0.4576, a weak statistically significant correlation; in patients with occupational asbestos exposure, however, the correlation coefficient was 0.7341.
  • C(AB/DLT) >3000/g dry lung tissue when C(AB/SED) is >or=3.5/mL suggests the potential for the accumulation of asbestos absorption by lung tissue.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / analysis. Clinical Laboratory Techniques. Formaldehyde. Lung Neoplasms / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Occupational Exposure / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 20398191.001).
  • [ISSN] 1440-1827
  • [Journal-full-title] Pathology international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathol. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1332-21-4 / Asbestos; 1HG84L3525 / Formaldehyde
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61. Matsuyama A, Hisaoka M, Iwasaki M, Iwashita M, Hisanaga S, Hashimoto H: TLE1 expression in malignant mesothelioma. Virchows Arch; 2010 Nov;457(5):577-83
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  • [Title] TLE1 expression in malignant mesothelioma.
  • Malignant mesothelioma, an aggressive and often lethal tumor commonly associated with asbestos exposure, has been morphologically classified into epithelial, biphasic, and sarcomatoid subtypes.
  • TLE1, which plays an important role in Wnt pathway, has been shown to be a specific marker for synovial sarcoma and diagnostically is useful; however, TLE1 expression in malignant mesotheliomas has not been fully evaluated.
  • We immunohistochemically examined the expression of TLE1, factors related to the Wnt pathway including β-catenin and cyclin D1, and mesothelioma markers including calretinin, HBME-1, cytokeratin 5/6, and thrombomodulin in 29 malignant mesotheliomas.
  • TLE1 was variably expressed in 28 malignant mesotheliomas regardless of histomorphological subtype with >25% of positive cells in 20 cases (69.0%).
  • Our study showed no or limited value of the immunohistochemical TLE1 expression in distinguishing malignant mesothelioma and synovial sarcoma.


62. Rushton L, Bagga S, Bevan R, Brown TP, Cherrie JW, Holmes P, Fortunato L, Slack R, Van Tongeren M, Young C, Hutchings SJ: Occupation and cancer in Britain. Br J Cancer; 2010 Apr 27;102(9):1428-37
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  • [Title] Occupation and cancer in Britain.
  • BACKGROUND: Prioritising control measures for occupationally related cancers should be evidence based.
  • We estimated the current burden of cancer in Britain attributable to past occupational exposures for International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) group 1 (established) and 2A (probable) carcinogens.
  • METHODS: We calculated attributable fractions and numbers for cancer mortality and incidence using risk estimates from the literature and national data sources to estimate proportions exposed.
  • RESULTS: 5.3% (8019) cancer deaths were attributable to occupation in 2005 (men, 8.2% (6362); women, 2.3% (1657)).
  • Attributable incidence estimates are 13 679 (4.0%) cancer registrations (men, 10 063 (5.7%); women, 3616 (2.2%)).
  • Occupational attributable fractions are over 2% for mesothelioma, sinonasal, lung, nasopharynx, breast, non-melanoma skin cancer, bladder, oesophagus, soft tissue sarcoma, larynx and stomach cancers.
  • Asbestos, shift work, mineral oils, solar radiation, silica, diesel engine exhaust, coal tars and pitches, occupation as a painter or welder, dioxins, environmental tobacco smoke, radon, tetrachloroethylene, arsenic and strong inorganic mists each contribute 100 or more registrations.
  • Industries and occupations with high cancer registrations include construction, metal working, personal and household services, mining, land transport, printing/publishing, retail/hotels/restaurants, public administration/defence, farming and several manufacturing sectors.
  • 56% of cancer registrations in men are attributable to work in the construction industry (mainly mesotheliomas, lung, stomach, bladder and non-melanoma skin cancers) and 54% of cancer registrations in women are attributable to shift work (breast cancer).
  • CONCLUSION: This project is the first to quantify in detail the burden of cancer and mortality due to occupation specifically for Britain.
  • It highlights the impact of occupational exposures, together with the occupational circumstances and industrial areas where exposures to carcinogenic agents occurred in the past, on population cancer morbidity and mortality; this can be compared with the impact of other causes of cancer.
  • [MeSH-minor] Agricultural Workers' Diseases / epidemiology. Asbestos. Carcinogens. Coal Tar / adverse effects. Female. Great Britain / epidemiology. Humans. Incidence. Industry. Male. Mesothelioma / chemically induced

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  • (PMID = 20424618.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-1827
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carcinogens; 1332-21-4 / Asbestos; 8007-45-2 / Coal Tar
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2865752
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63. Ruosaari ST, Nymark PE, Aavikko MM, Kettunen E, Knuutila S, Hollmén J, Norppa H, Anttila SL: Aberrations of chromosome 19 in asbestos-associated lung cancer and in asbestos-induced micronuclei of bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. Carcinogenesis; 2008 May;29(5):913-7
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  • [Title] Aberrations of chromosome 19 in asbestos-associated lung cancer and in asbestos-induced micronuclei of bronchial epithelial cells in vitro.
  • Exposure to asbestos is known to induce lung cancer, and our previous studies have suggested that specific chromosomal regions, such as 19p13, are preferentially aberrant in lung tumours of asbestos-exposed patients.
  • Here, we further examined the association between the 19p region and exposure to asbestos using array comparative genomic hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in lung tumours and FISH characterization of asbestos-induced micronuclei (MN) in human bronchial epithelial BEAS 2B cells in vitro.
  • We detected an increased number of 19p losses in the tumours of asbestos-exposed patients in comparison with tumours from non-exposed subjects with similar distribution of tumour histology in both groups (13/33; 39% versus 3/25; 12%, P = 0.04).
  • In BEAS 2B cells, a 48 h exposure to crocidolite asbestos (2.0 microg/cm(2)) was found to induce centromere-negative MN-harbouring chromosomal fragments.
  • The results suggest that 19p has significance in asbestos-associated carcinogenesis and that asbestos may be capable of inducing specific chromosome aberrations.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / toxicity. Bronchi / pathology. Chromosome Aberrations / drug effects. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 19 / drug effects. Epithelial Cells / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / genetics

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  • (PMID = 18339684.001).
  • [ISSN] 1460-2180
  • [Journal-full-title] Carcinogenesis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Carcinogenesis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
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64. Gaafar R, Bahnassy A, Abdelsalam I, Kamel MM, Helal A, Abdel-Hamid A, Eldin NA, Mokhtar N: Tissue and serum EGFR as prognostic factors in malignant pleural mesothelioma. Lung Cancer; 2010 Oct;70(1):43-50
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  • [Title] Tissue and serum EGFR as prognostic factors in malignant pleural mesothelioma.
  • BACKGROUND: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an asbestos related aggressive tumor.
  • Asbestos causes genetic modifications and cell signaling events that favor resistance to chemotherapy.
  • Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in a variety of epithelial malignancies including lung cancer in which EGFR aberrations not only predict response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors but also indicate tumor progression.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20347505.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-8332
  • [Journal-full-title] Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lung Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor
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65. Thurneysen C, Opitz I, Kurtz S, Weder W, Stahel RA, Felley-Bosco E: Functional inactivation of NF2/merlin in human mesothelioma. Lung Cancer; 2009 May;64(2):140-7
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  • Samples obtained from 44 mesothelioma, 3 asbestosis patients and 6 normal pleura from non-asbestos related disease patients were analyzed.


66. Marinaccio A, Altavista P, Binazzi A, Comba P, Mastrantonio M, Nesti M, Pasetto R, Scarselli A, Uccelli R, Pirastu R: [Pleural cancer mortality and compensated cases of asbestosis in Sardinia Region municipalities (1980-2000)]. Epidemiol Prev; 2005 Sep-Dec;29(5-6 Suppl):57-62
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  • [Title] [Pleural cancer mortality and compensated cases of asbestosis in Sardinia Region municipalities (1980-2000)].
  • OBJECTIVE: To his study describes the geographical distribution of pleural cancer deaths and asbestosis cases from 1980 to 2000 in Sardinia Region (Italy).
  • DESIGN: For each town we have estimated Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs) for pleural cancer and Standardized Incidence Ratios (SIRs) for asbestosis.
  • RESULTS: The most important cluster of pleural cancer was identified in the area defined by Carloforte, Calasetta, Portoscuso and Sant'Antioco municipalities (Southwestern Sardinia) with 15 observed cases (p value= 0.003).
  • CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate the urgency of the epidemiological surveillance of asbestos related diseases in Sardinia.
  • The active search for incident cases of malignant mesothelioma in the whole Region and the analysis of modalities of asbestos exposure (according to national guidelines) is an indispensable tool for the primary prevention of occupational, environmental and domestic exposures from unknown asbestos sources of contamination.

