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1. Galesić K, Morović-Vergles J: [Drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis]. Reumatizam; 2003;50(1):14-7
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  • [Title] [Drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis].
  • Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) due to the drugs is caused by allergic reaction and it is presented by acute renal failure, rush, eosinophilia and eosinophiluria.
  • AIN due to NSAID in comparison with AIN caused by other drugs is presented with nephrotic syndrome and acute renal failure.
  • Kidney biopsy is necessary for diagnosis of AIN.
  • The most important and first step in the treatment is the discontinuation of the drug.
  • In severe cases, the corticosteroids are indicated (1 mg/kg of body weight), or intravenous bolus of corticosteroids followed by high-oral dose administration for several weeks.

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  • (PMID = 15067818.001).
  • [ISSN] 0374-1338
  • [Journal-full-title] Reumatizam
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Reumatizam
  • [Language] hrv
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Croatia
  • [Number-of-references] 20
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2. Hanawa N, Tanaka A, Fukami M, Miura R, Goto H, Tashiro H, Aiso M, Takamori Y, Fujita Y, Sato T, Kawaguchi H, Kobayashi M, Takikawa H: Autoimmune neutropenia due to antineutrophil antibodies in a patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis. Clin J Gastroenterol; 2010 Jun;3(3):149-54
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  • [Title] Autoimmune neutropenia due to antineutrophil antibodies in a patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis.
  • Autoimmune neutropenia (AIN) is defined as a decrease in the circulating absolute neutrophil count (ANC) to less than 1500/μl caused by serum antineutrophil antibodies.
  • Secondary AIN is associated with various autoimmune diseases.
  • Herein we present the case of a patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) who developed secondary AIN.
  • A 19-year-old man was admitted due to liver injury, and a diagnosis of PSC was established by cholangiogram and liver biopsy.
  • No medications had been given at that time and bone marrow aspiration revealed no abnormality.
  • Therefore we suspected secondary AIN as a causative etiology and examined whether antineutrophil antibodies were detectable in the patient's sera by flow cytometric analysis of the granulocyte indirect immunofluorescence test.
  • This is the first reported case of a patient with PSC who developed AIN, with detection of serum antineutrophil antibodies.

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  • (PMID = 26190122.001).
  • [ISSN] 1865-7257
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin J Gastroenterol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Autoimmune disease / Cholestasis / Granulocyte indirect immunofluorescence test / Neutropenia
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3. Al-Daraji WI, Al-Mahmoud RM, Ilyas M: Gastric changes following colchicine therapy in patients with FMF. Dig Dis Sci; 2008 Aug;53(8):2079-82
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  • The salient features of this disease include brief recurrent episodes of peritonitis, pleuritis, and arthritis, which are usually associated with fever.
  • Colchicine is highly effective in the treatment of FMF and in preventing the development of recurrent attacks and amyloidosis, and it is essential to make the correct diagnosis and institute daily therapy with colchicine (0.5-0.6 mg bid).
  • In this study, effects of colchicines on the gastrointestinal tract were evaluated in patients with FMF treated with colchicine.
  • METHODS: Biopsies were reviewed from 43 patients attending Ain Shams University Hospital (Egypt) who were diagnosed with FMF and treated with colchicine.
  • This included biopsies from stomach body (38), stomach antrum (50), and colon (24).
  • In addition, gastric biopsies were reviewed from 17 control patients who did not have FMF and were not on colchicine.
  • RESULTS: Three patients known to have FMF and on colchicine therapy showed typical histological features of colchicine (metaphase mitoses, epithelial pseudoproliferation, mucin depletion, and frequent apoptosis).
  • These features were seen only in gastric antral biopsies and not in colonic biopsies.
  • None of the control group showed the characteristic morphological features of colchicine toxicity.
  • CONCLUSION: This is the first report of histological changes seen in the stomach following colchicine therapy.
  • In contrast with previous reports, we did not find any definitive change in the large intestine.
  • If these finding are seen histologically, they merit correlation with the clinical impression and should not be interpreted as toxicity in isolation.
  • [MeSH-major] Colchicine / adverse effects. Familial Mediterranean Fever / drug therapy. Stomach / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Apoptosis / drug effects. Colon / drug effects. Egypt. Female. Gastric Mucosa / drug effects. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Mitosis / drug effects

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  • [RetractionIn] Dig Dis Sci. 2009 Dec;54(12):2772 [19789978.001]
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  • (PMID = 18080195.001).
  • [ISSN] 0163-2116
  • [Journal-full-title] Digestive diseases and sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dig. Dis. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Retracted Publication
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] SML2Y3J35T / Colchicine
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4. Al-Shadli AM, Bener A, Brebner J, Dunn EV: Asthma diagnosis and management in adults: is the risk of underdiagnosis and undertreatment related to patients' education levels? J Asthma; 2001 Apr;38(2):121-6
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  • [Title] Asthma diagnosis and management in adults: is the risk of underdiagnosis and undertreatment related to patients' education levels?
  • To determine the relationship between patient education and the risk of underdiagnosis and undertreatment of asthma, a cross-sectional study of 500 (250 males and 250 females) adult attendees between 16 and 44 years of age was undertaken at five primary health care (PHC) centers in Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates.
  • Doctors at PHC centers railed to diagnose 34.6% of the asthmatics with lower levels of education and 77.6% of the patients with higher levels of education.
  • Eighty-five percent of the asthmatics with lower levels of education and 46.6% of the asthmatics with higher levels of education recognized that they had asthma.
  • Thirty-eight percent of the asthmatics with lower levels of education and 83% of the asthmatics with higher levels of education were undertreated.
  • It was found that 19% of the asthmatics with lower levels of education and 3% of the asthmatics with higher level of education were on prophylactic medication for asthma.
  • We concluded that education level was related to underdiagnosis and undertreatment of asthma among adults between 16 and 44 years of age.
  • People with higher levels of education have a higher risk of underdiagnosis and undertreatment than do those with lower levels of education.
  • [MeSH-major] Asthma / diagnosis. Patient Education as Topic

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  • (PMID = 11321681.001).
  • [ISSN] 0277-0903
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of asthma : official journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Asthma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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5. Sanclemente G, Herrera S, Tyring SK, Rady PL, Zuleta JJ, Correa LA, He Q, Wolff JC: Human papillomavirus (HPV) viral load and HPV type in the clinical outcome of HIV-positive patients treated with imiquimod for anogenital warts and anal intraepithelial neoplasia. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol; 2007 Sep;21(8):1054-60
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  • [Title] Human papillomavirus (HPV) viral load and HPV type in the clinical outcome of HIV-positive patients treated with imiquimod for anogenital warts and anal intraepithelial neoplasia.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of 5% imiquimod in HIV-positive male patients with anogenital warts or anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN), and to elucidate whether human papillomavirus (HPV) type and viral load were important for clinical outcome and recurrences.
  • METHODS: Thirty-seven patients with histologically proven anogenital warts or AIN were enrolled.
  • Topical 5% imiquimod was applied three times per week for more than 8 h overnight for 16 weeks, although patients were allowed to continue therapy for 4 more weeks if they did not have complete clearance of lesions.
  • The perianal area was the main lesion location.
  • Eighteen patients had a histopathological diagnosis of AIN-1.
  • Clearance was not influenced by patients' CD4 counts, wart location, HIV viral load or HPV viral load.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The assumption that visible perianal warts are benign lesions in HIV-positive patients has to be reevaluated since an important number of such lesions could correspond to low-grade anal disease, which in turn could progress to high-grade anal disease or cancer.
  • In addition, our results in this preliminary study indicate that imiquimod appears to be effective in treating AIN in HIV-positive patients.
  • Further studies are needed to document its utility to prevent high-grade dysplasia and/or anal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections / drug therapy. Adjuvants, Immunologic / therapeutic use. Aminoquinolines / therapeutic use. Anus Diseases / drug therapy. Anus Neoplasms / drug therapy. Condylomata Acuminata / drug therapy. Genital Diseases, Male / drug therapy. Papillomavirus Infections / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Topical. Adult. Carcinoma in Situ / drug therapy. Carcinoma in Situ / virology. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Papillomaviridae / classification. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Treatment Outcome. Viral Load


6. Riedel SB, Fischer SM, Sanders BG, Kline K: Vitamin E analog, alpha-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid analog, alone and in combination with celecoxib, reduces multiplicity of ultraviolet-induced skin cancers in mice. Anticancer Drugs; 2008 Feb;19(2):175-81
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  • [Title] Vitamin E analog, alpha-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid analog, alone and in combination with celecoxib, reduces multiplicity of ultraviolet-induced skin cancers in mice.
  • The goals of this study were to determine whether alpha-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid analog (alpha-TEA), a novel vitamin E analog, and celecoxib, alone or in combination, when administered as a late intervention can reduce the ultraviolet-induced nonmelanoma skin-tumor burden of established tumors, prevent additional tumors from developing, and prevent tumor recurrence once treatments are stopped.
  • Hairless SKH-1 female mice were ultraviolet-irradiated for 24 weeks, divided into treatment groups so that each group had approximately 5.8 tumors/mouse, and then treated with 72 mug of liposome-formulated alpha-TEA by aerosol inhalation, 500 p.p.m. celecoxib in AIN-76 A diet, or a combination of alpha-TEA and celecoxib for 4 weeks.
  • At the end of 4 weeks of treatment, each treatment group was subdivided, with one subgroup continuing to receive treatment and with treatment being stopped in the other.
  • Skin-tumor development was monitored visually throughout the study and by histologic evaluation at the end.
  • After 4 weeks of treatment, all treatments showed statistically significant reductions in tumor number when compared with controls.
  • After termination of treatment, only alpha-TEA prevented a significant increase in tumor recurrence; however, continuous combination treatment resulted in the lowest total number of tumors.
  • In conclusion alpha-TEA is an effective late-stage chemopreventive agent for nonmelanoma skin cancer that exhibits lasting benefits.
  • [MeSH-minor] Acetates / chemistry. Administration, Inhalation. Animals. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma / diagnosis. Carcinoma / etiology. Carcinoma / prevention & control. Celecoxib. Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors / administration & dosage. Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Liposomes. Mice. Mice, Hairless. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Neoplasms, Squamous Cell / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Squamous Cell / etiology. Neoplasms, Squamous Cell / prevention & control. Radiation Dosage. Skin / pathology. Skin / radiation effects. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18176114.001).
  • [ISSN] 0959-4973
  • [Journal-full-title] Anti-cancer drugs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA59739; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / ES007784
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 2,5,7,8-tetramethyl-2R-(4R,8R,12-trimethyltridecyl)chroman-6-yloxy acetic acid; 0 / Acetates; 0 / Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors; 0 / Liposomes; 0 / Pyrazoles; 0 / Sulfonamides; 1406-66-2 / Tocopherols; JCX84Q7J1L / Celecoxib
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7. Fathi AA, Soliman MM: Carticaine versus lidocaine for peribulbar anesthesia in cataract surgery. J Cataract Refract Surg; 2002 Mar;28(3):513-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • SETTING: Ain Shams and Cairo University Hospitals, Cairo, Egypt.
  • METHODS: This prospective double-blind randomized study comprised 200 cataract patients assigned to 1 of 2 groups of 100 each based on type of anesthesia: carticaine 4% or lidocaine 2%.
  • The mean time for satisfactory block, need for supplementary injections, incidence of intraoperative and postoperative pain, and postoperative complications were evaluated.
  • The chi-square or Fisher exact test was used to assess eye movement scores, the need for supplementary injections, the onset of postoperative pain, and the incidence of postoperative complications.
  • RESULTS: The mean time for satisfactory anesthesia was 7.5 minutes +/- 1.68 (SD) for lidocaine 2% and 2.5 +/- 1.53 minutes for carticaine 4% (P <.001).
  • The need for supplementary injections was 28% in the lidocaine group and 4% in the carticaine group (P <.001).
  • The mean onset of postoperative pain was 2.00 +/- 0.86 hours in the lidocaine group and 5.52 +/- 1.80 hours in the carticaine group (P <.05).
  • There were no cases of postoperative neurotoxicity or extraocular muscle dysfunction in either group.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Carticaine 4% adrenaline hyaluronidase mixture was an effective and safe agent for peribulbar anesthesia.
  • [MeSH-minor] Double-Blind Method. Epinephrine / administration & dosage. Female. Humans. Hyaluronoglucosaminidase / administration & dosage. Male. Middle Aged. Nerve Block / methods. Orbit / drug effects. Pain, Postoperative / diagnosis. Prospective Studies. Safety

