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1. Patrinou A, Malindretos P, Koutroubas G, Anagnostou N, Argiraki E, Syrganis C: A rare retroperitoneal schwannoma in a patient with neurofibromatosis Type 2. NDT Plus; 2010 Jun;3(3):288-290

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A rare retroperitoneal schwannoma in a patient with neurofibromatosis Type 2.
  • Neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) is a dominantly inherited tumour-prone disorder, characterized by the development of multiple schwannomas, meningiomas and ependymomas.
  • Vestibular schwannoma (VS) is the hallmark of NF2.
  • Retroperitoneal schwannomas are expected to occur in only 3% of cases.
  • We present the case of a large retroperitoneal schwannoma in a patient with NF2.
  • Brain, orbits, cervical, thoracic and lumbar MRI revealed bilateral VS, multiple meningiomas as well as multiple schwannomas and ependymomas in the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine.
  • The retroperitoneal mass represents a schwannoma probably derived from an intercostal nerve.

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  • (PMID = 28657039.001).
  • [ISSN] 1753-0784
  • [Journal-full-title] NDT plus
  • [ISO-abbreviation] NDT Plus
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; meningioma / neurofibromatosis Type 2 / retroperitoneal / schwannoma
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2. Ortigara L, Rosemberg N, Siqueira R, Neto F: Resection of a mediastinal schwannoma using video-assisted thoracoscopy. J Bras Pneumol; 2006 Mar-Apr;32(2):172-5
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  • [Title] Resection of a mediastinal schwannoma using video-assisted thoracoscopy.
  • Schwannomas are tumors that are typically benign.
  • They are derived from Schwann cells (glial cells of the peripheral nervous system that serve to separate and isolate nerve cells from adjacent structures).
  • The most common type of schwannoma is a benign tumor of cranial nerve VIII and is referred to as an acoustic neuroma.
  • When extradural, such tumors usually present as masses that can invade adjacent structures, thereby becoming symptomatic, as in the case of intrathoracic schwannomas (typically found in the posterior mediastinum).
  • Herein, we present a case of a schwannoma treated through video-assisted thoracoscopy, and we review the literature on the subject.
  • [MeSH-major] Mediastinal Neoplasms / surgery. Neurilemmoma / surgery. Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted

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  • (PMID = 17273587.001).
  • [ISSN] 1806-3756
  • [Journal-full-title] Jornal brasileiro de pneumologia : publicaça̋o oficial da Sociedade Brasileira de Pneumologia e Tisilogia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Bras Pneumol
  • [Language] eng; por
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
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3. Balasubramaniam A, Shannon P, Hodaie M, Laperriere N, Michaels H, Guha A: Glioblastoma multiforme after stereotactic radiotherapy for acoustic neuroma: case report and review of the literature. Neuro Oncol; 2007 Oct;9(4):447-53
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Glioblastoma multiforme after stereotactic radiotherapy for acoustic neuroma: case report and review of the literature.
  • Indications for the use of radiotherapy in the management of a variety of benign intracranial neoplastic and nonneoplastic pathologies are increasing.
  • Although the short-term risks are minimal, the long-term risks of radiation-induced de novo secondary neoplasms or malignant progression of the primary benign tumor need to be considered.
  • There are currently 19 reported cases of tumors linked with stereotactic radiotherapy/radiosurgery, to which we add our second institutional experience of a patient who succumbed to a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) after stereotactic radiotherapy for an acoustic neuroma (AN).
  • Review of these 20 cases revealed 10 de novo secondary tumors, of which eight were malignant, with six being malignant gliomas.
  • The majority of the cases (14 of 20) involved AN, with most being in patients with neurofibromatosis-2 (NF2; 8 of 14), reflecting the large numbers and long-term use of radiotherapy for AN.
  • Accelerated growth of the primary benign AN, some 2 to 6 years after focused radiotherapy, was found in six of eight NF2 patients, with pathological verification of a malignant nerve sheath tumor documented in most.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / etiology. Glioblastoma / etiology. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / etiology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / etiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 17704364.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-8517
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuro-oncology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1994102
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4. Schneider AB, Ron E, Lubin J, Stovall M, Shore-Freedman E, Tolentino J, Collins BJ: Acoustic neuromas following childhood radiation treatment for benign conditions of the head and neck. Neuro Oncol; 2008 Feb;10(1):73-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Acoustic neuromas following childhood radiation treatment for benign conditions of the head and neck.
  • Childhood radiation exposure has been associated with an increased risk for developing several neoplasms, particularly benign and malignant thyroid tumors, but little is known about the risk of developing acoustic neuromas.
  • The aim of this study was to confirm whether there is a risk for acoustic neuromas and, if so, to determine its magnitude and duration.
  • We investigated the time trend and dose-response relationships for acoustic neuroma incidence in a cohort of 3,112 individuals who were irradiated as children between 1939 and 1962.
  • Most of the patients were treated to reduce the size of their tonsils and adenoids and received substantial radiation exposure to the cerebellopontine angle, the site of acoustic neuromas.
  • Forty-three patients developed benign acoustic neuromas, forty of them surgically resected, far in excess of what might be expected from data derived from brain tumor registries.
  • Our study provides support for an association between acoustic neuromas and childhood radiation exposure.
  • Although acoustic neuromas are usually benign and often asymptomatic, many cause significant morbidity.
  • Any symptoms of an acoustic neuroma in a patient with a history of radiation to the head and neck area should be investigated carefully, and the threshold for employing imaging should be lowered.

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  • (PMID = 18079359.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-8517
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuro-oncology
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-21518; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CP / N01-CP-85604; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CP / N01-CP-95614; United States / Intramural NIH HHS / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2600840
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5. Ngai S, Tang YM, Du L, Stuckey S: Hyperintensity of the middle cerebellar peduncles on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging: variation with age and implications for the diagnosis of multiple system atrophy. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol; 2006 Nov-Dec;27(10):2146-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We hypothesize that mild MCP hyperintensity on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging can be a normal finding.
  • To our knowledge, a detailed study of the prevalence of this finding in various age groups with the FLAIR sequence has not been described.
  • METHODS: One hundred twenty-two patients underwent an axial FLAIR examination of the brain as part of either a hearing loss or tinnitus work-up (ie, to exclude an acoustic neuroma or a retrocochlear cause).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Mild MCP FLAIR hyperintensity can occur normally, and this finding shows no relationship with age.

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  • (PMID = 17110685.001).
  • [ISSN] 0195-6108
  • [Journal-full-title] AJNR. American journal of neuroradiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AJNR Am J Neuroradiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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6. Montaguti M, Bergonzoni C, Zanetti MA, Rinaldi Ceroni A: Comparative evaluation of ABR abnormalities in patients with and without neurinoma of VIII cranial nerve. Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital; 2007 Apr;27(2):68-72
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Comparative evaluation of ABR abnormalities in patients with and without neurinoma of VIII cranial nerve.
  • Although the diagnostic reliability of auditory brainstem responses (ABR) in acoustic neuromas has been revised due to its poor sensitivity (demonstrated above all in smaller tumours), and its limited specificity, this method is still used as the initial otoneurological approach.
  • To contribute to the clinical use of this method, in particular with the aim of reducing the number of false positives, a retrospective study was carried out in two groups of patients affected by unilateral sensorineural hearing loss with auditory brainstem response abnormalities: in the first group (50 cases: true positives) hearing loss was the expression of an acoustic neuroma shown by magnetic resonance imaging, in the second group (130: false positives) magnetic resonance imaging was negative.
  • A comparison between the two groups made it possible to show that the finding of "major" auditory brainstem response alterations (complete absence of response not justified by the extent of the hearing loss or presence of only wave I) is correlated with a high probability of the presence of a neuroma, while other abnormalities (wave V latency and I-V interpeak latency increase) have no particular predictive value since percentages are almost identical in the two groups.
  • Wave V latency increase with normal I-V interpeak latency was observed in only one case of acoustic neuroma and this clinical finding is not easy to interpret.
  • [MeSH-major] Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem / physiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / diagnosis. Neuroma, Acoustic / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 17608133.001).
  • [ISSN] 0392-100X
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta otorhinolaryngologica Italica : organo ufficiale della Società italiana di otorinolaringologia e chirurgia cervico-facciale
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2640003
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7. Balbani AP, Montovani JC: Mobile phones: influence on auditory and vestibular systems. Braz J Otorhinolaryngol; 2008 Jan-Feb;74(1):125-31
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  • [Title] Mobile phones: influence on auditory and vestibular systems.
  • The skin, inner ear, cochlear nerve and the temporal lobe surface absorb the radiofrequency energy.
  • METHODS: We reviewed papers on the influence of mobile phones on auditory and vestibular systems from Lilacs and Medline databases, published from 2000 to 2005, and also materials available in the Internet.
  • RESULTS: Studies concerning mobile phone radiation and risk of developing an acoustic neuroma have controversial results.
  • Some authors did not see evidences of a higher risk of tumor development in mobile phone users, while others report that usage of analog cellular phones for ten or more years increase the risk of developing the tumor.
  • Acute exposure to mobile phone microwaves do not influence the cochlear outer hair cells function in vivo and in vitro, the cochlear nerve electrical properties nor the vestibular system physiology in humans.
  • CONCLUSION: there is no evidence of cochleo-vestibular lesion caused by cellular phones.
  • [MeSH-major] Auditory Perceptual Disorders / etiology. Cell Phones. Electromagnetic Fields / adverse effects. Neuroma, Acoustic / etiology. Otoacoustic Emissions, Spontaneous / radiation effects. Vestibule, Labyrinth / radiation effects

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  • [ErratumIn] Rev Bras Otorrinolaringol (Engl Ed). 2008 Mar-Apr;74(2):319
  • (PMID = 18392513.001).
  • [ISSN] 1808-8694
  • [Journal-full-title] Brazilian journal of otorhinolaryngology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Braz J Otorhinolaryngol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
  • [Number-of-references] 30
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8. Jaspers GW, Stegenga B: [Trigeminal neuralgia by an acoustic neuroma. The need of imaging]. Ned Tijdschr Tandheelkd; 2005 Jun;112(6):231-3
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  • [Title] [Trigeminal neuralgia by an acoustic neuroma. The need of imaging].
  • [Transliterated title] Trigeminusneuralgie door een neurinoom van de nervus acusticus. De noodzaak van beeldvormend onderzoek.
  • In a 43-year old female with neuralgia of the second and third branch of the trigeminal nerve, the diagnosis was made on the basis of clinical findings.
  • This investigation showed an acoustic neuroma in the cerebellopontine angle.
  • [MeSH-major] Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Neuroma, Acoustic / complications. Neuroma, Acoustic / diagnosis. Trigeminal Neuralgia / diagnosis. Trigeminal Neuralgia / etiology


9. Hamann C, Rudolf J, von Specht H, Freigang B: [Vestibular evoked muscle potentials dependency on neural origin and the location of an acoustic neuroma]. HNO; 2005 Aug;53(8):690-4
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  • [Title] [Vestibular evoked muscle potentials dependency on neural origin and the location of an acoustic neuroma].
  • INTRODUCTION: Most acoustic neuromas (AN) originate from the inferior vestibular nerve (IVN).
  • Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) are accepted as the only unilateral test for the function of the sacculus and the IVN.
  • METHODS: The influence of the origin from the IVN and superior vestibular nerve (SVN), and the position of the AN in relation to the internal auditory canal on VEMPs was investigated.
  • [MeSH-major] Acoustic Stimulation / methods. Evoked Potentials, Auditory. Neuroma, Acoustic / diagnosis. Vestibular Function Tests / methods. Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 15558221.001).
  • [ISSN] 0017-6192
  • [Journal-full-title] HNO
  • [ISO-abbreviation] HNO
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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10. Myrseth E, Møller P, Wentzel-Larsen T, Goplen F, Lund-Johansen M: Untreated Vestibular Schwannoma: Vertigo is a Powerful Predictor for Health-Related Quality of Life. Neurosurgery; 2006 Jul 01;59(1):67-76

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Untreated Vestibular Schwannoma: Vertigo is a Powerful Predictor for Health-Related Quality of Life.

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  • (PMID = 28180608.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4040
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurgery
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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11. Hasegawa T, Kida Y, Yoshimoto M, Koike J, Goto K: TABLEEvaluation of Tumor Expansion after Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Patients Harboring Vestibular Schwannomas. Neurosurgery; 2006 Jun 01;58(6):1119-1128

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] TABLEEvaluation of Tumor Expansion after Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Patients Harboring Vestibular Schwannomas.

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  • (PMID = 28173267.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4040
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurgery
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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12. Lunsford LD, Niranjan A, Flickinger JC, Maitz A, Kondziolka D: Radiosurgery of vestibular schwannomas: summary of experience in 829 cases. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):195-199

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Radiosurgery of vestibular schwannomas: summary of experience in 829 cases.
  • OBJECT: Management options for vestibular schwannomas (VSs) have greatly expanded since the introduction of stereotactic radiosurgery.
  • Optimal outcomes reflect long-term tumor control, preservation of cranial nerve function, and retention of quality of life.
  • The average tumor volume was 2.5 cm<sup>3</sup>.
  • The median margin dose to the tumor was 13 Gy (range 10-20 Gy).
  • Unchanged hearing preservation was possible in 50 to 77% of patients (up to 90% in those with intracanalicular tumors).
  • Trigeminal symptoms were detected in less than 3% of patients whose tumors reached the level of the trigeminal nerve.
  • Tumor control rates at 10 years were 97% (no additional treatment needed).
  • Gamma knife surgery provides a low risk, minimally invasive treatment option for patients with newly diagnosed or residual vs. Cranial nerve preservation and quality of life maintenance are possible in long-term follow up.

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  • (PMID = 28306432.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; gamma knife surgery / radiosurgery / vestibular schwannoma
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13. Chung WY, Liu KD, Shiau CY, Wu HM, Wang LW, Guo WY, Ming-Tak Ho D, Hung-Chi Pan D: Gamma knife surgery for vestibular schwannoma: 10-year experience of 195 cases. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):87-97

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Gamma knife surgery for vestibular schwannoma: 10-year experience of 195 cases.
  • OBJECT: The authors conducted a study to determine the optimal radiation dose for vestibular schwannoma (VS) and to examine the histopathology in cases of treatment failure for better understanding of the effects of irradiation.
  • Seventy-two patients (37%) had undergone partial or total excision of their tumor prior to gamma knife surgery (GKS).
  • The mean tumor volume was 4.1 cm<sup>3</sup> (range 0.04-23.1 cm<sup>3</sup>).
  • Multiisocenter dose planning placed a prescription dose of 11 to 18.2 Gy on the 50 to 94% isodose located at the tumor margin.
  • At the latest MR imaging assessment decreased or stable tumor volume was demonstrated in 93.6% of the patients.
  • Uncontrolled tumor swelling was noted in five patients at 3.5, 17, 24, 33, and 62 months after GKS, respectively.
  • Histopathological examination of specimens in three cases (one at 62 months after GKS) revealed a long-lasting radiation effect on vessels inside the tumor.
  • A margin 12-Gy dose with homogeneous distribution is effective in preventing tumor progression, while posing no serious threat to normal cranial nerve function.