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  • (PMID = 16646264.001).
  • [ISSN] 1120-9763
  • [Journal-full-title] Epidemiologia e prevenzione
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Epidemiol Prev
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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67. Forsell K, Hageberg S, Nilsson R: Lung cancer and mesothelioma among engine room crew--case reports with risk assessment of previous and ongoing exposure to carcinogens. Int Marit Health; 2007;58(1-4):5-13
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  • [Title] Lung cancer and mesothelioma among engine room crew--case reports with risk assessment of previous and ongoing exposure to carcinogens.
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article is to illustrate, by means of case reports on occupational exposure in four men with cancer, the hazards of previous and ongoing carcinogenic exposures in ships' engine rooms.
  • Several cases of cancer occurred within a few years among the engine room crew of a passenger ferry.
  • SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Nine cases of cancer among crew members of the ferry were reported between 2001 and 2006, six of which occurred in crew working in the engine room.
  • An experienced occupational hygienist evaluated work-related exposure to carcinogens.
  • RESULTS: Two engine room ratings contracted lung cancer at the age of 54 and 61, respectively.
  • Carcinogenic exposure included asbestos, with an estimated cumulative exposure of 2-5 fibreyears/mL, as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitroarenes from oils, soot and engine exhaust.
  • CONCLUSIONS: For the lung cancer cases, smoking and asbestos exposure were considered clear risk factors, and PAHs and nitroarenes possible risk factors.
  • For the mesothelioma cases, former asbestos exposure was considered a causal factor.
  • Asbestos can still be present on ships.
  • Steps should be taken to reduce the exposure to asbestos, PAHs and nitroarenes, and smoking.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Asbestos / toxicity. Humans. Male. Men's Health. Middle Aged. Occupational Exposure. Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic / toxicity. Risk Factors. Sweden

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  • (PMID = 18350972.001).
  • [ISSN] 1641-9251
  • [Journal-full-title] International maritime health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int Marit Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Air Pollutants, Occupational; 0 / Carcinogens; 0 / Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic; 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
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68. Peretz A, Van Hee VC, Kramer MR, Pitlik S, Keifer MC: Pleural plaques related to "take-home" exposure to asbestos: An international case series. Int J Gen Med; 2008;1:15-20
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  • [Title] Pleural plaques related to "take-home" exposure to asbestos: An international case series.
  • CONTEXT: While a large number of studies indicate the risks of high-level exposures to asbestos in the workplace setting, a relatively small number of studies describe the risk of pleural disease related to "take-home" asbestos brought into the household by workers exposed to asbestos.
  • Consequently, the risk of pleural disease in family members of asbestos-exposed workers is likely underappreciated.
  • CASE PRESENTATIONS: Two families of siblings, one in Israel and one in the US, were evaluated because of their significant exposures to asbestos brought into the home by family members with heavy occupational exposures.
  • Two of the four children of an asbestos cement debagger in Petach Tikvah, Israel and two children of a pipe lagger in a naval shipyard near Seattle, Washington, manifested benign pleural disease without parenchymal disease, despite having no occupational exposure to asbestos.
  • DISCUSSION: These cases illustrate that "take-home" asbestos exposure may lead to pleural disease at higher rates than commonly realized.
  • RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Providers should recognize that due to the potential for "take-home" exposures, asbestos-related disease in a patient may be a marker for disease in household contacts.
  • Patients with family members heavily exposed to asbestos should be strongly encouraged to quit smoking in an effort to reduce any further carcinogenic exposures.
  • Additionally, workplace control and regulation of asbestos use should be emphasized to protect both workers and their families.

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  • [Cites] Occup Environ Med. 2003 Jan;60(1):35-41; discussion 41-2 [12499455.001]
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  • (PMID = 20428401.001).
  • [ISSN] 1178-7074
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of general medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Gen Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2840547
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; asbestos / case series / environmental / household / nonoccupational / pleural plaques / take-home
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69. Harbut MR, Endress C, Graff JJ, Weis C, Pass H: Clinical presentation of asbestosis with intractable pleural pain in the adult child of a taconite miner and radiographic demonstration of the probable pathology causing the pain. Int J Occup Environ Health; 2009 Jul-Sep;15(3):269-73
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  • Taconite, although not classified by the United States Government as asbestos or asbestiform material, has been associated with asbestos-related diseases.
  • Intractable pleural pain has been described in asbestos-exposed patients with theorized etiologies.

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  • [CommentIn] Int J Occup Environ Health. 2010 Jan-Mar;16(1):101 [20166326.001]
  • (PMID = 19650581.001).
  • [ISSN] 1077-3525
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of occupational and environmental health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Occup Environ Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Silicates; 12249-26-2 / taconite; E1UOL152H7 / Iron
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70. García Gómez M, Artieda Pellejero L, Esteban Buedo V, Guzmán Fernández A, Camino Durán F, Martínez Castillo A, Lezzáun Goñi M, Gallo Fernández M, González García I, Martínez Arguisuelas N, Elvira Espinosa M, Sánchez de Navas AM, Zimmermann Verdejo M, Campos Acedo R, Galván Olivares F, Castañeda López R, Estaún Blasco E, Castell Salvá R, Martínez-Portillo LM, Rubio Sanz A, Unamuno Achúcarro A, Fernández Fernández I, Lama Herrera C, Mayoral Cortés JM: [Health surveillance of workers exposed to asbestos: an example of cooperation between the occupational prevention system and the national health system]. Rev Esp Salud Publica; 2006 Jan-Feb;80(1):27-39
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  • [Title] [Health surveillance of workers exposed to asbestos: an example of cooperation between the occupational prevention system and the national health system].
  • The Ministry of Health and Consumer Affairs and the Autonomous Governments of Spain have designed and agreed by consensus with the sanitary professionals and major employer's organizations and Unions a Integral Health Surveillance Programme of asbestos-exposed workers, in order to assure appropriate, uniform and harmonized action throughout the national territory with relation to these workers.
  • PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: This initiative started from the Occupational Health Working group of the Interterritorial Council, with inputs from the Asbestos Working Group of the National Occupational Safety and Health Commission.
  • CURRENT PROGRAM STATUS: two years after the Programme approval a total of 5778 workers are included in the Registry of asbestos-exposed workers.
  • 208 workers have COPD, 198 benign pleural disease, 8 lung cancer, 10 mesothelioma and 7 workers have other cancers possibly related to asbestos (gastric, larynx and colon cancer).

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  • (PMID = 16553258.001).
  • [ISSN] 1135-5727
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista española de salud pública
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev. Esp. Salud Publica
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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71. Spiess PE, Tuziak T, Kassouf W, Grossman HB, Czerniak B: Malignant mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis. Urology; 2005 Aug;66(2):397-401
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  • [Title] Malignant mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis.
  • OBJECTIVES: To review our experience with the management of malignant mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis with emphasis on disease-related outcomes.
  • METHODS: A retrospective chart review of patients seen during the past 25 years at our cancer center identified 5 cases of malignant mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis.
  • Asbestos exposure was identified in 4 patients.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Malignant mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis constitutes a rare but often fatal malignancy of the male genitalia.
  • This diagnosis should be suspected in patients exposed to asbestos and presenting with clinical symptoms of either hydrocele or inguinal hernia.


