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68. Antonescu CR, Dal Cin P, Nafa K, Teot LA, Surti U, Fletcher CD, Ladanyi M: EWSR1-CREB1 is the predominant gene fusion in angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma. Genes Chromosomes Cancer; 2007 Dec;46(12):1051-60
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  • [Title] EWSR1-CREB1 is the predominant gene fusion in angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma.
  • The molecular hallmark of angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma (AFH) is not well defined, with only six cases with specific gene fusions reported to date, consisting of either FUS-ATF1 or EWSR1-ATF1.
  • EWSR1-ATF1, identified in some AFH cases, is the most common genetic abnormality in soft tissue clear cell sarcoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Calmodulin-Binding Proteins / genetics. Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein / genetics. Gene Fusion. Histiocytoma, Malignant Fibrous / genetics. RNA-Binding Proteins / genetics

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 17724745.001).
  • [ISSN] 1045-2257
  • [Journal-full-title] Genes, chromosomes & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Genes Chromosomes Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CREB1 protein, human; 0 / Calmodulin-Binding Proteins; 0 / Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein; 0 / EWSR1 protein, human; 0 / RNA-Binding Proteins
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69. Tanas MR, Rubin BP, Montgomery EA, Turner SL, Cook JR, Tubbs RR, Billings SD, Goldblum JR: Utility of FISH in the diagnosis of angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma: a series of 18 cases. Mod Pathol; 2010 Jan;23(1):93-7
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  • [Title] Utility of FISH in the diagnosis of angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma: a series of 18 cases.
  • Angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma is a mesenchymal neoplasm of intermediate malignancy and uncertain histogenesis/line of differentiation, which occurs most commonly in the extremities of children to young adults.
  • It has a characteristic appearance characterized by a proliferation of histiocytoid cells with a lymphoid cuff and fibrous pseudocapsule, simulating the appearance of a neoplasm occurring within a lymph node.
  • Angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma has been found to harbor three related translocations, a t(12;16)(q13;p11) resulting in a FUS/ATF1 fusion gene, t(12;22)(q13;q12) resulting in a EWSR1/ATF1 fusion, and t(2;22)(q33;q12) resulting in a EWSR1/CREB1 fusion.
  • We evaluated 18 cases of angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma for rearrangements of EWSR1 and FUS by FISH, the largest series to date.
  • We found that 13 of 17 (76%) cases of angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma harbored rearrangements of EWSR1; rearrangements of FUS were not detected in any of the cases.
  • This study affirms that the rearrangement of EWSR1 is a common genetic event in angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma, and is thus useful diagnostically.
  • This study supports the fact that the rearrangement of FUS is present in only a small minority of angiomatoid fibrous histiocytomas.
  • Although it is possible that these cases contained cryptic rearrangements of EWSR1 or FUS that were not detectable by our FISH probes, it also raises the possibility that another translocation/gene fusion may be present in angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / genetics. Calmodulin-Binding Proteins / genetics. Histiocytoma, Malignant Fibrous / genetics. In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence. RNA-Binding Protein FUS / genetics. RNA-Binding Proteins / genetics