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  • (PMID = 28306447.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; gamma knife surgery / stereotaxy / vestibular schwannoma
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14. Piedra MP, Scheithauer BW, Driscoll CL, Link MJ: Primary Melanocytic Tumor of the Cerebellopontine Angle Mimicking a Vestibular Schwannoma. Neurosurgery; 2006 Jul 01;59(1):E206

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Primary Melanocytic Tumor of the Cerebellopontine Angle Mimicking a Vestibular Schwannoma.

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  • (PMID = 28180621.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4040
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurgery
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. Wowra B, Muacevic A, Jess-Hempen A, Hempel JM, Müller-Schunk S, Tonn JC: Outpatient gamma knife surgery for vestibular schwannoma: definition of the therapeutic profile based on a 10-year experience. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):114-118
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Outpatient gamma knife surgery for vestibular schwannoma: definition of the therapeutic profile based on a 10-year experience.
  • OBJECT: The purpose of the study was to define the therapeutic profile of outpatient gamma knife surgery (GKS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) by using sequential tumor volumetry to quantify changes following treatment.
  • The actuarial 6-year tumor control rate after a single GKS treatment was 95%.
  • Tumor swelling was observed in 43 patients (38.7%).
  • Recurrence was significantly associated with NF2 (p < 0.003) and the reduced dose (p < 0.03) delivered to these tumors.
  • The incidence of facial nerve neuropathy was mainly determined by surgery prior to GKS (p < 0.0001).
  • Facial nerve radiation toxicity was mild and transient.
  • No permanent facial nerve toxicity was observed.
  • The risk of hearing loss was correlated with age and transient tumor swelling (p < 0.05) but not with dose parameters or NF2.

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  • (PMID = 28306422.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; gamma knife surgery / tumor volumetry / vestibular schwannoma
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16. van Eck AT, Horstmann GA: Increased preservation of functional hearing after gamma knife surgery for vestibular schwannoma. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):204-206

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Increased preservation of functional hearing after gamma knife surgery for vestibular schwannoma.
  • OBJECT: Gamma knife surgery (GKS) for vestibular schwannoma is still associated with an additional hearing loss of approximately 30%.
  • The mean tumor volume was 2.28 cm<sup>3</sup>.
  • After a mean follow-up duration of 22 months, the magnetic resonance imaging-based tumor control rate was 87%.
  • One patient suffered transient facial nerve impairment.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Reducing the maximum dose to 20 Gy seems to be an effective treatment, which probably increases preservation of functional hearing without sacrificing the high tumor control rates achieved in radiosurgery.
  • Post-radiosurgery tumor swelling occurred in 25% of the cases and was not correlated with hearing deterioration.

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  • (PMID = 28306452.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; acoustic neurinoma / gamma knife surgery / hearing preservation / tumor swelling / vestibular schwannoma
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17. Brooker J, Burney S, Fletcher J, Dally M: A qualitative exploration of quality of life among individuals diagnosed with an acoustic neuroma. Br J Health Psychol; 2009 Sep;14(Pt 3):563-78
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A qualitative exploration of quality of life among individuals diagnosed with an acoustic neuroma.
  • OBJECTIVES: To explore quality of life outcomes and the factors that influenced adjustment among individuals diagnosed with an acoustic neuroma.
  • METHODS: Twenty-one participants who had been diagnosed with and/or treated for an acoustic neuroma since 2000 attended one of four focus groups.
  • [MeSH-major] Adaptation, Psychological. Neuroma, Acoustic / psychology. Quality of Life / psychology

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  • (PMID = 19055870.001).
  • [ISSN] 1359-107X
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of health psychology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br J Health Psychol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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18. Tlachacova D, Schmitt M, Novotny J Jr, Novotny J, Majali M, Liscak R: A comparison of the gamma knife model C and the Automatic Positioning System with Leksell model B. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):25-28
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  • Data were analyzed in patients in whom the following diagnoses had been made: vestibular schwannoma, pituitary adenoma, meningioma, solitary metastasis, and other benign and malignant solitary tumors.
  • CONCLUSIONS: With the C model there was a better conformity for most treated targets, such as vestibular schwannomas (p = 0.005) and meningiomas (p = 0.015).

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  • (PMID = 28306471.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; conformity index / extracranial exposure / staff exposure / stereotactic radiosurgery
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19. Inoue HK: Low-dose radiosurgery for large vestibular schwannomas: long-term results of functional preservation. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):111-113

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Low-dose radiosurgery for large vestibular schwannomas: long-term results of functional preservation.
  • OBJECT: The author conducted a study to assess the long-term results obtained in patients who underwent GKS for large vestibular schwannomas (> cochlear nerve functions were evaluated.
  • METHODS: Twenty consecutive large tumors in 18 patients (including two cases of neurofibromatosus Type 2 [NF2]) were followed for more than 6 years.
  • There were eight tumors that were more than 4 cm in maximum diameter.
  • Microsurgery had already been performed prior to GKS in 11 patients (nine recurrent and two residual tumors).
  • Fourteen of 15 tumors were stable or decreased in size.
  • Facial nerve function was preserved in all patients and hearing preserved in four of five patients with cochlear nerve function prior to radiosurgery.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Gamma knife surgery seems to have a place in the low-dose treatment of selected large vestibular schwannoma in patients with a reasonable chance of retaining facial function and pretreatment hearing level.

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  • (PMID = 28306427.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; facial function / gamma knife surgery / outcome / vestibular schwannoma
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20. Karagama YG, Bridges LR, van Hille PT: Angioleiomyoma of the internal auditory meatus: a rare occurrence in the internal auditory canal. Ear Nose Throat J; 2005 Apr;84(4):216, 218

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • A finding of this tumor at this site is very unusual.
  • In our patient, the tumor was clinically and radiologically difficult to distinguish from an acoustic neuroma.
  • It would be important to recognize this rare small tumor preoperatively because it may be appropriate to manage it conservatively.

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  • (PMID = 15929320.001).
  • [ISSN] 0145-5613
  • [Journal-full-title] Ear, nose, & throat journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ear Nose Throat J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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21. Ondik MP, Benson AG, Djalilian H: An unusual site of a CSF leak following resection of a retrosigmoid acoustic neuroma. Ear Nose Throat J; 2006 Mar;85(3):164, 166-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] An unusual site of a CSF leak following resection of a retrosigmoid acoustic neuroma.
  • Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks may occur after acoustic neuroma resection.
  • We describe a case of an infracochlear CSF leak that developed following the retrosigmoid resection of an acoustic neuroma.
  • [MeSH-major] Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea / etiology. Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea / surgery. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Otologic Surgical Procedures / adverse effects. Postoperative Complications / surgery

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  • (PMID = 16615598.001).
  • [ISSN] 0145-5613
  • [Journal-full-title] Ear, nose, & throat journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ear Nose Throat J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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22. Curtin HD, Hirsch WL Jr: Imaging of acoustic neuromas. 1992. Neurosurg Clin N Am; 2008 Apr;19(2):175-205, v
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Imaging of acoustic neuromas. 1992.
  • Diagnosis of acoustic neuromas has been simplified considerably by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
  • Either enhanced method will visualize almost every acoustic neuroma.
  • Currently, a gadolinium-enhanced MRI scan is considered an accurate indicator of whether or not an individual has an acoustic neuroma, although there have been false-positive enhanced MRI scans recently reported.
  • [MeSH-major] Magnetic Resonance Imaging / history. Neuroma, Acoustic / history. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / history

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  • (PMID = 18534334.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-1349
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurg. Clin. N. Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Biography; Classical Article; Historical Article; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Personal-name-as-subject] Curtin HD; Hirsch WL Jr
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23. Wandong S, Meng L, Xingang L, Yuguang L, Shugan Z, Lei W, Chengyuan W: Cystic acoustic neuroma. J Clin Neurosci; 2005 Apr;12(3):253-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cystic acoustic neuroma.
  • To define the clinical characteristics of cystic acoustic neuroma, we retrospectively analyzed 22 patients with cystic acoustic neuroma and reviewed the literature with regard to clinical manifestation, imaging features, diagnosis, surgical procedures and prognosis.
  • An acoustic neuroma was defined as cystic according to the following criteria: the presence of hypodense/hypointense areas on CT or MRI, the identification of cystic elements at operation and histological verification.
  • At the end of surgery, the facial nerve was anatomically intact in 86.4% of cystic acoustic neuromas.
  • Complete removal of the tumor was achieved in 18 cases (81.8%).
  • We conclude that patients with cystic acoustic neuroma need prompt surgery with special attention paid to the preservation of the facial nerve.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Facial Nerve / surgery. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neurosurgical Procedures. Prognosis. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15851076.001).
  • [ISSN] 0967-5868
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical neuroscience : official journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Neurosci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
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24. Wackym PA: Stereotactic radiosurgery, microsurgery, and expectant management of acoustic neuroma: basis for informed consent. Otolaryngol Clin North Am; 2005 Aug;38(4):653-70
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Stereotactic radiosurgery, microsurgery, and expectant management of acoustic neuroma: basis for informed consent.
  • Stereotactic radio-surgery, like any other treatment modality, has advantages and disadvantages that must be discussed with a patient who has an acoustic neuroma or other skull base tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures. Radiosurgery

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  • (PMID = 16005724.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6665
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngologic clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 36
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25. Stripf T, Mann WJ: [Ocular tilt reaction. A rare complication after acoustic neuroma surgery]. HNO; 2005 Dec;53(12):1077-80
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Ocular tilt reaction. A rare complication after acoustic neuroma surgery].
  • Visual disturbances after acoustic neuroma surgery are very rare complications.
  • We present a patient with diplopia after a middle fossa approach for resection of an acoustic neuroma.
  • It is generally agreed that this reaction is secondary to a dysfunction of the tonic bilateral vestibular inputs that stabilize the eyes and head in a normal upright position in the roll plane.
  • It has also been described after denervation of the utricle and injury of the brain stem.
  • [MeSH-major] Diplopia / diagnosis. Diplopia / etiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Neurosurgical Procedures / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 15660240.001).
  • [ISSN] 0017-6192
  • [Journal-full-title] HNO
  • [ISO-abbreviation] HNO
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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26. Bergson E, Sataloff RT: Preoperative computerized dynamic posturography as a prognostic indicator of balance function in patients with acoustic neuroma. Ear Nose Throat J; 2005 Mar;84(3):154-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Preoperative computerized dynamic posturography as a prognostic indicator of balance function in patients with acoustic neuroma.
  • We conducted a study to determine the prognostic reliability of preoperative computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) in patients undergoing surgical excision of an acoustic neuroma.
  • [MeSH-major] Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted. Neuroma, Acoustic / diagnosis. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Posture. Sensation Disorders / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cohort Studies. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neurosurgical Procedures / methods. Postural Balance / physiology. Predictive Value of Tests. Preoperative Care / methods. Retrospective Studies. Risk Assessment. Sensitivity and Specificity. Treatment Outcome. Vestibular Function Tests

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  • (PMID = 15871583.001).
  • [ISSN] 0145-5613
  • [Journal-full-title] Ear, nose, & throat journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ear Nose Throat J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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27. Halleck P, Haisch A, Sedlmaier B: [Differential diagnoses of acute bilateral hearing loss in a patient with metastatic bronchial carcinoma]. HNO; 2006 Jul;54(7):553-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The first symptom of an acoustic neuroma in about 50% of the patients is hearing loss, which occurs suddenly in about 5-10% of cases.
  • Cerebellar and hepatic metastases from a bronchial carcinoma were previously diagnosed in the case presented here, and the most probable causes of the progressive hearing loss, e.g. idiopathic sudden deafness, infection and tumor-associated factors, were considered and diagnostically analyzed.
  • The discussion ultimately focused on the clinical and radiological signs of bilateral acoustic neuroma.
  • Nevertheless, the constellation of findings suggests that the bilateral hearing loss was caused by a bilateral acoustic neuroma.
  • [MeSH-major] Bronchial Neoplasms / diagnosis. Hearing Loss, Bilateral / diagnosis. Hearing Loss, Bilateral / etiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / diagnosis. Neuroma, Acoustic / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 16132878.001).
  • [ISSN] 0017-6192
  • [Journal-full-title] HNO
  • [ISO-abbreviation] HNO
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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28. Jalloh I, Guilfoyle MR, Lloyd SK, Macfarlane R, Smith C: Reactivation and centripetal spread of herpes simplex virus complicating acoustic neuroma resection. Surg Neurol; 2009 Nov;72(5):502-4
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  • [Title] Reactivation and centripetal spread of herpes simplex virus complicating acoustic neuroma resection.
  • CASE DESCRIPTION: A 44-year-old man underwent uneventful resection of an acoustic neuroma.
  • [MeSH-major] Encephalitis, Herpes Simplex / etiology. Facial Nerve Diseases / complications. Neuroma, Acoustic / complications. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Neurosurgical Procedures / adverse effects. Simplexvirus / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Acyclovir / therapeutic use. Adult. Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use. Consciousness Disorders / virology. DNA, Viral / analysis. Facial Nerve / surgery. Facial Nerve / virology. Fever / virology. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Recurrence. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Vestibulocochlear Nerve / pathology. Vestibulocochlear Nerve / radiography. Vestibulocochlear Nerve / surgery. Vomiting / virology

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  • (PMID = 19631366.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-3339
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgical neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg Neurol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 0 / DNA, Viral; X4HES1O11F / Acyclovir
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29. Gönül E, Izci Y, Onguru O: Arachnoid cyst of the cerebellopontine angle associated with gliosis of the eighth cranial nerve. J Clin Neurosci; 2007 Jul;14(7):700-2