72. Battista G, Costantini AS, Gorini G, Orsi D, Paredes I, Miceli GB, De Vuono G, Peccetti V: [Mortality in a cohort of sugar refinery workers in Arezzo Province, Italy]. Med Lav; 2007 Jul-Aug;98(4):289-95
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  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate mortality of a cohort of 1,767 male workers employed in a sugar refinery plant located in the Province of Arezzo, Italy, where asbestos had been used from the 1960's for the insulation of thermohydraulic systems and for furnaces.
  • In 1987-88 workers removed the asbestos-cement insulation from the plant.
  • Significant decreases in mortality were observed for overall mortality (SMR = 78; 95% CI = 69-88), all cancers (SMR = 80; 95% CI = 65-97), cardiovascular diseases (SMR = 64; 95% CI = 50-81), lung cancer (SMR = 66; 95% CI = 43-98), and gastrointestinal diseases (SMR = 53; 95% CI = 26-98).
  • Non-significant increases were observed for kidney cancer (SMR = 229; 95% CI = 92-472), and diseases of the nervous system (SMR = 155; 95% CI = 71-294).
  • Kidney cancer mortality for workers employed for > = 5 years was significantly higher (SMR = 508; 95% CI = 105-1485).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Mortality for asbestos-related diseases did not show any increase.
  • The higher kidney cancer mortality for workers employed for > = 5 years could be due to exposures to various carcinogens, that occurred not only in the sugar refinery plant, given that the workers were seasonal and did other jobs during the rest of the year.
  • Asbestos-related deaths could occur in the future among some workers who in 1987-88 were employed on the removal of asbestos-cement insulation from the plant.

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  • (PMID = 17679341.001).
  • [ISSN] 0025-7818
  • [Journal-full-title] La Medicina del lavoro
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Lav
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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73. Ali IU, Xiao Z, Malone W, Smith M, Conrads TP, Veenstra TD, Greenwald P, Luke BT, McLarty JW: Plasma proteomic profiling: search for lung cancer diagnostic and early detection markers. Oncol Rep; 2006 May;15(5):1367-72
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  • [Title] Plasma proteomic profiling: search for lung cancer diagnostic and early detection markers.
  • Environmental and occupational exposure to asbestos is among the established risk factors for lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States.
  • This link between exposure to asbestos and the excessive death rate from lung cancer was evident in a study of former workers of an asbestos pipe insulation manufacturing plant in Tyler, TX.
  • A distance-dependent K-nearest neighbor (KNN) classification algorithm identified spectral features of m/z values 7558.9 and 15103.0 that were able to distinguish lung cancer patients from disease-free individuals with high sensitivity and specificity.
  • Examination of these proteomic markers in the plasma samples of subjects from >5 years before death from lung cancer suggested that they are related to the early development of lung cancer.
  • Validation of these biomarkers would have significant implications for the early detection of lung cancer and better management of high-risk patients.

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  • (PMID = 16596212.001).
  • [ISSN] 1021-335X
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncol. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CO / N01-CO-12400
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Proteome
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74. Pan SY, Ugnat AM, Mao Y, Canadian Cancer Registries Epidemiology Research Group: Occupational risk factors for brain cancer in Canada. J Occup Environ Med; 2005 Jul;47(7):704-17
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  • [Title] Occupational risk factors for brain cancer in Canada.
  • OBJECTIVE: We sought to examine the impact of occupational exposure on brain cancer risk.
  • METHODS: Mailed questionnaires were used to collect information on lifetime employment history, occupational exposure to 18 chemicals, and other risk factors for 1009 incident cases of brain cancer and 5039 control subjects in Canada in 1994 to 1997.
  • An increased risk of brain cancer might be associated with exposure to asbestos, benzene, mineral or lubricating oil, isopropyl oil, and wood dust and with following occupations: teaching; protective service; metal processing and related jobs, and metal shaping and forming; knitting in textile processing; construction trades; and transport equipment operating.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests a possible role for occupational exposure in the etiology of brain cancer.


75. Pass HI, Lott D, Lonardo F, Harbut M, Liu Z, Tang N, Carbone M, Webb C, Wali A: Asbestos exposure, pleural mesothelioma, and serum osteopontin levels. N Engl J Med; 2005 Oct 13;353(15):1564-73
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  • [Title] Asbestos exposure, pleural mesothelioma, and serum osteopontin levels.
  • BACKGROUND: We investigated the presence of osteopontin in pleural mesothelioma and determined serum osteopontin levels in three populations: subjects without cancer who were exposed to asbestos, subjects without cancer who were not exposed to asbestos, and patients with pleural mesothelioma who were exposed to asbestos.
  • METHODS: A group of 69 subjects with asbestos-related nonmalignant pulmonary disease were compared with 45 subjects without exposure to asbestos and 76 patients with surgically staged pleural mesothelioma.
  • RESULTS: There were no significant differences in mean (+/-SE) serum osteopontin levels between age-matched subjects with exposure to asbestos and subjects without exposure to asbestos (30+/-3 ng per milliliter and 20+/-4 ng per milliliter, respectively; P=0.06).
  • In the group with exposure to asbestos, elevated serum osteopontin levels were associated with pulmonary plaques and fibrosis (56+/-13 ng per milliliter) but not with normal radiographic findings (21+/-5 ng per milliliter), plaques alone (23+/-3 ng per milliliter), or fibrosis alone (32+/-7 ng per milliliter) (P=0.004).
  • Serum osteopontin levels were significantly higher in the group with pleural mesothelioma than in the group with exposure to asbestos (133+/-10 ng per milliliter vs. 30+/-3 ng per milliliter, P<0.001).
  • An analysis of serum osteopontin levels comparing the receiver-operating-characteristic curve in the group exposed to asbestos with that of the group with mesothelioma had a sensitivity of 77.6 percent and a specificity of 85.5 percent at a cutoff value of 48.3 ng of osteopontin per milliliter.
  • Subgroup analysis comparing patients with stage I mesothelioma with subjects with exposure to asbestos revealed a sensitivity of 84.6 percent and a specificity of 88.4 percent at a cutoff value of 62.4 ng of osteopontin per milliliter.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Serum osteopontin levels can be used to distinguish persons with exposure to asbestos who do not have cancer from those with exposure to asbestos who have pleural mesothelioma.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / adverse effects. Asbestosis / blood. Mesothelioma / blood. Occupational Exposure. Pleural Neoplasms / blood. Sialoglycoproteins / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Biomarkers / blood. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Osteopontin. ROC Curve. Regression Analysis. Survival Analysis

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2005 Massachusetts Medical Society.
  • [CommentIn] N Engl J Med. 2005 Oct 13;353(15):1617-8 [16221786.001]
  • [CommentIn] N Engl J Med. 2006 Jan 19;354(3):304-5; author reply 304-5 [16422024.001]
  • [CommentIn] N Engl J Med. 2006 Jan 19;354(3):304-5; author reply 304-5 [16421377.001]
  • (PMID = 16221779.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-4406
  • [Journal-full-title] The New England journal of medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] N. Engl. J. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / SPP1 protein, human; 0 / Sialoglycoproteins; 106441-73-0 / Osteopontin; 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
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76. Hillegass JM, Shukla A, MacPherson MB, Lathrop SA, Alexeeva V, Perkins TN, van der Vliet A, Vacek PM, Gunter ME, Mossman BT: Mechanisms of oxidative stress and alterations in gene expression by Libby six-mix in human mesothelial cells. Part Fibre Toxicol; 2010 Sep 11;7:26
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  • BACKGROUND: Exposures to an amphibole fiber in Libby, Montana cause increases in malignant mesothelioma (MM), a tumor of the pleural and peritoneal cavities with a poor prognosis.
  • Affymetrix microarray/GeneSifter analysis was used to determine alterations in gene expression of a human mesothelial cell line (LP9/TERT-1) by a non-toxic concentration (15×10(6) μm2/cm2) of unprocessed Libby six-mix and negative (glass beads) and positive (crocidolite asbestos) controls.
  • A dose-related increase in SOD2 activity was observed, although total SOD activity remained unchanged.
  • Both Libby six-mix and crocidolite asbestos at 75×10(6) μm2/cm2 caused transient decreases (p < 0.05) in GSH for up to 24 h and increases in gene expression of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in LP9/TERT-1 and HKNM-2 cells.

