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1. de Araujo JA Jr, Falavigna G, Rogero MM, Pires IS, Pedrosa RG, Castro IA, Donato J Jr, Tirapegui J: Effect of chronic supplementation with branched-chain amino acids on the performance and hepatic and muscle glycogen content in trained rats. Life Sci; 2006 Aug 29;79(14):1343-8
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  • [Title] Effect of chronic supplementation with branched-chain amino acids on the performance and hepatic and muscle glycogen content in trained rats.
  • The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of a diet supplemented with branched-chain amino acids (BCAA; 3.57% and 4.76%) on the performance and glycogen metabolism of trained rats.
  • Thirty-six adult male Wistar rats received the control diet (AIN-93M) (n=12) and two diets supplemented with BCAA (S1: AIN-93M+3.57% BCAA, n=12, and S2: AIN-93M+4.76% BCAA, n=12) for 6 weeks.
  • The training protocol consisted of bouts of swimming exercise (60 min day(-1)) for 6 weeks at intensities close to the lactate threshold.
  • The time to exhaustion did not differ between groups.
  • The groups submitted to the exhaustion test presented a reduction in plasma glucose and an increase in plasma ammonia and blood lactate concentrations compared to the 1H condition.
  • In the 1H condition, hepatic glycogen concentration was significantly higher in group S2 compared to the control diet and S1 groups (132% and 44%, respectively).
  • Group S2 in the 1H condition presented a higher muscle glycogen concentration (45%) compared to the control diet group.
  • In the EX condition, a significantly higher hepatic glycogen concentration was observed for group S2 compared to the control diet and S1 groups (262% and 222%, respectively).
  • [MeSH-major] Amino Acids, Branched-Chain / pharmacology. Glycogen / metabolism. Liver Glycogen / metabolism. Muscle, Skeletal / metabolism. Physical Conditioning, Animal / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Ammonia / blood. Anaerobic Threshold / drug effects. Animals. Blood Glucose / metabolism. Citrate (si)-Synthase / metabolism. Diet. Eating / drug effects. Lactic Acid / blood. Male. Rats. Rats, Wistar

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  • (PMID = 16698042.001).
  • [ISSN] 0024-3205
  • [Journal-full-title] Life sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Life Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Amino Acids, Branched-Chain; 0 / Blood Glucose; 0 / Liver Glycogen; 33X04XA5AT / Lactic Acid; 7664-41-7 / Ammonia; 9005-79-2 / Glycogen; EC 2.3.3.1 / Citrate (si)-Synthase
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2. Valdman A, Häggarth L, Cheng L, Lopez-Beltran A, Montironi R, Ekman P, Egevad L: Expression of redox pathway enzymes in human prostatic tissue. Anal Quant Cytol Histol; 2009 Dec;31(6):367-74
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  • In a prognostic TMA, 294 primary cases of PCa with a median follow-up of 49 months were stained for Trx1 and Prdx2.
  • Another TMA containing benign prostatic tissue, atrophy, high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) and PCa from 40 patients was stained with all 3 antibodies.
  • Trx1 and Prdx2 did not correlate with biochemical recurrence.

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  • (PMID = 20698352.001).
  • [ISSN] 0884-6812
  • [Journal-full-title] Analytical and quantitative cytology and histology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anal. Quant. Cytol. Histol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / TXN protein, human; 52500-60-4 / Thioredoxins; EC 1.11.1.15 / PRDX2 protein, human; EC 1.11.1.15 / Peroxiredoxins; EC 1.8.1.9 / TXNRD2 protein, human; EC 1.8.1.9 / Thioredoxin Reductase 2
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3. Alves CC, Torrinhas RS, Giorgi R, Brentani MM, Logullo AF, Arias V, Mauad T, da Silva LF, Waitzberg DL: Short-term specialized enteral diet fails to attenuate malnutrition impairment of experimental open wound acute healing. Nutrition; 2010 Sep;26(9):873-9
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  • METHODS: Adult male isogenic Lewis rats divided into two groups (eutrophic, n = 30; and previously malnourished, 12-15% body weight loss, n = 27) were subjected to cutaneous dorsal wounds and gastrostomy.
  • Control rats received a standard oral diet (AIN-93M chow) plus enteral saline solution.
  • A specialized enteral diet did not improve wound healing of malnourished rats but did promote wound contraction at post-trauma day 7 in eutrophic rats.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Collagen / genetics. Collagen / metabolism. Disease Models, Animal. Enteral Nutrition. Fibroblasts / cytology. Food, Formulated. Gene Expression / physiology. Inflammation / etiology. Male. Rats. Rats, Inbred Lew

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20692600.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-1244
  • [Journal-full-title] Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nutrition
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antioxidants; 9007-34-5 / Collagen; 94ZLA3W45F / Arginine
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4. Saad AA, El-Shennawy D, El-Hagracy RS, Hamed AI, El-Feky MA, Ismail MA: Prognostic value of lipoprotein lipase expression among egyptian B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients. J Egypt Natl Canc Inst; 2008 Dec;20(4):323-9
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  • [Title] Prognostic value of lipoprotein lipase expression among egyptian B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients.
  • BACKGROUND: B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) is a heterogeneous disease with a highly variable clinical course.
  • The motive to find more reliable prognostic factors apart from stage, age, tumor volume and immunoglobulin heavy chain mutations is of clinical interest.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was carried out on 25 CLL patients attending Hematology Clinic at Ain Shams University Hospitals.
  • Peripheral blood sample was taken from each patient for surface CD38 and cytoplasmic zeta-chain-associated protein tyrosine kinase (ZAP-70) by flow cytometry and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) expression by real time PCR.
  • RESULTS: We demonstrated statistically significant association between high level of LPL expression and significantly high LDH level, poor cytogenetic risk, ZAP- 70 expression and response to therapy (p=0.01, 0.02, 0.04 and 0.001 respectively).

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  • (PMID = 20571590.001).
  • [ISSN] 1110-0362
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the Egyptian National Cancer Institute
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Egypt Natl Canc Inst
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Egypt
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5. Al-Kaabi J, Al-Maskari F, Saadi H, Afandi B, Parkar H, Nagelkerke N: Assessment of dietary practice among diabetic patients in the United arab emirates. Rev Diabet Stud; 2008;5(2):110-5
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  • [Title] Assessment of dietary practice among diabetic patients in the United arab emirates.
  • OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess dietary practices and risk profile (hypertension, obesity, lipid profile and glycemic control) among people with diabetes in Al-Ain District, United Arab Emirates (UAE).
  • METHODS: During 2006, we performed a cross-sectional study of diabetic patients attending diabetic outpatient clinics at Tawam Hospital and primary health care centers in Al-Ain District.
  • Subjects completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire, blood pressure, body mass index, percentage body fat and abdominal circumference were measured and recorded and the most recent HbA1c levels and fasting lipid profile were identified.
  • 46% reported that they had never been seen by dietician since their diagnosis.
  • Their overall risk profile, notably body weight, lipid profile and blood pressure, was very unfavorable; more than half of the study sample had uncontrolled hypertension and uncontrolled lipid profile and the majority was overweight (36%) or obese (45%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The dietary practices of diabetic patients in the UAE are inadequate and need improvement.

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  • (PMID = 18795213.001).
  • [ISSN] 1614-0575
  • [Journal-full-title] The review of diabetic studies : RDS
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Diabet Stud
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2556444
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6. Boateng J, Verghese M, Shackelford L, Walker LT, Khatiwada J, Ogutu S, Williams DS, Jones J, Guyton M, Asiamah D, Henderson F, Grant L, DeBruce M, Johnson A, Washington S, Chawan CB: Selected fruits reduce azoxymethane (AOM)-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in Fisher 344 male rats. Food Chem Toxicol; 2007 May;45(5):725-32
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  • The groups were fed AIN-93G as a control (C) diet, the rats fed fruits received AIN-93G+5% fruits and the groups that were given fruits juices received 20% fruit juice instead of water.
  • The rats received subcutaneous injections of AOM at 16 mg/kg body weight at seventh and eighth weeks of age.
  • Total ACF numbers (mean+/-SEM) in the rats fed CON, BLU, BLK, PLM, MNG, POJ, WMJ and CBJ were 171.67+/-5.6, 11.33+/-2.85, 24.0+/-0.58, 33.67+/-0.89, 28.67+/-1.33, 15.67+/-1.86, 24.33+/-3.92 and 39.0+/-15.31.

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  • (PMID = 17321025.001).
  • [ISSN] 0278-6915
  • [Journal-full-title] Food and chemical toxicology : an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Food Chem. Toxicol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Plant Extracts; EC 2.5.1.18 / Glutathione Transferase; MO0N1J0SEN / Azoxymethane
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7. Kim YJ, Kwon S, Kim MK: Effect of Chlorella vulgaris intake on cadmium detoxification in rats fed cadmium. Nutr Res Pract; 2009;3(2):89-94
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  • The aim of this study was to investigate if dietary Chlorella vulgaris (chlorella) intake would be effective on cadmium (Cd) detoxification in rats fed dietary Cd.
  • Fourteen-week old male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats weighing 415.0 +/- 1.6 g were randomly divided into two groups and fed slightly modified American Institute of Nutrition-93 Growing (AIN-93G) diet without (n=10) or with (n=40) dietary Cd (200 ppm) for 8 weeks.
  • To confirm alteration by dietary Cd intake, twenty rats fed AIN-93G diet without (n=10) and with (n=10) dietary Cd were sacrificed and compared.
  • Other thirty rats were randomly blocked into three groups and fed slightly modified AIN-93G diets replacing 0 (n=10), 5 (n=10) or 10% (n=10) chlorella of total kg diet for 4 weeks.
  • Daily food intake, body weight change, body weight gain/calorie intake, organ weight (liver, spleen, and kidney), perirenal fat pad and epididymal fat pad weights were measured.
  • Food intake, calorie intake, body weight change, body weight gain/calorie intake, organ weight and fat pad weights were decreased by dietary Cd intake.
  • Urinary Cd excretion and MT concentrations in kidney and small intestine were increased by dietary Cd.
  • After given Cd containing diet, food intake, calorie intake, body weight change, body weight gain/calorie intake, organ weights and fat pad weights were not influenced by dietary chlorella intake.
  • Renal MT synthesis tended to be higher in a dose-dependent manner, but not significantly.
  • And chlorella intake did not significantly facilitate renal and intestinal MT synthesis and urinary Cd excretion.
  • These findings suggest that, after stopping cadmium supply, chlorella supplementation, regardless of its percentage, might not improve cadmium detoxification from the body in growing rats.

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  • (PMID = 20016707.001).
  • [ISSN] 2005-6168
  • [Journal-full-title] Nutrition research and practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nutr Res Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2788181
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Chlorella vulgaris / Sprague-Dawley rats / cadmium excretion / metallothionein
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8. Garland SM: Prevention strategies against human papillomavirus in males. Gynecol Oncol; 2010 May;117(2 Suppl):S20-5
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  • Oncogenic HPV is strongly associated with cancers and high-grade dysplasias of the anogenital tract, including the anus, penis, and also a proportion of oropharyngeal cancers.
  • In reducing male disease burden, some consider screening and treatment for high-grade anal dysplasia (AIN) to prevent anal cancer in high-risk populations.
  • Such strategies have wide implications for the workforce, and require more evidence for the optimal management of AIN.
  • Male sexual behavior, with consequent HPV infection and disease contribute to considerable disease burden in females.
  • Hence, inclusion of males in prophylactic HPV vaccination programs should prevent HPV-related disease in males as well as substantially reducing disease burden in females.
  • Clinical trial data in males 16-26 years for the quadrivalent vaccine show it is well tolerated, induces a strong type-specific immunological response comparable to that of females, and reduced vaccine HPV-type-related genital infection, as well as disease.
  • Cost-benefit analyses and mathematical modeling show that the most cost-effective strategy involves routine administration of this vaccine to 12-year-old females, with catch-up vaccination of 12- to 24-year-olds, with the most effective strategy in disease reduction including men and/or boys in the program.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • (PMID = 20138347.001).
  • [ISSN] 1095-6859
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Papillomavirus Vaccines
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9. Kayser G, Gerlach U, Walch A, Nitschke R, Haxelmans S, Kayser K, Hopt U, Werner M, Lassmann S: Numerical and structural centrosome aberrations are an early and stable event in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence of colorectal carcinomas. Virchows Arch; 2005 Jul;447(1):61-5
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  • METHODS: Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded specimens (normal colonic epithelium n=21; low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia n=27, high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia n=16 and invasive adenocarcinomas n=33) were stained by an anti-gamma-tubulin antibody using standard immunofluorescence.
  • RESULTS: The mean centrosome signal per cell differed significantly (P<0.0001) between normal colonic epithelium (0.8775) and each low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (1.787), high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (2.259) and invasive carcinomas (2.267).
  • Similarly, both the centrosomes' structural entropy (SE) and minimal spanning tree (MST) differed significantly (P<0.001) between normal (SE=3.956, MST=38.78) and each low- (SE=6.39, MST=26) and high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (SE=5.75, MST=26.97) and invasive carcinoma (SE=6.86, MST=28.08).
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Chromosomal Instability. Fluorescent Antibody Technique. Humans. Image Processing, Computer-Assisted. Microscopy, Confocal

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  • (PMID = 15928943.001).
  • [ISSN] 0945-6317
  • [Journal-full-title] Virchows Archiv : an international journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Virchows Arch.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Tubulin
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10. Aboumarzouk OM, Coleman R, Goepel JR, Shorthouse AJ: PNET/Ewing's sarcoma of the rectum: a case report and review of the literature. BMJ Case Rep; 2009;2009
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  • [Title] PNET/Ewing's sarcoma of the rectum: a case report and review of the literature.
  • Stem-cell supported chemoradiotherapy resulted in complete resolution of her primary tumour and liver metastases.
  • Serial CT scanning and endoscopy revealed no recurrence after 7 years of follow-up, when she presented with a malignant anal fissure.
  • Imaging and subsequently abdominoperineal resection revealed no evidence of metastases from either the anal cancer or the PNET tumour.
  • Histopathology showed a T1N0R0 basaloid squamous carcinoma originating from grade III squamous intraepithelial neoplasia with no obvious wart viral infection.

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  • (PMID = 21691396.001).
  • [ISSN] 1757-790X
  • [Journal-full-title] BMJ case reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMJ Case Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3029497
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11. Villa LL: Prophylactic HPV vaccines: reducing the burden of HPV-related diseases. Vaccine; 2006 Mar 30;24 Suppl 1:S23-8
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  • [Title] Prophylactic HPV vaccines: reducing the burden of HPV-related diseases.
  • HPV-associated diseases, such as cervical and other anogenital cancers, cervical and anal intraepithelial neoplasia, genital warts, and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis confer considerable morbidity and mortality, and are significant health care concerns.
  • Successful vaccination strategies that protect against HPV infection are expected to substantially reduce HPV-related disease burden.
  • Prophylactic HPV vaccines in late stages of clinical testing are composed of HPV L1 capsid protein that self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) when expressed in recombinant systems.
  • Furthermore, phase 2 trials of a bivalent vaccine designed to protect against high-risk HPV types 16 and 18 and a quadrivalent vaccine designed to protect against HPV 16 and 18, and low-risk, genital wart-causing HPV 6 and 11 have demonstrated that VLP vaccines reduce the incidence of HPV-associated disease in vaccinated individuals.


12. Lillo FB: Human papillomavirus infection and its role in the genesis of dysplastic and neoplastic lesions of the squamous epithelia. New Microbiol; 2005 Apr;28(2):111-8
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  • [Title] Human papillomavirus infection and its role in the genesis of dysplastic and neoplastic lesions of the squamous epithelia.
  • Extensive laboratory and epidemiological evidence demonstrate that human papillomavirus (HPV) is the major cause of squamous cervical carcinoma (SCC), its precursor lesions (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia - CIN) and several other benign and malign clinical manifestations including genital warts, condylomata acuminata, Bowenoid papulosis, vaginal, vulvar and anal intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN and AIN) and carcinoma, penile carcinoma and other squamous neoplasias of the head and neck districts.
  • The relevance and high level of scientific interest surrounding HPVs are related to the oncogenic potential of some viral types belonging to this family and the possibility to influence the incidence of various tumour forms likecervical carcinoma, improving the efficacy of specific screening programs or defining preventive strategies like vaccination.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Squamous Cell. Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia. Papillomaviridae / pathogenicity. Papillomavirus Infections / virology

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  • (PMID = 16035255.001).
  • [ISSN] 1121-7138
  • [Journal-full-title] The new microbiologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] New Microbiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Number-of-references] 40
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13. Goldstone S: A stand against expectant management of anal dysplasia. Dis Colon Rectum; 2006 Oct;49(10):1648-9; author reply 1649-50
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  • [Title] A stand against expectant management of anal dysplasia.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / surgery. HIV Seropositivity / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Anal Canal / pathology. Disease Progression. Humans. Treatment Outcome

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  • HIV InSite. treatment guidelines - Human Herpesvirus-8 .
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  • [CommentOn] Dis Colon Rectum. 2002 Apr;45(4):453-8 [12006924.001]
  • [CommentOn] Dis Colon Rectum. 2006 Jan;49(1):36-40 [16283561.001]
  • [CommentOn] Dis Colon Rectum. 2005 May;48(5):1042-54 [15868241.001]
  • (PMID = 16972138.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-3706
  • [Journal-full-title] Diseases of the colon and rectum
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dis. Colon Rectum
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comment; Letter
  • [Publication-country] United States
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14. Parés D, Mullerat J, Pera M: [Anal intraepithelial neoplasia]. Med Clin (Barc); 2006 Nov 18;127(19):749-55
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  • [Title] [Anal intraepithelial neoplasia].
  • [Transliterated title] Neoplasia intraepitelial anal.
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for anal condylomata, anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) and anal squamous cell carcinoma.
  • AIN is a premalignant condition that can progress to invasive carcinoma through different grades of severity of the disease called AIN I, AIN II and AIN III.
  • This paper looks at the current definition, diagnostic methods and management of AIN.
  • The incidence of AIN has increased significantly in the last decades.
  • The groups at risk are mainly patients with infection with human immunodeficiency virus, immunossuppressed patients and patients affected by HPV related diseases (e.g., cervical cancer or anal condyloma).
  • Accurate diagnosis of AIN lesions consists of accurate grading and disease extension.
  • Low grade AIN (AIN I) or in extensive lesions, follow-up is advised to determine the possible evolution to anal squamous cell carcinoma.
  • In cases of more severe and localized lesions (AIN II and AIN III), surgical resection should be considered if the predictive postoperative morbidity is low.
  • Screening programs for AIN are not currently in place and there might be much effort to study the management of HPV in these patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / pathology. Carcinoma in Situ / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Anal Canal / pathology. Anal Canal / surgery. Humans