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  • (PMID = 11973100.001).
  • [ISSN] 0886-3350
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cataract and refractive surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Cataract Refract Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anesthetics, Local; 98PI200987 / Lidocaine; D3SQ406G9X / Carticaine; EC 3.2.1.35 / Hyaluronoglucosaminidase; YKH834O4BH / Epinephrine
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8. Parkhie SM, Fine DM, Lucas GM, Atta MG: Characteristics of patients with HIV and biopsy-proven acute interstitial nephritis. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol; 2010 May;5(5):798-804
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  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to describe the characteristics of patients with HIV infection and biopsy-proven acute interstitial nephritis (AIN).
  • Patients who received a diagnosis of AIN without evidence of HIV-associated nephropathy were identified, and their clinical course was reviewed up to 18 months after biopsy.
  • RESULTS: Of 262 biopsies, 29 (11%) patients who had AIN without evidence of HIV-associated nephropathy were identified.
  • The mean age at the time of biopsy was 47.5 years (range 28 to 71 years), 17 (59%) were men, and 23 (79%) were black.
  • The majority (62%) of patients were on antiretroviral therapy, 59% were current or former intravenous drug users, and 62% had hepatitis C co-infection.
  • Drugs were identified as the cause of AIN in the majority (72%) of cases.
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were most commonly implicated, followed by sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In our series, AIN was prevalent (11%) and was often drug induced.
  • AIN should not be excluded from the differential diagnosis on the basis of absence of the classic clinical triad of fever, rash, and pyuria.


9. Bener A, Safa W, Abdulhalik S, Lestringant GG: An analysis of skin prick test reactions in asthmatics in a hot climate and desert environment. Allerg Immunol (Paris); 2002 Oct;34(8):281-6
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  • BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that allergens are very important sensitizing agents in patients with asthma.
  • OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between allergen specific IgE antibodies and skin test reactivity in patients with asthma in hot climate and desert Arabian country.
  • DESIGN: A hospital-based prospective study conducted.
  • SETTING: Tawam Teaching Hospital, Al-Ain, UAE.
  • PATIENTS: 327 adult patients recruited with respiratory, dermatologic and ophthalmologic diseases of suspected allergic origin who attended Tawam Teaching Hospital of Faculty of Medicine, Al Ain, UAE, during three years from 1996 to 1998.
  • The blood sample was taken for measuring specific IgE concentration.
  • RESULTS: There were 327 UAE patients of whom 117 (35.8%) were males and 210 (64.2%) were females.
  • The population sample had a higher prevalence of diagnosed asthma among females (48.1%) than in males (36.7%).
  • Total IgE level (> 100 kU/l) was strongly associated with history of wheeze (p = 0.019), asthma (p = 0.01) and allergic rhinitis (p < 0.0001), atopy (p < 0.0001) and the presence of specific IgE antibodies to grass pollen (p < 0.0001), mite (p = 0.008) and cockroaches (p = 0.025).
  • CONCLUSION: The present study revealed that hypersensitivity to pollens, house dust, dust mite and cockroach was common.
  • The family history, environment, and airborne allergens are identified to be risk factors for asthma and other allergic diseases in Arabian Gulf Countries.
  • [MeSH-major] Asthma / diagnosis. Climate. Skin Tests
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age of Onset. Allergens. Animals. Antibody Specificity. Child. Female. Fungi. Humans. Humidity. Immunoglobulin E / blood. Immunoglobulin E / immunology. Insects. Male. Middle Aged. Mites. Outpatients. Pollen. Prevalence. Prospective Studies. Radioallergosorbent Test. Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial / epidemiology. Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial / etiology. Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal / epidemiology. Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal / etiology. Temperature. United Arab Emirates / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 12449666.001).
  • [ISSN] 0397-9148
  • [Journal-full-title] Allergie et immunologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Allerg Immunol (Paris)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Allergens; 37341-29-0 / Immunoglobulin E
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10. Praga M, González E: Acute interstitial nephritis. Kidney Int; 2010 Jun;77(11):956-61
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  • Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) represents a frequent cause of acute kidney injury, accounting for 15-27% of renal biopsies performed because of this condition.
  • By and large, drug-induced AIN is currently the commonest etiology of AIN, with antimicrobials and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs being the most frequent offending agents.
  • Pathogenesis is based on an immunologic reaction against endogenous nephritogenic antigens or exogenous antigens processed by tubular cells, with cell-mediated immunity having a major pathogenic role.
  • A significant proportion of AIN has nowadays an oligosymptomatic presentation, although the presence of specific extrarenal symptoms such as fever, skin rash, arthralgias, and peripheral eosinophilia has an important role to orientate clinical diagnosis.
  • Identification and removal of the offending drug are the mainstay of the treatment, but recent studies strongly suggest that early steroid administration (within 7 days after diagnosis) improves the recovery of renal function, decreasing the risk of chronic renal impairment.
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Animals. Disease Progression. Humans. Predictive Value of Tests. Recovery of Function. Risk Factors. Steroids / therapeutic use. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] Kidney Int. 2011 Jan;79(1):137-8; author reply 138 [21157464.001]
  • (PMID = 20336051.001).
  • [ISSN] 1523-1755
  • [Journal-full-title] Kidney international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Kidney Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Steroids
  • [Number-of-references] 34
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11. Geevasinga N, Coleman PL, Webster AC, Roger SD: Proton pump inhibitors and acute interstitial nephritis. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol; 2006 May;4(5):597-604
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  • BACKGROUND & AIMS: Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are a widely prescribed class of drugs, and their usage worldwide is increasing.
  • Although well-tolerated, there have been case reports and a recent case series implicating these drugs in acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) and progression to acute renal failure (ARF).
  • The aim of this study was to investigate how widespread this complication is in Australia, to identify which PPIs are implicated, and to establish whether PPI-induced AIN is a class effect.
  • METHODS: We undertook a retrospective case review of potential cases at 2 teaching hospitals and a review of registry data from the Therapeutic Goods Administration of Australia (TGA).
  • Parameters sought included the drug implicated, concurrent medications, symptoms, signs, serum creatinine, and time of onset after prescription.
  • RESULTS: We identified 18 cases of biopsy-proven PPI-induced AIN causing ARF in the retrospective case review, which is the largest hospital-based case series to date.
  • CONCLUSION: With the ever more widespread use of this class of medications, PPI-induced AIN is likely to become more frequent.
  • Failure to recognize this entity might have catastrophic long-term consequences including chronic kidney disease.
  • Increased awareness might facilitate more rapid diagnosis and management of this potentially reversible condition.
  • [MeSH-minor] 2-Pyridinylmethylsulfinylbenzimidazoles. Adult. Age Distribution. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Australia. Benzimidazoles / adverse effects. Benzimidazoles / therapeutic use. Dyspepsia / diagnosis. Dyspepsia / drug therapy. Education, Medical, Continuing. Female. Gastroesophageal Reflux / diagnosis. Gastroesophageal Reflux / drug therapy. Hospitals, Teaching. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Omeprazole / adverse effects. Omeprazole / analogs & derivatives. Omeprazole / therapeutic use. Prevalence. Prognosis. Registries. Retrospective Studies. Risk Assessment. Severity of Illness Index. Sex Distribution. Sulfoxides / adverse effects. Sulfoxides / therapeutic use

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  • [CommentIn] Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2006 Oct;4(10):1296-7; author reply 1297 [17045214.001]
  • (PMID = 16630752.001).
  • [ISSN] 1542-3565
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical gastroenterology and hepatology : the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Gastroenterol. Hepatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 2-Pyridinylmethylsulfinylbenzimidazoles; 0 / Benzimidazoles; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Proton Pump Inhibitors; 0 / Sulfoxides; D8TST4O562 / pantoprazole; KG60484QX9 / Omeprazole
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12. Hagensee ME, Cameron JE, Leigh JE, Clark RA: Human papillomavirus infection and disease in HIV-infected individuals. Am J Med Sci; 2004 Jul;328(1):57-63
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  • [Title] Human papillomavirus infection and disease in HIV-infected individuals.
  • HIV-infected women are at higher risk for cervical HPV detection, for infection with high-oncogenic-risk types of HPV, for persistent HPV infection, for cervical cytologic abnormalities, and for cervical intraepithelial neoplasms.
  • HIV-infected men are at increased risk for anal HPV infection, for anal infection with high oncogenic-risk types of HPV, for persistent anal HPV infection, and for anal intraepithelial defects.
  • Oral HPV infection rates have not declined since the initiation of HAART, and evidence suggests that the rates may have actually increased in white HIV-infected males.
  • [MeSH-minor] Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active. Anus Diseases / drug therapy. Anus Diseases / pathology. Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / pathology. Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / therapy. Condylomata Acuminata / therapy. Diagnosis, Differential. Disease Progression. Female. Genotype. Humans. Male. Mouth Neoplasms / pathology. Mouth Neoplasms / therapy. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 15254442.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-9629
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of the medical sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Med. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 41
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13. Simpson IJ, Marshall MR, Pilmore H, Manley P, Williams L, Thein H, Voss D: Proton pump inhibitors and acute interstitial nephritis: report and analysis of 15 cases. Nephrology (Carlton); 2006 Oct;11(5):381-5
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  • AIM: Although proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are usually safe and effective therapeutic agents, serious adverse effects can occur.
  • The aim of the present study was to report and analyse the clinical features of 15 patients with acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) and acute renal failure from PPI that were referred to renal services in Auckland over a period of 3 years.
  • METHODS: The clinical presentation, therapeutic drugs, demographic details and renal outcome of the patients were considered.
  • The diagnosis of AIN was made by renal biopsy in 12 cases.
  • In all patients, the time-course of drug exposure and improvement of renal function on withdrawal suggested PPI were causal.
  • RESULTS: The median patient age was 78 years.
  • The mean baseline serum creatinine level was 83 micromol/L, peak level 392 micromol/L, and recovery level 139 micromol/L.
  • The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein were elevated at the time of diagnosis in the 11 and 12 patients, respectively, where this information was collected (ESR mean 85 mm/h, and C-reactive protein mean 81 mg/L).
  • AIN occurred at 8 per 100 000 patient years (95% confidence level 2.6-18.7 per 100 000 patient years).
  • CONCLUSION: PPI are now the most commonly identified cause of AIN in the Auckland area.
  • Recovery occurs after withdrawal of the drug but is often incomplete.
  • Early diagnosis may be facilitated by clinician awareness of the insidious onset of renal failure, and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein.
  • [MeSH-minor] 2-Pyridinylmethylsulfinylbenzimidazoles / adverse effects. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Anti-Ulcer Agents / adverse effects. Biopsy. Blood Sedimentation. C-Reactive Protein / metabolism. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Risk Factors