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  • (PMID = 20831825.001).
  • [ISSN] 1743-8977
  • [Journal-full-title] Particle and fibre toxicology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Part Fibre Toxicol
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL085646; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / T32ES007122
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Asbestos, Amphibole; 0 / Reactive Oxygen Species; 12001-28-4 / Asbestos, Crocidolite; EC 1.14.99.3 / HMOX1 protein, human; EC 1.14.99.3 / Heme Oxygenase-1; EC 1.15.1.1 / Superoxide Dismutase; EC 1.15.1.1 / superoxide dismutase 2; GAN16C9B8O / Glutathione
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2945990
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77. Riva MA, Carnevale F, Sironi VA, De Vito G, Cesana G: Mesothelioma and asbestos, fifty years of evidence: Chris Wagner and the contribution of the Italian occupational medicine community. Med Lav; 2010 Nov-Dec;101(6):409-15
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  • [Title] Mesothelioma and asbestos, fifty years of evidence: Chris Wagner and the contribution of the Italian occupational medicine community.
  • BACKGROUND: One of the first studies that "convincingly" described the relationship between pleural mesothelioma and asbestos was made by Wagner, Sleggs and Marchard in 1960.
  • This article, published fifty years ago, contains much of what we still know to-day about malignant mesothelioma.
  • OBJECTIVES: The aims of this article were to analyze the historical and scientific developments that led to the publication of Wagner's paper, to critically examine its contents and to consider the contribution to the initernational debate on the carcinogenesis of asbestos fibres made by occupational medicine in Italy in that period.
  • METHODS: A thorough analysis ofscientific and historical literature on the relationship between asbestos exposure and tumours was conducted, with special regard to the articles by Italian authors in the 1960's.
  • RESULTS: The decisive role of Wagner's paper in understanding the aetiopathogenetic mechanisms of asbestos-related tumours is inconfutable.
  • In particular, his article clearly demonstrated the existence of a typical cancer of the mesothelium, expressing three fundamental principles of the epidemiology of occupational cancer: association with the carcinogen, latency and individual susceptibility.
  • Enrico Vigliani, then director of the "Clinica del Lavoro" in Milan, made important contributions to this debate, also through the collection of data regarding mortality among Italian asbestos workers.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / adverse effects. Mesothelioma / history. Occupational Diseases / history. Occupational Medicine. Pleural Neoplasms / history

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  • (PMID = 21141345.001).
  • [ISSN] 0025-7818
  • [Journal-full-title] La Medicina del lavoro
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Lav
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Biography; Historical Article; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Mineral Fibers; 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
  • [Personal-name-as-subject] Wagner JC
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78. Neumann V, Kraus T, Fischer M, Löseke S, Tannapfel A: [Relevance of pathological examinations and lung dust analyses in the context of asbestos-associated lung cancer-No. 4104 of the list of occupational diseases in Germany]. Pneumologie; 2009 Oct;63(10):588-93
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  • [Title] [Relevance of pathological examinations and lung dust analyses in the context of asbestos-associated lung cancer-No. 4104 of the list of occupational diseases in Germany].
  • This report discusses the relevance of pathological-anatomical examinations and lung dust analyses in the context of asbestos-related lung cancer on the basis of three case reports.
  • The cases one and two demonstrate a limited performance of conventional computed tomography scanning with a resolution of 3 mm for the detection of asbestos-related pleural diseases.
  • As shown here, pathological-anatomic examinations including lung dust analysis are highly valuable for the estimation of asbestos-related lung diseases.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / toxicity. Asbestosis / epidemiology. Lung Neoplasms / epidemiology. Occupational Diseases / epidemiology. Pleural Diseases / epidemiology


79. Hiraku Y, Kawanishi S, Ichinose T, Murata M: The role of iNOS-mediated DNA damage in infection- and asbestos-induced carcinogenesis. Ann N Y Acad Sci; 2010 Aug;1203:15-22
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  • [Title] The role of iNOS-mediated DNA damage in infection- and asbestos-induced carcinogenesis.
  • Various infectious diseases and physical, chemical, and immunological factors participate in inflammation-related carcinogenesis.
  • We performed immunohistochemical analysis, and demonstrated that 8-nitroguanine was formed at the sites of carcinogenesis in animal models and patients with various cancer-prone infectious and inflammatory diseases, caused by parasites, viruses, and asbestos exposure.
  • In asbestos-exposed mice, 8-nitroguanine was formed in bronchial epithelial cells, and it is noteworthy that crocidolite induced significantly more intense 8-nitroguanine formation than chrysotile, inconsistent with their carcinogenic potentials.
  • On the basis of these findings, we have proposed that 8-nitroguanine could be a potential biomarker to evaluate the risk of inflammation-related carcinogenesis.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / adverse effects. Bacterial Infections / enzymology. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / genetics. DNA Damage / physiology. Inflammation Mediators / physiology. Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II / physiology. Parasitic Diseases / enzymology. Virus Diseases / enzymology

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  • (PMID = 20716278.001).
  • [ISSN] 1749-6632
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 8-nitroguanine; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Inflammation Mediators; 1332-21-4 / Asbestos; 5Z93L87A1R / Guanine; EC 1.14.13.39 / NOS2 protein, human; EC 1.14.13.39 / Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II
  • [Number-of-references] 40
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80. Guseva Canu I, Cardis E, Metz-Flamant C, Caër-Lorho S, Auriol B, Wild P, Laurier D, Tirmarche M: French cohort of the uranium processing workers: mortality pattern after 30-year follow-up. Int Arch Occup Environ Health; 2010 Mar;83(3):301-8
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  • Among cancer sites a priori related to uranium exposure, only mortality for lymphatic cancer was increased among potentially exposed workers (SMR = 1.49 (95% CI: 0.68-2.82); n = 9).
  • An important increase in mortality from pleural cancer was observed (SMR = 2.85 (95% CI: 0.93-6.66), n = 5); none of the deceased workers were exposed to radiation whereas all handled asbestos.

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  • (PMID = 19701767.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-1246
  • [Journal-full-title] International archives of occupational and environmental health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int Arch Occup Environ Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 4OC371KSTK / Uranium
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81. Gun R, Pratt NL, Roder DM, Ryan P: Asbestos-related cancers in refinery workers in the Australian petroleum industry. Arch Environ Occup Health; 2006 Jan-Feb;61(1):11-6
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  • [Title] Asbestos-related cancers in refinery workers in the Australian petroleum industry.
  • In this study of the incidence of asbestos-related cancer in the Australian petroleum industry, the authors traced a cohort of 16,543 petroleum industry workers for a total of 226,989 person-years.
  • The incidence of lung cancer was significantly lower than that in the general male population.
  • Lung cancer incidence was higher in maintenance workers than in nonmaintenance workers, but the excess was not statistically significant, as it was based on small numbers with wide confidence intervals.
  • Lung cancer rates in refinery workers did not increase with duration of employment; however, they did tend to be higher in workers hired in earlier decades.
  • Excess mesothelioma incidence in refinery workers is confirmed, but it is likely that there are few if any asbestos-related lung cancers.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / adverse effects. Industry. Lung Neoplasms / epidemiology. Mesothelioma / epidemiology. Petroleum

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  • (PMID = 17503616.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-8244
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of environmental & occupational health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch Environ Occup Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Petroleum; 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
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82. Guled M, Lahti L, Lindholm PM, Salmenkivi K, Bagwan I, Nicholson AG, Knuutila S: CDKN2A, NF2, and JUN are dysregulated among other genes by miRNAs in malignant mesothelioma -A miRNA microarray analysis. Genes Chromosomes Cancer; 2009 Jul;48(7):615-23
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  • [Title] CDKN2A, NF2, and JUN are dysregulated among other genes by miRNAs in malignant mesothelioma -A miRNA microarray analysis.
  • Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive cancer arising from mesothelial cells, mainly due to former asbestos exposure.
  • Regarding risk factors such as smoking status and asbestos exposure, significantly differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in smokers versus nonsmokers (miR-379, miR-301a, miR-299-3p, miR-455-3p, and miR-127-3p), but not in asbestos-exposed patients versus nonexposed ones.
  • This could be related to the method of assessment of asbestos exposure as asbestos remains to be the main contributor to the development of MM.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Asbestos / poisoning. Chromosomes, Human. Cluster Analysis. Female. Gene Expression Profiling / methods. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis / methods. Risk Factors. Smoking / genetics. Smoking / metabolism. Survival Analysis