70. Lau EY, Sampson WJ, Townsend GC, Hughes T: An evaluation of maxillary and mandibular rotational responses with the Clark twin block appliance. Aust Orthod J; 2009 May;25(1):48-58
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  • [Title] An evaluation of maxillary and mandibular rotational responses with the Clark twin block appliance.
  • AIMS: To evaluate the dentofacial changes and growth rotational responses of Angle Class II division 1 patients treated with the Clark twin block functional appliance.
  • METHOD: This retrospective study comprised 13 boys (8.77 +/- 0.86 years) and 13 girls (8.75 +/- 0.70 years) treated by one orthodontist with the Clark twin block appliance.
  • Selection was not biased by outcome and sample size power estimates exceeded 90 per cent.
  • Tracings made on the pretreatment (T1), post-treatment (T2) and observation (T3) radiographs were superimposed on anatomically stable landmarks and the dentofacial changes and growth rotational responses compared.
  • The data were tested for normal distribution and sexual dimorphism.
  • Pearson correlation analyses of the treatment and observation phases were performed.
  • RESULTS: In light of the few sex differences and lack of any consistent trends, the data for the boys and girls were combined.
  • Treatment reduced the overbite, overjet and achieved Class II correction through combinations of maxillary incisor uprighting (U1-SN: -5.3 +/- 5.30), lower incisor proclination (L1-MP: 6.6 +/- 6.80), facial height increase (AFH: 5.1 +/- 4.6 mm), ramal lengthening (Co-Go: 3.3 +/- 2.4 mm) and mandibular length increase (Co-Pog: 5.9 +/- 4.6 mm).
  • During the observation period, similar growth changes were recorded, but the overbite (2.9 +/- 1.9 mm) and overjet (3.6 +/- 2.0 mm) increased due to some reversal of the treatment-induced incisor angulation changes.
  • Over the treatment period (T1 to T2), the angles between the cranial base and maxillary (maxillary rotation) and mandibular stable structures (mandibular internal rotation) reduced by -0.1 +/- 1.2 degrees and -0.3 +/- 2.5 degrees, respectively.
  • The angles between mandibular stable structures and Go-Me (mandibular external rotation) and SN-GoMe (mandibular total rotation) increased by 0.6 +/- 1.7 degrees and 0.9 +/- 2.1 degrees, respectively.
  • Between T2 and T3, maxillary rotation, mandibular internal rotation and total mandibular rotation reduced -1.4 +/- 2.0 degrees, -2.4 +/- 2.5 degrees and -0.7 +/- 1.7 degrees, respectively.
  • Mandibular external rotation increased -1.8 +/- 2.0 degrees.
  • Mandibular total and internal rotation angles were significantly (p < 0.5) reduced at T2, but there were no significant associations between the rotations and dentofacial parameters during or following treatment.
  • CONCLUSIONS: On average, the maxillary and mandibular internal rotations were near zero during treatment, but the small and individually variable changes were not clearly associated with the Class II correction.
  • [MeSH-major] Malocclusion, Angle Class II / therapy. Mandible / physiology. Maxillofacial Development. Orthodontic Appliances, Functional. Orthodontics, Corrective / instrumentation
  • [MeSH-minor] Cephalometry / statistics & numerical data. Child. Face / anatomy & histology. Female. Humans. Male. Maxilla / physiology. Movement. Retrospective Studies. Vertical Dimension

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  • (PMID = 19634464.001).
  • [ISSN] 0587-3908
  • [Journal-full-title] Australian orthodontic journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Aust Orthod J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Australia
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71. Weinreb I, Rubin BP, Goldblum JR: Pleomorphic angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma: a case confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis for EWSR1 rearrangement. J Cutan Pathol; 2008 Sep;35(9):855-60
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  • [Title] Pleomorphic angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma: a case confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis for EWSR1 rearrangement.
  • Angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma (AFH) is a neoplasm of uncertain histogenesis with intermediate malignant potential.
  • The neoplasm is usually composed of a bland histiocytoid proliferation of cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm forming a syncytium, often surrounded by a dense fibrous pseudocapsule and lymphoid infiltrate, with abundant intralesional hemorrhage forming blood-filled spaces.
  • We present a diagnostically challenging case of AFH with pleomorphic features and minimal lymphoid and angiomatoid changes involving the superficial subcutis and deep dermis on the scalp of an 8-year-old boy.
  • [MeSH-major] Histiocytoma, Malignant Fibrous / pathology. Oncogene Proteins, Fusion / genetics. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology. Transcription Factors / genetics