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Arachnoid cyst of the cerebellopontine angle associated with gliosis of the eighth cranial nerve.
  • The clinical syndrome produced by a cyst in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) may closely mimic that of an acoustic neuroma, with sensorineural hearing loss, impaired corneal reflex, and cerebellar signs with increased intracranial pressure.
  • Gliosis of the eighth nerve is common but its association with CPA arachnoid cyst is very rare and not previously reported.
  • We report a patient with a CPA arachnoid cyst associated with gliosis of the eighth cranial nerve.
  • He presented with right peripheral facial palsy, and gliosis of the eighth nerve was diagnosed intraoperatively.
  • CPA arachnoid cysts should be included in the differential diagnosis of peripheral facial palsy and the eighth cranial nerve should be examined during the resection and fenestration of the arachnoid cyst.
  • [MeSH-major] Arachnoid Cysts / complications. Cerebellar Neoplasms / complications. Cerebellopontine Angle / pathology. Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / complications. Gliosis / complications. Vestibulocochlear Nerve / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17475499.001).
  • [ISSN] 0967-5868
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical neuroscience : official journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Neurosci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
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30. Heman-Ackah S, Pensak MA: Incidental finding of dysgeusia relieved by injections of botulinum toxin A. Laryngoscope; 2005 May;115(5):844-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Incidental finding of dysgeusia relieved by injections of botulinum toxin A.
  • OBJECTIVE: We report the unique finding of hemifacial spasm and associated dysgeusia that resolved after treatment with botulinum toxin A (BTX-A).
  • METHODS: Three years after undergoing resection of an acoustic neuroma and subsequent resolution of postoperative left-sided facial nerve palsy, a 38-year-old woman presented with new onset of facial spasm and dysgeusia.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Facial Paralysis / surgery. Female. Hemifacial Spasm / drug therapy. Humans. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] Laryngoscope. 2005 May;115(5):763 [15867635.001]
  • (PMID = 15867651.001).
  • [ISSN] 0023-852X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Laryngoscope
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Laryngoscope
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neuromuscular Agents; EC 3.4.24.69 / Botulinum Toxins, Type A
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31. O'Malley MR, Haynes DS: Assessment and management of meningitis following cerebellopontine angle surgery. Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2008 Oct;16(5):427-33
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Mortality from postoperative bacterial meningitis is rare in patients undergoing resection of an acoustic neuroma.
  • [MeSH-major] Cerebellopontine Angle / surgery. Meningitis, Aseptic / drug therapy. Meningitis, Bacterial / drug therapy. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Neurosurgical Procedures / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 18797284.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-6998
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in otolaryngology & head and neck surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Steroids
  • [Number-of-references] 85
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32. Jain A, Ablett M, Wardrop P: Vanishing tumour of the internal auditory meatus. J Laryngol Otol; 2009 May;123(5):563-5
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  • Radiological investigation, in the form of magnetic resonance imaging, revealed an internal auditory meatus mass which resembled an acoustic neuroma.
  • Rarely, metastatic deposits have been described in this region, from squamous cell carcinoma, malignant melanoma, malignant parotid oncocytoma, renal carcinoma, and lung and thyroid primaries.

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  • (PMID = 18694536.001).
  • [ISSN] 1748-5460
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of laryngology and otology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Laryngol Otol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal
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33. Scarlett A, Bird P, Macfarlane M: Conductive hearing loss after removal of acoustic neuroma. Otol Neurotol; 2008 Jun;29(4):553-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Conductive hearing loss after removal of acoustic neuroma.
  • OBJECTIVE: To report 4 patients who have developed a conductive and/or mixed hearing loss due to dehiscence of the inner ear after retrosigmoid approach for removal of acoustic neuroma.
  • PATIENTS: Four patients who presented with conductive and/or mixed hearing loss after retrosigmoid approach for removal of acoustic neuroma.
  • CONCLUSION: The occurrence of conductive hearing loss after the surgical removal of an acoustic neuroma has not previously been documented.
  • Computed tomographic scan of the temporal bones showing inner ear dehiscence may explain this finding.
  • [MeSH-major] Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / complications. Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / surgery. Hearing Loss, Conductive / etiology. Hearing Loss, Conductive / physiopathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / complications. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Postoperative Complications / physiopathology. Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases / complications. Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Acoustic Impedance Tests. Adult. Aged. Audiometry. Female. Hearing Aids. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Otologic Surgical Procedures. Otoscopy. Petrous Bone / pathology. Speech Perception. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 18451754.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-7129
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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34. Zwick OM, Seiff SR: Supportive care of facial nerve palsy with temporary external eyelid weights. Optometry; 2006 Jul;77(7):340-2
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  • [Title] Supportive care of facial nerve palsy with temporary external eyelid weights.
  • BACKGROUND: Patients with facial nerve palsy can have many ocular complications.
  • Lagophthalmos, or poor eyelid closure, and loss of blink secondary to lack of nerve supply to the orbicularis oculi, can lead to exposure keratopathy, corneal breakdown, ulcers, and even perforation.
  • Patients with facial nerve palsy who present at earlier stages can benefit from conservative treatment.
  • CASE REPORT: A 29-year-old patient with lagophthalmos secondary to left facial nerve palsy after surgical excision of an acoustic neuroma was treated with a temporary external eyelid weight.
  • CONCLUSION: Temporary external eyelid weights are part of the armamentarium in the supportive care of patients with lagophthalmos and exposure keratopathy secondary to facial nerve palsy.

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  • (PMID = 16814237.001).
  • [ISSN] 1529-1839
  • [Journal-full-title] Optometry (St. Louis, Mo.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Optometry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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35. Paquet N, Dannenbaum E, Hakim-Zadeh R, Fung J: Effects of fast head turns on head, trunk and pelvis motions during standing and walking in patients with unilateral vestibular deficit. J Vestib Res; 2006;16(6):279-84
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effects of fast head turns on head, trunk and pelvis motions during standing and walking in patients with unilateral vestibular deficit.
  • Patients with unilateral vestibular deficit (UVD) report difficulties with maintaining balance while executing fast head turns.
  • Our aim was to determine whether head, trunk, and pelvis angular displacements were symmetrical in patients with UVD as they executed voluntary yaw rotation of the head towards or away from the side of the vestibular lesion, during standing and walking.
  • Eight patients who underwent surgical resection of an acoustic neuroma stood with feet together or walked at comfortable pace across a 10-meter walkway.
  • [MeSH-major] Functional Laterality. Head Movements. Kinesthesis. Motion Perception. Postural Balance. Vestibular Diseases / physiopathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adaptation, Physiological. Adult. Aged. Biomechanical Phenomena. Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / complications. Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / surgery. Humans. Middle Aged. Movement. Neuroma, Acoustic / complications. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Pelvis. Rotation. Severity of Illness Index. Thorax. Vestibular Function Tests. Vestibulocochlear Nerve / pathology. Vestibulocochlear Nerve / physiopathology. Vestibulocochlear Nerve / surgery. Walking

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  • (PMID = 17726281.001).
  • [ISSN] 0957-4271
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of vestibular research : equilibrium & orientation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Vestib Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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36. Andersen HT, Schrøder SA, Bonding P: Unilateral deafness after acoustic neuroma surgery: subjective hearing handicap and the effect of the bone-anchored hearing aid. Otol Neurotol; 2006 Sep;27(6):809-14
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Unilateral deafness after acoustic neuroma surgery: subjective hearing handicap and the effect of the bone-anchored hearing aid.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the subjective hearing handicap in patients with unilateral deafness after acoustic neuroma surgery and the effect of the Bone-anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA) on test band.
  • STUDY DESIGN: Fifty-nine consecutive patients with unilateral deafness after translabyrintine removal of an acoustic neuroma, treated in Denmark in 2001 and 2002, were included.
  • CONCLUSION: This study shows that unilateral deafness after acoustic neuroma surgery is thought as a handicap in most of the patients and confirms that treatment with the BAHA has positive subjective effects and improves speech discrimination in noise.
  • Data from centers that perform simultaneous acoustic neuroma surgery and implantation for BAHA are necessary for firm conclusions.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Conduction. Hearing Aids. Hearing Loss, Unilateral / etiology. Hearing Loss, Unilateral / therapy. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Otologic Surgical Procedures / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 16885786.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-7129
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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37. Filipo R, Attanasio G, De Seta E, Viccaro M: Post-operative Herpes simplex virus encephalitis after surgical resection of acoustic neuroma: a case report. J Laryngol Otol; 2005 Jul;119(7):558-60
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Post-operative Herpes simplex virus encephalitis after surgical resection of acoustic neuroma: a case report.
  • The appearance of a strong headache followed by impairment of consciousness and hypertone of arms and legs complicated the post-operative course in a 33-year-old patient who underwent surgical removal of an acoustic neuroma.
  • Several brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography scans performed in the first week after onset of symptoms of infection did not establish a proper diagnosis.
  • Diffusion-weighted MRI detected brain abnormalities on the fourth day after onset of symptoms, and polymerase chain reaction identification of HSV 1 DNA confirmed the diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Encephalitis, Herpes Simplex / etiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Postoperative Complications / etiology


38. Ernst A, Todt I, Seidl RO, Eisenschenk A, Blödow A, Basta D: The application of vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials in otoneurosurgery. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2006 Aug;135(2):286-90
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The application of vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials in otoneurosurgery.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the applicability of vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) in the diagnostics, intraoperative monitoring, and postoperative follow-up of patients in otoneurosurgery.
  • STUDY DESIGN: A prospective study of patients who underwent either cochlear implantation (CI, n = 18) or were diagnosed with an acoustic neuroma (AN, n = 9) or with neuro(micro)vascular compression of the VIIIth nerve (NVC, n = 27) in the period 2002 to 2004.
  • [MeSH-major] Cochlear Implantation. Evoked Potentials, Auditory. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Vestibule, Labyrinth / physiology

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  • (PMID = 16890084.001).
  • [ISSN] 0194-5998
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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39. Morel N, Dumas G, Righini C, Karkas A, Hitter A, Schmerber S: [Multifrequency vestibular study after vestibular neurotomy and chemical labyrinthectomy]. Ann Otolaryngol Chir Cervicofac; 2008 Jun;125(3):139-45

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Multifrequency vestibular study after vestibular neurotomy and chemical labyrinthectomy].
  • [Transliterated title] Etude vestibulaire multifréquentielle après neurotomie vestibulaire et labyrinthectomie chimique.
  • OBJECTIVES: Vestibular neurotomy (VN) and chemical labyrinthectomy (CL) are the two most common techniques of vestibular deafferention to treat patients with intractable vertigo.
  • A long-term evaluation of vestibular function has been performed with a variety of vestibular tests to find out whether there persisted any residual vestibular function after each technique.
  • METHODS: We called in all patients who have been treated for the last 10 years and have no known vestibular disease in the non treated ear.
  • We were thus able to compare VN and CL patients with a group of 10 normal patients and another group of nine patients that had had a translabyrinthine approach for an acoustic neuroma.
  • RESULTS: We found out that vestibular responses did persist in seven out of nine (78 %) patients after VN and 11 out of 12 (92 %) patients after CL.
  • On the other hand, no vestibular response was detected following resection of vestibular schwannoma through a translabyrinthine approach.
  • CONCLUSION: We came to the conclusion that the two latter techniques, unlike vestibulocochlear nerve section via the translabyrinthine approach, are only incomplete methods of vestibular deafferention.
  • [MeSH-major] Ear Neoplasms / therapy. Ear, Inner. Neuroma / therapy. Otologic Surgical Procedures / methods. Sympathectomy, Chemical / methods. Vestibular Nerve / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Caloric Tests. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Severity of Illness Index. Vestibular Function Tests

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  • (PMID = 18534549.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-438X
  • [Journal-full-title] Annales d'oto-laryngologie et de chirurgie cervico faciale : bulletin de la Société d'oto-laryngologie des hôpitaux de Paris
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Otolaryngol Chir Cervicofac
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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40. House JW, Kutz JW Jr: Bone-anchored hearing aids: incidence and management of postoperative complications. Otol Neurotol; 2007 Feb;28(2):213-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The majority of patients had unilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss after removal of an acoustic neuroma or skull base tumor (59.1%) with the next most common etiology of deafness secondary to sudden sensorineural hearing loss (16.1%).
  • [MeSH-major] Hearing Aids. Hearing Loss, Sensorineural. Neuroma, Acoustic / complications. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Postoperative Complications / epidemiology. Postoperative Complications / surgery. Skull Base Neoplasms / complications. Skull Base Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 17255890.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-7129
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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41. Hjortshøj TD, Grønskov K, Rosenberg T, Brøndum-Nielsen K, Olsen JH: Risk for cancer in patients with Bardet-Biedl syndrome and their relatives. Am J Med Genet A; 2007 Aug 1;143A(15):1699-702
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  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disease with retinal dystrophy leading to blindness, postaxial polydactyly, truncal obesity, learning disabilities, male hypogenitalism, and renal anomalies.
  • This finding was based on the identification of three parents with renal cell carcinoma, representing a 17-fold increased risk.
  • The cancers were an embryonal carcinoma of the testis in a 23-year-old man and an acoustic neuroma in a 51-year-old man.