83. Alfonso HS, Fritschi L, de Klerk NH, Ambrosini GL, Beilby J, Olsen N, Musk AW: Plasma vitamin concentrations and incidence of mesothelioma and lung cancer in individuals exposed to crocidolite at Wittenoom, Western Australia. Eur J Cancer Prev; 2006 Aug;15(4):290-4
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  • [Title] Plasma vitamin concentrations and incidence of mesothelioma and lung cancer in individuals exposed to crocidolite at Wittenoom, Western Australia.
  • Increased rates of death from asbestos-related diseases have been reported in former workers and residents exposed to crocidolite (blue asbestos) at Wittenoom (Western Australia).
  • The relationships between plasma concentrations of retinol, carotene and vitamin E and incidence of mesothelioma and lung cancer in a cohort of people from this town were examined.
  • Of 1953 study participants, 65 developed mesothelioma during the follow-up, and 47 developed lung cancer.
  • A lower incidence of mesothelioma was related to plasma concentrations of retinol at the first visit [hazard ratio (HR)=0.63, 95% confidence interval=0.41-0.99], and to measurements at each visit (HR=0.71, 95% confidence interval=0.50-1.00).
  • Plasma carotene concentrations at the first measurement, but not during the follow-up period, were associated with lower incidence of lung cancer in men and in workers.
  • Vitamin E concentrations were not significantly associated with mesothelioma or lung cancer incidence.
  • These findings suggest that people with chronically low plasma levels of retinol have increased risk of developing mesothelioma and lung cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos, Crocidolite / toxicity. Lung Neoplasms / chemically induced. Lung Neoplasms / epidemiology. Mesothelioma / chemically induced. Mesothelioma / epidemiology. Occupational Exposure. Vitamins / blood

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  • (PMID = 16835500.001).
  • [ISSN] 0959-8278
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer prevention : the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Cancer Prev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carcinogens, Environmental; 0 / Vitamins; 11103-57-4 / Vitamin A; 12001-28-4 / Asbestos, Crocidolite; 1406-18-4 / Vitamin E; 36-88-4 / Carotenoids
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84. Berman DW, Crump KS: Update of potency factors for asbestos-related lung cancer and mesothelioma. Crit Rev Toxicol; 2008;38 Suppl 1:1-47
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  • [Title] Update of potency factors for asbestos-related lung cancer and mesothelioma.
  • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) health assessment document for asbestos (Nicholson, 1986, referred to as "the EPA 1986 update") is now 20 years old.
  • That document contains estimates of "potency factors" for asbestos in causing lung cancer (K(L)'s) and mesothelioma (K(M)'s) derived by fitting mathematical models to data from studies of occupational cohorts.
  • The EPA lung cancer model assumes that the relative risk varies linearly with cumulative exposure lagged 10 years.
  • Although the linear EPA model generally provided a good description of exposure response for lung cancer, in some cases it did so only by estimating a large background risk relative to the comparison population.
  • Lung cancer potency factors (K(L)'s) were developed from 20 studies from 18 locations, compared to 13 locations covered in the EPA 1986 update.
  • The K(M)'s showed evidence of a trend, with lowest K(M)'s obtained from cohorts exposed predominantly to chrysotile and highest K(M)'s from cohorts exposed only to amphibole asbestos, with K(M)'s from cohorts exposed to mixed fiber types being intermediate between the K(M)'s obtained from chrysotile and amphibole environments.
  • Despite the considerable uncertainty in the K(M) estimates, the K(M) from the Quebec mines and mills was clearly smaller than those from several cohorts exposed to amphibole asbestos or a mixture of amphibole asbestos and chrysotile.
  • For lung cancer, although there is some evidence of larger K(L)'s from amphibole asbestos exposure, there is a good deal of dispersion in the data, and one of the largest K(L)'s is from the South Carolina textile mill where exposures were almost exclusively to chrysotile.
  • Moreover, PCM does not distinguish between asbestos and nonasbestos particles.
  • In the accompanying article (Berman and Crump, 2008) the K(L)'s and K(M)'s and related uncertainty bounds obtained in this article are paired with fiber size distributions from the literature obtained using transmission electron microscopy (TEM).
  • The resulting database is used to define K(L)'s and K(M)'s that depend on both the size (e.g., length and width) and mineralogical type (e.g., chrysotile or crocidolite) of an asbestos structure.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / toxicity. Carcinogens, Environmental / toxicity. Lung Neoplasms / chemically induced. Mesothelioma / chemically induced. Models, Biological. Occupational Diseases / chemically induced


85. Paris C, Martin A, Letourneux M, Wild P: Modelling prevalence and incidence of fibrosis and pleural plaques in asbestos-exposed populations for screening and follow-up: a cross-sectional study. Environ Health; 2008;7:30
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  • [Title] Modelling prevalence and incidence of fibrosis and pleural plaques in asbestos-exposed populations for screening and follow-up: a cross-sectional study.
  • BACKGROUND: CT-Scan is currently under assessment for the screening of asbestos-related diseases.
  • However, to date no consensus exists as to how to select high-risk asbestos-exposed populations suitable for such screening programs.
  • METHODS: A screening program of non malignant asbestos-related diseases by CT-scan was conducted among asbestos-exposed volunteers in France.
  • Precise assessments of asbestos exposure were obtained by occupational hygiene measurements and a job-exposure matrix.
  • Several parameters were calculated (time since first exposure, duration, intensity and cumulative exposure to asbestos).
  • CONCLUSION: Our findings confirmed the role played by time since first exposure and dose but not duration in asbestos-related diseases.
  • [MeSH-major] Air Pollutants, Occupational / toxicity. Asbestos / toxicity. Asbestosis / epidemiology. Fibrosis / chemically induced. Occupational Exposure / adverse effects. Pleural Diseases / chemically induced

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  • (PMID = 18570653.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-069X
  • [Journal-full-title] Environmental health : a global access science source
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Environ Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Air Pollutants, Occupational; 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2441611
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86. Pira E, Pelucchi C, Piolatto PG, Negri E, Bilei T, La Vecchia C: Mortality from cancer and other causes in the Balangero cohort of chrysotile asbestos miners. Occup Environ Med; 2009 Dec;66(12):805-9
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  • [Title] Mortality from cancer and other causes in the Balangero cohort of chrysotile asbestos miners.
  • OBJECTIVES: To provide further information on mortality from cancer and other causes among chrysotile asbestos miners several years after exposure ceased, we updated the analyses from the Balangero mine worker cohort with follow-up to the end of 2003.
  • RESULTS: We found a significant excess mortality from pleural cancer only (4 deaths, SMR 4.67) and pleural and peritoneal cancers combined (5 deaths, SMR 3.16).
  • All pleural and peritoneal cancer deaths occurred 30 or more years after first exposure.
  • The SMRs were 1.27 for lung cancer (45 deaths), 1.82 for laryngeal cancer (8 deaths) and 1.12 for all cancers (142 deaths).
  • Cumulative dust exposure and the various time factors considered did not show a clear pattern of risk associated with mortality from lung cancer.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This updated analysis, with almost 60% of the cohort having died, confirmed the excess mortality from pleural and peritoneal cancers and from several alcohol-related causes.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos, Serpentine / toxicity. Mining / statistics & numerical data. Neoplasms / etiology. Occupational Diseases / etiology

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  • (PMID = 19643771.001).
  • [ISSN] 1470-7926
  • [Journal-full-title] Occupational and environmental medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Occup Environ Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Asbestos, Serpentine
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87. Park EK, Sandrini A, Yates DH, Creaney J, Robinson BW, Thomas PS, Johnson AR: Soluble mesothelin-related protein in an asbestos-exposed population: the dust diseases board cohort study. Am J Respir Crit Care Med; 2008 Oct 15;178(8):832-7
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  • [Title] Soluble mesothelin-related protein in an asbestos-exposed population: the dust diseases board cohort study.
  • RATIONALE: Soluble mesothelin-related protein (SMRP) is raised in epithelial-type malignant mesothelioma (MM), but the utility of SMRP in screening for MM is unknown.
  • OBJECTIVES: We aimed to evaluate SMRP in an asbestos-exposed cohort.
  • MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Mean (+/-SD) SMRP in healthy subjects exposed to asbestos (n = 223) was 0.79 (+/-0.45) nM.
  • Fifteen subjects had elevated SMRP, of whom one had lung cancer, which was successfully resected.
  • Another with lung cancer was undetected by SMRP.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This is the first large-scale prospective study of SMRP for screening for malignancy in asbestos-exposed individuals.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / adverse effects. Membrane Glycoproteins / biosynthesis. Mesothelioma / diagnosis. Occupational Diseases / diagnosis. Occupational Exposure / adverse effects. Pleural Neoplasms / diagnosis