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  • (PMID = 17198654.001).
  • [ISSN] 0025-7753
  • [Journal-full-title] Medicina clínica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Clin (Barc)
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Number-of-references] 58
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15. Klaudel-Dreszler M, Pietrucha B, Skopczynska H, Pac M, Kurenko-Deptuch M, Heropolitanska-Pliszka E, Wolska-Kusnierz B, Maslanka K, Bernatowska E: [Chronic neutropenia - experience from the Department of Immunology, Children's Memorial Health Institute]. Med Wieku Rozwoj; 2007 Apr-Jun;11(2 Pt 1):145-52
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  • [Title] [Chronic neutropenia - experience from the Department of Immunology, Children's Memorial Health Institute].
  • The diagnosis was based on: bone marrow smears, ANC, immunologic investigation.
  • RESULTS: we established the diagnosis of: Kostmann disease (KD), cyclic neutropenia (CyN), hyperIgM syndrome (HIGM), Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS), severe chronic neutropenia (SCN) and chronic benign neutropenia (CBN) in: 4, 2, 2, 1, 21 and 20 children respectively.
  • Due to positive results of tests: MAIGA, GIFT or GAT autoimmune neutropenia of infancy (AIN) was confirmed in 7 children.
  • A boy, with the same diagnosis, underwent bone marrow transplantation from related donor but died from invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.
  • During observation period all children suffered from upper respiratory tract infections, 19 had chronic gingivitis.
  • Severe infections- bacterial pneumonia, sepsis, severe varicella and measles were observed in 30, 5, 2 and 1 patient respectively.
  • 2. AIN proved to be a mild condition, although ANC decreased below 500.
  • 3. Antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for children with: KD, CyN, GSD1b, CN in 1st year of life, HIGM; in other cases it is considered individually.
  • [MeSH-major] Autoantibodies / immunology. Autoimmune Diseases / diagnosis. Autoimmune Diseases / therapy. Neutropenia / diagnosis. Neutropenia / therapy. Neutrophils / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Bone Marrow Transplantation. Child. Child, Preschool. Chronic Disease. Female. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / therapeutic use. Hospitals. Humans. Infant. Infection / diagnosis. Infection / immunology. Infection / therapy. Leukemia / diagnosis. Leukemia / immunology. Leukemia / therapy. Leukocyte Count. Male. Poland. Recombinant Proteins. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Failure. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17625284.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Medycyna wieku rozwojowego
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Wieku Rozwoj
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Autoantibodies; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 143011-72-7 / Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor
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16. Greene MD: Diagnosis and management of HPV-related anal dysplasia. Nurse Pract; 2009 May;34(5):45-51
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  • [Title] Diagnosis and management of HPV-related anal dysplasia.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / diagnosis. Anus Neoplasms / therapy. Nurse Practitioners / organization & administration. Papillomavirus Infections / diagnosis. Papillomavirus Infections / therapy. Primary Health Care / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections / complications. Algorithms. Biopsy. Cytodiagnosis. Decision Trees. Humans. Mass Screening. Neoplasm Staging. Nursing Assessment. Patient Education as Topic. Primary Prevention. Proctoscopy. Risk Factors. United States / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 19390399.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-8662
  • [Journal-full-title] The Nurse practitioner
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nurse Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 65
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17. Morey Kinney SR, Smiraglia DJ, James SR, Moser MT, Foster BA, Karpf AR: Stage-specific alterations of DNA methyltransferase expression, DNA hypermethylation, and DNA hypomethylation during prostate cancer progression in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate model. Mol Cancer Res; 2008 Aug;6(8):1365-74
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  • [Title] Stage-specific alterations of DNA methyltransferase expression, DNA hypermethylation, and DNA hypomethylation during prostate cancer progression in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate model.
  • We analyzed DNA methyltransferase (Dnmt) protein expression and DNA methylation patterns during four progressive stages of prostate cancer in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model, including prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, well-differentiated tumors, early poorly differentiated tumors, and late poorly differentiated tumors.
  • Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, and Dnmt3b protein expression were increased in all stages; however, after normalization to cyclin A to account for cell cycle regulation, Dnmt proteins remained overexpressed in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and well-differentiated tumors, but not in poorly differentiated tumors.
  • Parallel gene expression and DNA methylation analyses suggests that gene overexpression precedes downstream hypermethylation during prostate tumor progression.
  • In contrast to gene hypermethylation, genomic DNA hypomethylation, including hypomethylation of repetitive elements and loss of genomic 5-methyldeoxycytidine, occurred in both early and late stages of prostate cancer.
  • DNA hypermethylation and DNA hypomethylation did not correlate in TRAMP, and Dnmt protein expression did not correlate with either variable, with the exception of a borderline significant association between Dnmt1 expression and DNA hypermethylation.
  • In summary, our data reveal the relative timing of and relationship between key alterations of the DNA methylation pathway occurring during prostate tumor progression in an in vivo model system.

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  • (PMID = 18667590.001).
  • [ISSN] 1541-7786
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular cancer research : MCR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R21 CA128062-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R21 CA121216; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA016056; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA16056; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R21 CA128062; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R21 CA128062-02; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / NIH 5T32CA009072; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA128062-02; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / NIH R21 CA128062; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA128062-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA009072
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Calcium Channels, N-Type; 0 / Calcium Channels, P-Type; 0 / Calcium Channels, Q-Type; 0 / Cdkn2a protein, mouse; 0 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16; 0 / voltage-dependent calcium channel (P-Q type); EC 2.1.1.37 / DNA (Cytosine-5-)-Methyltransferase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS182572; NLM/ PMC2835734
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18. Ali MA, Nyberg F, Chandranath SI, Ponery AS, Adem A, Adeghate E: Effect of high-calorie diet on the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in the one-humped camel (Camelus dromedarius). Ann N Y Acad Sci; 2006 Nov;1084:402-10
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  • The prevalence of diabetes mellitus in two different groups of the one-humped camel, group (A) control (n = 102) camels and group (B) high-calorie diet-fed camels (n = 103), in Al-Ain region (UAE) was studied using biochemical and radioimmunoassay techniques.
  • In this article, 7% of the control camels have diabetes mellitus (blood glucose level: > or =140 mg/dL) compared to 21% of the high-calorie-fed camels.
  • Plasma insulin level was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in group B compared to group A.
  • The low insulin level in camels consuming high-caloric diet could be a sign of exhaustion of pancreatic beta cells.

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  • (PMID = 17151318.001).
  • [ISSN] 0077-8923
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Sekiguchi Y, Mano H, Nakatani S, Shimizu J, Wada M: Effects of the Sri Lankan medicinal plant, Salacia reticulata, in rheumatoid arthritis. Genes Nutr; 2010 Mar;5(1):89-96
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  • In the traditional medicine of Sri Lanka and India, Salacia reticulata bark is considered orally effective in the treatment of rheumatism, gonorrhea, skin disease and diabetes.
  • The mice were fed a lard containing chow diet (AIN-93G) or the same diet containing 1% (w/w) SRL powder.
  • On day 7 or 14 after LPS injection, mice were killed, and tissue and blood samples were collected.
  • However, the serum and mRNA levels of inflammatory mediators did not differ between the CAIA mice and the SRL-treated mice.

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  • (PMID = 19727885.001).
  • [ISSN] 1865-3499
  • [Journal-full-title] Genes & nutrition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Genes Nutr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2820195
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; CAIA / Osteoclast / Pannus / RANKL / Rheumatoid arthritis / Salacia reticulata
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20. Reddy BS, Wang CX, Kong AN, Khor TO, Zheng X, Steele VE, Kopelovich L, Rao CV: Prevention of azoxymethane-induced colon cancer by combination of low doses of atorvastatin, aspirin, and celecoxib in F 344 rats. Cancer Res; 2006 Apr 15;66(8):4542-6
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  • We assessed the efficacy of atorvastatin (lipitor), celecoxib, and aspirin, given individually at high dose levels and in combination at lower doses against azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis, in male F 344 rats.
  • One day after the last azoxymethane treatment (15 mg/kg body weight, s.c., once weekly for 2 weeks), groups of male F 344 rats were fed the AIN-76A diet or AIN-76A diet containing 150 ppm atorvastatin, 600 ppm celecoxib, and 400 ppm aspirin, 100 ppm atorvastatin + 300 ppm celecoxib, and 100 ppm atorvastatin + 200 ppm aspirin.

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  • (PMID = 16618783.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 1R01-CA-37663; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 1R01-CA-94962; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-17613; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CN / N01-CN-43308
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Carcinogens; 0 / Heptanoic Acids; 0 / Pyrazoles; 0 / Pyrroles; 0 / Sulfonamides; 48A5M73Z4Q / Atorvastatin Calcium; JCX84Q7J1L / Celecoxib; MO0N1J0SEN / Azoxymethane; R16CO5Y76E / Aspirin
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21. Salama MM, Ghorab EM, Al-Abyad AG, Al-Bahy KM: Concomitant weekly vincristine and radiation followed by adjuvant vincristine and carboplatin in the treatment of high risk medulloblastoma: Ain Shams University Hospital and Sohag Cancer Center study. J Egypt Natl Canc Inst; 2006 Jun;18(2):167-74
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  • [Title] Concomitant weekly vincristine and radiation followed by adjuvant vincristine and carboplatin in the treatment of high risk medulloblastoma: Ain Shams University Hospital and Sohag Cancer Center study.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: High risk medulloblastoma patients with postoperative gross residual disease that was >1.5 cm2 and/or metastatic disease (M+) were planned to receive craniospinal irradiation (CSI) 36 Gy followed by boost to the posterior fossa for a total of 55.8 Gy.
  • RESULTS: The study included seventeen high risk medulloblastoma patients presented to Ain Shams University hospitals and Sohag Cancer Center between November 2001 and March 2005.
  • The 3-year overall survival for M+ patients was 50% vs. 81.8% for M0 patients (p=0.04).
  • The 3-year PFS was 50% for M+ patients vs. 63.6% for M0 patients (p=0.15).
  • Grade 3 and 4 neutropenia were observed in 5 patients (29%).
  • CONCLUSION: Our results show that the present chemotherapy and radiotherapeutic approach is able to improve overall survival and PFS in high risk patients with gross residual disease but not in patients with metastatic disease (M+) that may require more intensive therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Carboplatin / administration & dosage. Cerebellar Neoplasms / therapy. Medulloblastoma / therapy. Vincristine / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Child. Child, Preschool. Combined Modality Therapy. Disease-Free Survival. Drug Administration Schedule. Female. Humans. Male. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 17496943.001).
  • [ISSN] 1110-0362
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the Egyptian National Cancer Institute
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Egypt Natl Canc Inst
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Egypt
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 5J49Q6B70F / Vincristine; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin
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22. Uyaroglu FG, Kayalioglu G, Erturk M: Incidence and morphology of the accessory head of the flexor pollicis longus muscle (Gantzer`s muscle) in a Turkish population. Neurosciences (Riyadh); 2006 Jul;11(3):171-4
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  • METHODS: The study was performed on 52 upper extremities of 26 adult Turkish cadavers in the Department of Anatomy, Ege University Faculty of Medicine, Izmir, Turkey in 2005.
  • In our dissections, the prevalence and anatomical morphology of the AHFPL including muscle shape, origin and insertion point, and its relation to the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) was examined.
  • RESULTS: The AHFPL muscle was found in 27 upper extremities (51.9%).
  • The AHFPL originated from the coronoid process of the ulna in 22 upper extremities (81.5%), and the medial epicondyle of the humerus in 5 cases (18.5%).
  • The AIN passed anterior to the AHFPL in one case (3.7%), lateral in 3 (11.1%), posterolateral in 8 (29.6%) and posterior in 15 (55.6%) cases.
  • CONCLUSION: The knowledge of the morphology and the topography of the AIN and AHFPL is important for understanding the mechanism of the AIN syndrome.
  • The results of this study show the mechanical compression due to the AHFPL may be a cause of the pronator and AIN syndromes.

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  • (PMID = 22266615.001).
  • [ISSN] 1319-6138
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosciences (Riyadh, Saudi Arabia)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosciences (Riyadh)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Saudi Arabia
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23. Kitawaki R, Nishimura Y, Takagi N, Iwasaki M, Tsuzuki K, Fukuda M: Effects of Lactobacillus fermented soymilk and soy yogurt on hepatic lipid accumulation in rats fed a cholesterol-free diet. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem; 2009 Jul;73(7):1484-8
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  • We examined the effects of lactic acid fermented soymilk, in which part of the soymilk was replaced with okara (soy yogurt), on plasma and hepatic lipid profiles in rats fed a cholesterol-free diet.
  • Male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 5 weeks (n=5/group) were fed a control diet (AIN-93) or a test diet in which 20% of the diet was replaced by soy yogurt for 7 weeks.
  • Soy yogurt consumption did not affect body weight or adipose tissue weight as compared with control diet.
  • In the soy yogurt group, the liver weight and hepatic triglyceride content were significantly lower than the control group, and the level of plasma cholesterol was also lower.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Bile Acids and Salts / metabolism. Body Weight / drug effects. Cholesterol, Dietary. Eating / drug effects. Feces. Gene Expression Regulation / drug effects. Lactic Acid / metabolism. Lipids / blood. Male. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis. Organ Size / drug effects. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley

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  • (PMID = 19584552.001).
  • [ISSN] 1347-6947
  • [Journal-full-title] Bioscience, biotechnology, and biochemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bile Acids and Salts; 0 / Cholesterol, Dietary; 0 / Lipids; 33X04XA5AT / Lactic Acid
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24. Kang YJ, Jung UJ, Lee MK, Kim HJ, Jeon SM, Park YB, Chung HG, Baek NI, Lee KT, Jeong TS, Choi MS: Eupatilin, isolated from Artemisia princeps Pampanini, enhances hepatic glucose metabolism and pancreatic beta-cell function in type 2 diabetic mice. Diabetes Res Clin Pract; 2008 Oct;82(1):25-32
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  • Eupatilin (5,7-dihydroxy-3',4',6-trimethoxyflavone) was isolated from Artemisia princeps to investigate the dose-response effects on blood glucose regulation and pancreatic beta-cell function in type 2 diabetic mice.
  • Db/db mice were divided into control (eupatilin-free, AIN-76 standard diet), low-Eupa (0.005g/100g diet) and high-Eupa (0.02g/100g diet) groups.
  • The supplementation of eupatilin for 6 weeks significantly lowered fasting blood glucose concentration while it increased hepatic glycogen content.
  • Also the pancreatic insulin concentration of eupatilin groups was higher than the control group.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blood Glucose / metabolism. Body Weight / drug effects. Eating / drug effects. Glucose Tolerance Test. Glucose-6-Phosphatase / metabolism. Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated / metabolism. Insulin / metabolism. Liver Glycogen / metabolism. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Pancrelipase / metabolism. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (GTP) / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 18703253.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-8227
  • [Journal-full-title] Diabetes research and clinical practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Diabetes Res. Clin. Pract.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Blood Glucose; 0 / Flavonoids; 0 / Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated; 0 / Insulin; 0 / Liver Glycogen; 4D58O05490 / eupatilin; 53608-75-6 / Pancrelipase; EC 3.1.3.9 / Glucose-6-Phosphatase; EC 4.1.1.32 / Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (GTP); IY9XDZ35W2 / Glucose
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25. Khor TO, Cheung WK, Prawan A, Reddy BS, Kong AN: Chemoprevention of familial adenomatous polyposis in Apc(Min/+) mice by phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC). Mol Carcinog; 2008 May;47(5):321-5
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  • [Title] Chemoprevention of familial adenomatous polyposis in Apc(Min/+) mice by phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC).
  • In this study, we investigated the chemopreventive efficacy of PEITC in the Apc(Min/+) mouse model.
  • Apc(Min/+) mice were fed with diet supplemented with 0.05% of PEITC for 3-wk.
  • Our results clearly demonstrated that Apc(Min/+) mice fed with PEITC supplemented diet developed significantly less (31.7% reduction) and smaller polyps in comparison to mice fed with the standard AIN-76A diet.
  • In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PEITC is a potent natural dietary compound for chemoprevention of gastrointestinal cancers.

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 17932952.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-2744
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular carcinogenesis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Carcinog.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / P30 ES005022; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA-073674-07
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Isothiocyanates; 6U7TFK75KV / phenethyl isothiocyanate; EC 2.7.11.24 / Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspases
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26. Li Y, Yang Z, Chen Z, Zhou Z: Computational investigation on structural and physical properties of AIN nanosheets and nanoribbons. J Nanosci Nanotechnol; 2010 Nov;10(11):7200-3
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  • [Title] Computational investigation on structural and physical properties of AIN nanosheets and nanoribbons.
  • Through first-principles computations, we investigated the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of two-dimensional AIN single layer and one-dimensional AIN nanoribbons.
  • AIN single layer and nanoribbons quit the Wurtzite configuration and adopt a graphitic-like structure after geometry optimization.
  • Both hydrogen-terminated zigzag and armchair AIN nanoribbons have a direct band gap, which increases monotonically with increasing ribbon width.
  • Bare zigzag AIN nanoribbons have a spin-polarized ground state and are magnetic semiconductors.
  • The results may promote the experimental preparation of AIN nanosheets and nanoribbons and their applications to nanotechnology.

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  • (PMID = 21137897.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-4880
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of nanoscience and nanotechnology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Nanosci Nanotechnol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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27. Perazella MA, Markowitz GS: Drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis. Nat Rev Nephrol; 2010 Aug;6(8):461-70
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  • Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is a common cause of acute kidney injury.
  • Many etiologies of AIN have been recognized--including allergic/drug-induced, infectious, autoimmune/systemic, and idiopathic forms of disease.
  • The most common etiology of AIN is drug-induced disease, which is thought to underlie 60-70% of cases.
  • Multiple agents from many different classes of drugs can cause AIN, and the clinical presentation and laboratory findings vary according to the class of drug involved.
  • AIN is characterized by interstitial inflammation, tubulitis, edema, and in some cases, eventual interstitial fibrosis.
  • A definitive diagnosis of AIN can be established only by kidney biopsy.
  • The mainstay of therapy for drug-induced AIN is timely discontinuation of the causative agent.
  • Although the benefits of corticosteroid therapy remain unproven, they do appear to have a positive effect in some patients with drug-induced AIN, especially when treatment is initiated early in the course of the disease.
  • In general, the prognosis for drug-induced AIN is good, and at least partial recovery of kidney function is normally observed.
  • Early recognition is crucial because patients can ultimately develop chronic kidney disease.
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans

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  • (PMID = 20517290.001).
  • [ISSN] 1759-507X
  • [Journal-full-title] Nature reviews. Nephrology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nat Rev Nephrol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
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28. Karlsson PC, Hughes R, Rafter JJ, Bruce WR: Polyethylene glycol reduces inflammation and aberrant crypt foci in carcinogen-initiated rats. Cancer Lett; 2005 Jun 8;223(2):203-9
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  • Nine of the rats in the carcinogen-initiated group were given a diet with 5% PEG 8000 in an AIN-93 based, high fat diet.
  • The other nine, and the control group received the diet without the addition of PEG.
  • Fecal water from the rats receiving PEG did not reduce transepithelial resistance of, or manitol flux through, human Caco-cells grown as monolayers in vitro.