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 17587209.001).
  • [ISSN] 1552-4833
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of medical genetics. Part A
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Med. Genet. A
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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42. Newton JR, Shakeel M, Flatman S, Beattie C, Ram B: Magnetic resonance imaging screening in acoustic neuroma. Am J Otolaryngol; 2010 Jul-Aug;31(4):217-20
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Magnetic resonance imaging screening in acoustic neuroma.
  • OBJECTIVES: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the definitive investigation for detection of an acoustic neuroma.
  • It is however an expensive resource, and pick-up rate of a tumor can be as low as 1% of all patients scanned.
  • In addition, MRI scans and case records were reviewed for the last 30 patients diagnosed with acoustic neuromas.
  • RESULTS: Two acoustic neuromas were picked up out of 132 scans performed.
  • Of the 30 positive scans for a tumor, the patients/audiograms revealed that 10% did not fit the published criteria despite the patients having no other audiovestibular symptoms.
  • Applying protocols may reduce the amount of scans performed, but up to 10% of tumors may be missed by this approach.
  • [MeSH-major] Hearing Loss, Sensorineural / diagnosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Neuroma, Acoustic / diagnosis

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20015748.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-818X
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of otolaryngology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Otolaryngol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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43. Marshall AH, Owen VM, Nikolopoulos TP, O'Donoghue GM: Acoustic schwannomas: awareness of radiologic error will reduce unnecessary treatment. Otol Neurotol; 2005 May;26(3):512-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Acoustic schwannomas: awareness of radiologic error will reduce unnecessary treatment.
  • OBJECTIVE: To measure the intra- and interobserver error in size estimation of acoustic schwannomas from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans by experienced radiologists to determine whether small amounts of tumor growth that may affect management (2 mm) could be reliably measured in clinical practice.
  • DESIGN: Duplicated, blinded size estimation of acoustic neuromas (according to American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery guidelines, 1995) from MRI scans of patients with acoustic neuromas.
  • PARTICIPANTS: Four radiologists (including 2 dedicated neuroradiologists) measuring positive MRI scans of 26 patients with an acoustic neuroma.
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Intraradiologist and inter-radiologist repeatability coefficients in millimeters for the maximal tumor diameter in the anteroposterior (AP) axis, medial-longitudinal (ML) axis, and the square-root of the product of these two measurements.
  • CONCLUSION: The study indicates that, in routine clinical practice, differences in tumor size of the order of 2 mm cannot be reliably measured, even by the same radiologist.
  • Thus, reported growth of acoustic tumors should be interpreted with caution, especially if this is the criterion for recommending treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neuroma, Acoustic / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 15891658.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-7129
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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44. McClelland S 3rd, Dusenbery KE, Higgins PD, Hall WA: Treatment of a facial nerve neuroma with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg; 2007;85(6):299-302
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment of a facial nerve neuroma with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.
  • BACKGROUND: Facial nerve neuromas are extremely rare and are often mistaken for acoustic neuromas when located near the vestibular nerve.
  • Usually presenting with facial weakness and hearing loss, facial nerve neuromas of the cerebellopontine angle have commonly been managed by surgery.
  • We present the first reported case of a facial nerve neuroma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT).
  • She underwent a middle fossa craniotomy only to reveal a facial nerve tumor rather than an acoustic neuroma that was not resected due to the high risk of facial paralysis.
  • Following surgery, her facial function worsened and was associated with tumor enlargement on MRI.
  • RESULTS: Three months after treatment she had no worsening of her pretreatment symptoms, and at the 1-year follow-up, she experienced facial weakness improvement accompanied by an absence of tumor growth on MRI.
  • CONCLUSION: In the first report of a facial nerve neuroma treated with FSRT, this treatment resulted in excellent long-term (4-year) tumor control with improvement of pretreatment symptomatology and absence of morbidity.
  • This report demonstrates the potential for using FSRT to treat facial nerve neuromas of the cerebellopontine angle that could otherwise be associated with significant operative morbidity.
  • [MeSH-major] Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Dose Fractionation. Facial Nerve / radiography. Neuroma / radiotherapy

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 17709984.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-0372
  • [Journal-full-title] Stereotactic and functional neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Stereotact Funct Neurosurg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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45. Dannenbaum E, Paquet N, Hakim-Zadeh R, Feldman AG: Optimal parameters for the clinical test of dynamic visual acuity in patients with a unilateral vestibular deficit. J Otolaryngol; 2005 Feb;34(1):13-9

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Optimal parameters for the clinical test of dynamic visual acuity in patients with a unilateral vestibular deficit.
  • METHODS: The subjects were 31 healthy individuals (22 to 79 years old) and 10 patients (19 to 70 years old) with a unilateral vestibular deficit owing to surgical resection of an acoustic neuroma.
  • [MeSH-major] Vestibular Diseases / physiopathology. Visual Acuity / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cochlear Nerve / pathology. Cochlear Nerve / surgery. Female. Head Movements / physiology. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms / pathology. Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms / surgery. Postoperative Complications. Posture. Vestibular Function Tests

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  • (PMID = 15966470.001).
  • [ISSN] 0381-6605
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of otolaryngology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Otolaryngol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Canada
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46. Cokkeser Y, Ilhan A: Late midbrain compression by liquefied fat in a case operated for an acoustic neuroma. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2006 Nov;135(5):807-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Late midbrain compression by liquefied fat in a case operated for an acoustic neuroma.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / transplantation. Fats / adverse effects. Mesencephalon. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery

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  • (PMID = 17071319.001).
  • [ISSN] 0194-5998
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fats
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47. Zanetti D, Campovecchi CB, Pasini S, Nassif N: Simultaneous translabyrinthine removal of acoustic neuroma and cochlear implantation. Auris Nasus Larynx; 2008 Dec;35(4):562-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Simultaneous translabyrinthine removal of acoustic neuroma and cochlear implantation.
  • OBJECTIVES: To report of a 65-year-old woman with bilateral Meniere's disease was referred for cochlear implantation (CI) due to severe/profound sensorineural hearing loss.
  • METHODS: During the assessment workup, a vestibular schwannoma in the right ear was found by MR imaging.
  • She underwent a translabyrinthine removal of the acoustic neuroma (AN) with sparing of the cochlear nerve and concurrent ipsilateral CI with a Nucleus Freedom device (Cochlear Ltd., Lane Cove, New South Wales, Australia).
  • CONCLUSION: Cochlear implantation at the time of acoustic neuroma removal with VIII nerve sparing can be a safe and effective hearing restoration procedure.
  • [MeSH-major] Cochlear Implantation. Hearing Loss, Sensorineural / surgery. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Meniere Disease / diagnosis. Speech Discrimination Tests

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  • (PMID = 18243617.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-1476
  • [Journal-full-title] Auris, nasus, larynx
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Auris Nasus Larynx
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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48. Schoemaker MJ, Swerdlow AJ, Auvinen A, Christensen HC, Feychting M, Johansen C, Klaeboe L, Lönn S, Salminen T, Tynes T: Medical history, cigarette smoking and risk of acoustic neuroma: an international case-control study. Int J Cancer; 2007 Jan 1;120(1):103-10
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  • [Title] Medical history, cigarette smoking and risk of acoustic neuroma: an international case-control study.
  • Acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma) is a benign tumor of the vestibulocochlear nerve.
  • Its recorded incidence is increasing but risk factors for this tumor have scarcely been investigated.
  • We conducted a population-based case-control study of risk factors for acoustic neuroma in the UK and Nordic countries, including 563 cases and 2,703 controls.
  • Tumor risk was analyzed in relation to medical history and cigarette smoking.
  • Risk of acoustic neuroma was significantly raised in parous compared with nulliparous women (OR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1-2.6), but was not related to age at first birth or number of children.
  • Risk was not associated with a history of allergic disease, past head injury, past diagnosis of a neoplasm or birth characteristics, but was significantly raised for past diagnosis of epilepsy (OR = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.3-4.9).
  • Tumor risk was significantly reduced in subjects who had ever regularly smoked cigarettes (OR = 0.7, 95% CI: 0.6-0.9), but the reduction applied only to current smokers (OR = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.4-0.6), not ex-smokers (OR = 1.0, 95% CI: 0.8-1.3).
  • The reduced risk of acoustic neuroma in smokers and raised risk in parous women might relate to sex hormone levels, or smoking might suppress tumor growth, but effects of parity and smoking on timing of diagnosis of the tumor are also a potential explanation.
  • The raised risk in relation to past diagnosis of epilepsy might be a surveillance artefact or imply that epilepsy and/or antiepileptic medication use predispose to acoustic neuroma.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / etiology. Smoking / adverse effects


49. Choy NL, Johnson N, Treleaven J, Jull G, Panizza B, Brown-Rothwell D: Balance, mobility and gaze stability deficits remain following surgical removal of vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma): an observational study. Aust J Physiother; 2006;52(3):211-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Balance, mobility and gaze stability deficits remain following surgical removal of vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma): an observational study.
  • QUESTION: Are there residual deficits in balance, mobility, and gaze stability after surgical removal of vestibular schwannoma?
  • PARTICIPANTS: Twelve people with a mean age of 52 years who had undergone surgical removal of vestibular schwannoma at least three months previously and had not undergone vestibular rehabilitation.
  • CONCLUSION: A prospective study is required to evaluate vestibular rehabilitation to ameliorate dizziness and to improve balance, mobility, and gaze stability for this clinical group.
  • [MeSH-major] Mobility Limitation. Neuroma, Acoustic / complications. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Ocular Motility Disorders / etiology. Postural Balance. Sensation Disorders / etiology


50. Kondziolka D, Lunsford LD: Future perspectives in acoustic neuroma management. Prog Neurol Surg; 2008;21:247-54
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Future perspectives in acoustic neuroma management.
  • Management options for patients with vestibular schwannomas (acoustic neuromas) include observation, resection, stereotactic radiosurgery, or fractionated radiotherapy.
  • There has been an evolution in available technologies, and an evolution in both patient and physician approaches to the management of this tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery / trends

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  • (PMID = 18810226.001).
  • [ISSN] 0079-6492
  • [Journal-full-title] Progress in neurological surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prog Neurol Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Number-of-references] 65
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51. Coca Pelaz A, Fernández Lisa C, Gómez JR, Rodrigo JP, Llorente JL, Suárez C: [Complete facial palsy following surgery for acoustic nerve neurinoma: evolution and associated ophthalmological complications]. Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp; 2008 May;59(5):223-7
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  • [Title] [Complete facial palsy following surgery for acoustic nerve neurinoma: evolution and associated ophthalmological complications].
  • [Transliterated title] Parálisis facial completa tras cirugía de neurinoma del acústico: evolución y complicaciones oftalmológicas asociadas.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the fraction of patients recovering to normal function after complete facial nerve paralysis secondary to acoustic neuroma surgery, and also to address the ophthalmologic complications associated with it and the therapeutic options.
  • MATERIAL AND METHOD: We performed a retrospective review of 30 cases operated on in our department for acoustic neuroma and who, despite anatomical preservation of the facial nerve, developed a complete post-operative facial nerve paralysis (grade VI of House-Brackmann [HB]).
  • RESULTS: Only 5 of the 30 cases studied (16.6 %) recovered to normal facial nerve function (HB grade I).
  • [MeSH-major] Cochlear Nerve / pathology. Cochlear Nerve / surgery. Corneal Ulcer / etiology. Facial Paralysis / etiology. Facial Paralysis / physiopathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms / pathology. Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms / surgery. Postoperative Complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 18501157.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6519
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta otorrinolaringológica española
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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52. Bisi MA, Selaimen CM, Chaves KD, Bisi MC, Grossi ML: Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) mimicking temporomandibular disorders: a case report. J Appl Oral Sci; 2006 Dec;14(6):476-81

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  • [Title] Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) mimicking temporomandibular disorders: a case report.
  • Approximately 6 to 16% of patients with trigeminal neuralgia symptoms present intracranial tumors, the most common being the vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma).
  • In these cases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved to be a useful tool in tumor diagnosis.
  • The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the relationship among trigeminal neuralgia symptoms, intracranial tumors and temporomandibular dysfunction by presenting a clinical case.

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  • (PMID = 19089251.001).
  • [ISSN] 1678-7765
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of applied oral science : revista FOB
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Appl Oral Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4327303
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53. Coca Pelaz A, Rodrigo JP, Llorente JL, Gómez JR, Suárez C: [Unusual clinical presentations of vestibular schwannomas]. Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp; 2008 Apr;59(4):187-9
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  • [Title] [Unusual clinical presentations of vestibular schwannomas].
  • [Transliterated title] Formas clínicas inusuales de presentación de los neurinomas del acústico.
  • The aim of this study is evaluate the unusual ways of initial presentation of the vestibular schwannomas.
  • We performed a retrospective study of the patients who underwent resection of acoustic neuromas on our service, including for analysis only the cases which initial symptom was not the hearing loss.
  • Tumor size, localization, clinical presentation, and age of the patients were considered.
  • A significant group of patients did not present with the otological symptoms classically associated with vestibular schwannoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Cerebellopontine Angle / pathology. Hearing Loss / etiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / complications. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology

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  • (PMID = 18447978.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6519
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta otorrinolaringológica española
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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54. Lee DJ, Maseyesva B, Westra W, Long D, Niparko JK, Califano J: Microsatellite analysis of recurrent vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) following stereotactic radiosurgery. Otol Neurotol; 2006 Feb;27(2):213-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Microsatellite analysis of recurrent vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) following stereotactic radiosurgery.
  • HYPOTHESIS: Genetic and immunohistochemical studies may provide insight into the mechanisms of vestibular schwannoma (VS) recurrence following radiation therapy.
  • BACKGROUND: Stereotactic radiation therapy is an increasingly common alternative to microsurgical resection for the primary management of sporadic vs. The molecular mechanisms associated with recurrent vestibular schwannoma (VS) following radiation therapy are not known.
  • METHODS: Primary or irradiated VS tumors were fresh-frozen at the time of surgical resection and microdissected to undergo DNA extraction.
  • Paired normal and tumor DNA specimens were analyzed for allelic loss by PCR amplification of polymorphic dinucleotide repeat sequences.
  • Deletions on chromosome 10 are seen in both benign and higher-grade meningiomas and intracranial malignancies associated with radiotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Chromosomes, Human, Pair 22. Microsatellite Repeats. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / genetics. Neuroma, Acoustic / genetics. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Base Sequence. Chi-Square Distribution. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 10. DNA Mutational Analysis. DNA, Neoplasm / blood. DNA, Neoplasm / chemistry. DNA, Neoplasm / genetics. DNA, Neoplasm / isolation & purification. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Genes, bcl-2 / genetics. Genes, p53 / genetics. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Loss of Heterozygosity. Neurofibromin 2 / analysis. Neurofibromin 2 / genetics

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  • (PMID = 16436992.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-7129
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 0 / Neurofibromin 2
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55. Chang LS, Welling DB: Molecular biology of vestibular schwannomas. Methods Mol Biol; 2009;493:163-77
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Molecular biology of vestibular schwannomas.
  • Recent advances in molecular biology have led to a better understanding of the etiology of vestibular schwannomas.
  • The underlying purpose of vestibular schwannoma research is the development of new treatment options; however, such options have not yet been established.
  • A fundamental understanding of the underlying molecular events leading to tumor formation began when mutations in the neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) tumor suppressor gene were identified in vestibular schwannomas.
  • The clinical characteristics of vestibular schwannomas and neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) syndromes have both been related to alterations in the NF2 gene.
  • When utilized with clinical screening, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), conventional audiometry, and auditory brainstem response (ABR), the early detection of NF2 can be made, which consequently makes a significant difference in the ability to successfully treat vestibular schwannomas.
  • Nf2-transgenic and knockout mice as well as vestibular schwannoma xenograft models are now ready for novel therapeutic testing.
  • [MeSH-major] Mutation. Neurofibromin 2 / genetics. Neuroma, Acoustic / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. DNA Mutational Analysis. Genetic Predisposition to Disease. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Mice. Mice, Knockout. Mice, SCID. Mice, Transgenic. Neurofibromatosis 2 / genetics. Neurofibromatosis 2 / pathology