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  • [CommentIn] Nephrology (Carlton). 2006 Oct;11(5):379-80 [17014548.001]
  • (PMID = 17014549.001).
  • [ISSN] 1320-5358
  • [Journal-full-title] Nephrology (Carlton, Vic.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nephrology (Carlton)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 2-Pyridinylmethylsulfinylbenzimidazoles; 0 / Anti-Ulcer Agents; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Proton Pump Inhibitors; 9007-41-4 / C-Reactive Protein; D8TST4O562 / pantoprazole; KG60484QX9 / Omeprazole
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14. Ogino Y, Osada K, Nakamura S, Ohta Y, Kanda T, Sugano M: Absorption of dietary cholesterol oxidation products and their downstream metabolic effects are reduced by dietary apple polyphenols. Lipids; 2007 Mar;42(2):151-61
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  • [Title] Absorption of dietary cholesterol oxidation products and their downstream metabolic effects are reduced by dietary apple polyphenols.
  • Exogenous and endogenous cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) perturb various metabolic processes, and thereby they may induce various homeostasis-related disorders.
  • Here, we observed that procyanidin-rich dietary apple polyphenol (APP) from unripe apples alleviates the perturbation of lipid metabolism by decreasing the exogenous COP levels in rats.
  • Dietary COPs may be the greatest source of COPs found in the human body.
  • Rats (4 weeks of age) were fed AIN-purified diets containing 0.3% COPs supplemented with 0.5 or 2.5% APP for 3 weeks.
  • Dietary APP alleviated the growth inhibition action of the exogenous COPs.
  • However, serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels increased following the intake of dietary APP.
  • Further, dietary APP inhibited the increase in lipid peroxide levels in the liver and serum by COPs.
  • The activity of hepatic Delta6 desaturase was lowered by dietary APP in a dose-dependent manner, although exogenous COPs generally increased the activity of this enzyme.
  • In keeping with this observation, Delta6 desaturation indices in the phospholipids and cholesteryl esters of the liver and serum lipids were lower in the APP-fed groups than those in the control group.
  • Dietary APP also promoted the excretion of exogenous COPs, cholesterol, and acidic steroids in feces.
  • Thus, APP may be an important removal agent of exogenous toxic material such as COPs contained in processed or fast foods.
  • [MeSH-major] Cholesterol, Dietary / pharmacokinetics. Flavonoids / pharmacology. Malus / chemistry. Phenols / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Body Weight / drug effects. Chromatography, Gas. Enzyme Activation / drug effects. Erythrocytes / metabolism. Feces / chemistry. Intestinal Absorption / drug effects. Lipid Metabolism / drug effects. Lipid Peroxides / metabolism. Lipids / blood. Mass Spectrometry. Molecular Structure. Oxidation-Reduction / drug effects. Polyphenols. Prostaglandins / metabolism. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Steroids / metabolism. Superoxide Dismutase / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17393221.001).
  • [ISSN] 0024-4201
  • [Journal-full-title] Lipids
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lipids
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cholesterol, Dietary; 0 / Flavonoids; 0 / Lipid Peroxides; 0 / Lipids; 0 / Phenols; 0 / Polyphenols; 0 / Prostaglandins; 0 / Steroids; EC 1.15.1.1 / Superoxide Dismutase
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16. Türkoglu-Raach G, Gröne HJ, Sitter T, Fischereder M: [Another "suspect": homeopathic agent associated with acute interstitial nephritis]. Dtsch Med Wochenschr; 2010 Jun;135(24):1224-7
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  • [Title] [Another "suspect": homeopathic agent associated with acute interstitial nephritis].
  • DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT AND COURSE: The chronic renal failure caused by an interstitial nephritis was treated with corticosteroids and hemodialysis treatment was started.
  • The trigger for AIN could not be found, there was no infectious or systemically disease nor a nephrotoxic medication identified.
  • For nearly six months the patient had taken a homeopathic agent which is a dilution of penicillium chrysogenum.
  • In case of a determined allergy to penicillin, an extract of the fungus producing penicillin could possibly cause an interstitial nephritis.
  • The patient was dialysis-independent with a GFR about 8 - 10 ml/min at the time of discharge.
  • CONCLUSION: With interstitial nephritis all agents should be considered a potential suspect, even homeopathic agents.
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Hypersensitivity / complications. Homeopathy. Kidney Failure, Chronic / chemically induced. Nephritis, Interstitial / chemically induced. Penicillins. Penicillium chrysogenum. Phytotherapy / adverse effects. Plant Extracts / toxicity
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Female. Glomerular Filtration Rate / drug effects. Humans. Risk Factors

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  • [Copyright] Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.
  • (PMID = 20533155.001).
  • [ISSN] 1439-4413
  • [Journal-full-title] Deutsche medizinische Wochenschrift (1946)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dtsch. Med. Wochenschr.
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Penicillins; 0 / Plant Extracts
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17. Dinda AK, Singh C, Dash SC, Tiwari SC, Aggarwal SK, Bhowmik D, Bagga A: Role of supravital staining of urine sediment and bright field microscopy in diagnosis of acute renal failure in bedside medicine. J Assoc Physicians India; 2000 Oct;48(10):958-61
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  • [Title] Role of supravital staining of urine sediment and bright field microscopy in diagnosis of acute renal failure in bedside medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: An early accurate etiological categorization of acute renal failure (ARF) into acute glomerulonephritis (AGN), acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is very important in clinical medicine.
  • The stain consisted of 1% crystal violet and 0.5% safranin in normal saline.
  • The coverslip preparations of coded and stained urine sediments were examined under ordinary bright field microscope (BFM) by two independent observers.
  • RESULTS: The renal biopsy showed 12 cases of AGN, 12 ATN and 8 AIN.
  • The diagnosis could be predicted by supravital staining method in 75% cases with 95% uniformity among two observers with a sensitivity of 85.7% for AGN followed by AIN (80%) and ATN (75%).
  • CONCLUSION: Thus this simple supravital staining technique can be used with ordinary BFM for accurate urine sediment analysis in cases of ARF in bedside medicine.
  • [MeSH-major] Acute Kidney Injury / diagnosis. Acute Kidney Injury / urine. Urine / cytology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Biopsy, Needle. Coloring Agents. Female. Humans. India. Male. Microscopy. Middle Aged. Reagent Kits, Diagnostic. Sensitivity and Specificity. Urinalysis

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  • (PMID = 11200918.001).
  • [ISSN] 0004-5772
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Assoc Physicians India
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Coloring Agents; 0 / Reagent Kits, Diagnostic
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18. Esteve JB, Launay-Vacher V, Brocheriou I, Grimaldi A, Izzedine H: COX-2 inhibitors and acute interstitial nephritis: case report and review of the literature. Clin Nephrol; 2005 May;63(5):385-9
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  • [Title] COX-2 inhibitors and acute interstitial nephritis: case report and review of the literature.
  • We report a case of biopsy-proven acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) in a 50-year-old diabetic woman, who had been treated with celecoxib for 4 weeks before presentation.
  • A kidney biopsy specimen showed AIN with intense tubuli and eosinophilic infiltrate in the interstitium.
  • A review of the literature yielded eight cases of COX-2 inhibitor-associated AIN with a biopsy-proven diagnosis.
  • Among the reported cases, AIN was diagnosed after an average of 8.3 months of therapy (SD 12 months, range 3 days - 3 years) with 25 mg rofecoxib or 200 mg celecoxib daily.
  • Renal failure was common at the time of diagnosis.
  • Mean serum creatinine levels were 0.86 +/- 0.11 mg/dl, 5.66 +/- 3.50 mg/dl and 1.15 +/- 0.24 before treatment, at time of diagnosis and 1 - 2 months after COX-2 inhibitor withdrawal, respectively.
  • After cessation of COX-2 inhibitor treatment, patients recovered completely with a normalized serum creatinine level after one to two months.
  • Management consisted of withdrawal of the COX-2 inhibitor drug and in four patients, corticosteroid therapy was well-tolerated and may have been beneficial.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / adverse effects. Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors / adverse effects. Nephritis, Interstitial / chemically induced. Nephritis, Interstitial / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy, Needle. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Kidney Function Tests. Middle Aged. Prednisolone / therapeutic use. Risk Assessment. Severity of Illness Index. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15909599.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-0430
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical nephrology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Nephrol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone
  • [Number-of-references] 25
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19. Gaillard R, Ouanas A, Spadone C, Llorca PM, Lôo H, Baylé FJ: [Benzodiazepines and schizophrenia, a review of the literature]. Encephale; 2006 Nov-Dec;32(6 Pt 1):1003-10
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  • [Transliterated title] Benzodiazépines et schizophrénie, revue de la littérature.
  • AIn this work, the authors have analysed the principal studies on the interest in the use of benzodiazepines in schizophrenia.
  • The first double-controlled study concerning this question was conducted in 1961.
  • The results of the first studies are criticisable due to the variability of the diagnostic and clinical assessment criteria, as well as to the divergences between the different conclusions.
  • BENZODIAZEPINES IN MONOTHERAPY: In monotherapy their action on productive and deficient psychotic symptoms is greatly discussed and not very convincing.
  • The main studies in the use of benzodiazepines alone ) are heterogeneous for their diagnosis criteria, their methodology and their results.
  • The conclusions of the publications are not totally clear, and different points are to be criticized: heterogeneity of assessment criteria, heterogeneity and variability of methodology, use of non standardized scales, most of the studies are open studies, variability of benzodiazepines dose.
  • According to certain studies, the therapeutic effect may appear in a short time, and then disappear within the fourth week.
  • The association of benzodiazepines with neuroleptics is particularly helpful for patients with great anxiety, whether they have neuroleptic intolerance or not.
  • There is no robust convergence about the type of benzodiazepines and their optimal dose in the treatment of schizophrenia.
  • Their use may permit a reduction in the neuroleptic dose.
  • Some studies point out the risk of behavioural desinhibition and dysphoria.
  • Their use should also be limited to patients with good compliancy, in order to avoid exacerbation of symptoms in the case of brutal interruption of the treatment.
  • Conversely, some studies point out the benefits of benzodiazepine use in schizophrenia, with their efficacy in the treatment and prevention of drug abuse.
  • Finally, benzodiazepines contribute to the establishment of a good patient-doctor relationship, and may guarantee enhanced treatment compliancy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antipsychotic Agents / therapeutic use. Benzodiazepines / therapeutic use. Schizophrenia / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Anxiety / drug therapy. Anxiety / epidemiology. Dopamine / metabolism. Humans. Prefrontal Cortex / drug effects. gamma-Aminobutyric Acid / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17372546.001).
  • [ISSN] 0013-7006
  • [Journal-full-title] L'Encéphale
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Encephale
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antipsychotic Agents; 12794-10-4 / Benzodiazepines; 56-12-2 / gamma-Aminobutyric Acid; VTD58H1Z2X / Dopamine
  • [Number-of-references] 75
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20. Bennett LM, Montgomery JL, Steinberg SM, Kulp KS: Flor-Essence herbal tonic does not inhibit mammary tumor development in Sprague Dawley rats. Breast Cancer Res Treat; 2004 Nov;88(1):87-93
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Flor-Essence herbal tonic does not inhibit mammary tumor development in Sprague Dawley rats.
  • BACKGROUND: Women who are diagnosed with breast cancer often self-administer complementary and alternative medicines to augment their conventional treatments, improve health, or prevent recurrence.
  • Flor-Essence tonic is a complex mixture of herbal extracts used by cancer patients because of anecdotal evidence that it can treat or prevent disease.
  • METHODS: Female Sprague-Dawley rats were given water or exposed to 3 or 6% Flor-Essence beginning at 1 day of age.
  • Mammary tumors were induced with a single oral 40 mg/kg/bw dose of dimethyl-benz[a]anthracene at 50 days of age and sacrificed at 23 weeks.
  • Rats were maintained on AIN-76A diet.
  • RESULTS: Control rats had palpable mammary tumor incidence of 51.0% at 19 weeks of age compared to 65.0 and 59.4% for the 3 and 6% Flor-Essence groups respectively.
  • Overall, no significant difference in time until first palpable tumor was detected among any of the groups.
  • At necropsy, mammary tumor incidence was 82.5% for controls compared to 90.0 and 97.3% for rats consuming 3 and 6% Flor-Essence, respectively.
  • Mean mammary tumor multiplicity (+/-SES) for the controls was 2.8 (+/-0.5) and statistically different from the 3 or 6% Flor-Essence groups with 5.2 (+/-0.7), and 4.8 (+/-0.6), respectively (p < or = 0.01).
  • As expected, the majority of isolated tumors were diagnosed as adenocarcinomas.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Flor-Essence can promote mammary tumor development in the Sprague-Dawley rat model.
  • This observation is contrary to widely available anecdotal evidence as well as the desire of the consumer that this commercially available herbal tonic will suppress and/or inhibit tumor growth.
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Animals. Benz(a)Anthracenes / administration & dosage. Beverages. Female. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley

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  • (PMID = 15538049.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-6806
  • [Journal-full-title] Breast cancer research and treatment
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Breast Cancer Res. Treat.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Benz(a)Anthracenes; 0 / Plant Extracts; 0 / flor-essence
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21. Gasztonyi B, Pár G, Pár A, Hunyady B: [Safety of pegylated interferon in patients with hepatitis C virus induced cirrhosis]. Orv Hetil; 2005 Nov 27;146(48):2431-4
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  • OBJECTIVES: The authors described their experience with the therapy with pegylated interferon and its safety in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) induced liver cirrhosis treated at First Department of Medicine, Medical School, University of Pécs and at Tawam Hospital, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
  • Liver cirrhosis was diagnosed by abdominal ultrasound and/or histological examination of liver biopsy.
  • RESULTS: Different genotypes of HCV were detected: genotype 1 in 7 cases, genotype 2 in 1 person, genotype 3 in 3 cases.
  • Thirteen of 24 patients were not treated earlier, 6 persons were non-responders to previous interferon monotherapy, pegylated interferon was administered to 5 patients because of relapse.
  • Biochemical parameters showed improvement in 16 cases (16/24, 66.66%), but did not in 5 patients.
  • Temporary dose reduction was needed in 13/24 cases (54.16%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Pegylated interferon treatment is well tolerated by patients with compensated liver cirrhosis (Child-Pough stage A).
  • Frequent side-effects (half of all cases) were usually mild or moderate requiring discontinuation only in 2 of 24 patients.
  • The incidence of neutropenia and thrombocytopenia emphasizes the need of frequent blood cell count tests and patients follow up.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / adverse effects. Hepacivirus / isolation & purification. Hepatitis C, Chronic / complications. Interferon-alpha / adverse effects. Liver Cirrhosis / drug therapy. Liver Cirrhosis / virology. Polyethylene Glycols / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] DNA, Viral / isolation & purification. Drug Resistance, Viral. Female. Genotype. Humans. Hungary. Male. Middle Aged. Neutropenia / chemically induced. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Recombinant Proteins. Severity of Illness Index. Thrombocytopenia / chemically induced. Treatment Outcome. United Arab Emirates

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  • (PMID = 16408382.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6002
  • [Journal-full-title] Orvosi hetilap
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Orv Hetil
  • [Language] hun
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] Hungary
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / DNA, Viral; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 0 / peginterferon alfa-2a; 0 / peginterferon alfa-2b; 30IQX730WE / Polyethylene Glycols; 76543-88-9 / interferon alfa-2a; 99210-65-8 / interferon alfa-2b
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22. Wang YC, Lin YF, Chao TK, Wu CC, Chen JS: Acute interstitial nephritis with prominent eosinophil infiltration. Clin Nephrol; 2009 Feb;71(2):187-91
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  • AIMS: Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is common, but prominent eosinophil infiltration in patients with acute interstitial nephritis is rare.
  • The possible etiologies, predisposing factors and treatment of such patients are the subjects of this study.
  • METHODS: one patient was reported from our medical center; nine more patients with similar findings were reviewed from the literature.
  • Suspected offending drugs, clinical presentations, predisposing factors and patient outcomes after therapy were recorded.
  • RESULTS: A case of clam extract-associated acute interstitial nephritis with prominent eosinophil infiltration was reported.
  • A variety of drugs was thought to be causative.
  • Bone marrow biopsy was not performed in most cases and only available for 2 patients including ours.
  • 9 patients treated with steroids had good responses but 1 patient died despite treatment.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Acute interstitial nephritis with prominent eosinophil infiltration can be caused by a great diversity of drugs, which can include clam extract tablets.
  • This disease rarely led to fatality and most patients responded well to steroid therapy.
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Adult. Biopsy. Diagnosis, Differential. Glucocorticoids / therapeutic use. Humans. Male. Prednisolone / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 19203513.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-0430
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical nephrology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Nephrol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Glucocorticoids; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone
  • [Number-of-references] 26
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23. Bertagni A, Vagliasindi A, Ascari Raccagni A, Valmori L, Verdecchia GM: [Perianal Bowen's disease: a case report and review of the literature]. Tumori; 2003 Jul-Aug;89(4 Suppl):16-8
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  • [Title] [Perianal Bowen's disease: a case report and review of the literature].
  • [Transliterated title] Perianal Bowen's disease: a case report and review of the literature.
  • Perianal Bowen's disease is a uncommon, slow growing, intraepidermal squamous-cell carcinoma (carcinoma in situ) of the anal region and may be a precursor to squamous carcinoma of the anus.
  • It is associated with cervical and vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia and have human papillomavirus as a common cause.
  • The symptoms of anal Bowen's disease are unspecific and the clinical findings are uncharacteristic and include pain, itching, bleeding and a disturbing lump.
  • Biopsy and histopathologic examination is required for diagnosis and to distinguish other perianal dermatoses; thus an anogenital warts that fail to respond to conventional therapy, or change in appearance, warrant a biopsy and, where the technique is available, DNA typing to identify the viral pathogen.
  • Infact the etiologic agent, the human papillomavirus (HPV), has been classified by DNA techniques into at least 42 types, of which 16 and 18 are considered to carry a high risk for cancer.
  • The intraoperative findings is a lesion at the anocutaneous line: perianal or intra-anal tumor, erosion or ulceration as well as lichenoid lesion or hyperpigmentation.
  • The disease has a proclivity for recurrence and there are many controversies concerning treatment that effectiveness remains uncertain and range from aggressive wide local excision with skin grafting when necessary to laser vaporization (argon or CO2), radiotherapy or a new immune response modifier (Imiquimod).
  • We report a case of a 50-years-old woman with recurrence of Bowen's disease associated with vulvar HPV infection and review the literature.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / pathology. Bowen's Disease / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage / etiology. Humans. Middle Aged. Mitomycins / administration & dosage. Pain / etiology. Papillomaviridae / isolation & purification. Papillomavirus Infections / virology. Pruritus / etiology. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Tumor Virus Infections / virology. Vulvitis / complications. Vulvitis / virology

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  • (PMID = 12903534.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-8916
  • [Journal-full-title] Tumori
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tumori
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Mitomycins; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
  • [Number-of-references] 12
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24. Joaquim AI, Mendes GE, Ribeiro PF, Baptista MA, Burdmann EA: Ga-67 scintigraphy in the differential diagnosis between acute interstitial nephritis and acute tubular necrosis: an experimental study. Nephrol Dial Transplant; 2010 Oct;25(10):3277-82
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  • [Title] Ga-67 scintigraphy in the differential diagnosis between acute interstitial nephritis and acute tubular necrosis: an experimental study.
  • BACKGROUND: The differentiation between acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) and acute tubular necrosis (ATN) is crucial in patients with acute kidney injury.
  • Gallium-67 citrate (Ga-67) has been used clinically in the differential diagnosis between these entities, but its efficacy is disputed.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate Ga-67 scintigraphy efficacy in the differentiation between experimental models of drug-induced AIN and ATN.
  • METHODS: Animals were divided into three groups: AIN (n = 8), ATN (n = 8) and control (NL, n = 10).
  • The AIN group received intraperitoneal puromycin aminonucleoside (single dose, 150 mg/kg).
  • The ATN group received a single intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin (6 mg/kg).
  • The NL group did not receive active drugs.
  • All of the animals were submitted to Ga-67 scintigraphy, serum creatinine (Cr) and urinary osmolality assessment, and blinded renal histology evaluation.
  • RESULTS: Renal Ga-67 uptake was strikingly more intense in the AIN group when compared to the ATN (P < 0.0001) and NL (P < 0.001) groups.
  • The ATN group had increased Cr when compared to the NL group (P < 0.001) and lower urinary osmolality vs the NL (P < 0.001) and AIN (P < 0.01) groups.
  • Renal histology showed severe acute tubular injury in the ATN group and intense interstitial inflammation in the AIN group, and was normal in control animals.
  • CONCLUSION: Ga-67 scintigraphy was extremely effective in the differentiation between experimental drug-induced ATN and AIN.
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Acute Kidney Injury / radionuclide imaging. Animals. Diagnosis, Differential. Kidney / pathology. Kidney / physiopathology. Male. Rats. Rats, Wistar

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  • (PMID = 20348147.001).
  • [ISSN] 1460-2385
  • [Journal-full-title] Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Gallium Radioisotopes
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25. Foad I, Sharawy I, Mostafa E, Margergis M, Hussein T: Concurrent cisplatin/radiation followed by adjuvant cisplatin/paclitaxel in treatment of patients with stage IB grade 3, IC and IIA endometrial carcinoma. J Egypt Natl Canc Inst; 2007 Jun;19(2):163-9
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  • [Title] Concurrent cisplatin/radiation followed by adjuvant cisplatin/paclitaxel in treatment of patients with stage IB grade 3, IC and IIA endometrial carcinoma.
  • OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of concomitant weekly cisplatin and postoperative RT in HREC (stages IB grade 3, IC and IIA) followed by adjuvant cisplatin and weekly paclitaxel.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighteen patients with pathologically confirmed endometrial carcinoma were enrolled in this study.
  • All patients underwent total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAHBSO) and surgical staging.
  • Five patients (28%), 4 patients (22%) and 9 patients (50%) presented with stages IB grade 3, IC and IIA respectively.
  • RESULTS: Between May 2000 and March 2002, a total of 18 patients with pathologically confirmed endometrial carcinoma, presented to Radiation Oncology & Nuclear Medicine Department, Ain Shams University Hospitals, were enrolled in this study.
  • Grade 3 hematological toxicities, leucopenia, neutropenia and anemia were recorded in one patient (5.6%) each during adjuvant chemotherapy.
  • Two patients (11%) relapsed with distant metastases and one patient (5.6%) developed pelvic recurrence.
  • Median time to progression was 67 months.
  • Five year disease free survival and the 5 year overall survival were 89% (95%, CI: 74-100).
  • This study verifies the feasibility of this treatment to potentially reduce the incidence of local and distant relapses in order to improve survival.
  • Randomized phase III studies with large number of patients are necessary to evaluate the benefits of this approach.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Cisplatin / administration & dosage. Combined Modality Therapy. Feasibility Studies. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Hysterectomy. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy. Neoplasm Staging. Ovariectomy. Paclitaxel / administration & dosage. Prognosis. Radiotherapy Dosage. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19034346.001).
  • [ISSN] 1110-0362
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the Egyptian National Cancer Institute
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Egypt Natl Canc Inst
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Egypt
  • [Chemical-registry-number] P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin
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26. Dash N, Ameen AS, Sheek-Hussein MM, Smego RA Jr: Epidemiology of meningitis in Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates, 2000-2005. Int J Infect Dis; 2007 Jul;11(4):309-12
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  • [Title] Epidemiology of meningitis in Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates, 2000-2005.
  • OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiologic features of meningitis in Al-Ain Medical District, United Arab Emirates from January 2000 through June 2005.
  • METHODS: A retrospective review of clinical records and notification forms for cases of meningitis reported to the Department of Preventive Medicine, Al-Ain.
  • Data collected and compiled included demographic features, causative microbiologic agents, and annual incidence rates of meningitis, by etiology.
  • RESULTS: Ninety-two cases of meningitis were reported during the study period; 53% were bacterial and 37% were viral in origin.
  • Ten percent of clinically diagnosed cases of meningitis had no causative microorganism recovered, and in 33% of patients with presumed pyogenic meningitis no specific bacterial pathogen could be identified.
  • The incidence rate of meningitis in Al-Ain ranged between 2.2/100,000 population in 2000 and 1/100,000 in 2005, with an overall downward trend by year.
  • The incidence of Haemophilus influenzae type b decreased significantly after implementation of the national immunization program in 1999.