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  • (PMID = 15896454.001).
  • [ISSN] 0304-3835
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carcinogens; 0 / Solvents; 30IQX730WE / Polyethylene Glycols; MO0N1J0SEN / Azoxymethane
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29. Tubbs RS, Custis JW, Salter EG, Wellons JC 3rd, Blount JP, Oakes WJ: Quantitation of and superficial surgical landmarks for the anterior interosseous nerve. J Neurosurg; 2006 May;104(5):787-91
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECT: There are scant data regarding the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) in the neurosurgical literature.
  • In the current study the authors attempt to provide easily identifiable superficial osseous landmarks for the identification of the AIN.
  • METHODS: The AIN in 20 upper extremities obtained in adult cadaveric specimens was dissected and quantified.
  • The AIN originated from the median nerve at mean distances of 5.4 cm distal to the medial epicondyle of the humerus and 21 cm proximal to the ulnar styloid process.
  • The distance from the origin of the AIN to its branch leading to the flexor pollicis longus muscle and to the point it travels deep to the pronator quadratus (PQ) muscle measured a mean 4 and 14.4 cm, respectively.
  • The mean distance from the AIN branch leading to the flexor pollicis longus muscle to the proximal PQ muscle was 12.1 cm, and the mean distance between this branch and the ulnar styloid process was 7.2 cm.
  • The mean diameter of the AIN was 1.6 mm at the midforearm.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Additional landmarks for identification of the AIN can aid the neurosurgeon in more precisely isolating this nerve and avoiding complications.
  • Furthermore, after quantitation of this nerve, the AIN branches can be easily used for neurotization of the median and ulnar nerves, and with the aid of a transinterosseous membrane tunneling technique, passed to the posterior interosseous nerve.

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  • (PMID = 16703884.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3085
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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30. Nahas CS, Lin O, Weiser MR, Temple LK, Wong WD, Stier EA: Prevalence of perianal intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV-infected patients referred for high-resolution anoscopy. Dis Colon Rectum; 2006 Oct;49(10):1581-6
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  • [Title] Prevalence of perianal intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV-infected patients referred for high-resolution anoscopy.
  • PURPOSE: This study was designed to describe perianal disease in a cohort of HIV-infected patients referred for high-resolution anoscopy.
  • All patients underwent anal canal and perianal high-resolution anoscopy in the office with biopsy of suspicious areas.
  • Patients with high-grade intraepithelial perianal lesions underwent multiple biopsies under general anesthesia in the operating room to rule out malignancy.
  • RESULTS: Of the 52 patients, 19 (37 percent) had perianal abnormalities noted on high-resolution anoscopy and underwent punch biopsy.
  • Office perianal biopsies diagnosed two patients with invasive squamous-cell carcinoma and nine with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion.
  • Seven of the nine patients with perianal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion on office biopsy were submitted to multiple biopsies under general anesthesia.
  • One of these seven had an occult perianal squamous-cell carcinoma.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Perianal disease was common in this group of HIV-infected patients; 11 patients (21 percent of total) were diagnosed with squamous-cell carcinoma or high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion.
  • Because only 19 patients had clinically suspicious perianal lesions biopsied, this may be an underestimate.
  • Our data suggest that anal canal neoplasia often is accompanied by perianal disease and illustrates the need for biopsy of any suspicious perianal lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / etiology. Carcinoma in Situ / etiology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / epidemiology. HIV Infections / complications. Proctoscopy / methods


31. Al-Maskari F, El-Sadig M, Norman JN: The prevalence of macrovascular complications among diabetic patients in the United Arab Emirates. Cardiovasc Diabetol; 2007;6:24
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  • The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors of macrovascular complications among diabetic patients in the Al-Ain district of the United Arab Emirates (UAE).
  • METHODS: The study was part of a general cross-sectional survey carried out to assess the prevalence of diabetes (DM) complications among known diabetic patients in Al-Ain District, UAE.
  • Patients completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire carried out by treating doctors and underwent a complete medical assessment including measurement of height, weight, blood pressure and examination for evidence of macrovascular complications.
  • A standard ECG was recorded and blood samples were taken to document fasting blood sugar, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1C) and lipid profile.
  • Overall, 29.5% of DM patients had evidence of macrovascular complications: 11.6% (95% CI: 8.8-14.4) of patients had peripheral vascular disease (PVD), 14.4% (95% CI: 11.3-17.5) had a history of coronary artery disease (CAD) and 3.5% (95% CI: 1.9-5.1%) had cerebrovascular disease (CVD).
  • CONCLUSION: Our data revealed a significant association between hypertension and presence of macrovascular disease among diabetic patients.
  • In addition, a lack of correlation between macrovascular disease and glycemic control among patients with DM was observed.
  • [MeSH-major] Coronary Artery Disease / epidemiology. Diabetic Angiopathies / epidemiology. Hypertension / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Age Distribution. Aged. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prevalence. Primary Health Care / statistics & numerical data. Risk Factors. Sex Distribution. United Arab Emirates / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 17880686.001).
  • [ISSN] 1475-2840
  • [Journal-full-title] Cardiovascular diabetology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cardiovasc Diabetol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2093928
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32. AbuMadini MS, Rahim SI, Al-Zahrani MA, Al-Johi AO: Two decades of treatment seeking for substance use disorders in Saudi Arabia: trends and patterns in a rehabilitation facility in Dammam. Drug Alcohol Depend; 2008 Oct 1;97(3):231-6
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  • [Title] Two decades of treatment seeking for substance use disorders in Saudi Arabia: trends and patterns in a rehabilitation facility in Dammam.
  • BACKGROUND: Treatment provision and treatment seeking for substance use disorders is a relatively new phenomenon in the Middle East.
  • The present study aims to study these trends among first admissions to the specialized addiction treatment Amal Hospital of Dammam over its first two decades (1986-2006).
  • The main outcome measures were: annual inception number (AIN), relative frequency of substances (RFS), relative frequency of drug combinations (RFDC), mean number of substances (MNS), and sociodemographic changes.
  • In the second decade, subjects were significantly older and less unemployed than in the first decade (28.9 years versus 30.2 years; 27% versus 19%).
  • The mean AIN rose from 509 in the first decade to 765 in the second decade.
  • In the same periods, the RFS increased for amphetamines and cannabis (from 12.1 and 17.5% to 48.1 and 46.5%, respectively), decreased for heroin, sedatives and volatile substances (from 51.1, 15.1, and 6.1% to 22.5, 7.3, and 2.5%, respectively), and remained stable for alcohol (from 27.1 to 26.7%).
  • The mean number of substances per subject increased from 1.32 to 1.56%.
  • [MeSH-major] Mental Health Services / organization & administration. Mental Health Services / trends. Patient Acceptance of Health Care / statistics & numerical data. Substance Abuse Treatment Centers / organization & administration. Substance-Related Disorders / epidemiology. Substance-Related Disorders / rehabilitation


33. Kamel H, Abdelazim I, Habib SM, El Shourbagy MAA, Ahmed NS: Immunoexpression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in malignant ovarian epithelial tumours. J Obstet Gynaecol Can; 2010 Jun;32(6):580-586
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  • [Title] Immunoexpression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in malignant ovarian epithelial tumours.
  • OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to evaluate the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in malignant ovarian epithelial tumours and to detect the relation between the degree of MMP-2 expression and the histological grade and surgical stage of the studied cases.
  • METHODS: This study was conducted in Ain Shams University Maternity Hospital in Cairo, Egypt, between March 2004 and December 2005.
  • Thirty patients with malignant ovarian epithelial tumours diagnosed after histopathological examination of the specimens were included in this study.
  • The staining intensity of MMP-2 was correlated with the clinical and pathological parameters of the studied cases, including patient's age, surgical stage, histological grade, omental metastasis, and lymph node metastasis.
  • The results were compared with the clinical and pathological parameters, including patient's age, tumour stage, and histological grade.
  • The MMP-2 expression was found to be significantly correlated with the histological grade (r = 0.52, P < 0.05) and with the surgical stage (r = 0.72, P < 0.001) of the studied tumours, but not with the age of the patients.
  • In this study, there was a direct correlation between the degree of expression of MMP-2 and histologically undifferentiated or advanced stages of ovarian epithelial tumours.
  • [MeSH-major] Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 / metabolism. Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial / enzymology. Ovarian Neoplasms / enzymology

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  • (PMID = 20569539.001).
  • [ISSN] 1701-2163
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada : JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada : JOGC
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Obstet Gynaecol Can
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.4.24.24 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 2
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34. Hanai M, Esashi T: The effects of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, and zinc in improving the depression of gonadal development in growing male rats kept under a disturbed daily rhythm-investigations based on the L(16)(2(15))-type orthogonal array. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo); 2006 Oct;52(5):368-75
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  • [Title] The effects of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, and zinc in improving the depression of gonadal development in growing male rats kept under a disturbed daily rhythm-investigations based on the L(16)(2(15))-type orthogonal array.
  • Five minerals (calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), and zinc (Zn)) were selected as experimental factors, and the dietary content of these minerals was normal (AIN-76 diet) or 1/3.5 of the normal content.
  • Among the constant darkness groups (D-groups), the highest value for testes weight was observed under the normal-Ca, normal-Mg, and normal-Na diet, and the lowest value was observed under the low-Ca, normal-Mg, and low-Na diet.
  • Among the normal lighting groups (N-groups), the highest value for testes weight was observed under the low-Ca, normal-Mg, and normal-Na diet, and the lowest value was observed under the normal-Ca, normal-Mg, and low-Na diet.
  • Among the D-groups, the highest value for serum testosterone was observed under the normal-Ca, normal-Mg, and low-Na diet.
  • Among the N-groups, the highest value was observed under the low-Ca, normal-Mg, and low-Na diet.
  • It became clear that the amount of dietary Ca necessary for the gonadal development of rats increases when rats are kept under constant darkness as a model of disturbed daily rhythm compared with the normal lighting condition.
  • [MeSH-major] Calcium, Dietary / pharmacology. Chronobiology Disorders / complications. Magnesium / pharmacology. Phosphorus, Dietary / pharmacology. Sodium, Dietary / pharmacology. Testis / growth & development. Zinc / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Analysis of Variance. Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena. Animals. Body Weight / drug effects. Darkness. Diet / methods. Disease Models, Animal. Epididymis / drug effects. Epididymis / growth & development. Feeding Behavior / drug effects. Light. Male. Organ Size / drug effects. Rats. Rats, Inbred F344. Testosterone / blood

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  • (PMID = 17190108.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-4800
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of nutritional science and vitaminology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Nutr. Sci. Vitaminol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Calcium, Dietary; 0 / Phosphorus, Dietary; 0 / Sodium, Dietary; 3XMK78S47O / Testosterone; I38ZP9992A / Magnesium; J41CSQ7QDS / Zinc
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35. Grases F, Sanchis P, Perello J, Isern B, Prieto RM, Fernandez-Palomeque C, Fiol M, Bonnin O, Torres JJ: Phytate (Myo-inositol hexakisphosphate) inhibits cardiovascular calcifications in rats. Front Biosci; 2006;11:136-42
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  • Calcification is an undesirable disorder, which frequently occurs in the heart vessels.
  • In general, the formation of calcific vascular lesions involves complex physicochemical and molecular events.
  • The levels found clearly depend on the dietary intake but it can also be absorbed topically.
  • Three groups were included, a control group, an InsP6 treated group (subjected to calcinosis induction by Vitamin D and nicotine and treated with standard cream with a 2% of InsP6 as potassium salt) and an InsP6 non-treated group (only subjected to calcinosis induction).
  • All rats were fed AIN 76-A diet (a purified diet in which InsP6 is undetectable).
  • After 60 hours of calcinosis treatment, all rats of the InsP6 non-treated group died and the rest were sacrificed.
  • [MeSH-major] Calcium Metabolism Disorders. Cardiovascular System / drug effects. Phytic Acid / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 16146720.001).
  • [ISSN] 1093-9946
  • [Journal-full-title] Frontiers in bioscience : a journal and virtual library
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Front. Biosci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 1406-16-2 / Vitamin D; 6M3C89ZY6R / Nicotine; 7IGF0S7R8I / Phytic Acid; RWP5GA015D / Potassium; SY7Q814VUP / Calcium
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36. Duffy PH, Lewis SM, Mayhugh MA, Trotter RW, Hass BS, Latendresse JR, Thorn BT, Tobin G, Feuers RJ: Neoplastic pathology in male Sprague-Dawley rats fed AIN-93M diet ad libitum or at restricted intakes. Nutr Res; 2008 Jan;28(1):36-42
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  • [Title] Neoplastic pathology in male Sprague-Dawley rats fed AIN-93M diet ad libitum or at restricted intakes.
  • The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of age and long-term dietary reduction on neoplastic diseases in rats fed the AIN-93M purified diet.
  • Second, pathologic profiles are critical to comprehensive dietary evaluation.
  • Male Sprague-Dawley rats assigned to 2 groups, ad libitum (AL) and dietary restricted (DR), were fed the AIN-93M (casein protein) diet free choice and reduced in amount by 31%, respectively.
  • At 114 weeks of age, the most common lesions were pituitary, adrenal gland, skin, mammary, brain, and pancreatic tumors and mononuclear cell leukemia.
  • Primary findings demonstrate that DR significantly reduced the total number of tumors per rat and incidence of benign and primary tumors (all organs) but did not reduce the incidence of malignant tumors (all organs).
  • Dietary restriction increased the percentage of unknown deaths.
  • These results may explain why survival rates for AL and DR rats were not significantly different at 114 weeks (43.3 vs 57.5%, respectively).
  • Factors such as diet composition and digestibility, although not independent of body weight, may have contributed to differences in rat mortality and may affect humans in a similar manner.
  • [MeSH-major] Aging / physiology. Caloric Restriction. Caseins / administration & dosage. Dietary Proteins / administration & dosage. Neoplasms / epidemiology. Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 19083386.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-0739
  • [Journal-full-title] Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nutr Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Caseins; 0 / Dietary Proteins
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37. Ardiansyah, Shirakawa H, Sugita Y, Koseki T, Komai M: Anti-metabolic syndrome effects of adenosine ingestion in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats fed a high-fat diet. Br J Nutr; 2010 Jul;104(1):48-55
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  • During this period, the rats had free access to a high-fat diet based on AIN-93M.
  • Administration of adenosine also increased plasma adiponectin levels, accompanied by upregulation of mRNA expression level of adiponectin and adiponectin receptor 1 in perirenal fat and adiponectin receptor 2 in the liver.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenosine / pharmacology. Cardiovascular Agents / pharmacology. Dietary Fats / administration & dosage. Enzymes / metabolism. Hypertension / metabolism. Metabolic Syndrome X / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adiponectin / blood. Adipose Tissue / metabolism. Animals. Antioxidants / metabolism. Antioxidants / pharmacology. Blood Glucose / metabolism. Deoxyguanosine / analogs & derivatives. Deoxyguanosine / urine. Gene Expression. Gene Expression Regulation. Insulin / blood. Kidney / metabolism. Lipids / blood. Liver / metabolism. Male. Nitric Oxide / blood. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. Rats. Rats, Inbred SHR. Receptors, Adiponectin / genetics. Receptors, Adiponectin / metabolism. Stroke

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  • (PMID = 20175942.001).
  • [ISSN] 1475-2662
  • [Journal-full-title] The British journal of nutrition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Nutr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adiponectin; 0 / Antioxidants; 0 / Blood Glucose; 0 / Cardiovascular Agents; 0 / Dietary Fats; 0 / Enzymes; 0 / Insulin; 0 / Lipids; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Receptors, Adiponectin; 31C4KY9ESH / Nitric Oxide; 88847-89-6 / 8-oxo-7-hydrodeoxyguanosine; G9481N71RO / Deoxyguanosine; K72T3FS567 / Adenosine
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38. Li Y, Hou MJ, Ma J, Tang ZH, Zhu HL, Ling WH: Dietary fatty acids regulate cholesterol induction of liver CYP7alpha1 expression and bile acid production. Lipids; 2005 May;40(5):455-62
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  • [Title] Dietary fatty acids regulate cholesterol induction of liver CYP7alpha1 expression and bile acid production.
  • In the present study we investigated the effects of dietary fats containing predominantly PUFA, monounsaturated FA (MUFA), or saturated FA (SFA) on lipid profile and liver cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7alpha1) mRNA expression and bile acid production in C57BL/6J mice.
  • The animals (n = 75) were randomly divided into five groups and fed a basic chow diet (AIN-93G) (BC diet), a chow diet with 1 g/100 g of cholesterol (Chol diet), a chow diet with 1 g/100 g of cholesterol and 14 g/100 g of safflower oil (Chol + PUFA diet), a chow diet with 1 g/100 g of cholesterol and olive oil (Chol + MUFA diet), or a chow diet with 1 g/100 g of cholesterol and myristic acid (Chol + SFA diet) for 6 wk.
  • The results showed that the Chol + SFA diet decreased CYP7alpha1 gene expression and bile acid pool size, resulting in increased blood and liver cholesterol levels.
  • Addition of PUFA and MUFA to a 1% cholesterol diet increased the bile acid pool production or bile acid excretion and simultaneously decreased liver cholesterol accumulation despite decreased CYP7alpha1 mRNA expression.
  • The results indicate that the decreased bile acid pool size induced by the SFA diet is related to inhibition of the liver CYP7alpha1 gene expression, but an increased bile acid pool size and improved cholesterol homeostasis are disassociated from the liver CYP7alpha1 gene expression.
  • [MeSH-major] Bile Acids and Salts / biosynthesis. Cholesterol / pharmacology. Cholesterol 7-alpha-Hydroxylase / biosynthesis. Dietary Fats / pharmacology. Fatty Acids / pharmacology. Liver / enzymology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cholesterol, Dietary / pharmacology. Fatty Acids, Unsaturated / pharmacology. Female. Lipids / blood. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Olive Oil. Plant Oils / pharmacology. Safflower Oil / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 16094854.001).
  • [ISSN] 0024-4201
  • [Journal-full-title] Lipids
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lipids
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bile Acids and Salts; 0 / Cholesterol, Dietary; 0 / Dietary Fats; 0 / Fatty Acids; 0 / Fatty Acids, Unsaturated; 0 / Lipids; 0 / Olive Oil; 0 / Plant Oils; 8001-23-8 / Safflower Oil; 97C5T2UQ7J / Cholesterol; EC 1.14.14.23 / Cholesterol 7-alpha-Hydroxylase; EC 1.14.14.23 / Cyp7a1 protein, mouse
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39. Caraglia M, Marra M, Tagliaferri P, Lamberts SW, Zappavigna S, Misso G, Cavagnini F, Facchini G, Abbruzzese A, Hofland LJ, Vitale G: Emerging strategies to strengthen the anti-tumour activity of type I interferons: overcoming survival pathways. Curr Cancer Drug Targets; 2009 Aug;9(5):690-704
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  • The selective targeting of these survival pathways might enhance the antitumor activity of IFN-ain cancer cells, as shown by: i) the combination of selective EGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (gefitinib) and IFN-a having cooperative anti-tumour effects;.