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  • (PMID = 18839347.001).
  • [ISSN] 1064-3745
  • [Journal-full-title] Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Methods Mol. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neurofibromin 2
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56. Gharabaghi A, Samii A, Koerbel A, Rosahl SK, Tatagiba M, Samii M: Preservation of function in vestibular schwannoma surgery. Neurosurgery; 2007 Feb;60(2 Suppl 1):ONS124-7; discussion ONS127-8
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  • [Title] Preservation of function in vestibular schwannoma surgery.
  • The management and surgical technique for microsurgical tumor removal of vestibular schwannomas (acoustic neuroma) with the suboccipital retrosigmoid approach and semi-sitting patient positioning is described.
  • An emphasis is placed on the preservation of auditory and facial nerve function with a stepwise description of the technical and operative nuances, including presurgical evaluation, positioning, anesthesiological and neurophysiological aspects, approach, microsurgical techniques, and postsurgical care.
  • [MeSH-major] Microsurgery / methods. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Neurosurgical Procedures / methods. Otologic Surgical Procedures / methods

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  • (PMID = 17297374.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4040
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurgery
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 18
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57. Xue B, Yang J: [The characteristics of VEMP in patients with acoustic neuroma]. Lin Chung Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2008 Jan;22(1):22-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [The characteristics of VEMP in patients with acoustic neuroma].
  • OBJECTIVE: To establish the normal value of the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP), and to determine the characteristics of VEMP in patients with acoustic neuroma (AN) and to explore the significance of VEMP in diagnosis of AN.
  • VEMP was investigated in 14 patients with AN who underwent surgery during the period of 2006-2007 as well as auditory brainstem response (ABR) and vestibular caloric test.
  • [MeSH-major] Evoked Potentials, Auditory. Neuroma, Acoustic / physiopathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Acoustic Stimulation. Adult. Case-Control Studies. Electromyography. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Vestibular Function Tests. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 18338565.001).
  • [ISSN] 1001-1781
  • [Journal-full-title] Lin chuang er bi yan hou tou jing wai ke za zhi = Journal of clinical otorhinolaryngology, head, and neck surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lin Chung Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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58. Nascentes SM, Paulo EA, de Andrade EC, da Silva AL, Vassoler TM, Scanavini AB: Sudden deafness as a presenting symptom of acoustic neuroma: case report. Braz J Otorhinolaryngol; 2007 Sep-Oct;73(5):713-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Sudden deafness as a presenting symptom of acoustic neuroma: case report.
  • Vestibular schwannoma, also known as acoustic neurinoma, is the most frequent tumor of the cerebellopontine angle, and represents 9% of all intracranial tumors.
  • The patients responded to therapy with Prednisone and Pentoxifylline after the diagnosis of acoustic neurinoma by imaging exams.
  • [MeSH-major] Deafness / etiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / complications. Tinnitus / etiology


59. Lobato-Polo J, Kondziolka D, Zorro O, Kano H, Flickinger JC, Lunsford LD: Gamma knife radiosurgery in younger patients with vestibular schwannomas. Neurosurgery; 2009 Aug;65(2):294-300; discussion 300-1
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  • [Title] Gamma knife radiosurgery in younger patients with vestibular schwannomas.
  • OBJECTIVE: Management options for patients with vestibular schwannoma include observation, surgical resection, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and stereotactic radiation therapy.
  • We studied tumor response and clinical outcomes after SRS in such patients.
  • METHODS: We reviewed long-term outcomes in 55 patients with vestibular schwannomas.
  • The median tumor volume was 1.7 mm.
  • The median tumor margin dose was 13.0 Gy (range, 11-20 Gy).
  • At the last assessment, facial and trigeminal nerve function was preserved in 98.2% and 96.4% of patients, respectively; the only facial deficit (House-Brackmann grade III) occurred in a patient who received a tumor dose of 20 Gy early in our experience (1988).
  • No patient developed a secondary radiation-related tumor.
  • CONCLUSION: Our experience indicates that GK SRS is an effective management strategy for younger patients with vestibular schwannoma, most of whom have no additional cranial nerve dysfunction.
  • [MeSH-major] Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / surgery. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Postoperative Complications / epidemiology. Radiosurgery / statistics & numerical data. Vestibular Nerve / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Distribution. Age Factors. Cochlear Nerve / physiopathology. Cochlear Nerve / radiation effects. Facial Nerve / physiopathology. Facial Nerve / radiation effects. Facial Nerve Injuries / epidemiology. Facial Nerve Injuries / prevention & control. Female. Hearing Loss, Sensorineural / epidemiology. Hearing Loss, Sensorineural / prevention & control. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / epidemiology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / prevention & control. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Outcome Assessment (Health Care). Radiation Dosage. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome. Trigeminal Nerve / physiopathology. Trigeminal Nerve / radiation effects. Trigeminal Nerve Diseases / epidemiology. Trigeminal Nerve Diseases / prevention & control. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19625908.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4040
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurgery
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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60. Arthurs BJ, Lamoreaux WT, Giddings NA, Fairbanks RK, Mackay AR, Demakas JJ, Cooke BS, Lee CM: Gamma Knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma: case report and review of the literature. World J Surg Oncol; 2009;7:100
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  • [Title] Gamma Knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma: case report and review of the literature.
  • Vestibular schwannomas, also called acoustic neuromas, are benign tumors of the vestibulocochlear nerve.
  • Unfortunately, definitive guidelines for treating vestibular schwannomas are lacking, because of insufficient evidence comparing the outcomes of therapeutic modalities.We present a contemporary case report, describing the finding of a vestibular schwannoma in a patient who presented with dizziness and a "clicking" sensation in the ear, but no hearing deficit.
  • Audible clicking is a symptom that, to our knowledge, has not been associated with vestibular schwannoma in the literature.
  • This case highlights an atypical presentation of vestibular schwannoma, associated with audible "clicks" and normal hearing.
  • We also provide a concise review of the available literature on modern vestibular schwannoma treatment, which may be useful in guiding treatment decisions.
  • [MeSH-major] Neurilemmoma / surgery. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery. Vestibular Nerve / surgery

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  • (PMID = 20021676.001).
  • [ISSN] 1477-7819
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2803477
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61. Tan M, Myrie OA, Lin FR, Niparko JK, Minor LB, Tamargo RJ, Francis HW: Trends in the management of vestibular schwannomas at Johns Hopkins 1997-2007. Laryngoscope; 2010 Jan;120(1):144-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Trends in the management of vestibular schwannomas at Johns Hopkins 1997-2007.
  • OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To assess trends in the management of unilateral vestibular schwannomas over an 11-year period and to identify disease- and provider-related influences.
  • METHODS: Subjects presented to the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and the Department of Neurosurgery for management of unilateral vestibular schwannoma from 1997 through 2007, with at least two visits within the first year of presentation.
  • The proportion of patients for whom initial management consisted of observation, surgical resection, or radiation therapy was determined, and the relative influence of study year, patient age, hearing status, and tumor size was analyzed.
  • There were no changes in mean age or hearing status at diagnosis, but mean tumor size declined significantly.
  • Tumors that were surgically removed were on average 11.6 mm larger than those that were observed.
  • The increasing frequency over time of observation relative to surgery was significant even after controlling for age, hearing status, and tumor size.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Among patients managed by our center, there has been a significant shift in management of vestibular schwannomas over the last decade, with increasing tendency towards observation.
  • [MeSH-major] Ear Neoplasms / therapy. Neuroma, Acoustic / therapy

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  • (PMID = 19877188.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-4995
  • [Journal-full-title] The Laryngoscope
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Laryngoscope
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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62. Horner KC, Cazals Y: Stress hormones in Ménière's disease and acoustic neuroma. Brain Res Bull; 2005 Jul 15;66(1):1-8
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  • [Title] Stress hormones in Ménière's disease and acoustic neuroma.
  • We investigated stress hormones in Ménière's patients and patients with acoustic neuroma.
  • We found a strong positive correlation between cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone in Ménière patients and patients with acoustic neuroma but no correlation in patients with facial spasm.
  • The data also revealed in female patients with Ménière's disease or with acoustic neuroma an unexpected significant positive correlation between cortisol and prolactin.
  • Both cortisol and prolactin increases are known to represent alternative strategies to cope with stress, and our data point to prolactin being possibly more dominant in Ménière's disease and cortisol in acoustic neuroma.
  • [MeSH-major] Hormones / blood. Meniere Disease / blood. Neuroma, Acoustic / blood. Stress, Physiological / blood

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  • (PMID = 15925138.001).
  • [ISSN] 0361-9230
  • [Journal-full-title] Brain research bulletin
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Brain Res. Bull.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hormones; 9002-60-2 / Adrenocorticotropic Hormone; 9002-62-4 / Prolactin; 9002-72-6 / Growth Hormone; WI4X0X7BPJ / Hydrocortisone
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63. Doherty JK, Friedman RA: Controversies in building a management algorithm for vestibular schwannomas. Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2006 Oct;14(5):305-13
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Controversies in building a management algorithm for vestibular schwannomas.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The present review examines the various mainstream treatment options, benefits and risks, and controversies involved in developing a management algorithm for treatment of vestibular schwannoma.
  • RECENT FINDINGS: Advances in microsurgery and radiosurgery have made tremendous contributions to management of vestibular schwannoma; however, considerable controversy still exists.
  • The auditory and facial nerve functional outcomes have improved with use of intraoperative monitoring for vestibular schwannoma removal and with lower radiosurgery doses; however, risks to the facial and auditory nerves still exist.
  • Observing vestibular schwannomas for growth with serial magnetic resonance imaging is an increasingly popular option for small vestibular schwannomas that allows patients to enjoy hearing and facial function.
  • SUMMARY: The risks and benefits of each treatment option must be weighed for each patient, and management decisions regarding vestibular schwannomas should be individualized for each patient depending on tumor anatomy, patient preferences, and symptoms.
  • [MeSH-major] Algorithms. Ear, Inner / surgery. Neuroma, Acoustic / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Cochlear Nerve / physiology. Facial Nerve / physiology. Hearing Loss / prevention & control. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Microsurgery. Neurofibromatosis 2 / surgery. Neurofibromatosis 2 / therapy. Radiosurgery. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2006 Oct;14(5):297-8 [16974140.001]
  • (PMID = 16974142.001).
  • [ISSN] 1068-9508
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in otolaryngology & head and neck surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 63
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64. Mackle T, Rawluk D, Walsh RM: Atypical clinical presentations of vestibular schwannomas. Otol Neurotol; 2007 Jun;28(4):526-8
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  • [Title] Atypical clinical presentations of vestibular schwannomas.
  • A significant number of patients with vestibular schwannomas present atypically, with none of the classical symptoms of unilateral sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus, and/or dysequilibrium.
  • STUDY DESIGN: The clinical data of all patients who presented to the vestibular schwannoma clinic at Beaumont Hospital over the past 12 years was prospectively recorded in a computerized database.
  • CONCLUSION: A significant subgroup, 3.7% in our study, did not present with the audiovestibular symptoms classically associated with vestibular schwannoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 17414179.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-7129
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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65. Sánchez-Legaza E, Meléndez Guerrero B, Sánchez Legaza B, Idelfonso Miranda J: [Acoustic neurinoma shown as a facial palsy]. An Otorrinolaringol Ibero Am; 2007;34(6):565-72
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  • [Title] [Acoustic neurinoma shown as a facial palsy].
  • [Transliterated title] Neurinoma del acústico manifestado como una parálisis facial.
  • Acoustic neurinoma is the most frequent benign tumour at the cerebellopontile angle.
  • We present the case of a vestibular schwannoma in a pregnant lady diagnosed by a peripheral facial palsy.
  • [MeSH-major] Ear Neoplasms / diagnosis. Facial Paralysis / diagnosis. Neuroma, Acoustic / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 18293776.001).
  • [ISSN] 0303-8874
  • [Journal-full-title] Anales otorrinolaringológicos ibero-americanos
  • [ISO-abbreviation] An Otorrinolaringol Ibero Am
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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66. Cauley KA, Ratkovits B, Braff SP, Linnell G: Communicating hydrocephalus after gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma: an MR imaging study. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol; 2009 May;30(5):992-4
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  • [Title] Communicating hydrocephalus after gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma: an MR imaging study.
  • Vestibular schwannomas are common, and gamma knife radiosurgery is a treatment option of symptomatic tumors.
  • Hydrocephalus may be a complication of gamma knife treatment of vestibular schwannoma, though the cause-and-effect relationship can be debated because tumors can cause hydrocephalus without treatment.
  • We present an MR imaging study of an unusual case of communicating hydrocephalus after gamma knife radiosurgery of a vestibular schwannoma in which the timeline of events strongly suggests that gamma knife played a contributory role in the development of hydrocephalus.
  • [MeSH-major] Hydrocephalus / etiology. Hydrocephalus / pathology. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery / adverse effects


67. Yomo S, Arkha Y, Delsanti C, Roche PH, Thomassin JM, Régis J: Repeat gamma knife surgery for regrowth of vestibular schwannomas. Neurosurgery; 2009 Jan;64(1):48-54; discussion 54-5
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  • [Title] Repeat gamma knife surgery for regrowth of vestibular schwannomas.
  • OBJECTIVE: Gamma knife surgery (GKS) has become established as a minimally invasive treatment modality for patients with vestibular schwannomas.
  • Treatment failure and/or tumor regrowth, however, is occasionally encountered, and microsurgical resection is usually warranted in such cases.
  • The goal of this study was to investigate whether repeat GKS is an effective treatment for recurrent vestibular schwannomas and to assess the conservation of residual neurological function.
  • METHODS: Between July 1992 and December 2007, 1951 patients harboring a unilateral vestibular schwannoma were treated with GKS.
  • Of these, 48 patients (2.5%) had to undergo a subsequent intervention because of progression or regrowth of the tumor.
  • Repeat GKS was performed in a total of 15 patients, 8 of whom had more than 2 years of follow-up and were eligible to be enrolled in the present study.
  • The median tumor volume was 0.51 and 1.28 mL at the initial and second GKS treatments, respectively.
  • Six patients demonstrated a significant reduction in tumor volume.
  • In 1 patient, the final tumor volume was less than the initial volume.
  • The other 2 patients showed stabilization of tumor growth.
  • Neither aggravation of facial nerve dysfunction nor other neurological deficits secondary to GKS were observed.
  • CONCLUSION: This is the first report to address repeat GKS for vestibular schwannomas.
  • After long-term follow-up, repeat GKS with a low marginal dose seems to be a safe and effective treatment in selected patients harboring regrowth of small vestibular schwannomas that have previously been treated with GKS.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery