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  • (PMID = 18422688.001).
  • [ISSN] 1600-0560
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cutaneous pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cutan. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 0 / EWS-ATF1 fusion protein, human; 0 / Oncogene Proteins, Fusion; 0 / RNA-Binding Protein FUS; 0 / Transcription Factors
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72. Cernik C, Channaiah D, Trevino J: Angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma in a six-year-old child. Pediatr Dermatol; 2009 Sep-Oct;26(5):636-8
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  • [Title] Angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma in a six-year-old child.
  • The histology is characterized by a fibrous capsule, surrounding lymphocytic infiltrate and blood-filled cystic spaces lined by flattened tumor cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Hemangioma / pathology. Histiocytoma, Malignant Fibrous / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology


73. Hedrick SC, Sullivan JH, Sales AE, Gray SL: Mom and pop versus the big boys: adult family homes as providers of Medicaid-funded residential care. J Aging Soc Policy; 2009 Jan-Mar;21(1):31-51
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  • [Title] Mom and pop versus the big boys: adult family homes as providers of Medicaid-funded residential care.
  • This paper compares assisted living apartments (ALs), adult residential care facilities (ARCs), and small adult family homes (AFHs) for Medicaid residents in Washington State, with particular emphasis on the settings, staffing, services, and policies of AFHs.
  • We targeted for enrollment all residents entering an AFH, ARC, or AL setting on Medicaid/state funding in a three-county area of Washington State.
  • We obtained information on 199 settings, interviewing administrative and direct care providers.
  • AFHs are smaller than ARCs and ALs and less likely to be part of a chain, with no significant difference in staffing ratios of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses.
  • Sixty-four percent of AFH residents were receiving public funds compared to 32% of AL residents.
  • AFHs report admitting residents with more activities of daily living needs, health conditions, and behavior problems.
  • They are less likely to have autonomy-related policies, and they provide more services and fewer activities.
  • While attention should continue to be paid to staff supports, policy and practice should support the continued role of AFHs, which are of special interest because of their potential to provide more homelike, less costly care but with possible trade-offs compared to larger facilities.
  • [MeSH-major] Medicaid / statistics & numerical data. Ownership. Residential Facilities / organization & administration
  • [MeSH-minor] Environment. Humans. Personnel Staffing and Scheduling / organization & administration. Public Policy. United States

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  • (PMID = 19197607.001).
  • [ISSN] 0895-9420
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of aging & social policy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Aging Soc Policy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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4. Kumari M, Fida M: Vertical facial and dental arch dimensional changes in extraction vs. non-extraction orthodontic treatment. J Coll Physicians Surg Pak; 2010 Jan;20(1):17-21
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Vertical facial and dental arch dimensional changes in extraction vs. non-extraction orthodontic treatment.
  • OBJECTIVE: To compare the vertical facial and dental arch dimensional changes occurring with extraction and nonextraction orthodontic treatments.
  • STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional comparative study.
  • PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY: The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi during the period 2003 to 2005.
  • METHODOLOGY: Data were collected using records of patients who visited the study setting during the study period.
  • Pre- and post-treatment lateral cephalographs and study casts of 81 orthodontic patients (41=non-extraction and 40=premolar extractions) were taken.
  • Variables used for evaluating vertical dimension were Frankfort mandibular plane angle (FMA), facial height (N-Me), facial height ratio (N-ANS/ANS-Me), soft tissue facial height (G' to Me'), soft tissue facial height ratio (G'-Sn'/zn'-Me'), upper first molar to palatal plane and lower first molar to mandibular plane distance, posterior facial height to anterior facial height ratio (PFH/AFH) and Y-axis.
  • Intercanine, interpremolar and intermolar widths and arch depths were also measured.
  • To evaluate the pre-treatment and posttreatment comparison within each group, paired t-tests were used.
  • For pre- and posttreatment comparisons between the extraction and non-extraction groups, independent sample t-tests were used.
  • RESULTS: The mean age was 15.8+/-1.5 years for non-extraction and 15.4+/-1.2 years for the extraction group.
  • There was no significant difference in the vertical dimensional changes between extraction and non-extraction treatments as it increased in both groups.
  • When comparing posttreatment arch dimensions, there was an increase in the maxillary intermolar width in the non-extraction group while the intermolar widths and arch depths decreased in the extraction group in both arches.
  • CONCLUSION: Vertical dimensional changes showed no significant difference between extraction and non-extraction groups.
  • Intermolar widths and arch depths decreased in both arches in the extraction group while the maxillary intermolar width increased in the non-extraction group.
  • [MeSH-major] Bicuspid / surgery. Dental Arch / anatomy & histology. Face / anatomy & histology. Orthodontics, Corrective. Tooth Extraction
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Female. Humans. Male. Malocclusion / surgery