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  • (PMID = 19508175.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-5576
  • [Journal-full-title] Current cancer drug targets
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Cancer Drug Targets
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Interferon Type I
  • [Number-of-references] 155
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40. Palefsky J: Biology of HPV in HIV infection. Adv Dent Res; 2006 Apr 01;19(1):99-105
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  • The risks for HPV-associated high-grade intra-epithelial neoplasia (IN) and cancer are also increased.
  • The prevalence of oral, anal, and cervical HPV infection in HIV-positive individuals compared with HIV-negative individuals increases with progressively lower CD4+ levels, as does incident high-grade IN.
  • In contrast to IN, development of cancer is not related to lower CD4+ level.
  • With increasing grades of IN and cancer, the proportion of tissues with copy-number abnormalities (CNA) increases, with one of the most common genetic changes being amplification of chromosome 3q.
  • This suggests a link between CNA and increased HPV-induced chromosomal instability mediated through de-repressed E6 and E7 expression consequent to loss of functional E2 protein.
  • In addition, epigenetic changes occur with increasing frequency in high-grade IN and cancer, such as hypermethylation leading to down-regulation of potential tumor suppressor genes.
  • Analysis of these data together suggests that immune suppression plays a more prominent role in the earlier stages of HPV-associated disease, up to and including incident high-grade IN.
  • There are few data to suggest a direct role for HIV in the pathogenesis of HPV-associated neoplasia, but HIV-associated attenuation of HPV-specific immune responses may allow for persistence of high-grade IN and sufficient time for accumulation of genetic changes that are important in progression to cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / virology. HIV Infections / virology. Papillomaviridae / physiology. Papillomavirus Infections / complications. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / virology
  • [MeSH-minor] AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections / virology. Aneuploidy. Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active / adverse effects. Anus Neoplasms / complications. Anus Neoplasms / genetics. Anus Neoplasms / virology. CD4 Lymphocyte Count. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3 / virology. Female. Humans. Male. Virus Integration

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  • (PMID = 16672559.001).
  • [ISSN] 1544-0737
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in dental research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv. Dent. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / 5 M01-RR-00079; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA54053; United States / NIDCR NIH HHS / DE / DE07946; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA66529; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / UO1 CA70019
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 78
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41. Aynaud O, Buffet M, Roman P, Plantier F, Dupin N: Study of persistence and recurrence rates in 106 patients with condyloma and intraepithelial neoplasia after CO2 laser treatment. Eur J Dermatol; 2008 Mar-Apr;18(2):153-8
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  • [Title] Study of persistence and recurrence rates in 106 patients with condyloma and intraepithelial neoplasia after CO2 laser treatment.
  • Our aim was to evaluate remission and relapse rates and the number of laser sessions necessary for treatment.
  • This retrospective study was performed in patients, immunocompetent or not, treated with CO2 laser for condylomatous or neoplastic anogenital lesions by the same operator over a period of 12 months.
  • Twenty-seven (25.5%) patients presented with high-grade intraepithelial neoplasms (IEN III).
  • IEN III lesions were more common in the HIV(+) group than in immunocompetent patients (47.4% versus 20.2%, p = 0.015).
  • The development of HPV-induced lesions at several sites on the body was also more common in HIV(+) patients.
  • Remission rates at one month did not differ significantly between the three groups.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Anal Canal / pathology. Female. France / epidemiology. Humans. Immunocompetence. Laser Therapy. Male. Middle Aged. Penis / pathology. Perineum / pathology. Retrospective Studies. Scrotum / pathology. Treatment Outcome. Urethra / pathology. Vulva / pathology


42. Kreuter A, Brockmeyer NH, Weissenborn SJ, Gambichler T, Stücker M, Altmeyer P, Pfister H, Wieland U, German Competence Network HIV/AIDS: Penile intraepithelial neoplasia is frequent in HIV-positive men with anal dysplasia. J Invest Dermatol; 2008 Sep;128(9):2316-24
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Penile intraepithelial neoplasia is frequent in HIV-positive men with anal dysplasia.
  • These patients have a strongly increased risk of HPV-induced anal cancer and its precursor lesion, anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN), and a moderately increased risk for penile cancer.
  • Only limited data exist on penile intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in HIV+MSM.
  • We determined the prevalence and evaluated the virologic characteristics of PIN and AIN in 263 HIV+MSM.
  • In case of histologically confirmed PIN (and AIN), HPV-typing, HPV-DNA load determination, and immunohistochemical staining for p16(INK4a) were performed.
  • PIN was detected in 11 (4.2%) and AIN in 156 (59.3%) patients.
  • Ten PIN patients also had AIN within the observation period.
  • Cutaneous beta-HPVs were found in PIN and AIN, but beta-HPV-DNA loads were very low, irrespective of the histological grade. p16(INK4a) Expression was detectable in all PIN lesions and correlated both with the histological grade and with high-risk HPV-DNA loads.
  • In view of the PIN prevalence found in our study, all HIV+MSM should be screened for PIN in addition to AIN screening.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Diseases / epidemiology. Anus Neoplasms / epidemiology. Carcinoma in Situ / epidemiology. HIV Infections. Homosexuality, Male. Penile Neoplasms / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. DNA, Viral / metabolism. Disease Progression. HIV / genetics. Humans. Male. Mass Screening / methods. Middle Aged. Prevalence. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors


43. Lee H, Kim JM, Kim HJ, Lee I, Chang N: Folic acid supplementation can reduce the endothelial damage in rat brain microvasculature due to hyperhomocysteinemia. J Nutr; 2005 Mar;135(3):544-8
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  • [Title] Folic acid supplementation can reduce the endothelial damage in rat brain microvasculature due to hyperhomocysteinemia.
  • To evaluate the effects of dietary folic acid supplementation on the cerebral vascular damage induced by hyperhomocysteinemia, rats were fed a diet containing 3.0 g/kg homocystine for 2 wk and then either 3.0 g/kg homocystine or 3.0 g/kg homocystine plus 0.008 g/kg folic acid for 8 wk.
  • Control rats consumed the AIN-93 Maintenance diet throughout the experiment.
  • The inclusion of dietary folic acid for 8 wk caused plasma homocysteine levels to be the same as in control rats and it significantly upregulated the cerebral expression of GLUT-1 that was significantly reduced by hyperhomocysteinemia.
  • Folic acid supplementation also significantly decreased the incidence of damaged vessels due to hyperhomocysteinemia.
  • These results and the electron microscopy findings suggested that folic acid supplementation might reduce the detrimental effects on the endothelium caused by experimentally induced hyperhomocysteinemia.
  • [MeSH-major] Dietary Supplements. Endothelium, Vascular / pathology. Folic Acid / pharmacology. Hyperhomocysteinemia / prevention & control. Microcirculation / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cerebrovascular Circulation / drug effects. Disease Models, Animal. Energy Intake. Homocysteine / blood. Male. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Reference Values. Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances / metabolism. Vitamin B 12 / blood. Weight Gain

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  • (PMID = 15735091.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3166
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of nutrition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Nutr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances; 0LVT1QZ0BA / Homocysteine; 935E97BOY8 / Folic Acid; P6YC3EG204 / Vitamin B 12
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44. Bobe G, Barrett KG, Mentor-Marcel RA, Saffiotti U, Young MR, Colburn NH, Albert PS, Bennink MR, Lanza E: Dietary cooked navy beans and their fractions attenuate colon carcinogenesis in azoxymethane-induced ob/ob mice. Nutr Cancer; 2008;60(3):373-81
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  • [Title] Dietary cooked navy beans and their fractions attenuate colon carcinogenesis in azoxymethane-induced ob/ob mice.
  • Cooked navy beans (whole beans), the insoluble fraction (bean residue) or soluble fraction of the 60% (vol:vol) ethanol extract of cooked navy beans (bean extract), or a modified AIN-93G diet (16.6% fat including 12.9% lard) as control diet were fed to 160 male obese ob/ob mice after 2 azoxymethane injections.
  • In comparison to control-fed mice, dysplasia, adenomas, or adenocarcinomas were detected in fewer mice on either bean fraction diet (percent reduction from control: whole beans 54%, P=0.10; bean residue 81%, P=0.003; bean extract 91%, P=0.007), and any type of colon lesions, including focal hyperplasia, were found in fewer mice on each of the 3 bean diets percent reduction from control: whole bean 56%, P=0.04; bean residue 67%, P=0.01; bean extract 87%, P=0.0003.

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  • (PMID = 18444172.001).
  • [ISSN] 0163-5581
  • [Journal-full-title] Nutrition and cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nutr Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / Z01 BC010025-12
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Carcinogens; 0 / Plant Extracts; MO0N1J0SEN / Azoxymethane
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS48988; NLM/ PMC2423381
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45. Alvarez J, de Pokomandy A, Rouleau D, Ghattas G, Vézina S, Coté P, Allaire G, Hadjeres R, Franco EL, Coutlée F, HIPVIRG Study Group: Episomal and integrated human papillomavirus type 16 loads and anal intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV-seropositive men. AIDS; 2010 Sep 24;24(15):2355-63
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  • [Title] Episomal and integrated human papillomavirus type 16 loads and anal intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV-seropositive men.
  • OBJECTIVES: To assess levels of episomal and integrated human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) loads in HIV-seropositive men who have sex with men (MSM) in anal infection and to study the association between episomal and integrated HPV-16 loads and anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN).
  • Overall, 135 (54.7%) men provided 665 HPV-16-positive anal samples.
  • METHODS: Episomal and integrated HPV-16 loads were measured with quantitative real-time PCR assays.
  • HPV-16 integration was confirmed in samples with a HPV-16 E6/E2 of 1.5 or more with PCR sequencing to demonstrate the presence of viral-cellular junctions.
  • RESULTS: The HPV-16 DNA forms in anal samples were characterized as episomal only in 627 samples (94.3%), mixed in 22 samples (3.3%) and integrated only in nine samples (1.4%).
  • HPV-16 episomal load [odds ratio (OR) = 1.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-2.1], number of HPV types (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.8) and current smoking (OR = 4.8, 95% CI 1.3-18.6) were associated with high-grade AIN (AIN-2,3) after adjusting for age and CD4 cell counts.
  • Integrated HPV-16 load was not associated with AIN-2,3 (OR = 0.7, 95% CI 0.4-1.1).
  • Considering men with AIN-1 at baseline, four (16.7%) of the 24 men who progressed to AIN-2,3 had at least one sample with integrated HPV-16 DNA compared with three (23.1%) of 13 men who did not progress (OR = 0.7, 95% CI 0.2-3.8; P = 0.64).
  • Integration was detected in similar proportions in samples from men without AIN, with AIN-1 or AIN-2,3.
  • CONCLUSION: High episomal HPV-16 load but not HPV-16 integration load measured by real-time PCR was associated with AIN-2,3.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / immunology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / immunology. HIV Seropositivity / immunology. Human papillomavirus 16 / immunology. Papillomavirus Infections / immunology. Plasmids / immunology

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  • (PMID = 20706109.001).
  • [ISSN] 1473-5571
  • [Journal-full-title] AIDS (London, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AIDS
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] Canada / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Viral
  • [Investigator] Allaire G; Baril JG; Boissonnault M; Charest L; Charron MA; Coté S; Coté P; Coutlée F; de Pokomandy A; Dion H; Dufresne S; Falutz J; Fortin C; Franco EL; Ghattas G; Gilmore N; Gorska I; Hadjeres R; Junod P; Klein M; Lalonde R; Laplante F; Leblanc R; Legault D; Lessard B; Longpré D; McLeod J; Maziade JP; Murphy D; Nguyen VK; O'Brien R; Phaneuf D; Rouleau D; Routy JP; Szabo J; Tessier D; Thomas R; Toma E; Tremblay C; Trépanier JM; Trottier B; Tsoukas C; Turner H; Vezina S
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46. Suryanarayana P, Saraswat M, Mrudula T, Krishna TP, Krishnaswamy K, Reddy GB: Curcumin and turmeric delay streptozotocin-induced diabetic cataract in rats. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci; 2005 Jun;46(6):2092-9
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  • METHODS: Wistar-NIN rats were selected and diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (35 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally) and divided into four groups (group II-V).
  • The control (group I) rats received only vehicle.
  • Group I and II animals received an unsupplemented AIN-93 diet, and those in groups III, IV, and V received 0.002% and 0.01% curcumin and 0.5% turmeric, respectively, in an AIN-93 diet for a period of 8 weeks.
  • Cataract progression due to hyperglycemia was monitored by slit lamp biomicroscope and classified into four stages.
  • Blood glucose and insulin levels were also determined.
  • RESULTS: Although, both curcumin and turmeric did not prevent streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia, as assessed by blood glucose and insulin levels, slit lamp microscope observations indicated that these supplements delayed the progression and maturation of cataract.
  • Further, these results imply that ingredients in the study's dietary sources, such as turmeric, may be explored for anticataractogenic agents that prevent or delay the development of cataract.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blood Glucose / metabolism. Body Weight. Chromatography, Gel. Crystallins / metabolism. Diet. Disease Progression. Eating. Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel. Glutathione / metabolism. Hyperglycemia / drug therapy. Insulin / blood. Lipid Peroxidation / drug effects. Male. Oxidative Stress / drug effects. Oxidoreductases / metabolism. Rats. Rats, Wistar. Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 15914628.001).
  • [ISSN] 0146-0404
  • [Journal-full-title] Investigative ophthalmology & visual science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Blood Glucose; 0 / Crystallins; 0 / Insulin; 0 / Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances; EC 1.- / Oxidoreductases; GAN16C9B8O / Glutathione; IT942ZTH98 / Curcumin
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47. Cashman JP, Guerin SM, Hemsing M, McCormack D: Effect of deferred treatment of supracondylar humeral fractures. Surgeon; 2010 Apr;8(2):71-3
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  • In our institution, patients are not brought to theatre after midnight, except in the 'life or limb' situation.
  • Most common complications identified were ulnar nerve palsy and AIN palsy.
  • Supracondylar fractures which are not grossly displaced, have no neurovascular deficit or risk of skin compromise, can be safely deferred without an increased risk of complication.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2009 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20303886.001).
  • [ISSN] 1479-666X
  • [Journal-full-title] The surgeon : journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Ireland
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surgeon
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
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48. De Vuyst H, Franceschi S: Human papillomavirus vaccines in HIV-positive men and women. Curr Opin Oncol; 2007 Sep;19(5):470-5
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  • An increased incidence of human papillomavirus infection in anal and vulvar/vaginal neoplasia has been reported in individuals with HIV.
  • Preliminary results have also been reported on therapeutic vaccines, notably for the treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2 and 3.

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  • (PMID = 17762573.001).
  • [ISSN] 1040-8746
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Papillomavirus Vaccines
  • [Number-of-references] 68
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49. Konomi A, Yokoi K: Effects of zinc and/or iron deficiency on rectal temperature in rats. Biol Trace Elem Res; 2006 Jan;109(1):49-54
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  • However, it is not known whether a combined deficiency of zinc and iron affects rectal temperature.
  • Forty 4-wk-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned into four dietary treatment groups of 10 rats each for the 4-wk study: zinc-deficient group (4.5 mg Zn and 35 mg Fe/kg diet; -Zn), iron-deficient group (30 mg Zn/kg diet, no supplemental iron; -Fe), zinc/iron-deficient group (4.5 mg Zn/kg diet, no supplemental iron; -Zn-Fe), and control group (AIN-93G; Cont).
  • The rectal temperature of the -Zn group was significantly lower than the Cont group.
  • The rectal temperature of the -Zn-Fe group was similar to that of the Cont group, although thyroid-stimulating hormone and total thyroxin concentrations were the lowest in the -Zn-Fe group among all groups.
  • Although observation of the rectal temperature is not conclusive, the balance between zinc and iron intake seems to determine the body temperature set point.
  • These results suggest that the thermogenic effect of thyroid hormones is not thought to influence the paradoxical maintenance of rectal temperature in combined deficiency of zinc and iron.
  • [MeSH-major] Body Temperature. Iron / deficiency. Zinc / deficiency
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Dietary Supplements. Iron, Dietary / metabolism. Male. Nitrates / blood. Nitrites / blood. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Rectum / physiology. Thyrotropin / blood. Thyroxine / blood

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  • [ErratumIn] Biol Trace Elem Res. 2006 May;110(2):191
  • (PMID = 16388102.001).
  • [ISSN] 0163-4984
  • [Journal-full-title] Biological trace element research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biol Trace Elem Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Iron, Dietary; 0 / Nitrates; 0 / Nitrites; 9002-71-5 / Thyrotropin; E1UOL152H7 / Iron; J41CSQ7QDS / Zinc; Q51BO43MG4 / Thyroxine
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50. Orlando G, Beretta R, Fasolo MM, Amendola A, Bianchi S, Mazza F, Rizzardini G, Tanzi E: Anal HPV genotypes and related displasic lesions in Italian and foreign born high-risk males. Vaccine; 2009 May 29;27 Suppl 1:A24-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Anal HPV genotypes and related displasic lesions in Italian and foreign born high-risk males.
  • Anal intraepithelial neoplasia and anal cancer are closely related to infection from high-risk Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) genotypes.
  • Since HPVs involved in disease progression are reported to vary by geographical regions, this study focuses on HPV genotypes spectrum in 289 males attending a Sexual Transmitted Diseases (STD) unit according to their nationality.
  • Anal cytology, Digene Hybrid Capture Assay (HC2) and HPV genotyping were evaluated in 226 Italian (IT) and 63 foreign born (FB) subjects, recruited between January 2003 and December 2006.
  • FB people were younger (median 32y-IQR 27-35 vs 36y-IQR 31-43, respectively; Mann-Whitney test p<0.0001) and had a higher rate of abnormal results (>or=atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS)) on anal cytology (95.0% vs 84.04%) (p=0.032; OR 3.61; 95% CI 1.04-1.23).
  • HPV-16 is by far the most common genotype found in anal cytological samples independently from nationality while differences in distribution of other HPV genotypes were observed.
  • The probability of infection from high-risk HPVs was higher in FB (OR 1.69; 95% CI 1.07-2.68) and is due to a higher rate of HPV-58 (OR 4.98; 95% CI 2.06-12.04), to a lower rate of HPV-11 (OR 0.35; 95% CI 0.16-0.77), to the presence of other high-risk genotypes (HPV-45, HPV-66, HPV-69).
  • The relative contribution of each HPV genotype in the development of pre-neoplastic disease to an early age in the FB group cannot be argued by this study and more extensive epidemiological evaluations are needed to define the influence of each genotype and the association with the most prevalent high-risk HPVs on cytological intraepithelial lesions development.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / virology. Papillomaviridae / genetics. Papillomavirus Infections / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Anal Canal / virology. Cross-Sectional Studies. DNA, Viral / genetics. Genotype. HIV Infections / complications. HIV Infections / virology. Humans. Italy / epidemiology. Male. Prevalence. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 19480957.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-2518
  • [Journal-full-title] Vaccine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vaccine
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Viral
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51. Al-Maskari F, El-Sadig M, Nagelkerke N: Assessment of the direct medical costs of diabetes mellitus and its complications in the United Arab Emirates. BMC Public Health; 2010;10:679
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  • The aim of the study was to estimate the direct annual treatment costs of DM and its related complications among patients in Al-Ain city, UAE.
  • METHODS: A sample of 150 DM patients were enrolled during 2004-2005, and their medical costs over the ensuing 12 months was measured, quantified, analyzed and extrapolated to the population in Al-Ain and UAE, using conventional and inference statistics.
  • RESULTS: The total annual direct treatment costs of DM among patients without complications in Al Ain-UAE, was US $1,605 (SD = 1,206) which is 3.2 times higher than the per capita expenditure for health care in the UAE (US$ 497) during 2004 (WHO, 2004).