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  • [CommentIn] Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2008 Oct 15;178(8):781-2 [18832552.001]
  • [CommentIn] Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2009 May 1;179(9):851; author reply 851-852 [19383930.001]
  • (PMID = 18583574.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-4970
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Blood Proteins; 0 / GPI-Linked Proteins; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / mesothelin; 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
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88. Yasuda M, Hanagiri T, Shigematsu Y, Onitsuka T, Kuroda K, Baba T, Mizukami M, Ichiki Y, Uramoto H, Takenoyama M, Yasumoto K: Identification of a tumour associated antigen in lung cancer patients with asbestos exposure. Anticancer Res; 2010 Jul;30(7):2631-9
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  • [Title] Identification of a tumour associated antigen in lung cancer patients with asbestos exposure.
  • BACKGROUND: This study analysed the humoral immune response in asbestos exposed lung cancer patients to identify new surrogate markers of the carcinogenic risk in populations exposed to asbestos.
  • METHODS AND RESULTS: A serological analysis identified five distinct antigens reactive with IgG derived from a lung cancer patient with high asbestos exposure.
  • In one of the isolated antigens, quantitative RT-PCR indicated that annexin A2 (AnxA2) was overexpressed in lung cancer tissues and normal lung from patients with high asbestos exposure.
  • Antibody against AnxA2 was detected in 9/15 (60%) of lung cancer patients with high asbestos exposure; however, in only 1/12 (8%) of lung cancer patients with low asbestos exposure.
  • AnxA2 was also overexpressed in malignant mesothelioma cells, and the antibody was also positive in 8/15 (53%) of patients with malignant mesothelioma.
  • CONCLUSION: The antibody titer against AnxA2 may be a potentially useful new diagnostic surrogate marker for asbestos-related lung cancer and malignant mesothelioma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, Neoplasm / immunology. Asbestos / poisoning. Lung Neoplasms / etiology. Lung Neoplasms / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Annexin A2 / biosynthesis. Annexin A2 / immunology. Antibodies, Neoplasm / immunology. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Humans. Immunity, Humoral / immunology. Immunoglobulin G / immunology. Interleukin-6 / blood. Interleukin-6 / immunology. Male. Mesothelioma / etiology. Mesothelioma / immunology. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 20682992.001).
  • [ISSN] 1791-7530
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / ANXA2 protein, human; 0 / Annexin A2; 0 / Antibodies, Neoplasm; 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm; 0 / Immunoglobulin G; 0 / Interleukin-6; 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
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89. Scattone A, Pennella A, Gentile M, Musti M, Nazzaro P, Buonadonna AL, Marzullo A, Cavone D, Pollice L, Serio G: Comparative genomic hybridisation in malignant deciduoid mesothelioma. J Clin Pathol; 2006 Jul;59(7):764-9
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  • [Title] Comparative genomic hybridisation in malignant deciduoid mesothelioma.
  • BACKGROUND: Malignant deciduoid mesothelioma is a rare variant of epithelioid mesothelioma.
  • This tumour generally has poor prognosis, and can be asbestos related.
  • AIM: To identify peculiar genetic changes responsible for critical phases in pathogenesis of malignant deciduoid mesothelioma and their prognostic relevance.
  • METHODS: Comparative genomic hybridisation was carried out in six cases of malignant pleural deciduoid mesothelioma, four sporadic and two familial.
  • All cases were found to be asbestos related.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Asbestos / adverse effects. Female. Humans. Image Processing, Computer-Assisted. Immunoenzyme Techniques. Male. Middle Aged. Nucleic Acid Hybridization / methods. Occupational Diseases / etiology. Occupational Diseases / genetics. Occupational Diseases / pathology. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 16569690.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-9746
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1860431
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90. Leem JH, Kim HC, Ryu JS, Won JU, Moon JD, Kim YC, Koh SB, Yong SJ, Kim SG, Park JY, Kim I, Kim JI, Kim JW, Lee EC, Kim HR, Kim DH, Kang DM, Hong YC: Occupational lung cancer surveillance in South Korea, 2006-2009. Saf Health Work; 2010 Dec;1(2):134-9
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  • [Title] Occupational lung cancer surveillance in South Korea, 2006-2009.
  • OBJECTIVES: The lung cancer mortality in Korea has increased remarkably during the last 20 years, and has been the first leading cause of cancer-related deaths since 2000.
  • The aim of the current study was to examine the time trends of occupational lung cancer and carcinogens exposure during the period 2006-2009 in South Korea, by assessing the proportion of occupational burden.
  • METHODS: We defined occupational lung cancer for surveillance, and developed a reporting protocol and reporting website for the surveillance of occupational lung cancer.
  • RESULTS: The combined proportion of definite and probable occupational lung cancer among all lung cancers investigated in this study was 10.0%, 8.6%, 10.7%, and 15.8% in the years 2006 to 2009, respectively, with an average of 11.7% over the four-year study period.
  • The main carcinogens were asbestos, crystalline silica, radon, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), diesel exhaust particles, chromium, and nickel.
  • CONCLUSION: We estimated that about 11.7% of the incident lung cancer was preventable.
  • This reveals the potential to considerably reduce lung cancer by intervention in occupational fields.

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  • (PMID = 22953173.001).
  • [ISSN] 2093-7997
  • [Journal-full-title] Safety and health at work
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Saf Health Work
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3430893
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Asbestos / Lung cancer / Occupational cancer / Occupational disease burden / Surveillance
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91. Yee H, Yie TA, Goldberg J, Wong KM, Rom WN: Immunohistochemical study of fibrosis and adenocarcinoma in dominant-negative p53 transgenic mice exposed to chrysotile asbestos and benzo(a)pyrene. J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol; 2008;27(4):267-76
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  • [Title] Immunohistochemical study of fibrosis and adenocarcinoma in dominant-negative p53 transgenic mice exposed to chrysotile asbestos and benzo(a)pyrene.
  • We evaluated the mechanisms using immunohistochemistry whereby chrysotile asbestos and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) instilled intratracheally into lung-specific dominant-negative p53 (dnp53) mice might interact in causing lung carcinomas and fibrosis.
  • Chrysotile asbestos and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) were instilled intratracheally into lung-specific dominant-negative p53 (dnp53) and control mice.
  • Immunostains for proteins related to apoptosis, fibrogenesis, matrix remodeling and inflammation were performed.
  • Several atypical adenomatous hyperplasia lesions were found in the combined treatment group. dnp53 and FVBN control mice developed nodular buds of fibrotic lung tissue after chrysotile asbestos exposure that were localized in respiratory bronchioles; these lesions had significant increases in immunohistochemical staining for TGF-beta, MMP-7 and -9, MIG-1, and SDF-1.
  • We conclude that BaP and the combination of BaP plus chrysotile asbestos are potent inducers of adenocarcinoma in dnp53 mice and that the inflammatory cytokines and proteases MMP-7 and -9, MIG-1, and SDF-1, and growth factors Cyclin D and TGF-beta are increased in the specific lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma. Asbestos, Serpentine / toxicity. Benzo(a)pyrene / toxicity. Lung Neoplasms. Pulmonary Fibrosis. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / biosynthesis