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  • (PMID = 20141687.001).
  • [ISSN] 1022-386X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons--Pakistan : JCPSP
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Coll Physicians Surg Pak
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Pakistan
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75. Yu H, Wang CF, Yang WT, Zhu XZ: [Angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma: report of 5 cases with review of literature]. Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi; 2010 Apr;39(4):245-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma: report of 5 cases with review of literature].
  • OBJECTIVE: To study the clinicopathologic features, immunophenotype and differential diagnosis of angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma (AFH).
  • Fibrillary neuropil-type intercellular material was identified in all cases and a fibrous pseudocapsule surrounded by lymphocytes and plasma cells was demonstrated in 3 cases.
  • CONCLUSIONS: AFH is a rare tumor of intermediate malignant potential.
  • [MeSH-major] Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous / pathology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aneurysm / metabolism. Aneurysm / pathology. Antigens, CD / metabolism. Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic / metabolism. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Desmin / metabolism. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Histiocytoma, Malignant Fibrous / pathology. Humans. Male. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Vimentin / metabolism. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20654123.001).
  • [ISSN] 0529-5807
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua bing li xue za zhi = Chinese journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic; 0 / CD68 antigen, human; 0 / Desmin; 0 / Vimentin
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76. Lessa FC, Enoki C, Feres MF, Valera FC, Lima WT, Matsumoto MA: Breathing mode influence in craniofacial development. Braz J Otorhinolaryngol; 2005 Mar-Apr;71(2):156-60
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  • [Title] Breathing mode influence in craniofacial development.
  • AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in facial proportions of nose and mouth breathing children using cephalometric analysis.
  • STUDY DESIGN: Transversal cohort.
  • MATERIAL AND METHOD: Sixty cephalometric radiographs from pediatric patients aged 6 to 10 years were used.
  • After otorhinolaryngological evaluation, patients were divided into two groups: Group I, with mouth breathing children and group II, with nose breathers.
  • Standard lateral cephalometric radiographs were obtained to evaluate facial proportions using the following measures: SN.GoGn, ArGo.GoMe, N-Me, N-ANS, ANS-Me and S-Go; and the following indexes: PFH-AFH ratio: S-Go/N-Me; LFH-AFH ratio: ANS-Me/N-Me and UFH-LFH ratio: N-ANS/ANS-Me.
  • RESULTS: It was observed that the measurements for the inclination of the mandibular plane (SN.GoGn) in mouth breathing children were statistically higher than those in nasal breathing children.
  • The posterior facial height was statistically smaller than the anterior one in mouth breathing children (PFH-AFH ratio).
  • Thus, the upper anterior facial height was statistically smaller than the lower facial height (UFH-LFH ratio).
  • CONCLUSION: We concluded that mouth breathing children tend to have higher mandibular inclination and more vertical growth.
  • These findings support the influence of the breathing mode in craniofacial development.
  • [MeSH-major] Facial Bones / growth & development. Respiration
  • [MeSH-minor] Cephalometry. Child. Cohort Studies. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Humans. Male. Maxillofacial Development. Mouth Breathing. Nose. Skull / anatomy & histology. Skull / growth & development

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  • (PMID = 16446911.001).
  • [ISSN] 1808-8694
  • [Journal-full-title] Brazilian journal of otorhinolaryngology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Braz J Otorhinolaryngol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
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