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  • (PMID = 21059202.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2458
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC public health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Public Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2988742
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52. Ding L, Zou XJ, Ao JE, Yao AX, Cai L: ELISA test to detect CDKN2A (p16(INK4a)) expression in exfoliative cells: a new screening tool for cervical cancer. Mol Diagn Ther; 2008;12(6):395-400
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  • CDKN2A is upregulated and considered as a surrogate marker for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer.
  • RESULTS: The sensitivity and specificity of the TCT for screening of cervical dysplasia and cancer were 82.93% and 88.11%, respectively.
  • The sensitivity and specificity for measuring CDKN2A with ELISA to detect significant cervical disease were 87.80% and 92.43%, respectively.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Early Detection of Cancer. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Sensitivity and Specificity. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / diagnosis. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / pathology. Young Adult


53. Saarinen NM, Abrahamsson A, Dabrosin C: Estrogen-induced angiogenic factors derived from stromal and cancer cells are differently regulated by enterolactone and genistein in human breast cancer in vivo. Int J Cancer; 2010 Aug 1;127(3):737-45
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  • Angiogenesis is a key in cancer progression and its regulators are released both by the tumor cells and the stroma.
  • Dietary phytoestrogens, such as the lignan enterolactone (ENL) and the isoflavone genistein (GEN), may differently affect breast cancer growth.
  • In this study, human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) were established in mice creating a tumor with species-specific cancer and stroma cells.
  • Ovariectomized athymic mice supplemented with estradiol (E2) were fed basal AIN-93G diet (BD) or BD supplemented with 100 mg/kg ENL, 100 mg/kg GEN or their combination (ENL+GEN).
  • We show that ENL and ENL+GEN inhibited E2-induced cancer growth and angiogenesis, whereas GEN alone did not.
  • In subcutaneous Matrigel plugs in mice, ENL and ENL+GEN decreased E2-induced endothelial cell infiltration, whereas GEN alone did not.
  • In endothelial cells, ENL inhibited E2-induced VEGFR-2 expression, whereas GEN did not.
  • These results suggest that ENL has potent effects on breast cancer growth, even in combination with GEN, by downregulating E2-stimulated angiogenic factors derived both from the stroma and the cancer cells, whereas dietary GEN does not possess any antiestrogenic effects.

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  • (PMID = 19924815.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0215
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inducing Agents; 0 / Estrogens; 0 / Lignans; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; DH2M523P0H / Genistein; OL659KIY4X / 4-Butyrolactone; X01E7E1D6H / 2,3-bis(3'-hydroxybenzyl)butyrolactone
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54. Modica M, Vanhems P, Tebib J: Comparison of conventional NSAIDs and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in outpatients. Joint Bone Spine; 2005 Oct;72(5):397-402
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  • OBJECTIVES: To compare outpatients treated with conventional nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) versus cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) inhibitors in June 2002 in the Ain district of France.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was done in the 14,216 patients older than 19 years of age who were identified in the universal health insurance database as having received therapy with conventional NSAIDs or COX2 inhibitors.
  • Factors significantly associated with COX2 inhibitor therapy were older age and concomitant use of symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, anticoagulants, antiplatelet agents, diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin II receptor antagonists.

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  • (PMID = 16129642.001).
  • [ISSN] 1297-319X
  • [Journal-full-title] Joint, bone, spine : revue du rhumatisme
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Joint Bone Spine
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors
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55. Riedel SB, Fischer SM, Sanders BG, Kline K: Vitamin E analog, alpha-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid analog, alone and in combination with celecoxib, reduces multiplicity of ultraviolet-induced skin cancers in mice. Anticancer Drugs; 2008 Feb;19(2):175-81
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  • [Title] Vitamin E analog, alpha-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid analog, alone and in combination with celecoxib, reduces multiplicity of ultraviolet-induced skin cancers in mice.
  • The goals of this study were to determine whether alpha-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid analog (alpha-TEA), a novel vitamin E analog, and celecoxib, alone or in combination, when administered as a late intervention can reduce the ultraviolet-induced nonmelanoma skin-tumor burden of established tumors, prevent additional tumors from developing, and prevent tumor recurrence once treatments are stopped.
  • Hairless SKH-1 female mice were ultraviolet-irradiated for 24 weeks, divided into treatment groups so that each group had approximately 5.8 tumors/mouse, and then treated with 72 mug of liposome-formulated alpha-TEA by aerosol inhalation, 500 p.p.m. celecoxib in AIN-76 A diet, or a combination of alpha-TEA and celecoxib for 4 weeks.
  • At the end of 4 weeks of treatment, each treatment group was subdivided, with one subgroup continuing to receive treatment and with treatment being stopped in the other.
  • Skin-tumor development was monitored visually throughout the study and by histologic evaluation at the end.
  • After 4 weeks of treatment, all treatments showed statistically significant reductions in tumor number when compared with controls.
  • After termination of treatment, only alpha-TEA prevented a significant increase in tumor recurrence; however, continuous combination treatment resulted in the lowest total number of tumors.
  • In conclusion alpha-TEA is an effective late-stage chemopreventive agent for nonmelanoma skin cancer that exhibits lasting benefits.
  • [MeSH-minor] Acetates / chemistry. Administration, Inhalation. Animals. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma / diagnosis. Carcinoma / etiology. Carcinoma / prevention & control. Celecoxib. Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors / administration & dosage. Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Liposomes. Mice. Mice, Hairless. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Neoplasms, Squamous Cell / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Squamous Cell / etiology. Neoplasms, Squamous Cell / prevention & control. Radiation Dosage. Skin / pathology. Skin / radiation effects. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18176114.001).
  • [ISSN] 0959-4973
  • [Journal-full-title] Anti-cancer drugs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA59739; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / ES007784
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 2,5,7,8-tetramethyl-2R-(4R,8R,12-trimethyltridecyl)chroman-6-yloxy acetic acid; 0 / Acetates; 0 / Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors; 0 / Liposomes; 0 / Pyrazoles; 0 / Sulfonamides; 1406-66-2 / Tocopherols; JCX84Q7J1L / Celecoxib
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56. Wainwright PE, Lomanowska AM, McCutcheon D, Park EJ, Clandinin MT, Ramanujam KS: Postnatal dietary supplementation with either gangliosides or choline: effects on spatial short-term memory in artificially-reared rats. Nutr Neurosci; 2007 Feb-Apr;10(1-2):67-77
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  • [Title] Postnatal dietary supplementation with either gangliosides or choline: effects on spatial short-term memory in artificially-reared rats.
  • This study addressed the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with either gangliosides or choline during the brain growth spurt would enhance short-term spatial memory.
  • Male Long-Evans rats were reared artificially from postnatal days (PD) 5-18 and were fed diets containing either (i) choline chloride 1250 mg/l (CHL), (ii) choline chloride 250 mg/l and GD3 24 mg/l (GNG) or (iii) choline chloride 250 mg/l (STD).
  • A fourth group (SCK) was reared normally.
  • Rats were weaned onto AIN 93G diet and on PD 35 were trained on a cued delayed- matching-to-place version of the Morris water maze.
  • All groups learned to swim to the beacon that indicated the platform position on the first trial; similarly, on the second un-cued trial, the distance swam to reach the platform decreased to the same extent in all groups over the five days of training.
  • The groups also responded in the same way to an increase in delay between the first and second trial from 1 min to 1 h, showing an increase in the distance swam, accompanied by a decrease in the number of direct swims to the platform.
  • [MeSH-major] Choline / pharmacology. Dietary Supplements. Gangliosides / pharmacology. Maze Learning / drug effects. Memory / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Aging. Animal Feed. Animals. Brain / drug effects. Brain / growth & development. Male. Models, Animal. Rats. Rats, Inbred Lew. Swimming / physiology

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  • (PMID = 17539485.001).
  • [ISSN] 1028-415X
  • [Journal-full-title] Nutritional neuroscience
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nutr Neurosci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Gangliosides; N91BDP6H0X / Choline
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57. Lee SI, Oh SH, Park KY, Park BH, Kim JS, Kim SD: Antihyperglycemic effects of fruits of privet (Ligustrum obtusifolium) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats fed a high fat diet. J Med Food; 2009 Feb;12(1):109-17
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  • The protective effects of freeze-dried privet (Ligustrum obtusifolium) fruits (PFs) were observed in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats on a high fat diet by measuring levels of blood glucose, serum insulin, fructosamine, and hepatic reactive oxygen species generating and scavenging enzyme activities.
  • A PF-supplemented diet was prepared by mixing an AIN-76 diet with powdered PF (final concentration, 1% or 2%).
  • Diabetic animals receiving the PF-supplemented diet showed a significant increase in body weight, feed efficiency ratio, liver, kidney, and heart weight, and serum glucose, insulin, and fructosamine levels compared with high fat diet-fed diabetic animals.
  • Furthermore, necrosis of tubular epithelial cells and dilatation of luminal space in diabetic kidneys exhibited near-noninjured condition.
  • This is the first time an antihyperglycemic effect of L. obtusifolium fruit in STZ-induced diabetic rats has been identified.
  • [MeSH-major] Blood Glucose. Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental / diet therapy. Hypoglycemic Agents / therapeutic use. Ligustrum. Phytotherapy. Plant Preparations / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Alanine Transaminase / blood. Animals. Biomarkers / blood. Dietary Fats. Fructosamine / blood. Fruit. Glutathione / blood. Glutathione Transferase / blood. Insulin / blood. Kidney / drug effects. Male. Organ Size / drug effects. Pancreas / drug effects. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Reactive Oxygen Species / metabolism. Superoxide Dismutase / blood. Weight Gain / drug effects. Xanthine Oxidase / blood

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  • (PMID = 19298203.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-7600
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of medicinal food
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Med Food
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Blood Glucose; 0 / Dietary Fats; 0 / Hypoglycemic Agents; 0 / Insulin; 0 / Plant Preparations; 0 / Reactive Oxygen Species; 4429-04-3 / Fructosamine; EC 1.15.1.1 / Superoxide Dismutase; EC 1.17.3.2 / Xanthine Oxidase; EC 2.5.1.18 / Glutathione Transferase; EC 2.6.1.2 / Alanine Transaminase; GAN16C9B8O / Glutathione
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58. Moreira AS, González-Torres L, Olivero-David R, Bastida S, Benedi J, Sánchez-Muniz FJ: Wakame and Nori in restructured meats included in cholesterol-enriched diets affect the antioxidant enzyme gene expressions and activities in Wistar rats. Plant Foods Hum Nutr; 2010 Sep;65(3):290-8
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  • Six groups of ten male growing Wistar rats each were fed a mix of 85% AIN-93 M diet and 15% freeze-dried RM for 35 days.
  • The control group (C) consumed control RM, the Wakame (W) and the Nori (N) groups, RM with 5% Wakame and 5% Nori, respectively.
  • Animals on added cholesterol diets (CC, CW, and CN) consumed their corresponding basal diets added with cholesterol (2%) and cholic acid (0.4%).
  • Alga and dietary cholesterol significantly interact (P < 0.002) influencing all enzyme expressions but not activities.
  • CN diet induced significantly lower plasma cholesterol levels (P < 0.001) than the CW diet.
  • [MeSH-major] Antioxidants / metabolism. Cholesterol, Dietary / pharmacology. Enzymes / metabolism. Meat Products. Plant Preparations / pharmacology. Porphyra. Undaria
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Anticholesteremic Agents / pharmacology. Cholic Acid. Functional Food. Gene Expression. Male. Oxidative Stress. Phytotherapy. Rats. Rats, Wistar

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  • (PMID = 20676937.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-9104
  • [Journal-full-title] Plant foods for human nutrition (Dordrecht, Netherlands)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Plant Foods Hum Nutr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticholesteremic Agents; 0 / Antioxidants; 0 / Cholesterol, Dietary; 0 / Enzymes; 0 / Plant Preparations; G1JO7801AE / Cholic Acid
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59. Zhang XH, Hua JZ, Wang SR, Sun CH: Post-weaning isocaloric hyper-soybean oil versus a hyper-carbohydrate diet reduces obesity in adult rats induced by a high-fat diet. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr; 2007;16 Suppl 1:368-73
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  • In the present study, newborn male Wistar rats were weaned on d 24, divided into CON (control), HC and HSO groups.
  • CON was assigned to AIN-93G diet (a hypercarbohydrate diet, for short HC diet) during the entire experiment.
  • On 3,5,11 wk, the body weight, body fat content, blood glucose, blood lipid, serum insulin and leptin levels and obesity-related gene (CPT-1, FAS, UCP2, UCP3) expression levels in rats were detected.
  • It was shown that body weight, body fat content, blood glucose and blood lipid, serum insulin and leptin levels in HSO were down-regulated on 3 and 5 wk, therefore were significantly reduced on 11 wk vs. HC.
  • The study indicated that an early isocaloric HSO diet may reduce later obesity risk and reduce blood lipid and glucose abnormalities in adulthood via persistently influencing insulin and leptin sensitivity and permanent regulation of obesity-related gene expressions.
  • [MeSH-major] Dietary Carbohydrates / administration & dosage. Down-Regulation. Obesity / prevention & control. Soybean Oil / administration & dosage. Weight Gain
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blood Glucose / metabolism. Gene Expression / drug effects. Gene Expression / physiology. Insulin / metabolism. Leptin / metabolism. Lipids / blood. Male. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. Rats. Rats, Wistar. Weaning

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  • (PMID = 17392134.001).
  • [ISSN] 0964-7058
  • [Journal-full-title] Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Asia Pac J Clin Nutr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Blood Glucose; 0 / Dietary Carbohydrates; 0 / Insulin; 0 / Leptin; 0 / Lipids; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 8001-22-7 / Soybean Oil
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60. Edgren G, Sparén P: Risk of anogenital cancer after diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia: a prospective population-based study. Lancet Oncol; 2007 Apr;8(4):311-6
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  • [Title] Risk of anogenital cancer after diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia: a prospective population-based study.
  • BACKGROUND: The first vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV)-related disease is now available.
  • Associations between HPV and vaginal, vulvar, and anal cancers are well established, but the full extent in terms of age and time since diagnosis of these associations is not well known.
  • Using national registration numbers, we linked this cohort to nationwide population, migration, cancer, and death registers.
  • The incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of vaginal, vulvar, anal, and rectal cancer in women with a history of a cervical intraepithelial neoplasm (CIN), grade 3, compared with women with no such history were estimated by use of multivariate Poisson regression.
  • FINDINGS: Women with a history of grade 3 CIN had increased risks of cancer of the vagina (6.74 [95% CI 5.24-8.56]), vulva (2.22 [1.79-2.73]), and anus (IRR 4.68 [3.87-5.62]).
  • For all four anatomical sites, the IRRs varied substantially with the amount of time that had elapsed since the date of first diagnosis of grade 3 CIN.
  • Analyses stratified by attained age during follow-up showed that the risk of cancer conferred by a history of diagnosis of grade 3 CIN was highly age dependent.
  • The observed increased risks were not explained by smoking or socioeconomic status.
  • INTERPRETATION: This study confirms the known association between history of CIN, presumed HPV infection, and increased risk of cancers of the vagina, vulva, and anus by use of large and complete databases, but also shows that this risk varies both by the time from initial diagnosis of grade 3 CIN and by the age of the individual.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / complications. Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / complications. Genital Neoplasms, Female / complications. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / complications