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  • (PMID = 19050660.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4040
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurgery
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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68. Solares CA, Panizza B: Vestibular schwannoma: an understanding of growth should influence management decisions. Otol Neurotol; 2008 Sep;29(6):829-34
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  • [Title] Vestibular schwannoma: an understanding of growth should influence management decisions.
  • BACKGROUND: Treatments for vestibular schwannomas include surgical removal and radiotherapy.
  • Observation is a reasonable alternative, given the slow growth of these tumors.
  • METHODS: Patients with unilateral vestibular schwannomas who presented in the last 10 years were reviewed.
  • The following information was recorded from the charts: age, sex, tumor size at presentation and subsequent follow-up sessions, treatment in the event of growth, and time interval between presentation and last imaging available.
  • Interestingly, 11 patients (10%) demonstrated tumor regression.
  • Patients with intracanalicular tumors had a 5-year no-growth rate of 89.8% compared with 73.9% and 45.2% for Grade I and Grade II or larger tumors, respectively.
  • The difference between intracanalicular and Grade II or larger tumors was statistically significant (p = 0.0196).
  • CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that treatment can be delayed in a large proportion of vestibular schwannoma patients and that this is particularly true in patients with small tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Ear Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Ear Neoplasms / surgery. Neuroma, Acoustic / radiotherapy. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery

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  • (PMID = 18636034.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-4505
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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69. Møller MN, Werther K, Nalla A, Stangerup SE, Thomsen J, Bøg-Hansen TC, Nielsen HJ, Cayé-Thomasen P: Angiogenesis in vestibular schwannomas: expression of extracellular matrix factors MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1. Laryngoscope; 2010 Apr;120(4):657-62
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  • [Title] Angiogenesis in vestibular schwannomas: expression of extracellular matrix factors MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1.
  • OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are potent mediators of tumor angiogenesis.
  • It has been demonstrated that vestibular schwannoma VEGF expression correlates with tumor growth pattern, whereas knowledge on the expression of MMPs is lacking.
  • This study targets the angiogenic process by investigation of tumor expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1.
  • A possible correlation with gender, patient age, symptom duration, tumor size, and the absolute and relative growth rate is explored.
  • STUDY DESIGN: Prospective vestibular schwannoma tissue sampling for ELISA and immunohistochemical determination of MMP-2, MMP-9 and TIMP-1.
  • METHODS: Thirty-four patients with a sporadic, noncystic, vestibular schwannoma were selected prospectively.
  • Repeated, preoperative magnetic resonance imaging determined the tumor growth pattern.
  • Following translabyrinthine resection, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used for determination of the MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 concentration in tumor sample homogenates.
  • Immunohistochemical labeling was performed in 12 randomly selected tumors.
  • RESULTS: : All tumor homogenates expressed measurable MMP-9, MMP-2, and TIMP-1.
  • Immunolabeling localized MMP-9 expression to the tumor cells, whereas MMP-2 and TIMP-1 was found interstitially.
  • A significant correlation existed between the concentration MMP-9 and absolute tumor growth rate, whereas a weak correlation occurred for the relative growth rate.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Vestibular schwannomas express MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 and the tumor concentration of MMP-9 correlates with absolute tumor growth rate, but not with age, gender, symptom duration, or preoperative tumor size.
  • We conclude that MMP-9 appears to be involved in the growth of vestibular schwannomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 / biosynthesis. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 / biosynthesis. Neovascularization, Pathologic / enzymology. Neuroma, Acoustic / blood supply. RNA, Neoplasm / genetics. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 20205165.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-4995
  • [Journal-full-title] The Laryngoscope
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Laryngoscope
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Neoplasm; 0 / Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1; EC 3.4.24.24 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 2; EC 3.4.24.35 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 9
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70. Propp JM, McCarthy BJ, Davis FG, Preston-Martin S: Descriptive epidemiology of vestibular schwannomas. Neuro Oncol; 2006 Jan;8(1):1-11
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  • [Title] Descriptive epidemiology of vestibular schwannomas.
  • Vestibular schwannomas, commonly termed acoustic neuromas, arise from the vestibular branch of the eighth cranial nerve (acoustic nerve) and are benign, slow-growing brain tumors that negatively impact patient quality of life.
  • They are thought to account for the majority of intracranial nerve sheath tumors.
  • To describe incidence rate patterns and trends of primary nerve sheath tumors of the brain/CNS and the subset of vestibular schwannomas in two population-based incidence registries, data were obtained from 11 Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States (CBTRUS) collaborating state registries and the Los Angeles County Cancer Surveillance Program (LACCSP) (1975-1998).
  • Multiplicative Poisson regression models were used to compare trends in primary nerve sheath tumors of the brain/CNS overall and in subgroups, including vestibular schwannomas, controlling for age, gender, race, microscopic confirmation, and region.
  • The overall incidence of primary nerve sheath tumors of the brain/CNS was 1.1 per 100,000 person-years (CBTRUS, 1995-1999 and LACCSP, 1995-1998).
  • The incidence of vestibular schwannomas was similar for both data sets: 0.6 per 100,000 person-years (CBTRUS, 1995-1999) and 0.8 per 100,000 person-years (LACCSP, 1995-1998).
  • Moreover, the incidence of primary nerve sheath tumors of the brain/CNS overall (CBTRUS, 1985-1999 and LACCSP, 1975-1998) and of vestibular schwannomas (CBTRUS, 1992-1999 and LACCSP, 1992-1998) increased over time.
  • However, the incidence of benign schwannomas in sites other than the acoustic nerve either decreased (CBTRUS, 1992-1999) or experienced no significant change (LACCSP, 1992-1998).
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / epidemiology. Registries

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  • (PMID = 16443943.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-8517
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuro-oncology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1871924
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71. Régis J, Roche PH, Delsanti C, Thomassin JM, Ouaknine M, Gabert K, Pellet W: Modern management of vestibular schwannomas. Prog Neurol Surg; 2007;20:129-41
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  • [Title] Modern management of vestibular schwannomas.
  • Within the last 3 decades, microsurgery and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) have become well-established management options for vestibular schwannomas (VSs).
  • A long-term tumor control rate of 97%, transient facial palsy lower than 1%, and a probability of functional hearing preservation between 50 and 95% was achieved in this large series of patients treated with state-of-the-art SRS.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Postoperative Complications / epidemiology. Radiosurgery

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  • (PMID = 17317981.001).
  • [ISSN] 0079-6492
  • [Journal-full-title] Progress in neurological surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prog Neurol Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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72. Koerbel A, Gharabaghi A, Safavi-Abbasi S, Tatagiba M, Samii M: Evolution of vestibular schwannoma surgery: the long journey to current success. Neurosurg Focus; 2005 Apr 15;18(4):e10
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  • [Title] Evolution of vestibular schwannoma surgery: the long journey to current success.
  • The extraordinary improvement of patient outcome after surgical treatment for vestibular schwannomas is relatively recent and has occurred mainly over the last 30 years.
  • Whereas in the past the primary goal of vestibular schwannoma management was to preserve the patient's life, the objective in vestibular schwannoma treatment today is to preserve neurological function.
  • Long-term follow-up examinations show negligible recurrence rates, indicating that the aim of preservation of nerve function does not limit the completeness of tumor removal with modern neurosurgical techniques.
  • Despite these advances in preserving the anatomical integrity of, for example, the cochlear nerve, losses of function and even deafness may occur postoperatively in some cases.
  • In this article, the authors report in detail the developments achieved in vestibular schwannoma surgery and the great clinicians to whom these results can be credited.
  • [MeSH-major] Microsurgery / history. Neuroma, Acoustic / history. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Neurosurgery / history. Neurosurgical Procedures / history. Vestibulocochlear Nerve / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Deafness / etiology. Deafness / prevention & control. Facial Nerve Injuries / etiology. Facial Nerve Injuries / prevention & control. History, 18th Century. History, 19th Century. History, 20th Century. Humans. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / prevention & control. Postoperative Complications / etiology. Postoperative Complications / pathology. Postoperative Complications / prevention & control. Vestibulocochlear Nerve Injuries

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  • (PMID = 15844862.001).
  • [ISSN] 1092-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgical focus
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurg Focus
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Historical Article; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 70
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73. Mohammed TA, Ahuja MS, Ju SS, Thomas J: Normal pressure hydrocephalus after gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma. J Postgrad Med; 2010 Jul-Sep;56(3):213-5
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  • [Title] Normal pressure hydrocephalus after gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma.
  • Vestibular schwannomas are not uncommon, and gamma knife radiosurgery is one of the treatment options for symptomatic tumors.
  • Hydrocephalus is a complication of gamma knife treatment of vestibular schwannoma, though the mechanism of the development of hydrocephalus remains controversial.
  • We present an unusual case of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) after gamma knife radiosurgery of a vestibular schwannoma in which the timeline of events strongly suggests that gamma knife played a contributory role in the development of the hydrocephalus.
  • [MeSH-major] Hydrocephalus, Normal Pressure / etiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery / adverse effects


74. Khrais T, Romano G, Sanna M: Nerve origin of vestibular schwannoma: a prospective study. J Laryngol Otol; 2008 Feb;122(2):128-31
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Nerve origin of vestibular schwannoma: a prospective study.
  • OBJECTIVE: The origin of vestibular schwannoma has always been a matter of debate.
  • The aim of our study was to identify the nerve origin of this tumour.
  • METHODS: A total of 200 cases of vestibular schwannoma were included in the study.
  • The origin of the tumour was limited to one nerve at the fundus in 152 cases (76 per cent).
  • Out of these cases, the tumour originated from the inferior vestibular nerve in 139 cases (91.4 per cent), from the superior vestibular nerve in nine cases (6 per cent), from the cochlear nerve in two cases (1.3 per cent) and from the facial nerve in two cases (1.3 per cent).
  • CONCLUSION: The vast majority of vestibular schwannomas originate from the inferior vestibular nerve; the incidence of involvement of this nerve increases as the tumour size increases.
  • An origin of vestibular schwannoma from the inferior vestibular nerve can be considered as one of the explanatory factors for the poor functional outcome of the extended middle cranial fossa approach, and probably accounts also for the better hearing preservation rate reported in some series for the retrosigmoid approach.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology. Otologic Surgical Procedures / methods. Vestibular Nerve / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Prospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 18039415.001).
  • [ISSN] 1748-5460
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of laryngology and otology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Laryngol Otol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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75. Sughrue ME, Yang I, Rutkowski MJ, Aranda D, Parsa AT: Preservation of facial nerve function after resection of vestibular schwannoma. Br J Neurosurg; 2010 Dec;24(6):666-71
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  • [Title] Preservation of facial nerve function after resection of vestibular schwannoma.
  • OBJECTIVE: Most data regarding facial nerve function in patients undergoing microsurgical resection of vestibular schwannomas predominantly include series performed at a single institution.
  • In an effort to minimise individual surgeon or institutional bias, we performed an analysis of the published literature on facial nerve outcomes following microsurgical resection of vestibular schwannomas.
  • The objective of this study was to provide a comprehensive assessment of reported outcomes for facial nerve preservation after VS surgery.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: We identified a total of 296 studies involving over 25,000 patients that included outcome data for facial nerve function of vestibular schwannoma patients treated surgically.
  • Data regarding surgical approach, tumour size, patient age, and use of intra-operative monitoring were extracted and correlated with facial nerve function after surgery.
  • Patients with preoperative facial nerve dysfunction (House-Brackmann score 3 or higher) were excluded and 'facial nerve preservation' was defined as grade I or II House-Brackmann function at last follow-up visit.
  • Patients treated with the middle cranial fossa approach had a trend towards higher overall facial nerve preservation rate (85%), compared to the translabyrinthine approach (81%, p = 0.07) , and did statistically better than the retrosigmoid approach (78%, p < 0.0001).
  • Patients with an average tumour size <20 mm had significantly improved facial nerve preservation rates, compared to larger tumours (90% vs. 67%, p < 0.0001).
  • Patients under 65 years of age had a lower facial nerve preservation rate (71% vs. 84%, p < 0.001).
  • Finally, the use of intra-operative monitoring improved the facial nerve preservation rate (76% vs. 71%, p < 0.001).
  • CONCLUSION: Factors that appear to be associated with facial nerve preservation after microsurgical resection of a vestibular schwannoma include tumour size <20 mm, use of the middle fossa approach and use of neuromonitoring during surgery.
  • These data provide a summary assessment of the published literature regarding facial nerve preservation after microsurgical resection of vestibular schwannoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Facial Nerve / physiopathology. Facial Nerve Injuries / prevention & control. Neuroma, Acoustic / physiopathology. Radiation Injuries / prevention & control. Radiosurgery / methods

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  • (PMID = 21070151.001).
  • [ISSN] 1360-046X
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br J Neurosurg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
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76. Conley GS, Hirsch BE: Stereotactic radiation treatment of vestibular schwannoma: indications, limitations, and outcomes. Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2010 Oct;18(5):351-6
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  • [Title] Stereotactic radiation treatment of vestibular schwannoma: indications, limitations, and outcomes.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Stereotactic radiation treatment is an increasingly performed procedure for patients with vestibular schwannoma and other benign skull base tumors.
  • The specific role of radiation in current management strategies for vestibular schwannoma continues to evolve as long-term outcome data are analyzed and standardized studies are performed.
  • Observation of small vestibular schwannomas is recommended over early radiation or microsurgical intervention.
  • Radiation may be used as adjunctive therapy for large tumors and in certain postradiation treatment failures.
  • Current evidence supports its use for small to medium sized primary and recurrent vestibular schwannomas with optimal dosing below 13 Gy.
  • It is also recommended for adjunctive therapy, recurrent tumors, in poor surgical candidates, and for those who do not desire observation or surgery.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / radiotherapy. Radiosurgery. Skull Base Neoplasms / radiotherapy