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  • (PMID = 16950640.001).
  • [ISSN] 1201-9712
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of infectious diseases : IJID : official publication of the International Society for Infectious Diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Infect. Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
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27. Etancelin P, Silly S, Merle V, Bonmarchand G, Richard JC, Vannier JP, Nouvellon M: [Efficacy of a multidisciplinary team for preventing hospital-acquired invasive aspergillosis: five years' experience]. Pathol Biol (Paris); 2009 Feb;57(1):71-5
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  • [Transliterated title] Efficacité des mesures environnementales dans la prévention de l'aspergillose invasive nosocomiale liée aux travaux: bilan de cinq années d'expérience.
  • The aim of our study was to estimate the efficiency of these measures using an indirect indicator, reflecting the incidence of the cases of invasive nosocomial aspergillosis (AI): the consumption of antifungals.
  • From the nominative prescriptions established, we studied the medical files about 210 patients to track down the number of IA cases in intensive care unit (ICUI) and in pediatric hematology-oncology units between 2002 and 2006.
  • The incidence of the cases was put in parallel with the various periods of level 5-risk works during these five years.
  • The relative risk of appearance of the disease was calculated.
  • In pediatric haematology-oncology unit, 35 cases were diagnosed on 99 medical files which have been studied and in ICU 19 cases were classified on 93 studied files.
  • The follow-up of the incidence in both units stake in parallel with the periods of level 5-risk works does not show increase of the number of cases.
  • The calculated relative risk indicates the same result: the level 5-risk works are not a factor facilitating the appearance of invasive aspergillosis cases.
  • This study shows the importance of the environmental measures of prevention during the periods of works within services for risk.
  • The coordination of the actors within an interdisciplinary cell seems thus essential for the prevention of AIN.
  • [MeSH-minor] Antifungal Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Drug Prescriptions / statistics & numerical data. Drug Utilization / statistics & numerical data. Filtration / instrumentation. France / epidemiology. Hematology. Hospital Departments / statistics & numerical data. Hospitals, University / organization & administration. Humans. Incidence. Intensive Care Units / statistics & numerical data. Medical Oncology. Medical Records. Middle Aged. Pediatrics. Program Evaluation. Retrospective Studies. Spores, Fungal


28. Punnose J, Agarwal MM, El Khadir A, Devadas K, Mugamer IT: Childhood and adolescent diabetes mellitus in Arabs residing in the United Arab Emirates. Diabetes Res Clin Pract; 2002 Jan;55(1):29-33
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  • In 9 years (1990-1998), 40 Arab patients between the ages of 0 and 18 years had newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus (DM) at the Al-Ain hospital, United Arab Emirates (UAE).
  • In this cohort, 35 patients had Type 1 DM while the remaining five patients had features of early onset Type 2 DM.
  • For Type 1 DM patients, the mean age at diagnosis of was 9.2+/-4.1 years.
  • The mean insulin requirement increased from 0.84+/-0.27 U/kg per 24 h (0-9-year group) to 1.02+/-0.33 U/kg per 24 h (10-18-year group), P=0.055.
  • The home glucose monitoring and the glycaemic control of these Type 1 DM patients were sub-optimal with 28% of patients having recurrence of DKA.
  • Among the Type 2 DM patients, four (80%) were obese with a positive family history of Type 2 DM.
  • All of them initially responded to diet and oral hypoglycaemic drugs.
  • [MeSH-major] Arabs / genetics. Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 / epidemiology. Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Age Factors. Age of Onset. Blood Glucose / metabolism. Child. Child, Preschool. Diabetic Ketoacidosis / epidemiology. Female. Follicle Stimulating Hormone / blood. Humans. Infant. Insulin / therapeutic use. Luteinizing Hormone / blood. Male. Nuclear Family. United Arab Emirates / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 11755476.001).
  • [ISSN] 0168-8227
  • [Journal-full-title] Diabetes research and clinical practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Diabetes Res. Clin. Pract.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Blood Glucose; 0 / Insulin; 9002-67-9 / Luteinizing Hormone; 9002-68-0 / Follicle Stimulating Hormone
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29. Papachristou F, Printza N, Farmaki E, Leontsini M, Kavaki D, Kollios K: Antibiotics-induced acute interstitial nephritis in 6 children. Urol Int; 2006;76(4):348-52
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  • INTRODUCTION: Antibiotics-induced acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is a rare disorder in children, and the diagnosis is often delayed.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: We reviewed the medical records of 6 children, age range from 10 months to 14 years, with biopsy-confirmed antibiotics-induced AIN.
  • RESULTS: Symptoms of AIN started 2-4 weeks after antimicrobial therapy with beta-lactam antibiotics in 5 children and with gentamicin in 1 child.
  • The glomerular filtration rate was dramatically reduced in 2 cases and mildly reduced in 4 patients.
  • Two of our patients had supportive treatment, 2 received corticosteroid therapy, and 2 children remained under peritoneal dialysis for 12 and 22 days, respectively.
  • Five patients had a full recovery of their renal function, and 1 child, 2 years later, still presented impairment of the renal function.
  • CONCLUSION: AIN should be considered in case of acute renal failure in children, mostly when other common causes have been excluded, and there is a history of drug exposure.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Bacterial Agents / adverse effects. Nephritis, Interstitial / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Adolescent. Child. Female. Humans. Infant. Male

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  • [Copyright] 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 16679839.001).
  • [ISSN] 0042-1138
  • [Journal-full-title] Urologia internationalis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urol. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents
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30. Grutter PW, Desilva GL, Meehan RE, Desilva SP: The accuracy of distal posterior interosseous and anterior interosseous nerve injection. J Hand Surg Am; 2004 Sep;29(5):865-70
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  • [Title] The accuracy of distal posterior interosseous and anterior interosseous nerve injection.
  • PURPOSE: To standardize a technique of delivering a local anesthetic to the posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) and anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) by using the anatomic landmarks of the wrist and to evaluate the accuracy of the technique in a cadaver model.
  • METHODS: Techniques for PIN and AIN injection and for PIN injection alone are described.
  • Staining was quantified by calculating the mean density and area stained.
  • Methylene blue was delivered accurately to the AIN in 100% of samples in which it was injected.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These techniques saturated successfully the PIN and AIN and may be useful as diagnostic and therapeutic tools for chronic wrist pain and in evaluating presurgically the effectiveness of partial wrist denervation.
  • [MeSH-minor] Anesthetics, Local / administration & dosage. Cadaver. Coloring Agents. Humans. Injections, Intralesional. Median Nerve. Methylene Blue. Pain / drug therapy. Radial Nerve. Reproducibility of Results

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  • (PMID = 15465236.001).
  • [ISSN] 0363-5023
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of hand surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Hand Surg Am
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anesthetics, Local; 0 / Coloring Agents; T42P99266K / Methylene Blue
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31. Herat A, Whitfeld M, Hillman R: Anal intraepithelial neoplasia and anal cancer in dermatological practice. Australas J Dermatol; 2007 Aug;48(3):143-53; quiz 154-5
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  • [Title] Anal intraepithelial neoplasia and anal cancer in dermatological practice.
  • Anal intraepithelial neoplasia is considered to be a precursor lesion of invasive anal cancer.
  • Human papillomaviruses are considered to be an important aetiological agent in both anal intraepithelial neoplasia and anal cancer.
  • Dermatologists are likely to encounter these conditions among the differential diagnoses to be considered in high-risk patients presenting with perianal and anal lesions.
  • Anal cancer rates are also increasing among the HIV-infected and HIV-non-infected population.
  • The successful treatment of anal intraepithelial neoplasia may reduce the risk of subsequent development of anal cancer.
  • However, current therapies for anal intraepithelial neoplasia may be associated with treatment-related morbidity and are not well validated.
  • It is currently not proven that they reduce the likelihood of the development of anal cancer.
  • Nevertheless, screening for anal intraepithelial neoplasia is being advocated for high-risk groups and may become standard dermatological care for these patients.
  • In view of recent developments in the understanding of this condition, this article reviews the current understanding of anal intraepithelial neoplasia and its treatment from a dermatological perspective.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms. Carcinoma in Situ. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell. Papillomavirus Infections
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnosis, Differential. HIV Infections / complications. Humans. Papillomaviridae / pathogenicity