61. Watson AJ, Smith BB, Whitehead MR, Sykes PH, Frizelle FA: Malignant progression of anal intra-epithelial neoplasia. ANZ J Surg; 2006 Aug;76(8):715-7
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  • [Title] Malignant progression of anal intra-epithelial neoplasia.
  • BACKGROUND: Anal intra-epithelial neoplasia (AIN) is believed to be a precursor to squamous cell carcinoma of the anus.
  • The risk of developing anal cancer in patients with AIN, although known to occur, has been thought to be relatively low.
  • This study reviews our experience with AIN, reviewing the incidence and risk factors for development of invasive malignancy and the outcome of present management strategies.
  • METHODS: This study examined a cohort of 72 patients identified from a prospective database with AIN from a single institution between January 1996 and December 2004.
  • We identified progression of AIN to invasive malignancy in eight patients despite undergoing surveillance.
  • CONCLUSION: This study has shown a high rate of progression to invasive malignancy (11%) with AIN despite surveillance.
  • The patients at risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma were the immunocompromised and those with genital intra-epithelial field change.
  • Treatment of AIN has significant complications and despite treatment, invasive cancers do occur.
  • Decisions made for treatment of AIN can affect treatment choices if invasive malignancy develops.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / epidemiology. Anus Neoplasms / pathology. Carcinoma in Situ / pathology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 16916390.001).
  • [ISSN] 1445-1433
  • [Journal-full-title] ANZ journal of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] ANZ J Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
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62. de Moura RF, Ribeiro C, de Oliveira JA, Stevanato E, de Mello MA: Metabolic syndrome signs in Wistar rats submitted to different high-fructose ingestion protocols. Br J Nutr; 2009 Apr;101(8):1178-84
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  • First, two adult rat groups (aged 90 d) were studied: a control group (C1; n 6) received regular rodent chow (Labina, Purina) and a fructose group (F1; n 6) was fed on regular rodent chow.
  • Second, two adult rat groups (aged 90 d) were evaluated: a control group (C2; n 6) was fed on a balanced diet (AIN-93G) and a fructose group (F2; n 6) was fed on a purified 60 % fructose diet.
  • Finally, two young rat groups (aged 28 d) were analysed: a control group (C3; n 6) was fed on the AIN-93G diet and a fructose group (F3; n 6) was fed on a 60 % fructose diet.
  • Glucose tolerance, peripheral insulin sensitivity, blood lipid profile and body fat were analysed.
  • In the fructose groups F2 and F3 glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were lower, while triacylglycerolaemia was higher than the respective controls C2 and C3 (P < 0.05).
  • Blood total cholesterol, HDL and LDL as well as body fat showed change only in the second protocol.
  • [MeSH-major] Disease Models, Animal. Fructose / toxicity. Metabolic Syndrome X / chemically induced
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blood Glucose / metabolism. Cholesterol / blood. Glucose Tolerance Test / methods. Insulin / metabolism. Insulin Resistance. Male. Rats. Rats, Wistar. Weight Gain / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 19007450.001).
  • [ISSN] 1475-2662
  • [Journal-full-title] The British journal of nutrition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Nutr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Blood Glucose; 0 / Insulin; 30237-26-4 / Fructose; 97C5T2UQ7J / Cholesterol
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63. Burdge GC, Slater-Jefferies J, Torrens C, Phillips ES, Hanson MA, Lillycrop KA: Dietary protein restriction of pregnant rats in the F0 generation induces altered methylation of hepatic gene promoters in the adult male offspring in the F1 and F2 generations. Br J Nutr; 2007 Mar;97(3):435-9
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  • [Title] Dietary protein restriction of pregnant rats in the F0 generation induces altered methylation of hepatic gene promoters in the adult male offspring in the F1 and F2 generations.
  • Females rats (F0) were fed a reference diet (180 g/kg protein) or PRD (90 g/kg protein) throughout gestation, and AIN-76A during lactation.
  • The F1 offspring were weaned onto AIN-76A.
  • F1 females were mated and fed AIN-76A throughout pregnancy and lactation.
  • Hepatic PPARalpha and GR promoter methylation was significantly (P<0 x 05) lower in the PRD group in the F1 (PPARalpha 8 %, GR 10 %) and F2 (PPARalpha 11 %, GR 8 %) generations.
  • These data show for the first time that the altered methylation of gene promoters induced in the F1 generation by maternal protein restriction during pregnancy is transmitted to the F2 generation.
  • [MeSH-minor] Acyl-CoA Oxidase / biosynthesis. Acyl-CoA Oxidase / genetics. Animals. Dietary Proteins / administration & dosage. Epigenesis, Genetic. Female. Gene Expression. Male. PPAR alpha / biosynthesis. PPAR alpha / genetics. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase / biosynthesis. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase / genetics. Pregnancy. RNA, Messenger / genetics. Rats. Rats, Wistar. Receptors, Glucocorticoid / biosynthesis. Receptors, Glucocorticoid / genetics

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  • (PMID = 17313703.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1145
  • [Journal-full-title] The British journal of nutrition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Nutr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / British Heart Foundation / / FS/05/064/19525
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dietary Proteins; 0 / PPAR alpha; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Receptors, Glucocorticoid; EC 1.3.3.6 / Acyl-CoA Oxidase; EC 4.1.1.31 / Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2211514; NLM/ UKMS1427
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64. Uduman SA, Sheek-Hussein M, Bakir M, Trad O, Al-Hussani M, Uduman J, Sheikhs F: Pattern of varicella and associated complications in children in Unite Arab Emirates: 5-year descriptive study. East Mediterr Health J; 2009 Jul-Aug;15(4):800-6
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  • The objective of this study was to characterize the epidemiology of varicella and varicella-associated complications in Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates (UAE) during 2000-04.
  • The annual number of reported cases varied from 373 to 790 per 100 000 population.
  • The overall mortality rate among hospitalized children was 1.1%, all due to invasive group A Streptococcus.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Age Distribution. Central Nervous System Diseases / virology. Chi-Square Distribution. Child. Child, Preschool. Fever / virology. Hospital Mortality. Hospitalization / statistics & numerical data. Humans. Incidence. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Population Surveillance. Seasons. Statistics, Nonparametric. Streptococcal Infections / virology. Streptococcus pyogenes. Superinfection / virology. United Arab Emirates / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 20187531.001).
  • [ISSN] 1020-3397
  • [Journal-full-title] Eastern Mediterranean health journal = La revue de santé de la Méditerranée orientale = al-Majallah al-ṣiḥḥīyah li-sharq al-mutawassiṭ
  • [ISO-abbreviation] East. Mediterr. Health J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Egypt
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65. Demirkaya E, Atay AA, Musabak U, Sengul A, Gok F: Ceftriaxone-related hemolysis and acute renal failure. Pediatr Nephrol; 2006 May;21(5):733-6
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  • A 5-year-old girl with no underlying immune deficiency or hematologic disease was treated with a combination of ceftriaxone and ampicilline-sulbactam for pneumonia.
  • Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) was diagnosed by renal biopsy.
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Ampicillin / adverse effects. Child, Preschool. Coombs Test. Female. Humans. Immunoglobulin G / immunology. Peritoneal Dialysis. Pneumonia / drug therapy. Sulbactam / adverse effects. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16491410.001).
  • [ISSN] 0931-041X
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric nephrology (Berlin, Germany)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr. Nephrol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Immunoglobulin G; 65DT0ML581 / sultamicillin; 75J73V1629 / Ceftriaxone; 7C782967RD / Ampicillin; S4TF6I2330 / Sulbactam
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66. Immunoregulation in Chronic Inflammatory Disorders. Proceedings of the Third Al-Ain International Immunology Meeting. Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates. March 17-20, 2008. Clin Immunol; 2009 Jan;130(1):1-109
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  • [Title] Immunoregulation in Chronic Inflammatory Disorders. Proceedings of the Third Al-Ain International Immunology Meeting. Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates. March 17-20, 2008.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Chronic Disease. Humans

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  • (PMID = 19143039.001).
  • [ISSN] 1521-7035
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical immunology (Orlando, Fla.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Immunol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Congresses; Overall
  • [Publication-country] United States
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67. Nagarajan S, Stewart BW, Badger TM: Soy isoflavones attenuate human monocyte adhesion to endothelial cell-specific CD54 by inhibiting monocyte CD11a. J Nutr; 2006 Sep;136(9):2384-90
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  • Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed AIN-93G diets containing soy protein isolate or casein.
  • Sera from soy-fed rats inhibited CD54-dependent monocyte adhesion, whereas sera from casein-fed rats did not.
  • However, binding of the activation epitope-specific antibody mAb24, which binds specifically to the active form of CD11a, was significantly lower in soy isoflavone-treated monocytes than in media-treated cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD11a / drug effects. Endothelial Cells / chemistry. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 / metabolism. Isoflavones / pharmacology. Monocytes / physiology. Soybeans / chemistry

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  • (PMID = 16920859.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3166
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of nutrition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Nutr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antigens, CD11a; 0 / Caseins; 0 / Interleukin-6; 0 / Interleukin-8; 0 / Isoflavones; 0 / Lipoproteins, LDL; 0 / Soybean Proteins; 0 / oxidized low density lipoprotein; 126547-89-5 / Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1
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68. Lacey CJ: Therapy for genital human papillomavirus-related disease. J Clin Virol; 2005 Mar;32 Suppl 1:S82-90
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  • [Title] Therapy for genital human papillomavirus-related disease.
  • Genital warts are caused by HPV 6/11 infection and are one of the commonest clinically recognised disease manifestations of genital HPV.
  • Various individual subject and disease factors mediate appropriate therapy choice.
  • Some of the treatments that are used for genital warts can also be used for some cases of intraepithelial neoplasia caused by high-oncogenic risk HPVs occurring at vulval, anal or penile sites.
  • [MeSH-major] Condylomata Acuminata / therapy. Genital Diseases, Female / therapy. Genital Diseases, Male / therapy. Papillomaviridae

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  • (PMID = 15753016.001).
  • [ISSN] 1386-6532
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical virology : the official publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Virol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Number-of-references] 71
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69. Hayanga AJ: When to test women for human papillomavirus: take this opportunity to screen for anal cancer too. BMJ; 2006 Jan 28;332(7535):237
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  • [Title] When to test women for human papillomavirus: take this opportunity to screen for anal cancer too.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / diagnosis. Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / diagnosis. Tumor Virus Infections / diagnosis. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / diagnosis


70. Baumgardner JN, Shankar K, Hennings L, Albano E, Badger TM, Ronis MJ: N-acetylcysteine attenuates progression of liver pathology in a rat model of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. J Nutr; 2008 Oct;138(10):1872-9
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  • A "2-hit" model for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has been proposed in which steatosis constitutes the "first hit" and sensitizes the liver to potential "second hits" resulting in NASH.
  • N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant, has been suggested as a dietary therapy for NASH.
  • We examined the effects of NAC in a rat total enteral nutrition (TEN) model where NASH develops as the result of overfeeding dietary polyunsaturated fat.
  • Male Sprague-Dawley rats consumed pelleted AIN-93G diets ad libitum or were overfed a 9200 kJ.kg(-0.75).d(-1) liquid diet containing 70% corn oil with or without 2 g.kg(-1).d(-1) NAC i.g. for 65 d.
  • Hepatic steatosis was not influenced by dietary supplementation with NAC; however, the liver pathology score was lower (P </= 0.05) and NAC provided partial protection against alanine aminotransferase release (P </= 0.05).
  • NAC attenuated increased hepatic oxidative stress (TBARS; P </= 0.05) and prevented increases in cytochrome P450 2E1 apoprotein and mRNA and in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) mRNA.
  • Titers of auto-antibodies against proteins adducted to lipid peroxidation products were lower in serum of the NAC group than in the 70% corn oil group (P </= 0.05).
  • Using NAC in a TEN model of NASH, we have demonstrated that NAC prevents many aspects of NASH progression by decreasing development of oxidative stress and subsequent increases in TNFalpha but does not block development of steatosis.

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  • (PMID = 18806095.001).
  • [ISSN] 1541-6100
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of nutrition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Nutr.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIAAA NIH HHS / AA / AA012819-05; United States / NIAAA NIH HHS / AA / R01 AA012819; United States / NIAAA NIH HHS / AA / R01 AA012819-05; United States / NIAAA NIH HHS / AA / R01 AA 12819; United States / NIAAA NIH HHS / AA / R01 AA018282
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Autoantibodies; 0 / Triglycerides; GAN16C9B8O / Glutathione; WYQ7N0BPYC / Acetylcysteine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS232260; NLM/ PMC2935161
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71. Itoh T, Kobayashi M, Horio F, Furuichi Y: Hypoglycemic effect of hot-water extract of adzuki (Vigna angularis) in spontaneously diabetic KK-A(y) mice. Nutrition; 2009 Feb;25(2):134-41
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  • OBJECTIVE: Recently, we reported that 40% ethanol fraction of hot-water extracts of adzuki (Vigna angularis; EtEx.40) suppressed the postprandial blood glucose level and serum insulin level in normal mice and streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic rats.
  • The present study examined the hypoglycemic effect of EtEx.40 on blood glucose, insulin concentrations, organ weight, serum composition, and hepatic lipid content in spontaneously diabetic KK-A(y)/Ta Jcl mice, a model for type 2 diabetes.
  • METHODS: To investigate the prevention of type 2 diabetes by EtEx.40 ingestion, 4-wk-old non-diabetic KK-A(y) mice were fed an AIN-76 diet containing 5000 mg of EtEx.40/kg of body weight per day (EtEx.40) or an AIN-76 diet without EtEx.40 for 8 wk.
  • RESULTS: Compared with the control group, EtEx.40 supplementation had a significant effect in lowering blood glucose levels, water intake, serum insulin levels, urinary glucose, urinary microalbumin/creatinine ratio, liver triacylglycerol, and total cholesterol levels.
  • In the present study, we conclude that the preventive and ameliorative effects by EtEx.40 were due to the modulation of blood glucose levels and the protective effect against oxidative damage in diabetes mellitus.
  • [MeSH-major] Blood Glucose / drug effects. Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / drug therapy. Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / prevention & control. Hypoglycemic Agents / pharmacology. Plant Extracts / pharmacology. Plants, Medicinal / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Disease Models, Animal. Drinking / drug effects. Hot Temperature. Insulin / blood. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred Strains. Organ Size / drug effects. Oxidation-Reduction. Postprandial Period. Random Allocation. Water

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  • (PMID = 18929464.001).
  • [ISSN] 0899-9007
  • [Journal-full-title] Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nutrition
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Blood Glucose; 0 / Hypoglycemic Agents; 0 / Insulin; 0 / Plant Extracts; 059QF0KO0R / Water
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72. Varnai AD, Bollmann M, Griefingholt H, Speich N, Schmitt C, Bollmann R, Decker D: HPV in anal squamous cell carcinoma and anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN). Impact of HPV analysis of anal lesions on diagnosis and prognosis. Int J Colorectal Dis; 2006 Mar;21(2):135-42
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  • [Title] HPV in anal squamous cell carcinoma and anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN). Impact of HPV analysis of anal lesions on diagnosis and prognosis.
  • BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Majority of cases of anal squamous cell carcinoma are human papilloma virus (HPV)-induced and result from anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN).
  • This study was conducted to examine methods which may enable the routine diagnosis of HPV-induced changes in the anal rim and the consequences of such detection especially in view of a more sensitive diagnosis of AIN.
  • METHODS: The study included biopsy samples from 87 patients who had been diagnosed with the following disease patterns: 47 invasive anal carcinoma, 33 AIN of varying severity and seven condylomatous lesions.
  • RESULTS: In 38 of 47 cases of anal carcinoma, HPV DNA could be detected via PCR (80.9%), the majority of which were HPV 16 (33/38=86.8%).
  • In 29 of the 33 cases of AIN, HPV DNA was detected (87.9%), most of these in AIN III (15/16=93.8%).
  • DISCUSSION: In our series, the clinical diagnosis of the invasive anal carcinoma had a high sensitivity of 93.6%, with a specificity of 80%.
  • The positive predictive value was 84.6%, and the negative predictive value 91.4%.
  • In contrast, AIN had been detected clinically in none of the cases.
  • In this situation, especially with high-risk patients, our findings recommend anal HPV screening in combination with anal cytology and anoscopy.
  • CONCLUSION: Based on our results, we urgently recommend for any histological report on excision of anal lesions to include a statement whether histological markers of HPV infection were detected.
  • [MeSH-major] Alphapapillomavirus / genetics. Anus Neoplasms / virology. Carcinoma in Situ / virology. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / virology. DNA, Viral / analysis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Biopsy. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies

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  • [CommentIn] Int J Colorectal Dis. 2007 Oct;22(10):1289 [16703315.001]
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  • (PMID = 15864603.001).
  • [ISSN] 0179-1958
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of colorectal disease
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Colorectal Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Viral
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73. Om AS, Shim JY: Effect of daidzein, a soy isoflavone, on bone metabolism in Cd-treated ovariectomized rats. Acta Biochim Pol; 2007;54(3):641-6
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  • (4) OVX fed 50 ppm of CdCl2 and 10 microg of daidzein per kg of body mass (OVX-CD-D); or (5) OVX fed 50 ppm of CdCl2 and 10 microg of estrogen per kg of body mass (OVX-CD-E).
  • All rats were given free access to AIN-76 modified diet and drinking water, with or without Cd, for 8 weeks.
  • The OVX groups gained more (P < 0.05) body mass than the SH group.
  • Femoral mass was increased by feeding daidzein and estradiol, whereas femoral length was not (P > 0.05) significantly different among groups.
  • Femoral breaking force was not significantly different among groups, however, femoral BMD was significantly lower in OVX-Cd than in the SH and OVX groups.
  • Morphologically proliferative cartilage and hypertrophic cells in femur showed normal distribution in OVX-Cd-D and OVX-Cd-E groups unlike those in OVX-Cd group.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Bone Density / drug effects. Cadmium / toxicity. Calcium / metabolism. Estradiol / pharmacology. Female. Femur / drug effects. Femur / metabolism. Rats. Rats, Wistar

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  • (PMID = 17717607.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-527X
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta biochimica Polonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Biochim. Pol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Isoflavones; 00BH33GNGH / Cadmium; 4TI98Z838E / Estradiol; 6287WC5J2L / daidzein; SY7Q814VUP / Calcium
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74. Moran MG, Barkley TW Jr, Hughes CB: Screening and management of anal dysplasia and anal cancer in HIV-infected patients: a guide for practice. J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care; 2010 Sep-Oct;21(5):408-16
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  • [Title] Screening and management of anal dysplasia and anal cancer in HIV-infected patients: a guide for practice.
  • People living with HIV infection have a significantly higher rate of anal cancer as compared with that of uninfected people.
  • It is believed that high-grade anal dysplasia secondary to human papillomavirus infection is a precursor to anal cancer.
  • Considering this, screening and treatment of high-grade anal dysplasia is a possible means of preventing the development of anal cancer.
  • No national or international guidelines exist to guide practice for screening and management of anal dysplasia.
  • On the basis of a review of research and expert recommendations, a guide to practice for screening and management of anal dysplasia and anal cancer is made for clinicians.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / complications. HIV Infections / complications

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2010 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20409734.001).
  • [ISSN] 1552-6917
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care : JANAC
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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75. Markowitz GS, Perazella MA: Drug-induced renal failure: a focus on tubulointerstitial disease. Clin Chim Acta; 2005 Jan;351(1-2):31-47
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  • [Title] Drug-induced renal failure: a focus on tubulointerstitial disease.
  • Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) develops from medications that incite an allergic reaction, leading to interstitial inflammation and tubular damage.
  • This review focuses on the multitude of patterns of drug-induced renal failure due to tubulointerstitial disease.