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  • (PMID = 20613529.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-6998
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in otolaryngology & head and neck surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
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77. Archibald DJ, Neff BA, Voss SG, Splinter PL, Driscoll CL, Link MJ, Dong H, Kwon ED: B7-H1 expression in vestibular schwannomas. Otol Neurotol; 2010 Aug;31(6):991-7
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  • [Title] B7-H1 expression in vestibular schwannomas.
  • HYPOTHESIS: B7-H1 is expressed in vestibular schwannomas.
  • BACKGROUND: Little is known about how benign human vestibular schwannomas interact with antibody-mediated or cell-mediated immunity.
  • We report on the aberrant expression of a novel T-cell coregulatory molecule, B7 homolog 1 (B7-H1), in vestibular schwannomas and discuss the implications of B7-H1 expression and tumor aggressiveness and a potential regulator of B7-H1 expression.
  • METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining for B7-H1, CD8+, CD3+, and CD4+ lymphocytes were performed on 48 fresh-frozen vestibular schwannoma tissue specimens.
  • A clinical review of patient presenting symptoms and tumor characteristics was performed.
  • Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to determine if there was differential expression of B7-H1 messenger RNA and microRNA-513, a known regulator of B7-H1, in several strongly positive and negative B7-H1 vestibular schwannomas.
  • RESULTS: Nine (19%) of 48 tumors were negative, 23 (48%) tumors were 1+ mildly positive (<20% section area), and 16 (33%) stained 2+ strongly positive (>or=20% section area) for B7-H1.
  • The average number of CD8 cells per high-power field was 2.1 for positive-staining tumors and 1.0 for negative tumors (p = 0.16).
  • Failure of tumor control with stereotactic radiation (p = 0.029) was significantly greater in the strongly positive B7-H1 tumors.
  • Real-time polymerase chain reaction did not show significant differential expression of microRNA-513 (p = 0.62) or B7-H1 messenger RNA (p = 0.35) between the tumors showing strong and negative immunohistochemical staining for B7-H1 protein.
  • CONCLUSION: Vestibular schwannoma tumors express B7-H1, which has been associated with immune tolerance and adverse disease characteristics in several malignancies.
  • Growing tumors that were surgically removed after failed stereotactic radiation therapy were significantly more likely to strongly express B7-H1 protein, which lends some credibility to the hypothesis that immuno-evasion may play some role in their continued growth.
  • Although clinical trends were seen, greater statistical power is required to evaluate whether B7-H1 expression correlates with more aggressive tumor growth or poorer hearing class.
  • B7-H1 seems to be expressed in equal amounts at the RNA level in all vestibular schwannoma tumors that suggests that differential protein expression is occurring at the posttranscriptional level.
  • However, microRNA-513 does not regulate B7-H1 protein expression in these tumors.

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  • (PMID = 20601920.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-4505
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA134345-03; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA134345; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA134345-03
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / Antigens, CD274; 0 / CD274 protein, human; 0 / RNA, Messenger
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS242934; NLM/ PMC4810681
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78. Bian LG, Tirakotai W, Sun QF, Zhao WG, Shen JK, Luo QZ: Molecular genetics alterations and tumor behavior of sporadic vestibular schwannoma from the People's Republic of China. J Neurooncol; 2005 Jul;73(3):253-60
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  • [Title] Molecular genetics alterations and tumor behavior of sporadic vestibular schwannoma from the People's Republic of China.
  • OBJECTIVES: To analyze the molecular genetic alteration of sporadic vestibular schwannomas from the People's Republic of China and to correlate these alterations with the tumor behaviors.
  • The proliferative index (LI) of vestibular schwannoma was evaluated by proliferative cell nuclear antigen investigation.
  • RESULTS: Sixteen vestibular schwannomas (44.4%) showed allele loss.
  • We found 22 mutations in 36 schwannomas.
  • The LI and the growth rate of schwannomas with LOH or mutation were significantly higher than those without LOH or mutation.
  • All of these vestibular schwannomas showed no immunoreaction to anti-NF2(A-19) IgG by immunohistochemistry.
  • By immunoblotting technique, reduced expression of S/M was found in 31 cases (86%).
  • The growth index of schwannomas with severely reduced expression of S/M was significantly higher than those with moderately reduced or normal expression.
  • CONCLUSION: The molecular genetic changes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas from Chinese patients were similar to the previous reports.
  • We demonstrate the relationship between tumor behaviors and genetic alteration (including LOH and mutation of NF2 gene).
  • We propose that inactivation of S/M, may be an important step in tumorigenesis of sporadic vestibular schwannoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Chromosomes, Human, Pair 22 / genetics. Genes, Neurofibromatosis 2. Neuroma, Acoustic / genetics. Neuroma, Acoustic / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 15980976.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-594X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neurofibromin 2
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79. Shih C, Tseng FY, Yeh TH, Hsu CJ, Chen YS: Ipsilateral and contralateral acoustic brainstem response abnormalities in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2009 Dec;141(6):695-700
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  • [Title] Ipsilateral and contralateral acoustic brainstem response abnormalities in patients with vestibular schwannoma.
  • OBJECTIVE: To analyze auditory brainstem response (ABR) data in patients with vestibular schwannomas (VS) in an effort to identify correlations between abnormal ABR parameters and tumor size.
  • Average VS tumor size was 2.48 +/- 1.31 cm.
  • Tumor size was positively correlated with pure-tone average (P = 0.0106) and with the total number of bilateral abnormal ABR parameters (P = 0.004).
  • CONCLUSIONS: We identified a correlation between ABR parameters and VS tumor size.
  • An ipsilateral ILD-I-V greater than 0.2 ms was sensitive for detecting vs. Abnormal contralateral wave V and interpeak III-V latency indicated a tumor size potentially larger than 2 cm.
  • [MeSH-major] Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem / physiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / physiopathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Audiometry, Pure-Tone. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Humans. Linear Models. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Vestibular Function Tests

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  • (PMID = 19932840.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-6817
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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80. Kramer F, Stöver T, Warnecke A, Diensthuber M, Lenarz T, Wissel K: BDNF mRNA expression is significantly upregulated in vestibular schwannomas and correlates with proliferative activity. J Neurooncol; 2010 May;98(1):31-9
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  • [Title] BDNF mRNA expression is significantly upregulated in vestibular schwannomas and correlates with proliferative activity.
  • The expression of neurotrophic factors, such as artemin, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), neurturin, transforming growth factors (TGF)-beta1/beta2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), is enhanced in vestibular schwannomas compared to peripheral nerves.
  • Vestibular schwannoma arising from Schwann cells of the vestibular nerve are mostly benign and slow-growing.
  • Most of the pathogenic mechanisms regulating the vestibular schwannoma growth process are unknown.
  • However, molecular mechanisms interfering with regulation of the vestibular schwannoma growth also modulated by mitogenic factors have to be identified.
  • Neurotrophic factors are involved in regulation of developmental processes in neuronal tissues and regeneration after peripheral nerve trauma and also reveal mitogenic effects on glial cell populations.
  • Gene expression profiles of artemin, BDNF, GDNF, TGF-beta1/beta2 and Ret were determined in the vestibular schwannoma in comparison to the peripheral nerve tissues by using semiquantitative RT-PCR.
  • A significant higher BDNF expression was observed in the vestibular schwannoma, whereas gene expression of artemin and GDNF was upregulated in peripheral nerves.
  • The correlation between LI and BDNF, TGF-beta1 and Ret was found to be significant in the vestibular schwannoma.
  • Our results demonstrate a coherence between BDNF expression and proliferative activity in the vestibular schwannoma.
  • Based on these results, we propose a pivotal role for BDNF in modulating the vestibular schwannoma growth.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor / genetics. Cell Proliferation. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic / physiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / genetics. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. Up-Regulation / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor / genetics. Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor / metabolism. Humans. Ki-67 Antigen / metabolism. Male. Middle Aged. Nerve Tissue Proteins / genetics. Nerve Tissue Proteins / metabolism. Peripheral Nerves / metabolism. Statistics as Topic / methods. Statistics, Nonparametric. Transforming Growth Factor beta1 / genetics. Transforming Growth Factor beta1 / metabolism. Transforming Growth Factor beta2 / genetics. Transforming Growth Factor beta2 / metabolism. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19937367.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-7373
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / ARTN protein, human; 0 / Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor; 0 / Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor; 0 / Ki-67 Antigen; 0 / Nerve Tissue Proteins; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Transforming Growth Factor beta1; 0 / Transforming Growth Factor beta2
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81. Mandl ES, Vandertop WP, Meijer OW, Peerdeman SM: Imaging-documented repeated intratumoral hemorrhage in vestibular schwannoma: a case report. Acta Neurochir (Wien); 2009 Oct;151(10):1325-7
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  • [Title] Imaging-documented repeated intratumoral hemorrhage in vestibular schwannoma: a case report.
  • Intratumoral hemorrhage in vestibular schwannomas is rare.
  • Intratumoral hemorrhage is probably caused by vascular fragility associated with tumor characteristics and growth.
  • The present report details the case of acute neurological deterioration in a patient with repeated intratumoral hemorrhage inside a vestibular schwannoma with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging confirmation.
  • To our knowledge, repeated hemorrhage in vestibular schwannoma with radiological confirmation has not been reported before.
  • [MeSH-major] Cerebellopontine Angle / pathology. Intracranial Hemorrhages / diagnosis. Intracranial Hemorrhages / etiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / complications. Neuroma, Acoustic / diagnosis. Vestibular Nerve / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Disease Progression. Facial Nerve Injuries / etiology. Female. Humans. Hydrocephalus / etiology. Hydrocephalus / pathology. Hydrocephalus / surgery. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Middle Aged. Neurosurgical Procedures. Postoperative Complications. Radiotherapy. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome. Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt

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  • [Cites] Neurosurgery. 2003 Aug;53(2):282-87; discussion 287-8 [12925242.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 1998 Mar;100(1):68-74 [9637211.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Radiol. 1994 Jan;49(1):61-3 [8299336.001]
  • [Cites] Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo). 1989 Apr;29(4):328-32 [2478916.001]
  • (PMID = 19255715.001).
  • [ISSN] 0942-0940
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta neurochirurgica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Neurochir (Wien)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Austria
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2760714
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82. del Río L, Lassaletta L, Alfonso C, Sarriá MJ, Gavilán J: [Clinical tumoral size dissociation in acoustic neuroma: reality or measure distortion?]. Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp; 2006 Oct;57(8):345-9
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  • [Title] [Clinical tumoral size dissociation in acoustic neuroma: reality or measure distortion?].
  • [Transliterated title] Disociación clínica-tamaño tumoral en el neurinoma del acúistico: realidad o problema de medida?
  • INTRODUCTION: In this study we have analyzed (i) the audiometric frequencies more often affected in acoustic neuroma (AN), (ii) the percentage of patients presenting normal hearing and those with sudden hearing loss, (iii) if there is a correlation between tumor size and hearing loss, and (iv) the relationship between clinical and radiological parameters and audiological data.
  • RESULTS: The highest threshold in the tumor's ear was found at 8000 Hz, and the highest interaural difference at 4000 Hz.
  • No significant association was found between tumor size and hearing loss, preoperative facial palsy or Vth cranial nerve deficit.
  • There was a significant association between the degree of hearing loss and Vth cranial nerve deficit, and between hearing loss and preoperative facial palsy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The association between hearing loss and Vth cranial nerve deficit, and between hearing loss and preoperative facial palsy is independent the size of the tumour.
  • [MeSH-major] Hearing Loss / etiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / complications. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17117690.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6519
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta otorrinolaringológica española
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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83. Rutten I, Baumert BG, Seidel L, Kotolenko S, Collignon J, Kaschten B, Albert A, Martin D, Deneufbourg JM, Demanez JP, Stevenaert A: Long-term follow-up reveals low toxicity of radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma. Radiother Oncol; 2007 Jan;82(1):83-9
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  • [Title] Long-term follow-up reveals low toxicity of radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma.
  • AIM: The long-term effects of radiosurgery of vestibular schwannomas were investigated in a group of consecutively treated patients.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between 1995 and 2001, 26 patients (median age: 67, range: 30-82) with a vestibular schwannoma were treated by Linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS).
  • Five-year-probability of preservation of hearing and facial nerve function was 96% and 100%, respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: With the doses used, our study demonstrates that SRS provides an equivalent tumour control rate when compared to surgery, as well as on a long-term basis, an excellent preservation of the facial and the acoustic nerves.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 17182142.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-8140
  • [Journal-full-title] Radiotherapy and oncology : journal of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiother Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
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84. Mick P, Westerberg BD, Ngo R, Akagami R: Growing vestibular schwannomas: what happens next? Otol Neurotol; 2009 Jan;30(1):101-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Growing vestibular schwannomas: what happens next?
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine the subsequent growth patterns in vestibular schwannomas shown to be growing on serial imaging.
  • PATIENTS: Patients with tumors that demonstrated growth of greater than 1 mm/yr between 2 consecutive scans (magnetic resonance or computed tomography) and had at least 1 follow-up scan were included.
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Maximum dimension along the axis of the internal auditory canal was measured for intracanalicular tumors, whereas for extracanalicular tumors, maximal dimension along any orientation was used.
  • Of the growing tumors, 63.9% continued to grow, 30.6% stayed the same size, and 5.6% regressed in size.
  • CONCLUSION: Most vestibular schwannomas identified to be growing are likely to continue to grow on subsequent serial imaging.
  • These results are useful in clinical decision making and counseling patients with growing vestibular schwannomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Division. Ear Canal / pathology. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Patient Selection. Remission, Spontaneous. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 19108071.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-4505
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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85. Roche PH, Bouvier C, Chinot O, Figarella-Branger D: Genesis and biology of vestibular schwannomas. Prog Neurol Surg; 2008;21:24-31
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  • [Title] Genesis and biology of vestibular schwannomas.
  • This review chapter is a synthesis of the recent literature about pathogenesis of schwannomas with emphasis on vestibular schwannomas (VSs).
  • The cornerstone of cellular transformation and proliferation of Schwann cells toward schwannomas has been attributed to the nonexpression of normal schwannomin/merlin (S/M) by these cells.
  • The understanding of this mechanism has been gained from molecular genetic studies of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) patients, in whom mutations of a tumor suppressor gene (NF2 gene) was clearly identified.
  • Lack of normal S/M protein in the schwannoma cell is due to gene mutation in 50% of sporadic VSs.
  • The exact interactions of S/M with extracellular matrix, membranous glycoprotein and cytoskeleton are not fully understood.
  • However, it is recognized that these interactions activate several pathways that might regulate cell-cycle process, apoptosis and intercellular interaction.
  • Apart from the involvement of the S/M pathway, the authors review the potential role of other genetic abnormalities and growing factors that are supposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of vs. Understanding the pathways of action and regulation of S/M may provide the basics for identifying potential therapeutic targets, which is of paramount importance for a better management of NF2 patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Genes, Neurofibromatosis 2 / physiology. Neurofibromin 2 / physiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / genetics. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology