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  • (PMID = 17680964.001).
  • [ISSN] 0004-8380
  • [Journal-full-title] The Australasian journal of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Australas. J. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Number-of-references] 115
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32. Härmark L, van der Wiel HE, de Groot MC, van Grootheest AC: Proton pump inhibitor-induced acute interstitial nephritis. Br J Clin Pharmacol; 2007 Dec;64(6):819-23
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  • AIM: To investigate the association between the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and acute interstitial nephritis (AIN).
  • METHODS: The Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre Lareb received seven case reports of AIN induced by various PPIs.
  • In five of the reports it was mentioned that the diagnosis was confirmed by a renal biopsy.
  • RESULTS: The time to onset varied between hours to 4 months.
  • In all cases but one the patient spontaneously recovered after withdrawal of the offending agent.
  • In one case the patient received treatment with prednisolone and recovered.
  • In one patient a rechallenge was done 9 days after the initial event.
  • Within 12 h of re-exposure the patient developed symptoms of AIN.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The mechanism of drug-induced AIN is unknown, but an immunological mechanism is suspected.
  • Our reports show no relation between dosage, latency, time to recovery, age or gender, supporting the hypothesis that the aetiology of AIN is immunological.
  • Lareb has received reports of AIN with the use of omeprazole, pantoprazole and rabeprazole.
  • This shows that AIN is a complication associated with the whole group of PPIs and not only omeprazole.
  • It is important for health professionals to be aware of this adverse drug reaction, because an accurate and timely diagnosis and withdrawal of the offending drug can prevent potentially life-threatening renal failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Nephritis, Interstitial / chemically induced. Nephritis, Interstitial / diagnosis. Proton Pump Inhibitors / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 17635502.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2125
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of clinical pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br J Clin Pharmacol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Proton Pump Inhibitors
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2198775
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33. Voigt W, Kegel T, Weiss M, Mueller T, Simon H, Schmoll HJ: Potential activity of paclitaxel, vinorelbine and gemcitabine in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol; 2005 Sep;131(9):585-90
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  • Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) has a rapidly fatal course in the mostly elderly patients with a median survival after diagnosis of 4-12 months.
  • Recently, based on preclinical data Ain et al. conducted a clinical phase II study with paclitaxel 96 h infusion in ATC achieving a promising response rate of 53%.
  • To further improve therapeutic options in ATC, we evaluated the activity of topotecan, oxaliplatin, vinorelbine, gemcitabine and paclitaxel in comparision to cisplatin and doxorubicin (1 and 96 h drug exposure) alone or in combination in the ATC cell lines SW1736 and 8505C.
  • IC50 values were determined by the sulforhodamine B assay, potential clinical activity was estimated by relative antitumor activity (RAA) and drug interaction was analyzed using a parametric response surface approach (Greco model) of the Loewe additivity.
  • Duration of drug effect was estimated by regrowth kinetics.
  • We found paclitaxel, vinorelbine and gemcitabine active in ATC with RAA (1 h drug exposure) ranging from 86 to 454, 15 to 17 and 31 to 140, respectively.
  • The activity of doxorubicin and cisplatin was moderate with RAA ranging from 1.4 to 2.2 and 0.2 to 0.3, respectively.
  • Combined drug exposure of gemcitabine/paclitaxel and gemcitabine/vinorelbine was synergistic with a Loewe index > 0.
  • However, these results did not reach statistical significance with p > 0.05.
  • At clinically relevant drug concentrations paclitaxel, gemcitabine and vinorelbine but not oxaliplatin exerted a sustained growth inhibition after cessation of drug exposure for the complete assay time of 15 days.
  • In conclusion, paclitaxel, gemcitabine and vinorelbine but not topotecan or oxaliplatin appeared to be active in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma based on RAA or growth delay at clinically relevant drug concentrations.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / pharmacology. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Paclitaxel / pharmacology. Thyroid Neoplasms / drug therapy. Vinblastine / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. Cisplatin / pharmacology. Doxorubicin / pharmacology. Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor. Drug Synergism. Humans. Organoplatinum Compounds / pharmacology. Topotecan / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 16021466.001).
  • [ISSN] 0171-5216
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cancer research and clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cancer Res. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 04ZR38536J / oxaliplatin; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; 5V9KLZ54CY / Vinblastine; 7M7YKX2N15 / Topotecan; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; B76N6SBZ8R / gemcitabine; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel; Q20Q21Q62J / Cisplatin; Q6C979R91Y / vinorelbine
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34. Shimomura H, Nakase Y, Furuta H, Nishi M, Nakao T, Hanabusa T, Sasaki H, Okamoto K, Furukawa F, Nanjo K: A rare case of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3. Diabetes Res Clin Pract; 2003 Aug;61(2):103-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A rare case of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3.
  • A 57-year-old female was admitted to our hospital suffering from a lower lip tumor, small ulcers in the arms and alopecia of the head.
  • Because she had type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) for the past 3 years, she was referred to our department of internal medicine for its treatment.
  • Glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA) and islet cell antibodies (ICA) were both positive.
  • Therefore, she was diagnosed as having slowly progressive form of type 1 DM.
  • Type 1 DM is sometimes complicated with autoimmune disorders.
  • After further examinations, she was diagnosed as having Sjögren's syndrome, Graves' disease and autoimmune neutropenia (AIN).
  • According to the histological examinations of the lip tumor and peripheral site of the skin ulcer, the patient was diagnosed as having carcinoma spinocellulare and chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus.
  • She is a rare case of an autoimmune polyglandullar syndrome (APS) type 3 simultaneously manifesting these seven diseases with multiple autoimmune antibodies.
  • [MeSH-major] Autoantibodies / blood. Polyendocrinopathies, Autoimmune / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Alopecia / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / diagnosis. Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 / diagnosis. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Glutamate Decarboxylase / blood. Graves Disease / diagnosis. Hormones / blood. Hormones / immunology. Humans. Islets of Langerhans / immunology. Lupus Erythematosus, Discoid / diagnosis. Middle Aged. Neutropenia / diagnosis. Sjogren's Syndrome / diagnosis. Skin Neoplasms / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 12951278.001).
  • [ISSN] 0168-8227
  • [Journal-full-title] Diabetes research and clinical practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Diabetes Res. Clin. Pract.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Autoantibodies; 0 / Hormones; EC 4.1.1.15 / Glutamate Decarboxylase
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35. Torun D, Sezer S, Kayaselcuk F, Zumrutdal A, Ozdemir FN, Haberal M: Acute interstitial nephritis due to cefoperazone. Ann Pharmacother; 2004 Sep;38(9):1446-8
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  • OBJECTIVE: To describe a case of cefoperazone-induced acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) in which the diagnosis was supported by renal biopsy.
  • CASE SUMMARY: A 35-year-old woman presented to our hospital with decreased urine output and no past history of renal problems.
  • On day 12 of therapy, the patient noted decreased urine output, anorexia, and weakness, but she continued taking cefoperazone for 3 more days.
  • DISCUSSION: Although AIN has been linked with other cephalosporins, as of June 18, 2004, to our knowledge, this is the first report of a cefoperazone-induced case.
  • We based our diagnosis on the features of acute-onset renal failure, abnormal urinalysis findings, eosinophilia, inflammatory infiltrate in the interstitium, and recovery from renal failure after initiation of corticosteroid treatment.
  • Application of the Naranjo probability scale indicated a probable relationship between the acute renal failure secondary to the possible AIN and cefoperazone therapy in this patient.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This case indicates that cefoperazone, like other cephalosporins, can cause AIN.
  • We recommend close monitoring of renal function in patients who are prescribed this drug.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Bacterial Agents / adverse effects. Cefoperazone / adverse effects. Nephritis, Interstitial / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Adult. Blood Urea Nitrogen. Creatinine / blood. Female. Humans. Kidney / pathology. Oliguria / chemically induced. Prednisolone / therapeutic use. Renal Dialysis

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  • (PMID = 15213314.001).
  • [ISSN] 1060-0280
  • [Journal-full-title] The Annals of pharmacotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Pharmacother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 7U75I1278D / Cefoperazone; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone; AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine
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36. Taniuchi S, Masuda M, Hasui M, Tsuji S, Takahashi H, Kobayashi Y: Differential diagnosis and clinical course of autoimmune neutropenia in infancy: comparison with congenital neutropenia. Acta Paediatr; 2002;91(11):1179-82
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Differential diagnosis and clinical course of autoimmune neutropenia in infancy: comparison with congenital neutropenia.
  • AIM: Autoimmune neutropenia in infancy (AIN) is caused by granulocyte-specific autoantibodies.
  • Clinical presentation and diagnosis have not been well studied, resulting in cumbersome diagnostic investigations and unnecessary treatment such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy.
  • METHODS: Clinical, laboratory and immunological data of 18 infants with AIN were evaluated.
  • RESULTS: The average age of onset and resolution of neutropenia in AIN was 7.4 +/- 3.4 mo (mean +/- SD) and 20.4 +/- 4.9 mo, respectively.
  • G-CSF was given to only one infectious patient.
  • CONCLUSION: A combination of diagnostic tests for the detection of granulocyte-specific autoantibodies was useful in diagnosing AIN, thus avoiding unnecessary investigations.
  • Continuous treatment with G-CSF was not necessary for prophylaxis, even if neutrophil counts were extremely low.
  • [MeSH-major] Autoimmune Diseases / diagnosis. Neutropenia / diagnosis. Neutropenia / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Anti-Infective Agents / therapeutic use. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Direct. Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect. Granulocytes / immunology. Humans. Immunoblotting. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Male. Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 12463315.001).
  • [ISSN] 0803-5253
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Paediatr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Norway
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Infective Agents; 8064-90-2 / Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination
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37. Buylaert MA, Schifferli JA: [Acute renal failure--"a well meant present from a friend"]. Ther Umsch; 2004 Dec;61(12):725-7
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  • Acute allergic interstitial nephritis (AIN) due to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) is a well known but rare adverse drug event.
  • Here, we describe the case of a 70 year old woman with recurrent episodes of acute renal failure.
  • A first episode of (AIN) occurred after the intake of mefenaminic acid tablets.
  • A second episode of AIN occurred two years later, this time after transdermal application of diclofenac.
  • Our case illustrates cross-reactivity between NSAIDs and shows that transdermally applied medication can cause systemic adverse events as well.
  • Patients do not mention ointments because they often do not realize that ointments contain active substances, and physicians forget to ask.
  • [MeSH-major] Acute Kidney Injury / chemically induced. Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / toxicity. Diclofenac / toxicity. Mefenamic Acid / toxicity. Nephritis, Interstitial / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Cutaneous. Administration, Oral. Aged. Biopsy. Cross Reactions. Drug Hypersensitivity / diagnosis. Drug Hypersensitivity / pathology. Female. Humans. Kidney / pathology. Recurrence

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  • (PMID = 15651168.001).
  • [ISSN] 0040-5930
  • [Journal-full-title] Therapeutische Umschau. Revue thérapeutique
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ther Umsch
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 144O8QL0L1 / Diclofenac; 367589PJ2C / Mefenamic Acid
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38. Printza N, Koukourgianni F, Saleh T, Goga C, Papachristou F: Drug-induced interstitial nephritis in a child with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl; 2009 Nov;20(6):1072-5
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  • [Title] Drug-induced interstitial nephritis in a child with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome.
  • Both the clinical picture of the patient as well as laboratory, imaging and histopathological findings may help in the diagnosis.
  • We present a case of drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis (AIN), complicated with ARF, in a 2(1/2) -year-old girl with active INS.
  • The child was referred to the Hippokration General Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece hospital with steroid-resistant NS; renal biopsy was performed, which did not show any remarkable findings and cyclosporine was administered in addition to steroid therapy.
  • The first day after biopsy, the child developed gross hematuria and abdominal pain and an antibiotic was added to her treatment.
  • Ultrasound study revealed enlarged kidneys with increased echogenity and loss of corticomedullary differentiation.
  • A second renal biopsy was performed, which confirmed the diagnosis of acute interstitial nephritis.
  • The child did not require dialysis therapy.
  • Our case re-emphasizes the need for investigation of factors precipitating ARF in children with idiopathic NS.
  • [MeSH-major] Acute Kidney Injury / etiology. Anti-Bacterial Agents / adverse effects. Cyclosporine / adverse effects. Immunosuppressive Agents / adverse effects. Nephritis, Interstitial / chemically induced. Nephrotic Syndrome / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 19861874.001).
  • [ISSN] 1319-2442
  • [Journal-full-title] Saudi journal of kidney diseases and transplantation : an official publication of the Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation, Saudi Arabia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Saudi Arabia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Steroids; 83HN0GTJ6D / Cyclosporine
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39. Sabah AA, Aly AM, Tawab AH, Arafa WA: Brucellosis in Egyptian female patients. J Egypt Soc Parasitol; 2008 Aug;38(2):671-8
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  • Over six months, 129 consecutive brucellosis cases were diagnosed in females attending the outpatients' clinics the females in Al-Azhar and Ain Shams Universities Hospitals.
  • 113 (87.6%) gave history of raw milk consumption, 13 (10%) gave history of home slaughtering of sheep, 2 (1.5%) gave history of animal contact, and one patient gave history of abortion, that partner had brucellosis.
  • A total of 61.2% of patients gave serum agglutination test of 1: 640, who suffered acute or subacute infection.
  • Titers of 1:320 (38.8%) were found in the majority of chronic cases.
  • Spinal involvement was in 15% patients, who had chronic brucellosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Brucellosis / drug therapy. Brucellosis / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Aged. Child. Chronic Disease. Drug Therapy, Combination. Egypt. Female. Fever / etiology. Fever / microbiology. Humans. Middle Aged. Rifampin / therapeutic use. Risk Factors. Streptomycin / therapeutic use. Tetracycline / therapeutic use. Treatment Outcome. Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 18853637.001).
  • [ISSN] 1110-0583
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the Egyptian Society of Parasitology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Egypt Soc Parasitol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Egypt
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 8064-90-2 / Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination; F8VB5M810T / Tetracycline; VJT6J7R4TR / Rifampin; Y45QSO73OB / Streptomycin
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40. González E, Gutiérrez E, Galeano C, Chevia C, de Sequera P, Bernis C, Parra EG, Delgado R, Sanz M, Ortiz M, Goicoechea M, Quereda C, Olea T, Bouarich H, Hernández Y, Segovia B, Praga M, Grupo Madrileño De Nefritis Intersticiales: Early steroid treatment improves the recovery of renal function in patients with drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis. Kidney Int; 2008 Apr;73(8):940-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Early steroid treatment improves the recovery of renal function in patients with drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis.
  • The role of steroid treatment in drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis (DI-AIN) is controversial.
  • We performed a multicenter retrospective study to determine the influence of steroids in 61 patients with biopsy-proven DI-AIN, 52 of whom were treated with steroids.
  • The responsible drugs were antibiotics (56%), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (37%) or other drugs.
  • The final serum creatinine was significantly lower in treated patients while almost half of untreated patients remained on chronic dialysis.
  • After withdrawal of the presumed causative drug, we found that when steroid treatment was delayed (by an average of 34 days) renal function did not return to baseline levels compared to those who received steroid treatment within the first 2 weeks after withdrawal of the offending agent.
  • Our study shows that steroids should be started promptly after diagnosis of DI-AIN to avoid subsequent interstitial fibrosis and an incomplete recovery of renal function.
  • [MeSH-major] Creatinine / blood. Nephritis, Interstitial / drug therapy. Steroids / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / adverse effects. Biopsy. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Kidney / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies


41. Itoh T, Miura AB: [Drug-induced autoimmune neutropenia(drug-induced AIN)]. Ryoikibetsu Shokogun Shirizu; 2000;(31):190-3
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Drug-induced autoimmune neutropenia(drug-induced AIN)].
  • [MeSH-major] Autoimmune Diseases / chemically induced. Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions. Neutropenia / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity. Autoantibodies. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Neutrophils / immunology. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 11269054.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Ryōikibetsu shōkōgun shirīzu
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ryoikibetsu Shokogun Shirizu
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Autoantibodies
  • [Number-of-references] 14
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42. Health Quality Ontario: Anal dysplasia screening: an evidence-based analysis. Ont Health Technol Assess Ser; 2007;7(4):1-43
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  • [Title] Anal dysplasia screening: an evidence-based analysis.
  • OBJECTIVE: This review considered the role of the anal Pap test as a screening test for anal dysplasia in patients at high risk of anal SCC.
  • High-resolution anoscopy (a method to view the rectal area, using an anoscope, a lighted instrument inserted into the rectum) rather than routine anoscopy-guided biopsy, is also now considered to be the diagnostic standard.
  • CLINICAL NEED: TARGET POPULATION AND CONDITION Anal cancer, like cervical cancer, is a member of a broader group of anogenital cancers known to be associated with sexually transmitted viral HPV infection.
  • Sexual practices involving receptive anal intercourse lead to significantly elevated risk for anal dysplasia and cancer, particularly in those with immune dysfunctions.
  • Anal cancer is rare.
  • It occurs at a rate of about 1 to 2 per 100,000 in the general population.
  • It is the least common of the lower gastrointestinal cancers, representing about 4% of them, in contrast to colorectal cancers, which remain the third most commonly diagnosed malignancy.
  • Certain segments of the population, however, such as HIV-positive men and women, other chronic immune-suppressed patients (e.g., after a transplant), injection drug users, and women with genital dysplasia /cancer, have a high susceptibility to anal cancer.
  • Those with the highest identified risk for anal cancer are HIV-positive homosexual and bisexual men, at a rate of 70 per 100,000 men.
  • The risk for anal cancer is reported to be increasing dramatically in HIV-positive males and females, particularly since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy in the mid-1990s.
  • The introduction of effective viral therapy has been said to have transformed the AIDS epidemic in developed countries into a chronic disease state of long-term immunosuppression.
  • About 28% of the newly diagnosed HIV infections are in women, a doubling since 1999.
  • It has also been estimated that 1 of 3 people living with HIV do no know it.
  • HEALTH TECHNOLOGY DESCRIPTION: Anal Pap test screening involves the blind insertion of a swab into the anal canal and fixing cells either on a slide or in fluid for cytological examination.
  • Anal cytology classified by the standardized Bethesda System is the same classification used for cervical cytology.
  • It has 4 categories: normal, atypical squamous cells of uncertain significance, or squamous intraepithelial lesions which are further classified into low- or high-grade lesions.
  • Several HPV deoxyribonucleic acid detection technologies such as the Hybrid 11 Capture and the polymerase chain reaction are available to detect and differentiate HPV viral strains.
  • Unlike cervical cancer, there are no universally accepted guidelines or standards of care for anal dysplasia.
  • The New York State Department of Health AIDS Institute has recently recommended (March 2007) annual anal pap testing in high-risk groups.
  • That is, there is no reimbursement for anal Pap testing in men or women, and HPV screening tests for cervical or anal cancer are also not reimbursed.
  • Assessments of current practices were obtained through consultations with various agencies and individuals including the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care AIDS Bureau; Public Health Infectious Diseases Branch, Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care; Cancer Care Ontario; HIV/AIDS researchers; pathology experts; and HIV/AIDS clinical program directors.
  • FINDINGS: No direct evidence was found for the existence of controlled studies evaluating the effectiveness of anal Pap test screening programs for impact on anal cancer morbidity or mortality.
  • In addition, no studies were found on the use of HPV DNA testing in the screening or diagnostic setting for anal dysplasia.
  • The reported prevalence of HPV infection in high-risk groups, particularly HIV-positive males, however, was sufficiently high to preclude any utility of HPV testing as an adjunct to anal Pap testing.
  • Nine reports involving studies in the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada were identified that evaluated the performance characteristics of anal Pap test screening for anal dysplasia.
  • All studies involved experienced pathologists, so the results generally represent best-case scenarios.
  • Estimates of anal Pap test sensitivity and specificity were highly variable, and depended on the varying prevalence of cytology abnormality and differential thresholds for abnormality for both cytology and histopathology.
  • In the largest study of HIV-positive males, sensitivity varied from 46% (95% confidence interval [CI], 36%-56%) to 69% (95% CI, 60%-78%).
  • In the only study of HIV-negative males, sensitivity ranged from 26% (95% CI, 5%-47%) to 47% (95% CI, 26%-68%).
  • In comparison, cervical Pap testing has also been evaluated mainly in settings where there is a high prevalence of the disease, and estimates of sensitivitykij and specificity were also low and highly variable.
  • CONCLUSIONS: No direct evidence exists to support the effectiveness of an anal Pap test screening program to reduce anal cancer mortality or morbidity.
  • Sexually transmitted HPV viral infection is currently the acknowledged common causative agent for both anal and cervical cancer.
  • Anal cancer rates in high-risk populations are approaching those of cervical cancer before the implementation of Pap testing.
  • The anal Pap test, although it has been mainly evaluated only in HIV-positive males, has similar operating characteristics of sensitivity and specificity as the cervical Pap test.
  • In general, the treatment options for precancer dysplasia in the cervix and the anus are similar, but treatment involving a definitive surgical resection in the anus is more limited because of the higher risk of complications.
  • A range of ablative therapies has been applied for anal dysplasia, but evidence on treatment effectiveness, tolerability and durability, particularly in the HIV-positive patient, is limited.

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  • (PMID = 23074504.001).
  • [ISSN] 1915-7398
  • [Journal-full-title] Ontario health technology assessment series
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ont Health Technol Assess Ser
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3377578
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43. Elnour AA, El Mugammar IT, Jaber T, Revel T, McElnay JC: Pharmaceutical care of patients with gestational diabetes mellitus. J Eval Clin Pract; 2008 Feb;14(1):131-40
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pharmaceutical care of patients with gestational diabetes mellitus.
  • RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the introduction of a programme of optimising drug treatment, intensive education and self-monitoring of patients diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) at an early stage (<20 gestational weeks), will improve management outcomes as determined by objective measures of patient knowledge about diabetes, glycaemia control, maternal/neonatal complications, and health-related quality of life.
  • METHODS: The study was a randomized, controlled, longitudinal, prospective clinical trial performed at Al-Ain Hospital, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates.
  • Over an 18-month period, patients diagnosed with GDM were recruited and were randomly assigned to either an intervention or a control group, in a ratio of 3:2.
  • Intervention patients received a structured pharmaceutical care service (including education and introduction of intensive self-monitoring) while control patients received traditional services.
  • Patients were followed up from time of recruitment until 6 months postnatally at scheduled outpatient clinics.
  • RESULTS: A total of 165 patients (99 intervention, 66 control) completed the study.
  • The intervention patients exhibited a range of benefits from the provision of the programme when compared with control group patients.
  • Statistically significant (P < 0.05) improvements were shown in the intervention group for knowledge of diabetes, health-related quality of life (as determined by the SF36), control of plasma glucose and HbA(1c), maternal complications [e.g. decreased incidence of pre-eclampsia (5.1% vs. 16.7%), eclampsia (1.0% vs. 7.6%), episodes of severe hyperglycaemia (3.0% vs. 19.7%) and need for Caesarean section (7.1% vs. 18.2%)], and neonatal complications [e.g. decreased incidence of neonatal hypoglycaemia (2.0% vs. 10.6%), respiratory distress at birth (4.0% vs. 15.2%), hyperbilirubinaemia (1.0% vs. 12.1%) and large for gestational age (9.0% vs. 22.7%)].
  • CONCLUSION: The research provides clear evidence that provision of pharmaceutical care adds value to the management of GDM as exemplified by improved maternal and neonatal outcomes.
  • [MeSH-major] Diabetes, Gestational / drug therapy. Insulin / therapeutic use. Patient Education as Topic
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Area Under Curve. Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring. Comorbidity. Female. Humans. Longitudinal Studies. Pregnancy. Pregnancy Outcome. Prospective Studies. Quality of Life. Statistics, Nonparametric. Surveys and Questionnaires. Treatment Outcome. United Arab Emirates

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  • (PMID = 18211656.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2753
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of evaluation in clinical practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Eval Clin Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Insulin
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44. Lee PK, Wilkins KB: Condyloma and other infections including human immunodeficiency virus. Surg Clin North Am; 2010 Feb;90(1):99-112, Table of Contents
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  • Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are a common public health problem and as such may be more common in a surgical practice than is believed.
  • This article reviews the presentation and management of the more common perianal STDs including human immunodeficiency virus, as well as the pathogenesis and management of anal intraepithelial neoplasia.
  • [MeSH-major] Condylomata Acuminata / therapy. Condylomata Acuminata / virology. Genital Diseases, Female / virology. Genital Diseases, Male / virology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aminoquinolines / administration & dosage. Anti-Bacterial Agents / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Anus Neoplasms / virology. Chancroid. Female. HIV Infections. Herpes Genitalis / diagnosis. Herpesvirus 1, Human. Herpesvirus 2, Human. Humans. Male. Penicillin G / administration & dosage. Proctitis / virology. Rectal Diseases / virology. Sexually Transmitted Diseases / virology. Syphilis / drug therapy. Ulcer

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20109635.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-3171
  • [Journal-full-title] The Surgical clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Aminoquinolines; 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 99011-02-6 / imiquimod; Q42T66VG0C / Penicillin G
  • [Number-of-references] 42
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45. Sen S, Bayrak R, Ok E, Başdemir G: Drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis and vasculitis or vasculary rejection in renal allografts. Am J Kidney Dis; 2001 Jan;37(1):E4
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  • [Title] Drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis and vasculitis or vasculary rejection in renal allografts.
  • We describe a patient who sought treatment for acute renal allograft dysfunction 2 weeks after renal transplantation.
  • Pathologic diagnosis was acute rejection (grade 2b- Banff 93); however, another clinical diagnosis, drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis (AIN), was not excluded.
  • Recovery of renal function without antirejection treatment and discontinuation of TMP-SMZ shows that renal pathology might be related to drug-induced dysfunction and drug-induced AIN and vasculitis.
  • After 5 years, the patient and his renal allograft function are both well.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Transplantation / adverse effects. Nephritis, Interstitial / etiology. Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination / adverse effects. Vasculitis / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Biopsy. Diagnosis, Differential. Graft Rejection / complications. Graft Rejection / diagnosis. Humans. Kidney / pathology. Male