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  • (PMID = 15563870.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-8981
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinica chimica acta; international journal of clinical chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Chim. Acta
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Number-of-references] 119
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76. Ralston NV, Blackwell JL 3rd, Raymond LJ: Importance of molar ratios in selenium-dependent protection against methylmercury toxicity. Biol Trace Elem Res; 2007 Dec;119(3):255-68
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  • [Title] Importance of molar ratios in selenium-dependent protection against methylmercury toxicity.
  • The influence of dietary selenium (Se) on mercury (Hg) toxicity was studied in weanling male Long Evans rats.
  • Rats were fed AIN-93G-based low-Se torula yeast diets or diets augmented with sodium selenite to attain adequate- or rich-Se levels (0.1, 1.0 or 15 micromol/kg, respectively) These diets were prepared with no added methylmercury (MeHg) or with moderate- or high-MeHg (0.2, 10 or 60 micromol/kg, respectively).
  • Growth of rats fed high-MeHg, adequate-Se diets was impaired by approximately 8% (p < 0.05) relative to their control group, but rats fed high-MeHg, rich-Se diets did not show any growth impairment.
  • Low-MeHg exposure did not affect rat growth at any dietary Se level.
  • Concentrations of Hg in hair and blood reflected dietary MeHg exposure, but Hg toxicity was more directly related to the Hg to Se ratios.
  • Results support the hypothesis that Hg-dependent sequestration of Se is a primary mechanism of Hg toxicity.
  • Therefore, Hg to Se molar ratios provide a more reliable and comprehensive criteria for evaluating risks associated with MeHg exposure.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Brain / metabolism. Hair / chemistry. Male. Mercury / blood. Mercury / metabolism. Mercury / toxicity. Models, Biological. Rats. Rats, Long-Evans. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 17916948.001).
  • [ISSN] 0163-4984
  • [Journal-full-title] Biological trace element research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biol Trace Elem Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Methylmercury Compounds; FXS1BY2PGL / Mercury; H6241UJ22B / Selenium
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77. Siqueira EM, Arruda SF, de Vargas RM, de Souza EM: Beta-carotene from cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) leaves improves vitamin A status in rats. Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol; 2007 Jul-Aug;146(1-2):235-40
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  • Rats were separated into three groups and fed with a modified AIN-93G--vitamin A deficient--diet.
  • The cassava leaves beta-carotene bioavailability was lower than the synthetic beta-carotene probably because the beta-carotene from the leaf matrix may be bounded to protein complex or inside organelles, which impair carotenoid absorption.

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  • (PMID = 17261381.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-0456
  • [Journal-full-title] Comparative biochemistry and physiology. Toxicology & pharmacology : CBP
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Comp. Biochem. Physiol. C Toxicol. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Plant Extracts; 01YAE03M7J / beta Carotene; 11103-57-4 / Vitamin A
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78. Dawodu A, Al-Gazali L, Varady E, Varghese M, Nath K, Rajan V: Genetic contribution to high neonatally lethal malformation rate in the United Arab Emirates. Community Genet; 2005;8(1):31-4
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  • OBJECTIVES: We examined the contribution of genetic disorders to congenital anomalies (CA) causing neonatal deaths in the Al Ain Medical District (AMD) in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) because of the high consanguineous marriage rate in the community.
  • Data regarding pregnancy, a family history including the level of parental consanguinity, the results of genetic evaluations and neonatal outcomes were recorded as part of an ongoing malformation surveillance system.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 15767752.001).
  • [ISSN] 1422-2795
  • [Journal-full-title] Community genetics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Community Genet
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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79. Mukhopadhyay S, Rajaratnam V, Mukherjee S, Das SK: Control of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor-mediated breast cancer in rats by soy protein. Mol Carcinog; 2008 Apr;47(4):310-9
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  • Soy protein is known to have breast tumor suppressing activity.
  • The expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs), currently renamed as translocator protein (TSPO) and their associated functions, such as nuclear cholesterol uptake and content also have been shown to be increased in breast cancer.
  • Here we investigated whether the breast tumor suppressing effects of soy protein is mediated by down-regulation of PBR expression and function.
  • Breast tumors were induced by gavage administration of a single dose (80 mg/kg) of dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) into 50-d old female Sprague Dawley rats, maintained on a standard AIN-76A diet containing either casein or soy protein.
  • The ligand binding capacity, expression, and protein levels of PBRs, their nuclear localization and function, such as nuclear cholesterol uptake and content, were significantly increased in the tumors.
  • These data suggest that soy protein inhibits breast tumor development by decreasing the expression of the tumor-promoting gene, which encodes PBRs.

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 17932947.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-2744
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular carcinogenesis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Carcinog.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / G12RR03032; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U54CA91408; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / U54NS041071; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / U54RR019192
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Benzodiazepinones; 0 / Carcinogens; 0 / Ligands; 0 / Receptors, GABA-A; 0 / Soybean Proteins; 10028-17-8 / Tritium; 14439-61-3 / 4'-chlorodiazepam; 57-97-6 / 9,10-Dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene
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80. Palefsky J: Human papillomavirus and anal neoplasia. Curr HIV/AIDS Rep; 2008 May;5(2):78-85
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  • [Title] Human papillomavirus and anal neoplasia.
  • Anal cancer is a rare disease in the general population, but the incidence of anal cancer is higher in certain at-risk groups, such as men who have sex with men (MSM), and immunosuppressed individuals, including those with HIV infection.
  • Among HIV-positive MSM, the incidence of anal cancer may be as high as 10 times greater than current rates of cervical cancer in the general population of women.
  • Anal cancer is associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and may be preceded by high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN).
  • HGAIN and anal HPV infection are both highly prevalent in groups at risk for anal cancer.
  • Current issues include determining the effect of antiretroviral therapy on the natural history of HGAIN and the incidence of anal cancer, optimizing diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to HGAIN, and determining the potential for prophylactic HPV vaccines to prevent anal HPV infection and anal cancer in at-risk groups.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms. Carcinoma in Situ. Papillomavirus Infections
  • [MeSH-minor] Anus Diseases / epidemiology. Anus Diseases / virology. Female. HIV Infections / complications. Homosexuality, Male. Humans. Male. Papillomaviridae / isolation & purification

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  • (PMID = 18510893.001).
  • [ISSN] 1548-3568
  • [Journal-full-title] Current HIV/AIDS reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr HIV/AIDS Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 57
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81. Sukemori S, Kurosawa A, Ikeda S, Kurihara Y: Investigation on the growth of coprophagy-prevented rats with supplemented vitamin B12. J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr (Berl); 2006 Oct;90(9-10):402-6
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  • Six rats per group were fed under coprophagy-allowed (conventional feeding) and coprophagy-prevented conditions respectively.
  • In the first experiment, coprophagy-prevented rats were fed only feed containing recommended vitamin B12 level and forced fed hydrous faeces, vitamin B12 and folic acid respectively.
  • In the second experiment, coprophagy-prevented rats were fed AIN-93G at the recommended vitamin B12 level (25 microg/kg diet), at 100 times the level and at 1000 times the level respectively.
  • Body weight, feed consumption and amounts of each faeces type were determined in both experiments.
  • In a comparison of body weight gain, we learned that coprophagy prevention reduced the values, but that there was no significant difference in the forced feeding group in the first experiment.
  • Vitamin B12 supplementation was not able to raise feed intake significantly and hence it obviously was not a severely limiting factor under the respective experimental condition which depressed feed intake.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animal Feed. Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena. Animals. Dietary Supplements. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Male. Random Allocation. Rats, Sprague-Dawley

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  • (PMID = 16958797.001).
  • [ISSN] 0931-2439
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of animal physiology and animal nutrition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr (Berl)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] P6YC3EG204 / Vitamin B 12
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82. Tamagawa K, Nakayama-Imaohji H, Wakimoto S, Ichimura M, Kuwahara T: Utilization of titanium oxide-like compound as an inorganic phosphate adsorbent for the control of serum phosphate level in chronic renal failure. J Med Invest; 2010 Aug;57(3-4):275-83
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  • [Title] Utilization of titanium oxide-like compound as an inorganic phosphate adsorbent for the control of serum phosphate level in chronic renal failure.
  • To evaluate the phosphate binding potential of TAP in vivo, adenine-induced CRF rats were fed AIN-76 diet containing 3% TAP, 10% TAP, 3% sevelamer hydrochloride (clinical phosphate adsorbent), or 3% calcium carbonate, and serum levels of phosphate and calcium and urinary phosphate were compared with those in untreated CRF rats.
  • Orally administered TAP showed the inhibitory effect on serum phosphate level in adenine-induced CRF rats, which was equivalent to that of sevelamer hydrochloride.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Failure, Chronic / blood. Kidney Failure, Chronic / drug therapy. Phosphates / blood. Titanium / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adsorption. Animals. Disease Models, Animal. Humans. Hyperphosphatemia / blood. Hyperphosphatemia / drug therapy. Hyperphosphatemia / etiology. In Vitro Techniques. Male. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley

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  • (PMID = 20847528.001).
  • [ISSN] 1349-6867
  • [Journal-full-title] The journal of medical investigation : JMI
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Med. Invest.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Phosphates; 15FIX9V2JP / titanium dioxide; D1JT611TNE / Titanium
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83. De Vuyst H, Clifford GM, Nascimento MC, Madeleine MM, Franceschi S: Prevalence and type distribution of human papillomavirus in carcinoma and intraepithelial neoplasia of the vulva, vagina and anus: a meta-analysis. Int J Cancer; 2009 Apr 1;124(7):1626-36
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  • [Title] Prevalence and type distribution of human papillomavirus in carcinoma and intraepithelial neoplasia of the vulva, vagina and anus: a meta-analysis.
  • This meta-analysis investigated human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence in vulvar, vaginal and anal intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN, VAIN, AIN) grades 1-3 and carcinoma from 93 studies conducted in 4 continents and using PCR assays.
  • Overall HPV prevalence was 67.8%, 85.3% and 40.4% among 90 VIN1, 1,061 VIN2/3 and 1,873 vulvar carcinomas; 100%, 90.1% and 69.9% among 107 VAIN1, 191 VAIN2/3 and 136 vaginal carcinomas; and 91.5%, 93.9% and 84.3% among 671 AIN1, 609 AIN2/3 and 955 anal carcinomas, respectively.
  • HPV16 was found more frequently (>75%) and HPV18 less frequently (<10%) in HPV-positive vulvar, vaginal and anal carcinomas than in cervical carcinoma.
  • HPV6 and 11 were common in VIN1 and AIN1, but not in VAIN1.
  • HPV prevalence in anal carcinoma was higher among women (90.8%) than men (74.9%), but no difference by gender emerged in North America.
  • In conclusion, approximately 40% of vulvar, 60% of vaginal and 80% of anal carcinoma may be avoided by prophylactic vaccines against HPV16/18.
  • This proportion would be similar for the corresponding high-grade lesions of the vagina and anus, but higher for VIN2/3 (75%) than for vulvar carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / virology. Papillomavirus Infections / epidemiology. Vaginal Neoplasms / virology. Vulvar Neoplasms / virology


84. Yeh YY, Yeh SM: Homocysteine-lowering action is another potential cardiovascular protective factor of aged garlic extract. J Nutr; 2006 Mar;136(3 Suppl):745S-749S
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  • Plasma folate concentrations of 5, 24, and 202 nmol/L were detected in rats fed a folate-deficient L-amino acid diet containing succinyl sulfathiazole, an AIN-93G folate-deficient diet, and an AIN-93G folate-sufficient diet, respectively.
  • Plasma concentrations of total homocysteine were elevated to the highest level (32 micromol/L) by severe folate deficiency and to a moderate level (9 micromol/L) by mild folate deficiency, compared with the lowest level of (5 micromol/L), noted for the folate-sufficient group.
  • AGE added to the diet did not alter plasma concentrations of other aminothiol compounds: cysteine, glutathione, and cysteinylglycine.
  • More importantly, in addition to its cholesterol-lowering potential, blood pressure-lowering effect, and antioxidant property, a hypohomocysteinemic action may be another important cardiovascular protective factor of AGE.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Disease Models, Animal. Folic Acid / blood. Folic Acid Deficiency / blood. Male. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley

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  • (PMID = 16484555.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3166
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of nutrition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Nutr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Plant Extracts; 0LVT1QZ0BA / Homocysteine; 935E97BOY8 / Folic Acid
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85. Mazzucchelli R, Morichetti D, Santinelli A, Scarpelli M, Bono AV, Lopez-Beltran A, Cheng L, Montironi R: Immunohistochemical expression and localization of somatostatin receptor subtypes in androgen ablated prostate cancer. Anal Cell Pathol (Amst); 2010;33(1):27-36
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  • MATERIAL: The five SSTRs were evaluated in the epithelial, smooth muscle and endothelial cells of normal-looking epithelium (Nep), high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) and PCa in 20 RPs with clinically detected PCa from patients under CAA.
  • 20 RPs with clinically detected PCa from hormonally untreated patients were used as control group.
  • RESULTS: Concerning the secretory cells (i) membrane staining was seen for SSTR3 and SSTR4; the mean percentages of positive cells, higher in SSTR3 than in SSTR4, decreased sharply in HGPIN and PCa compared with Nep; the mean percentages in the androgen ablated group were 30-90% lower than in the untreated;.
  • (ii) cytoplasmic staining was seen for all 5 SSTRs; the mean percentages of positive cells in Nep, HGPIN and PCa of the untreated group were similar, and in general as high as 80% or more; in the treated group, the Nep values were similar to those in the untreated, whereas the values in HGPIN and PCa were lower for SSTR1, 3 and 5, with a decrease of 30% for SSTR1;.
  • (iii) nuclear staining was seen with SSTR4 and SSTR5, the mean percentages for the former being much lower than for the latter; treatment affected both HGPIN and PCa, whose proportions of stained cells were 30-55% lower than in the untreated group.
  • The values in the treated group were lower than in the other, the difference between the two group being in general comprised between 10 and 40%.
  • Treatment did not affect SSTR staining in the smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

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  • (PMID = 20966542.001).
  • [ISSN] 2210-7185
  • [Journal-full-title] Analytical cellular pathology (Amsterdam)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anal Cell Pathol (Amst)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androgen Antagonists; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Receptors, Somatostatin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4605569
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86. Galadari I: Serum levels of the soluble interleukin-2 receptor in vitiligo patients in UAE. Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol; 2005 Mar;37(3):109-11
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  • OBJECTIVE: To determine serum level of slL-2 receptor in patients with vitiligo in a population in Al Ain, UAE.
  • SETTING: Al Ain Medical District, Al Ain Hospital, UAE.
  • SUBJECTS: Vitiligo patients seen at Al Ain hospital in 2003.
  • 15 healthy individuals were selected as control group.
  • Serum level of slL-2R were significantly higher in vitiligo patient (112 +/- 129.2) than in healthy control (61.1 +/- 44.3 Pmol/L) P < 0.0001.
  • Patient with short duration of the disease shows higher the serum level slL-2R.
  • [MeSH-major] Receptors, Interleukin-2 / blood. Vitiligo / blood

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  • (PMID = 15918298.001).
  • [ISSN] 1764-1489
  • [Journal-full-title] European annals of allergy and clinical immunology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Epitopes; 0 / Receptors, Interleukin-2
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87. Delgado-Andrade C, Seiquer I, Navarro MP: Comparative effects of glucose-lysine versus glucose-methionine Maillard reaction products consumption: in vitro and in vivo calcium availability. Mol Nutr Food Res; 2005 Jul;49(7):679-84
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  • [Title] Comparative effects of glucose-lysine versus glucose-methionine Maillard reaction products consumption: in vitro and in vivo calcium availability.
  • The influence of glucose-lysine and glucose-methionine Maillard reaction products (MRPs) on calcium availability was studied in rats and in Caco-2 cells.
  • Equimolar glucose/lysine and glucose/methionine mixtures (40% moisture) were heated (150 degrees C, 30 or 90 min) to prepare samples (GL30, GL90, GM30, and GM90, respectively).
  • For 21 days, the rats were fed the AIN-93G diet (control group) or diets containing separately 3% of the heated mixtures (GL30, GL90, GM30, and GM90 groups, respectively).
  • Bone calcium concentration was lower among the animals consuming MRP diets, compared with the control group.
  • The possible long-term effects of MRP intake on calcium deposition in the bone should be further studied to ascertain the implications on related diseases.

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  • (PMID = 15786517.001).
  • [ISSN] 1613-4125
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular nutrition & food research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol Nutr Food Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] AE28F7PNPL / Methionine; IY9XDZ35W2 / Glucose; K3Z4F929H6 / Lysine; SY7Q814VUP / Calcium
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88. Adam SH, Eid HO, Barss P, Lunsjo K, Grivna M, Torab FC, Abu-Zidan FM: Epidemiology of geriatric trauma in United Arab Emirates. Arch Gerontol Geriatr; 2008 Nov-Dec;47(3):377-82
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  • The data of Al-Ain Hospital Trauma Registry were prospectively collected over a period of 3 years (2003-2006).
  • The median (range) ISS of the group was 5 (1-34).
  • [MeSH-major] Cause of Death. Hospital Mortality / trends. Wounds and Injuries / diagnosis. Wounds and Injuries / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 17936381.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-6976
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of gerontology and geriatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch Gerontol Geriatr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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89. Xiao R, Carter JA, Linz AL, Ferguson M, Badger TM, Simmen FA: Dietary whey protein lowers serum C-peptide concentration and duodenal SREBP-1c mRNA abundance, and reduces occurrence of duodenal tumors and colon aberrant crypt foci in azoxymethane-treated male rats. J Nutr Biochem; 2006 Sep;17(9):626-34
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  • [Title] Dietary whey protein lowers serum C-peptide concentration and duodenal SREBP-1c mRNA abundance, and reduces occurrence of duodenal tumors and colon aberrant crypt foci in azoxymethane-treated male rats.
  • Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats and their progeny were fed AIN-93G diets containing casein (CAS, control diet) or WPH as the sole protein source.
  • At this time point, differences in colon tumor incidence with diet were not observed; however, WPH-fed rats had fewer tumors in the small intestine (7.6% vs. 26% incidence, P=.004).
  • The relative mRNA abundance for the insulin-responsive, transcription factor gene, SREBP-1c, was reduced by WPH in the duodenum but not colon.
  • Results indicate potential physiological linkages of dietary protein type with circulating C-peptide (and by inference insulin), local expression of SREBP-1c gene and propensity for small intestine tumorigenesis.
  • [MeSH-major] C-Peptide / blood. Colonic Diseases. Milk Proteins / pharmacology. Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1 / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Azoxymethane. Choristoma. Dietary Proteins / pharmacology. Duodenal Neoplasms / chemically induced. Male. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Whey Proteins

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  • (PMID = 16504496.001).
  • [ISSN] 0955-2863
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of nutritional biochemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Nutr. Biochem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CB / N02-CB-07008
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / C-Peptide; 0 / Dietary Proteins; 0 / Milk Proteins; 0 / Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1; 0 / Whey Proteins; MO0N1J0SEN / Azoxymethane
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90. Al-Kaabi J, Al-Maskari F, Saadi H, Afandi B, Parkar H, Nagelkerke N: Physical activity and reported barriers to activity among type 2 diabetic patients in the United arab emirates. Rev Diabet Stud; 2009;6(4):271-8
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  • METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of type 2 diabetic patients who participated in the outpatient clinics in Al-Ain District, during 2006.
  • The patients completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire, and measurements of blood pressure, body mass index, body fat, abdominal circumference, glycemic control (HbA1c), and fasting lipid profile.
  • RESULTS: Of the 390 patients recruited, only 25% reported an increase in their physical activity levels following the diagnosis of diabetes, and only 3% reported physical activity levels that meet the recommended guidelines.
  • More than half of the study subjects had uncontrolled hypertension (53%) and unacceptable lipid profiles; 71% had a high low-density lipoprotein (LDL), 73% had low high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and 59% had hypertriglyceridemia.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The physical activity practice of type 2 diabetic patients in the UAE is largely inadequate to meet the recommended level necessary to prevent or ameliorate diabetic complications.