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  • (PMID = 19105532.001).
  • [ISSN] 0731-8898
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of environmental pathology, toxicology and oncology : official organ of the International Society for Environmental Toxicology and Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Environ. Pathol. Toxicol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Asbestos, Serpentine; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; 3417WMA06D / Benzo(a)pyrene; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspase 3; EC 3.4.24.- / Matrix Metalloproteinases
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92. Gasparrini A, Pizzo AM, Gorini G, Seniori Costantini A, Silvestri S, Ciapini C, Innocenti A, Berry G: Prediction of mesothelioma and lung cancer in a cohort of asbestos exposed workers. Eur J Epidemiol; 2008;23(8):541-6
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  • [Title] Prediction of mesothelioma and lung cancer in a cohort of asbestos exposed workers.
  • OBJECTIVE: To predict the future deaths attributable to asbestos in a cohort of railway rolling stock workers.
  • METHODS: The future mortality of the 1,146 living workers has been computed in term of individual probability of dying for three different risks: baseline mortality, lung cancer excess, mesothelioma mortality.
  • Lung cancer mortality attributable to asbestos was calculated assuming the excess risk as stable or with a decrease after a period of time since first exposure.
  • Mesothelioma mortality was based on cumulative exposure and time since first exposure, with the inclusion of a term for clearance of asbestos fibres from the lung.
  • RESULTS: The most likely range of the number of deaths attributable to asbestos in the period 2005-2050 was 15-30 for excess of lung cancer, and 23-35 for mesothelioma.
  • CONCLUSION: This study provides predictions of asbestos-related mortality even in a selected cohort of exposed subjects, using previous knowledge about exposure-response relationship.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / adverse effects. Cause of Death / trends. Lung Neoplasms / mortality. Mesothelioma / mortality. Occupational Exposure / adverse effects. Pleural Neoplasms / mortality


93. Comar M, Rizzardi C, de Zotti R, Melato M, Bovenzi M, Butel JS, Campello C: SV40 multiple tissue infection and asbestos exposure in a hyperendemic area for malignant mesothelioma. Cancer Res; 2007 Sep 15;67(18):8456-9
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  • [Title] SV40 multiple tissue infection and asbestos exposure in a hyperendemic area for malignant mesothelioma.
  • To assess the presence of SV40 in malignant mesothelioma tissue, 19 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded pleural cancer samples of patients from a hyperendemic area of northeastern Italy were analyzed retrospectively.
  • A total of 48 other tissues from the malignant mesothelioma subjects were investigated.
  • Exposure to asbestos was evaluated through a careful review of the occupational history of patients, supplemented by histology and isolation of asbestos bodies.
  • Three of 19 (15.8%) malignant mesothelioma tissues harbored SV40 genomic signals.
  • Two patients with SV40-positive malignant mesothelioma had viral sequences in another tissue.
  • SV40 viral loads were higher in malignant mesothelioma than in normal cells (P = 0.045).
  • This survey shows that SV40 sustains infections in multiple tissues in malignant mesothelioma patients from a geographic area affected with asbestos-related mesothelioma.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / adverse effects. Cocarcinogenesis. Mesothelioma / etiology. Pleural Neoplasms / etiology. Polyomavirus Infections / complications. Simian virus 40 / genetics. Tumor Virus Infections / complications

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  • (PMID = 17875683.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA104818
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Viral; 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
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94. Brunner WM, Williams AN, Bender AP: Investigation of exposures to commercial asbestos in northeastern Minnesota iron miners who developed mesothelioma. Regul Toxicol Pharmacol; 2008 Oct;52(1 Suppl):S116-20
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  • [Title] Investigation of exposures to commercial asbestos in northeastern Minnesota iron miners who developed mesothelioma.
  • A 70% excess of mesothelioma, an asbestos-related cancer, has been reported among men in northeastern Minnesota, where iron mining has been the major industry.
  • The Minnesota Department of Health has studied iron miners who developed mesothelioma to identify possible sources of asbestos exposure.
  • The job histories of the cases were examined to determine if any of their jobs could have involved exposure to commercial asbestos.
  • Of the 15 for whom adequate work histories were available, 14 had identifiable sources of exposure to commercial asbestos in jobs held both inside and outside of the mining industry.
  • The time between employment in these asbestos-exposed occupations and the diagnosis of mesothelioma is consistent with the 20 or more year latency period that has been observed in other studies of this cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Air Pollutants, Occupational / adverse effects. Asbestos / adverse effects. Asbestosis / etiology. Mesothelioma / etiology. Mining. Peritoneal Neoplasms / etiology. Pleural Neoplasms / etiology

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  • (PMID = 17988773.001).
  • [ISSN] 1096-0295
  • [Journal-full-title] Regulatory toxicology and pharmacology : RTP
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Regul. Toxicol. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Air Pollutants, Occupational; 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
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95. Rosell-Murphy M, Abós-Herràndiz R, Tarrés J, Martínez-Artés X, García-Allas I, Krier I, Cantarell G, Gallego M, Orriols R, Albertí C: Prospective study of asbestos-related diseases incidence cases in primary health care in an area of Barcelona province. BMC Public Health; 2010;10:203
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  • [Title] Prospective study of asbestos-related diseases incidence cases in primary health care in an area of Barcelona province.
  • BACKGROUND: Asbestos related diseases include a number of conditions due to inhalation of asbestos fibres at work, at home or in the environment, such as pleural mesothelioma, asbestosis and calcified pleural plaques.
  • Few epidemiological studies have established the incidence of asbestos related diseases in our area.
  • The present proposal is based on a retrospective study externally funded in 2005 that is currently taking place in the same area and largely carried out by the same research team.The aim of the study is to achieve a comprehensive and coordinated detection of all new cases of Asbestos Related Diseases presenting to primary care practitioners.
  • METHODS/DESIGN: This is a multicentre, multidisciplinary and pluri-institutional prospective study.Setting12 municipalities in the Barcelona province within the catchment area of the health facilities that participate in the study.SampleThis is a population based study, of all patients presenting with diseases caused by asbestos in the study area.MeasurementsA clinical and epidemiological questionnaire will be filled in by the trained researchers after interviewing the patients and examining their clinical reports.
  • DISCUSSION: Data on the incidence of the different Asbestos Related Diseases in this area will be obtained and the most plausible exposure source and space-time-patient profile will be described.
  • The study will also improve the standardization of patient management, the coordination between health care institutions and the development of preventive activities related with asbestos exposure and disease.

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  • (PMID = 20412567.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2458
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC public health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Public Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2874532
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96. Yano E, Wang X, Wang M, Qiu H, Wang Z: Lung cancer mortality from exposure to chrysotile asbestos and smoking: a case-control study within a cohort in China. Occup Environ Med; 2010 Dec;67(12):867-71
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  • [Title] Lung cancer mortality from exposure to chrysotile asbestos and smoking: a case-control study within a cohort in China.
  • OBJECTIVE: To confirm the association between exposure to chrysotile asbestos and lung cancer risk and to demonstrate the combined effect of smoking and asbestos exposure.
  • METHODS: A case-control study of 1139 asbestos workers identified 41 male lung cancer cases in 2001; each case was matched by age (±5 years) with five controls.
  • Workers in seven workshops were categorised into high-, medium- and low-exposure subgroups, and conditional logistic regression was applied to estimate the odds ratios for lung cancer risk associated with the different exposure levels.
  • A joint effect of asbestos exposure and smoking on lung cancer risk was analysed using a conditional logistical model.
  • The adjusted OR for lung cancer was 3.66 (95% CI 1.61 to 8.29) for high exposure and was elevated slightly for medium exposure (1.25; 95% CI 0.47 to 3.31).
  • Smoking was related to lung cancer risk (OR 3.33; 95% CI 1.10 to 10.08).
  • CONCLUSIONS: These results confirm the strong association between exposure to chrysotile asbestos and lung cancer risk, and support an interactive effect of asbestos exposure and smoking which is more than additive.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos, Serpentine / toxicity. Lung Neoplasms / etiology. Smoking / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 20833758.001).
  • [ISSN] 1470-7926
  • [Journal-full-title] Occupational and environmental medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Occup Environ Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Asbestos, Serpentine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2991074
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97. Bertolotti M, Ferrante D, Mirabelli D, Botta M, Nonnato M, Todesco A, Terracini B, Magnani C: [Mortality in the cohort of the asbestos cement workers in the Eternit plant in Casale Monferrato (Italy)]. Epidemiol Prev; 2008 Jul-Oct;32(4-5):218-28
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  • [Title] [Mortality in the cohort of the asbestos cement workers in the Eternit plant in Casale Monferrato (Italy)].
  • OBJECTIVE: The present report updates the mortality cohort study of "Eternit" workers in Casale Monferrato, one of the major plant for the production of corrugated and plain sheets, tubes and high-pressure pipes in asbestos-cement in Italy active between 1907-1986.
  • The SMRs for lung, pleural and peritoneal cancer and for asbestosis increased according to duration of exposure and latency.
  • For pleural cancer, increasing risks at shorter latencies were observed as exposure length increased.
  • In men, the increase in the SMRs for lung and pleural cancer was reduced in the category of longest latency; still increased but declining SMRs were also observed at longer time since first exposure.
  • Mortality from peritoneal cancer and asbestosis on the contrary increased with latency and with time since last exposure.
  • Among women, a significant increase of mortality for uterine cancer (SMR 2569; 15 obs vs 5.8 exp; p < 0.01), ovarian cancer (SMR 227.3; 9 obs vs 4.0 exp; p < 0.05) and rectum cancer (SMR 318.6; 9 obs vs 2.8 exp; p < 0.01) was observed.
  • CONCLUSION: a significant increase in mortality from the main asbestos-related diseases was confirmed by duration of exposure.
  • In relation to latency The SMRs for lung and pleural cancer present a curvilinear trend with a decrease for longest latency periods (after 30 years from the cessation of exposure).
  • The SMRs for peritoneal cancer and asbestosis showed a monotonic increase.
  • [MeSH-major] Asbestos / adverse effects. Construction Materials / adverse effects. Occupational Diseases / etiology. Occupational Diseases / mortality