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  • (PMID = 11136193.001).
  • [ISSN] 1523-6838
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Kidney Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 8064-90-2 / Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination
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46. Ra A, Tobe SW: Acute interstitial nephritis due to pantoprazole. Ann Pharmacother; 2004 Jan;38(1):41-5
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  • OBJECTIVE: To describe what is believed, as of November 4, 2003, to be the first case published in the literature of acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) due to pantoprazole.
  • CASE SUMMARY: A 77-year-old white woman presented to the hospital with elevated serum creatinine, oliguria for the past 24 hours, arthralgia, fatigue, fever, and bilateral flank pain.
  • The patient had initiated treatment with oral pantoprazole 40 mg/d for gastroesophageal reflux 2 months prior to admission.
  • After 5 weeks of therapy, she stopped taking pantoprazole due to general malaise.
  • Upon admission, all home medications, including pantoprazole, were reinitiated based on the patient's medication list.
  • Serum creatinine increased to 6.1 mg/dL on day 4 of admission from a baseline of 1.0 mg/dL.
  • Urinalysis revealed eosinophils, and a subsequent renal biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of AIN.
  • The serum creatinine level gradually declined over 2 weeks, and the patient was discharged home with a serum creatinine level of 1.6 mg/dL.
  • The Naranjo probability scale suggests a highly probable relationship between AIN and pantoprazole therapy in this patient.
  • DISCUSSION: Drug hypersensitivity reactions are the most common cause of AIN.
  • There have been several reported cases of omeprazole-induced AIN.
  • Although there are very few prospective data on the efficacy of treatment of drug-induced AIN, corticosteroids may have a role in recovery of renal function.
  • Prednisone doses of 1 mg/kg/d have been suggested.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Physicians should be aware that drug-induced AIN can be associated with proton-pump inhibitors.
  • [MeSH-major] Acute Disease. Benzimidazoles / adverse effects. Nephritis, Interstitial / chemically induced. Sulfoxides / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] 2-Pyridinylmethylsulfinylbenzimidazoles. Administration, Oral. Aged. Biopsy. Ciprofloxacin / administration & dosage. Ciprofloxacin / pharmacokinetics. Creatinine / blood. Female. Gastroesophageal Reflux / complications. Gastroesophageal Reflux / drug therapy. Humans. Kidney / pathology. Oliguria. Omeprazole / analogs & derivatives. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Prednisone / pharmacokinetics. Proton Pump Inhibitors. Proton Pumps / adverse effects. Proton Pumps / pharmacology. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 14742791.001).
  • [ISSN] 1060-0280
  • [Journal-full-title] The Annals of pharmacotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Pharmacother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 2-Pyridinylmethylsulfinylbenzimidazoles; 0 / Benzimidazoles; 0 / Proton Pump Inhibitors; 0 / Proton Pumps; 0 / Sulfoxides; 5E8K9I0O4U / Ciprofloxacin; AYI8EX34EU / Creatinine; D8TST4O562 / pantoprazole; KG60484QX9 / Omeprazole; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone
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47. Winder DM, Ball SL, Vaughan K, Hanna N, Woo YL, Fränzer JT, Sterling JC, Stanley MA, Sudhoff H, Goon PK: Sensitive HPV detection in oropharyngeal cancers. BMC Cancer; 2009 Dec 15;9:440
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  • BACKGROUND: Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the aetiological agents of certain benign and malignant tumours of skin and mucosae; the most important of which is cervical cancer.
  • Also, the incidence of ano-genital warts, HPV-anal cancer and oropharyngeal cancers are rising.
  • To help ascertain a useful PCR detection protocol for oropharyngeal cancers, we directly compared three commonly used primer sets in detection of HPV from different clinical samples.
  • METHODS: We compared PGMY09/11, MY09/11 and GP5+/6+ primers sets in PCRs of 34 clinically diagnosed samples of genital warts, cervical brushings (with associated histological diagnosis) and vulval biopsies.
  • RESULTS: PGMY09/11 primers detected HPV presence in more cervical brushing (100%) and genital wart (92.9%) samples compared to MY09/11 (90% and 64.3%) and GP5+/6+ (80% and 64.3%) primer sets, respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: PGMY09/11 primers are the preferred primer set among these three for primary PCR screening with different clinical samples.
  • MY09/11 and GP5+/6+ may be used (particularly for cervical samples) but demonstrate lower detection rates.
  • A nested PCR approach (i.e. a PGMY-GP system) may be required to confirm negativity or to detect low levels of HPV, undetectable using current primary PCR methods, as demonstrated using oropharyngeal cancer samples.

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  • (PMID = 20003490.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2407
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cancer
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Cancer Research UK / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA Primers; 0 / DNA, Viral
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2803197
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48. Kim MJ, Heim M, Mayr M: Effect of corticosteroids during ongoing drug exposure in pantoprazole-induced interstitial nephritis. Nephrol Dial Transplant; 2010 May;25(5):1716-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effect of corticosteroids during ongoing drug exposure in pantoprazole-induced interstitial nephritis.
  • Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) represents a significant cause of acute renal failure in hospital practice.
  • An increasing number of drugs are known to cause AIN.
  • We report on a case with pantoprazole-induced interstitial nephritis and on the effect of steroids during ongoing drug exposure.
  • In spite of ongoing drug exposure, steroids led to almost complete resolution of the inflammatory infiltrates.
  • Early diagnosis of interstitial nephritis by renal biopsy and identification of the causative drug and its withdrawal remains the mainstay of treatment.
  • However, the additional use of steroids has the potential to eradicate inflammatory infiltrates more rapidly and completely and may thus be important to minimize subsequent chronic damage.
  • [MeSH-major] 2-Pyridinylmethylsulfinylbenzimidazoles / adverse effects. Nephritis, Interstitial / chemically induced. Nephritis, Interstitial / drug therapy. Prednisone / therapeutic use. Proton Pump Inhibitors / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 20067906.001).
  • [ISSN] 1460-2385
  • [Journal-full-title] Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 2-Pyridinylmethylsulfinylbenzimidazoles; 0 / Proton Pump Inhibitors; D8TST4O562 / pantoprazole; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone
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49. Demirkaya E, Atay AA, Musabak U, Sengul A, Gok F: Ceftriaxone-related hemolysis and acute renal failure. Pediatr Nephrol; 2006 May;21(5):733-6
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  • A 5-year-old girl with no underlying immune deficiency or hematologic disease was treated with a combination of ceftriaxone and ampicilline-sulbactam for pneumonia.
  • Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) was diagnosed by renal biopsy.
  • The patient's renal insufficiency was successfully treated with peritoneal dialysis without any complications.
  • The patient recovered without any treatment using steroids or other immunosuppressive agents.
  • [MeSH-major] Acute Kidney Injury / chemically induced. Anemia, Hemolytic / chemically induced. Anti-Bacterial Agents / adverse effects. Ceftriaxone / adverse effects. Nephritis, Interstitial / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Ampicillin / adverse effects. Child, Preschool. Coombs Test. Female. Humans. Immunoglobulin G / immunology. Peritoneal Dialysis. Pneumonia / drug therapy. Sulbactam / adverse effects. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16491410.001).
  • [ISSN] 0931-041X
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric nephrology (Berlin, Germany)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr. Nephrol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Immunoglobulin G; 65DT0ML581 / sultamicillin; 75J73V1629 / Ceftriaxone; 7C782967RD / Ampicillin; S4TF6I2330 / Sulbactam
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50. Perazella MA, Markowitz GS: Drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis. Nat Rev Nephrol; 2010 Aug;6(8):461-70
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis.
  • Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is a common cause of acute kidney injury.
  • Many etiologies of AIN have been recognized--including allergic/drug-induced, infectious, autoimmune/systemic, and idiopathic forms of disease.
  • The most common etiology of AIN is drug-induced disease, which is thought to underlie 60-70% of cases.
  • Multiple agents from many different classes of drugs can cause AIN, and the clinical presentation and laboratory findings vary according to the class of drug involved.
  • AIN is characterized by interstitial inflammation, tubulitis, edema, and in some cases, eventual interstitial fibrosis.
  • A definitive diagnosis of AIN can be established only by kidney biopsy.
  • Noninvasive tests such as (67)gallium scintigraphy and testing for eosinophiluria have limited diagnostic utility.
  • The mainstay of therapy for drug-induced AIN is timely discontinuation of the causative agent.
  • Although the benefits of corticosteroid therapy remain unproven, they do appear to have a positive effect in some patients with drug-induced AIN, especially when treatment is initiated early in the course of the disease.
  • In general, the prognosis for drug-induced AIN is good, and at least partial recovery of kidney function is normally observed.
  • Early recognition is crucial because patients can ultimately develop chronic kidney disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Acute Kidney Injury / etiology. Kidney / drug effects. Nephritis, Interstitial / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans

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  • (PMID = 20517290.001).
  • [ISSN] 1759-507X
  • [Journal-full-title] Nature reviews. Nephrology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nat Rev Nephrol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
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51. Salama MM, Ghorab EM, Al-Abyad AG, Al-Bahy KM: Concomitant weekly vincristine and radiation followed by adjuvant vincristine and carboplatin in the treatment of high risk medulloblastoma: Ain Shams University Hospital and Sohag Cancer Center study. J Egypt Natl Canc Inst; 2006 Jun;18(2):167-74
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  • [Title] Concomitant weekly vincristine and radiation followed by adjuvant vincristine and carboplatin in the treatment of high risk medulloblastoma: Ain Shams University Hospital and Sohag Cancer Center study.
  • PURPOSE: To evaluate survival, progression free survival (PFS) and toxicity of children with newly diagnosed high risk medulloblastoma who were treated with weekly vincristine concurrently during irradiation followed by adjuvant carboplatin and vincristine.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: High risk medulloblastoma patients with postoperative gross residual disease that was >1.5 cm2 and/or metastatic disease (M+) were planned to receive craniospinal irradiation (CSI) 36 Gy followed by boost to the posterior fossa for a total of 55.8 Gy.
  • RESULTS: The study included seventeen high risk medulloblastoma patients presented to Ain Shams University hospitals and Sohag Cancer Center between November 2001 and March 2005.
  • The 3-year overall survival for M+ patients was 50% vs. 81.8% for M0 patients (p=0.04).
  • The 3-year PFS was 50% for M+ patients vs. 63.6% for M0 patients (p=0.15).
  • Grade 3 and 4 neutropenia were observed in 5 patients (29%).
  • One patient (6%) developed grade 3 peripheral neuropathy.
  • CONCLUSION: Our results show that the present chemotherapy and radiotherapeutic approach is able to improve overall survival and PFS in high risk patients with gross residual disease but not in patients with metastatic disease (M+) that may require more intensive therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Cerebellar Neoplasms / therapy. Medulloblastoma / therapy. Vincristine / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Male. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 17496943.001).
  • [ISSN] 1110-0362
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the Egyptian National Cancer Institute
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Egypt Natl Canc Inst
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Egypt
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin
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52. Martin F, Bower M: Anal intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV positive people. Sex Transm Infect; 2001 Oct;77(5):327-31
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  • [Title] Anal intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV positive people.
  • OBJECTIVE: To review the current literature on HIV associated anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN).
  • METHODS: A comprehensive Medline/Pubmed search was performed for the years 1980-2001 (January) for articles pertaining to HIV associated anal intraepithelial neoplasia.
  • From the MeSH terms "anal intraepithelial neoplasia" and "anal cancer" the following subheadings were used: HIV, homosexual men, HPV, Epidemiology, Etiology, Mortality, Diagnosis, Screening, Drug Therapy, Surgical Therapy, Radio Therapy, Risk factors, ASIL.
  • In the absence of enough "randomised controlled trials" the search was extended to clinical trials, reviews, and case reports.
  • The Cochrane Database of systematic reviews yielded 11 complete reviews for "anal cancer" and none for "anal intraepithelial neoplasia."
  • We also included our personal experience from the treatment of patients at the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, one of the largest centres for the management of HIV disease in Europe.
  • CONCLUSION: Routine anal cytological screening followed by appropriate management of AIN is an important issue for HIV infected patients.
  • The natural history of AIN has not been fully established and this prevents clinicians from defining clear management protocols.
  • There is early evidence that the benefits of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in terms of restoring immune function and reducing opportunistic infections and some neoplasms may not extend to regression of AIN.
  • Under these circumstances it might be predicted that AIN and subsequent progression to invasive anal cancer would rise as HAART prolongs the lives of seropositive people.
  • However, routine anal cytological screening will surely have to await an effective proved intervention for AIN and this would seem to be a pressing clinical goal.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / virology. Carcinoma in Situ / virology. HIV Seropositivity. Homosexuality, Male. Papillomavirus Infections / complications. Tumor Virus Infections / complications

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  • (PMID = 11588276.001).
  • [ISSN] 1368-4973
  • [Journal-full-title] Sexually transmitted infections
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Sex Transm Infect
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 48
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1744388
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