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  • (PMID = 20043039.001).
  • [ISSN] 1614-0575
  • [Journal-full-title] The review of diabetic studies : RDS
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Diabet Stud
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2836198
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91. Kohli HS, Bhat A, Aravindan, Sud K, Jha V, Gupta KL, Sakhuja V: Spectrum of renal failure in elderly patients. Int Urol Nephrol; 2006;38(3-4):759-65
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  • Patients included in the study group were elderly (age>60 years) who either attended outpatient renal clinic and or were hospitalized.
  • Of 137 patients 53 (38.7%) presented in end stage renal disease (ESRD).
  • Only 15 patients were on dialytic support at the end of 1 year.
  • Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) was the commonest cause of RPRF seen in 10 (33.3%) patients followed by vasculitis in 7 (23.3%).
  • Of 30 patients, 10 (33.3%) reached ESRD at end of 3 months of follow up, 4 (13.3%) died due to sepsis.
  • AIN patients had a relatively better outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Renal Insufficiency / diagnosis. Renal Insufficiency / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 17245550.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-1623
  • [Journal-full-title] International urology and nephrology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int Urol Nephrol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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92. Jia Q, Zhou HR, Shi Y, Pestka JJ: Docosahexaenoic acid consumption inhibits deoxynivalenol-induced CREB/ATF1 activation and IL-6 gene transcription in mouse macrophages. J Nutr; 2006 Feb;136(2):366-72
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  • [Title] Docosahexaenoic acid consumption inhibits deoxynivalenol-induced CREB/ATF1 activation and IL-6 gene transcription in mouse macrophages.
  • The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that consumption of the (n-3) PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) interferes with DON-induced transcriptional and post-transcriptional upregulation of IL-6 mRNA in murine macrophages.
  • DON evoked expression of IL-6 mRNA and IL-6 heterogenous nuclear RNA (hnRNA), an indicator of ongoing IL-6 transcription, in macrophages elicited from mice fed control AIN-93G diet for 4 wk, whereas expression of both RNA species was suppressed in macrophages from mice fed AIN-93G modified to contain 30 g DHA/kg diet for the same time period.
  • DON enhanced IL-6 mRNA stability similarly in macrophages from control and DHA-fed mice suggesting that (n-3) PUFA effects were not post-transcriptional.
  • DON upregulated binding activity of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and activator protein (AP-1) to their respective consensus sequences in nuclear extracts from control-fed mice, whereas both activities were suppressed in nuclear extracts from DHA-fed mice.
  • DON induced phosphorylation of CREB at Ser-133 and ATF1 at Ser-63 as well as intranuclear binding of phospho-CREB/ATF1 to the cis element of the IL-6 promoter in control macrophages, whereas both activities were inhibited in macrophages from DHA-fed mice.
  • [MeSH-major] Activating Transcription Factor 1 / metabolism. Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein / metabolism. Docosahexaenoic Acids / pharmacology. Interleukin-6 / genetics. Macrophages / drug effects. Transcription, Genetic / drug effects. Trichothecenes / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 16424113.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3166
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of nutrition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Nutr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Activating Transcription Factor 1; 0 / Creb1 protein, mouse; 0 / Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein; 0 / Interleukin-6; 0 / Phospholipids; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Trichothecenes; 25167-62-8 / Docosahexaenoic Acids; EC 2.7.11.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt; JT37HYP23V / deoxynivalenol
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93. Dianzani C, Pierangeli A, Avola A, Borzomati D, Persichetti P, Degener AM: Intra-anal condyloma: surgical or topical treatment? Dermatol Online J; 2008;14(12):8
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  • [Title] Intra-anal condyloma: surgical or topical treatment?
  • Although the viral types associated with condylomata usually do not cause carcinoma, in women with a history of these lesions there is an increased risk of intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer.
  • Generally the lesions are not life-threatening, but they provoke significant morbidity, are difficult to treat, and are a source of psychosocial stress.
  • Thus, condylomata represent not only a health problem for the patient but also an economic burden for the society.
  • We report a case of a male patient with external and intra-anal condyloma resistant to laser therapy.
  • Initially, surgical intervention appeared required because of florid and intra-anal growth.
  • [MeSH-major] Aminoquinolines / administration & dosage. Anus Diseases / drug therapy. Anus Diseases / surgery. Condylomata Acuminata / drug therapy. Condylomata Acuminata / surgery. Laser Therapy. Skin Diseases / drug therapy. Skin Diseases / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Topical. Adult. Anal Canal. Humans. Male. Ointments. Retreatment. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] Dermatol Online J. 2009;15(1):14 [19281719.001]
  • (PMID = 19265621.001).
  • [ISSN] 1087-2108
  • [Journal-full-title] Dermatology online journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dermatol. Online J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Aminoquinolines; 0 / Ointments; 99011-02-6 / imiquimod
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94. Baynouna LM, Shamsan AI, Ali TA, Al Mukini LA, Al Kuwiti MH, Al Ameri TA, Nagelkerke NJ, Abusamak AM, Ahmed NM, Al Deen SM, Jaber TM, Elkhalid AM, Revel AD, Al Husaini AI, Nour FA, Ahmad HO, Nazirudeen MK, Al Dhahiri R, Al Abdeen YO, Omar AO: A successful chronic care program in Al Ain-United Arab Emirates. BMC Health Serv Res; 2010;10:47
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  • [Title] A successful chronic care program in Al Ain-United Arab Emirates.
  • BACKGROUND: The cost effective provision of quality care for chronic diseases is a major challenge for health care systems.
  • SETTINGS AND METHODS: The project, using the principles of quality assurance cycles, was conducted in 4 stages.The assessment stage consisted of a community survey and an audit of the health care system, with particular emphasis on chronic disease care.
  • The information gleaned from this stage provided feedback to the staff of participating health centers.
  • In the second stage, deficiencies in health care were identified and interventions were developed for improvements, including topics for continuing professional development.In the third stage, these strategies were piloted in a single health centre for one year and the outcomes evaluated.
  • In the still ongoing fourth stage, the project was rolled out to all the health centers in the area, with continuing evaluation.
  • The intervention consisted of changes to establish a structured care model based on the predicted needs of this group of patients utilizing dedicated chronic disease clinics inside the existing primary health care system.
  • The health care quality indicators that showed the greatest improvement were the documentation of patient history (e.g. smoking status and physical activity); improvement in recording physical signs (e.g. body mass index (BMI)); and an improvement in the requesting of appropriate investigations, such as HbA1c and microalbuminurea.
  • There was also improvement in those parameters reflecting outcomes of care, which included HbA1c, blood pressure and lipid profiles.
  • CONCLUSION: Chronic disease care is a joint commitment by health care providers and patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Chronic Disease / therapy. Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) / methods. Total Quality Management / standards

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  • (PMID = 20175917.001).
  • [ISSN] 1472-6963
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC health services research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Health Serv Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2841164
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95. Bushby SA, Chauhan M: Management of internal genital warts: do we all agree? A postal survey. Int J STD AIDS; 2008 Jun;19(6):367-9
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  • Proctoscopy or anoscopy was performed in 60% of clinics for patients with perianal warts to determine the presence of warts within the anal canal or rectum.
  • Only 24% of patients with intra-anal warts are referred directly to surgery for biopsy, increasing to 61% if the patient has HIV infection.
  • Our findings suggest there is no consensus and we recommend that all HIV-positive patients with anal or cervical condyloma should be investigated for evidence of intraepithelial neoplasia.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / diagnosis. Condylomata Acuminata / diagnosis. Condylomata Acuminata / therapy. Health Surveys. Tumor Virus Infections / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Disease Management. Female. HIV Seropositivity. Humans. Male. Middle Aged


96. Nagai N, Ito Y, Inomata M, Shumiya S, Tai H, Hataguchi Y, Nakagawa K: Delay of cataract development in the Shumiya cataract rat by the administration of drinking water containing high concentration of magnesium ion. Biol Pharm Bull; 2006 Jun;29(6):1234-8
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  • A standard diet based on the American Institute of Nutrition guidelines (AIN-76) and DDW containing a high mineral concentration such as low, medium and high Mg2+ content (50, 200 and 1000 mg of Mg2+/l, respectively) were used in this study.
  • The opacities of SCR lenses were documented by anterior eye segment analysis system EAS-1000.
  • In addition, even cataractous SCR lenses at 14 weeks of age showed differences in opacity level.
  • The opacification and Ca2+ of the lenses in cataractous SCR administered medium DDW were lower than those administered purified water.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Calcium / blood. Calcium / metabolism. Disease Models, Animal. Drinking. Intestine, Small / metabolism. Magnesium / blood. Magnesium / metabolism. Male. Rats. Rats, Inbred Strains. Time Factors. Tissue Distribution

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  • (PMID = 16755023.001).
  • [ISSN] 1347-5215
  • [Journal-full-title] Biological & pharmaceutical bulletin
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biol. Pharm. Bull.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 059QF0KO0R / Water; 7487-88-9 / Magnesium Sulfate; I38ZP9992A / Magnesium; SY7Q814VUP / Calcium
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97. Berry JM, Palefsky JM, Jay N, Cheng SC, Darragh TM, Chin-Hong PV: Performance characteristics of anal cytology and human papillomavirus testing in patients with high-resolution anoscopy-guided biopsy of high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia. Dis Colon Rectum; 2009 Feb;52(2):239-47
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  • [Title] Performance characteristics of anal cytology and human papillomavirus testing in patients with high-resolution anoscopy-guided biopsy of high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia.
  • PURPOSE: High-resolution anoscopy is colposcopy of the anus after applying 3 percent acetic acid.
  • High-resolution anoscopy with biopsy was used as the standard for detecting high-grade anal neoplasia and was compared to detection of high-grade anal neoplasia by anal cytology, human papillomavirus testing, or the combination.
  • METHODS: A total of 125 men who have sex with men (MSM) were enrolled from a group of MSM identified by random digit dialing: HIV-negative = 85, HIV-positive = 35, and unknown status = 5.
  • A specimen was taken for anal cytology and human papillomavirus testing, followed by high-resolution anoscopy with biopsy of any lesions.
  • RESULTS: Ninety-one percent of HIV-positive and 57 percent of HIV-negative MSM had anal human papillomavirus infection.
  • In HIV-positive men the sensitivity of abnormal cytology to detect high-grade anal neoplasia was 87 percent, and in HIV-negative MSM it was 55 percent.
  • Among HIV-negative men, 9 of 20 cases of high-grade anal neoplasia would have been missed because cytology was negative, but the addition of human papillomavirus positivity increased sensitivity for the combination to 90 percent.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Sensitivity and specificity of anal cytology and human papillomavirus testing are different in HIV-positive and HIV-negative MSM for detecting high-grade anal neoplasia when patients have high-resolution anoscopy-guided biopsy of lesions.
  • High-resolution anoscopy is an effective tool for diagnosing high-grade anal neoplasia.
  • [MeSH-major] Anal Canal / pathology. Anus Neoplasms / diagnosis. Carcinoma in Situ / diagnosis. Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal. Papillomaviridae / isolation & purification. Papillomavirus Infections / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Anus Diseases / diagnosis. Anus Diseases / virology. Biopsy. Cytodiagnosis. HIV Seronegativity. HIV Seropositivity / complications. Homosexuality. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Precancerous Conditions / diagnosis. Predictive Value of Tests. Sensitivity and Specificity

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  • (PMID = 19279418.001).
  • [ISSN] 1530-0358
  • [Journal-full-title] Diseases of the colon and rectum
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dis. Colon Rectum
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / 5 M01-RR-00079; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / K23 AI054157; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 CA/AI 88739; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA54053; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / UL1 RR024131-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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98. Theelen W, Speel EJ, Herfs M, Reijans M, Simons G, Meulemans EV, Baldewijns MM, Ramaekers FC, Somja J, Delvenne P, Hopman AH: Increase in viral load, viral integration, and gain of telomerase genes during uterine cervical carcinogenesis can be simultaneously assessed by the HPV 16/18 MLPA-assay. Am J Pathol; 2010 Oct;177(4):2022-33
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  • A recently developed multiparameter HPV 16/18 multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay, which allows the simultaneous assessment of these factors, was applied to a series of 67 normal and (pre)malignant frozen uterine cervical samples, as well as to 91 cytological preparations, to test the ability of the MLPA assay to identify high-risk lesions on the basis of these factors.
  • Furthermore, the feasibility of the MLPA assay was shown for cytological samples, where in 57% of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion cases, the high-risk factors were detected using this assay.
  • [MeSH-major] Human papillomavirus 16 / isolation & purification. Human papillomavirus 18 / isolation & purification. Papillomavirus Infections / diagnosis. Telomerase / genetics. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / diagnosis. Viral Load. Virus Integration
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / etiology. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / genetics. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / pathology. Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / diagnosis. Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / etiology. DNA, Viral / genetics. Feasibility Studies. Female. Humans. In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence. Middle Aged. Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Uterus / metabolism. Uterus / pathology. Young Adult


99. Badger TM, Ronis MJ, Wolff G, Stanley S, Ferguson M, Shankar K, Simpson P, Jo CH: Soy protein isolate reduces hepatosteatosis in yellow Avy/a mice without altering coat color phenotype. Exp Biol Med (Maywood); 2008 Oct;233(10):1242-54
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  • Agouti (A(vy)/a) mice fed an AIN-93G diet containing the soy isoflavone genistein (GEN) prior to and during pregnancy were reported to shift coat color and body composition phenotypes from obese-yellow towards lean pseudoagouti, suggesting epigenetic programming.
  • Human consumption of purified GEN is rare and soy protein is the primary source of GEN.
  • Virgin a/a female and A(vy)/a male mice were fed AIN-93G diets made with casein (CAS) or soy protein isolate (SPI) (the same approximate GEN levels as in the above mentioned study) for 2 wks prior to mating.
  • Coat color distribution did not differ among diets, but SPI-fed, obese A(vy)/a offspring had lower hepatosteatosis (P < 0.05) and increased (P < 0.05) expression of CYP4a 14, a PPARalpha-regulated gene compared to CAS controls.
  • Similarly, weanling male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats fed SPI had elevated hepatic Acyl Co-A Oxidase (ACO) mRNA levels and increased in vitro binding of PPARalpha to the PPRE promoter response element.
  • Thus, 1) consumption of diets made with SPI partially protected against hepatosteatosis in yellow mice and in SD rats, and this may involve induction of PPARalpha-regulated genes; and 2) the lifetime (in utero, neonatal and adult) exposure to dietary soy protein did not result in a shift in coat color phenotype of A(vy)/a mice.
  • 2) SPI does not epigenetically regulate the agouti locus to shift the coat color phenotype in the same fashion as GEN alone; and 3) SPI may be beneficial in management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Body Composition / drug effects. Disease Models, Animal. Fatty Acids / metabolism. Female. Genistein / pharmacology. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred Strains. PPAR alpha / metabolism. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley

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  • (PMID = 18791133.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-3702
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental biology and medicine (Maywood, N.J.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp. Biol. Med. (Maywood)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Agouti Signaling Protein; 0 / Fatty Acids; 0 / PPAR alpha; 0 / Soybean Proteins; 0 / nonagouti protein, mouse; DH2M523P0H / Genistein
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100. Dulebohn RV, Yi W, Srivastava A, Akoh CC, Krewer G, Fischer JG: Effects of blueberry (Vaccinium ashei) on DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, and phase II enzyme activities in rats. J Agric Food Chem; 2008 Dec 24;56(24):11700-6
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  • Young, healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 8 per group) were fed control AIN-93 diets or AIN-93 diets supplemented with blueberries or blueberry extracts for 3 weeks.
  • Diets were supplemented with 10% freeze-dried whole blueberries, blueberry polyphenol extract and sugars to match the 10% blueberry diet, or 1 and 0.2% blueberry flavonoids, which were primarily anthocyanins.
  • Liver and colon mucosa glutathione-S-transferase (GST), quinone reductase, and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activities in colon mucosa and liver were not significantly increased by freeze-dried whole blueberries or blueberry fractions.
  • Liver GST activity, however, was approximately 25% higher than controls for the freeze-dried whole blueberry, blueberry polyphenol, and 1% flavonoid groups.
  • DNA damage was significantly lower than control only in the liver of animals fed the 1% flavonoid diet.
  • The level of urinary F(2)-isoprostanes, a measure of lipid peroxidation, was unaffected.
  • In summary, in healthy rats, short-term supplementation with freeze-dried whole blueberries, blueberry polyphenols, or blueberry flavonoids did not significantly increase phase II enzyme activities.

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  • (PMID = 19035656.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-5118
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of agricultural and food chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Agric. Food Chem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antioxidants; 0 / Plant Extracts; EC 1.6.5.2 / NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase (Quinone); EC 2.4.1.17 / Glucuronosyltransferase; EC 2.5.1.18 / Glutathione Transferase
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