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  • (PMID = 19186504.001).
  • [ISSN] 1120-9763
  • [Journal-full-title] Epidemiologia e prevenzione
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Epidemiol Prev
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1332-21-4 / Asbestos
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98. Edakuni N, Ikuta K, Yano S, Nakataki E, Muguruma H, Uehara H, Tani M, Yokota J, Aizawa H, Sone S: Restored expression of the MYO18B gene suppresses orthotopic growth and the production of bloody pleural effusion by human malignant pleural mesothelioma cells in SCID mice. Oncol Res; 2006;16(5):235-43
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  • [Title] Restored expression of the MYO18B gene suppresses orthotopic growth and the production of bloody pleural effusion by human malignant pleural mesothelioma cells in SCID mice.
  • Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is closely related to exposure to asbestos, and a rapid increase in the number of MPM patients is therefore estimated to occur from 2010 to 2040 in Japan.
  • MYO18B, a novel member of the myosin family, is a tumor suppressor gene isolated from a homozygously deleted region at 22q12.1 in a lung cancer cell line.
  • The inactivation of the MYO18B gene plays an important role in several malignant diseases.

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  • (PMID = 17294804.001).
  • [ISSN] 0965-0407
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncol. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / MYO18B protein, human; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins; EC 3.6.4.1 / Myosins
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99. Yang H, Rivera Z, Jube S, Nasu M, Bertino P, Goparaju C, Franzoso G, Lotze MT, Krausz T, Pass HI, Bianchi ME, Carbone M: Programmed necrosis induced by asbestos in human mesothelial cells causes high-mobility group box 1 protein release and resultant inflammation. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A; 2010 Jul 13;107(28):12611-6
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  • [Title] Programmed necrosis induced by asbestos in human mesothelial cells causes high-mobility group box 1 protein release and resultant inflammation.
  • Asbestos carcinogenesis has been linked to the release of cytokines and mutagenic reactive oxygen species (ROS) from inflammatory cells.
  • Asbestos is cytotoxic to human mesothelial cells (HM), which appears counterintuitive for a carcinogen.
  • We show that asbestos-induced HM cell death is a regulated form of necrosis that links to carcinogenesis.
  • Asbestos-exposed HM activate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, secrete H(2)O(2), deplete ATP, and translocate high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, and into the extracellular space.
  • The release of HMGB1 induces macrophages to secrete TNF-alpha, which protects HM from asbestos-induced cell death and triggers a chronic inflammatory response; both favor HM transformation.
  • In both mice and hamsters injected with asbestos, HMGB1 was specifically detected in the nuclei, cytoplasm, and extracellular space of mesothelial and inflammatory cells around asbestos deposits.
  • HMGB1 levels in asbestos-exposed individuals were significantly higher than in nonexposed controls (P < 0.0001).
  • Our findings identify the release of HMGB1 as a critical initial step in the pathogenesis of asbestos-related disease, and provide mechanistic links between asbestos-induced cell death, chronic inflammation, and carcinogenesis.
  • Chemopreventive approaches aimed at inhibiting the chronic inflammatory response, and especially blocking HMGB1, may decrease the risk of malignant mesothelioma among asbestos-exposed cohorts.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenosine Diphosphate Ribose / metabolism. Adenosine Diphosphate Ribose / pharmacology. Animals. Asbestos / metabolism. Asbestos / pharmacology. Carcinogens / metabolism. Carcinogens / pharmacology. Cell Death. Cell Nucleus / metabolism. Cells / metabolism. Cricetinae. Cytokines / metabolism. Cytokines / pharmacology. Epithelial Cells / metabolism. Epithelium / drug effects. Epithelium / metabolism. Female. HMGB Proteins / metabolism. HMGB Proteins / pharmacology. Humans. Hydrogen Peroxide / metabolism. Hydrogen Peroxide / pharmacology. Macrophages / metabolism. Mesocricetus. Mesothelioma / metabolism. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Necrosis / metabolism. Pleural Neoplasms / metabolism. Poly Adenosine Diphosphate Ribose / pharmacology. Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases / metabolism. Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases / pharmacology. Reactive Oxygen Species / metabolism. Reactive Oxygen Species / pharmacology. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / metabolism. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 20616036.001).
  • [ISSN] 1091-6490
  • [Journal-full-title] Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carcinogens; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / HMGB Proteins; 0 / HMGB1 Protein; 0 / Reactive Oxygen Species; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; 1332-21-4 / Asbestos; 20762-30-5 / Adenosine Diphosphate Ribose; 26656-46-2 / Poly Adenosine Diphosphate Ribose; BBX060AN9V / Hydrogen Peroxide; EC 2.4.2.30 / Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2906549
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100. Neuberger JS, Mahnken JD, Mayo MS, Field RW: Risk factors for lung cancer in Iowa women: implications for prevention. Cancer Detect Prev; 2006;30(2):158-67
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  • [Title] Risk factors for lung cancer in Iowa women: implications for prevention.
  • BACKGROUND: Multiple risk factors possibly associated with lung cancer were examined as part of a large-scale residential radon case-control study conducted in Iowa between 1994 and 1997.
  • METHODS: Four hundred thirteen female lung cancer cases and 614 controls aged 40-84, who were residents of their current home for at least 20 years, were included.
  • Risk factors examined included cigarette smoking, passive smoking, occupation, chemical exposure, previous lung disease, family history of cancer, and urban residence.
  • RESULTS: As expected, active cigarette smoking was the major risk factor for lung cancer.
  • While cessation of smoking was significantly associated with a reduced risk for lung cancer, the risk remained significantly elevated for 25 years.
  • Among all cases, asbestos exposure was a significant risk.
  • Among never smokers, a family history of kidney or bladder cancer were significant risk factors (OR=7.34, 95% CI=1.91-28.18; and OR=5.02, 95% CI=1.64-15.39, respectively), as was a history of previous lung disease (OR=2.28, 95% CI=1.24-4.18) and asbestos exposure.
  • No statistically significant increase in lung cancer risk was found for occupation or urban residence.
  • Relatives of individuals with smoking-related cancers are potentially at increased risk.

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  • (PMID = 16581199.001).
  • [ISSN] 0361-090X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer detection and prevention
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Detect. Prev.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R24 CA095835; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / R01 ES005653-05; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / R01 ES05653; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / P30 ES005605; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 5R24 CA095835; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / P30 ES05605; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / ES005653-05
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carcinogens, Environmental; Q74S4N8N1G / Radon
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS17367; NLM/ PMC1876736
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