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  • (PMID = 18810196.001).
  • [ISSN] 0079-6492
  • [Journal-full-title] Progress in neurological surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prog Neurol Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neurofibromin 2
  • [Number-of-references] 43
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86. Stangerup SE, Tos M, Thomsen J, Caye-Thomasen P: True incidence of vestibular schwannoma? Neurosurgery; 2010 Nov;67(5):1335-40; discussion 1340
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] True incidence of vestibular schwannoma?
  • BACKGROUND: The incidence of diagnosed sporadic unilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS) has increased, due primarily to more widespread access to magnetic resonance imaging.
  • OBJECTIVE: To present updated epidemiological data on VS incidence, as well as patient age, hearing acuity, tumor size, and localization at diagnosis for the last 4 decades in an unselected population, with emphasis on developments in recent years.
  • Incidence during the period, patient sex and age, data on hearing (pure tone average and speech discrimination), and tumor size at diagnosis were retrieved from the database.
  • Mean tumor size at diagnosis decreased from 30 mm in 1979 to 10 mm in 2008, whereas hearing acuity at diagnosis has improved over the years.
  • CONCLUSION: After a steady increase over the last 4 decades, the incidence of vestibular schwannomas appears to have peaked and decreased in recent years, stabilizing at about 19 tumors per million per year.
  • Whereas the sex ratio and age at diagnosis have remained grossly unchanged over the years, hearing has improved, and tumor size has decreased considerably.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 20871439.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4040
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurgery
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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87. Ambett R, Rupa V, Rajshekhar V: Analysis of causes for late presentation of Indian patients with vestibular schwannoma. J Laryngol Otol; 2009 May;123(5):502-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Analysis of causes for late presentation of Indian patients with vestibular schwannoma.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine the causes of delay in diagnosis and treatment of Indian patients with vestibular schwannomas.
  • METHODS: In a prospective study from 2003 to 2005, 50 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of vestibular schwannoma were interviewed to determine the causes for (1) the delay between the patient noting the initial symptom and the definitive diagnosis, and (2) the reasons for delayed diagnosis.
  • After the patient had noted symptoms, the diagnosis of vestibular schwannoma was delayed due to doctor-related causes in 80 per cent of cases, and due to patient-related causes in 20 per cent.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Delay in the diagnosis of vestibular schwannoma in Indian patients is due to both doctor- and patient-related factors.
  • [MeSH-major] Hearing Loss, Sensorineural / etiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Disease Progression. Female. Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice. Humans. India. Male. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies. Referral and Consultation / standards. Time Factors. Tinnitus / etiology. Vertigo / etiology. Vestibular Function Tests. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 18808730.001).
  • [ISSN] 1748-5460
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of laryngology and otology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Laryngol Otol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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88. Browne S, Distel E, Morton RP, Petrie KJ: Patients' quality of life, reported difficulties, and benefits following surgery for acoustic neuroma. J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2008 Jun;37(3):417-22
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Patients' quality of life, reported difficulties, and benefits following surgery for acoustic neuroma.
  • OBJECTIVES: We compared the quality of life of patients with acoustic neuroma (AN) with general population controls and other chronic illness patients.
  • METHODS: A research questionnaire was sent to all 119 members of the Acoustic Neuroma Association of New Zealand.
  • However, most AN patients do report finding some benefit from their illness experience.
  • [MeSH-major] Hearing / physiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / psychology. Otologic Surgical Procedures / methods. Quality of Life

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  • (PMID = 19128648.001).
  • [ISSN] 1916-0216
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of otolaryngology - head & neck surgery = Le Journal d'oto-rhino-laryngologie et de chirurgie cervico-faciale
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
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89. Jain VK, Mehrotra N, Sahu RN, Behari S, Banerji D, Chhabra DK: Surgery of vestibular schwannomas: an institutional experience. Neurol India; 2005 Mar;53(1):41-5; discussion 45
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  • [Title] Surgery of vestibular schwannomas: an institutional experience.
  • AIMS: To report management results of vestibular schwannomas (VS) treated surgically in our institute, with particular reference to completeness of tumor excision, facial nerve and hearing preservation and complications of surgery.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: The facial nerve function and hearing assessment was done according to House-Brackmann [HB] grading and pure tone audiometry (PTA) respectively.
  • RESULTS: Most patients had large tumors and had no useful hearing (90%), had disabling cerebellar ataxia (88%) and presented with features of raised intra-cranial pressure (45%).
  • Large sized tumors were in 41.3% and giant sized tumors were in 56% cases.
  • Complete tumor excision was carried out in 96.5% and anatomical preservation of facial nerve was achieved in 79.2% cases.
  • Cerebrospinal fluid leak with or without meningitis and transient lower cranial nerve paresis were common complications.
  • CONCLUSIONS: With experience, complete tumor excision with good facial nerve preservation can be achieved in large tumors.
  • Hearing preservation is difficult in bigger tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Facial Nerve / physiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Neurosurgical Procedures / methods. Postoperative Complications

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  • (PMID = 15805654.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-3886
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurology India
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurol India
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
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90. Battista RA: Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma. Otolaryngol Clin North Am; 2009 Aug;42(4):635-54
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma.
  • Since Leksell first treated a patient who had a vestibular schwannoma in 1967, there has been a year-to-year increase in the number of patients treated with the gamma knife for vestibular schwannoma.
  • This article outlines the technique of GKRS and discusses the current results of its use to treat vestibular schwannomas.
  • Other topics discussed include tumor control, treatment of recurrent/residual and cystic vestibular schwannomas, and the results of treatment of neurofibromatosis type 2.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiation Injuries / prevention & control. Radiosurgery / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy, Needle. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology. Neoplasm Staging. Patient Selection. Postoperative Complications / mortality. Postoperative Complications / physiopathology. Radiotherapy Dosage. Radiotherapy Planning, Computer-Assisted. Risk Assessment. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19751869.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-8259
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngologic clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 62
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91. Koh ES, Millar BA, Ménard C, Michaels H, Heydarian M, Ladak S, McKinnon S, Rutka JA, Guha A, Pond GR, Laperriere NJ: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for acoustic neuroma: single-institution experience at The Princess Margaret Hospital. Cancer; 2007 Mar 15;109(6):1203-10
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  • [Title] Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for acoustic neuroma: single-institution experience at The Princess Margaret Hospital.
  • BACKGROUND: The clinical outcome and toxicity of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) was assessed for acoustic neuroma in 60 patients treated in a single institution.
  • METHODS: Between October 1996 and February 2005, 60 patients received FSRT for acoustic neuroma (AN).
  • The median irradiated tumor volume was 4.9 cm(3) (range, 0.3-49.0 cm(3)).
  • Five of 6 patients with initial cranial nerve V (CNV) numbness remained stable post-FSRT.
  • All 3 patients with nonsurgically related facial nerve weakness either improved or achieved stability in function.
  • There were no cases of new cranial nerve toxicity post-FSRT.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 17318817.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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92. Niu Y, Ma L, Mao Q, Wu L, Chen J: Pituitary adenoma and vestibular schwannoma: case report and review of the literature. J Postgrad Med; 2010 Oct-Dec;56(4):281-3
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  • [Title] Pituitary adenoma and vestibular schwannoma: case report and review of the literature.
  • The concurrence of the intracranial multiple primary tumors (MPTs) consisting of acoustic neuroma (AN) and pituitary adenoma is very rare.
  • The model also indicates that when a pituitary tumor or AN is detected separately, we might consider the development of "expanding field" after oncological treatment especially after radiotherapy in order to prevent the second field tumor occurring.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoma / pathology. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / pathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology. Pituitary Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 20935399.001).
  • [ISSN] 0972-2823
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of postgraduate medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Postgrad Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] India
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93. Shchekut'ev GA, Shimanskiĭ VN, Ogurtsova AA, Semenov MS: [Identification of the cochlear nerve in surgical removal of vestibular schwannomas]. Zh Vopr Neirokhir Im N N Burdenko; 2009 Jul-Sep;(3):10-3; discussion 13-4
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  • [Title] [Identification of the cochlear nerve in surgical removal of vestibular schwannomas].
  • Review of methods which allow intraoperative identifying and monitoring of cochlear and facial nerves in resection of vestibular schwannomas is presented.
  • We describe a case of successful identification and functional preservation of facial and cochlear nerves in a patient with acoustic neuroma.
  • According to some authors, application of intraoperative neurophysiological techniques in surgery of vestibular schwannomas allows to preserve not only anatomical but also functional integrity of neural structures as well.
  • [MeSH-major] Cochlear Nerve / physiology. Hearing Loss, Sensorineural / prevention & control. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Neurosurgical Procedures / methods

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  • (PMID = 20088443.001).
  • [ISSN] 0042-8817
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhurnal voprosy neĭrokhirurgii imeni N. N. Burdenko
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zh Vopr Neirokhir Im N N Burdenko
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
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94. Jaiswal S, Agrawal V, Jaiswal AK, Pandey R, Mahapatra AK: Expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in vestibular schwannomas and their clinical significance. J Negat Results Biomed; 2009;8:9

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in vestibular schwannomas and their clinical significance.
  • OBJECTIVE: The objective was to determine the expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in vestibular schwannomas as well as to determine predictive factors for estrogen and progesterone receptor positivity.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included 100 cases of vestibular schwannomas operated from January 2006 to June 2009.
  • Formaldehyde-fixed parafiin-embedded archival vestibular schwannomas specimens were used for the immunohistochemical assessment of estrogen and progesterone receptors.
  • CONCLUSION: No estrogen and progesterone receptor could be found in any of our 100 cases of vestibular schwannomas.
  • Hence our study does not support a causative role of estrogen and progesterone in the growth of vestibular schwannoma as well as hormonal manipulation in the treatment of this tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Neurilemmoma / metabolism. Receptors, Estrogen / metabolism. Receptors, Progesterone / metabolism. Vestibular Diseases / metabolism

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  • [Cites] Acta Otolaryngol. 2000 Oct;120(8):950-4 [11200590.001]
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  • (PMID = 19889208.001).
  • [ISSN] 1477-5751
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of negative results in biomedicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Negat Results Biomed
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Receptors, Estrogen; 0 / Receptors, Progesterone
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2777842
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95. Bennett M, Haynes DS: Surgical approaches and complications in the removal of vestibular schwannomas. Otolaryngol Clin North Am; 2007 Jun;40(3):589-609, ix-x
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Surgical approaches and complications in the removal of vestibular schwannomas.
  • Vestibular schwannomas are benign tumors that usually originate from the balance portion of cranial nerve VIII.
  • The treatment options currently available for vestibular schwannomas include observation with serial imaging, stereotactic radiation, and microsurgical removal.
  • Although the ultimate goal in treatment of vestibular schwannomas is preservation of life, the best option for each patient depends on symptoms, tumor size, tumor location, and the patient's general health and age.
  • Surgical exposure of the cerebellopontine angle for removal of vestibular schwannomas can be performed safely via a translabyrinthine, retrosigmoid, and middle fossa approach.
  • The goal of surgery is complete eradication of tumor with preservation of hearing and facial nerve function when possible.
  • [MeSH-major] Ear Neoplasms / surgery. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Otologic Surgical Procedures / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Cerebrospinal Fluid Otorrhea / epidemiology. Cerebrospinal Fluid Otorrhea / etiology. Facial Nerve Diseases / epidemiology. Facial Nerve Diseases / etiology. Headache / epidemiology. Headache / etiology. Humans. Meningitis / epidemiology. Meningitis / etiology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Postoperative Complications. Postural Balance / physiology. Tinnitus / epidemiology. Tinnitus / etiology

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  • (PMID = 17544697.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6665
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngologic clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 33
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96. Sahu RN, Behari S, Agarwal VK, Giri PJ, Jain VK: Taste dysfunction in vestibular schwannomas. Neurol India; 2008 Jan-Mar;56(1):42-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Taste dysfunction in vestibular schwannomas.
  • BACKGROUND: Gustatory dysfunction associated with vestibular schwannomas (VS) is a poorly represented clinical presentation.
  • Preoperatively, taste disturbance was found in 29 (37.2%) giant, 28 (45.9%) large and one (33.3%) medium-sized tumors, respectively.
  • Among patients with anatomically preserved facial nerve, postoperative taste disturbances were found in 55 (42.3%) patients whereas nine (6.9%) patients reported improvement in taste sensations.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Taste dysfunction is common following vestibular schwannoma surgery.
  • Taste dysfunction should be included in the facial nerve functional grading system while assessing outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / complications. Taste Disorders / etiology

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  • (PMID = 18310836.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-3886
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurology India
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurol India
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
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97. Ito E, Saito K, Yatsuya H, Nagatani T, Otsuka G: Factors predicting growth of vestibular schwannoma in neurofibromatosis type 2. Neurosurg Rev; 2009 Oct;32(4):425-33
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Factors predicting growth of vestibular schwannoma in neurofibromatosis type 2.
  • We retrospectively reviewed characteristics of patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 to identify factors predicting further growth of bilateral vestibular schwannomas.
  • Subjects comprised 27 neurofibromatosis type 2 patients with 54 vestibular schwannomas, followed for 24-204 months (mean, 86 months).
  • This study investigated factors predictive of vestibular schwannoma growth in neurofibromatosis type 2.
  • Features distinguishing actively growing from quiescent VS were determined for untreated course (28 vestibular schwannomas) and posttreatment course (including either resection or radiosurgery; 33 vestibular schwannomas).
  • A general estimation equation was used to identify factors affecting tumor growth.
  • During the untreated course, 19 vestibular schwannomas showed growth and 9 vestibular schwannomas were stable.
  • [MeSH-major] Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / pathology. Neurofibromatosis 2 / pathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology. Trigeminal Nerve / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age of Onset. Analysis of Variance. Child. Child, Preschool. Disease Progression. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neurosurgical Procedures. Predictive Value of Tests. Radiosurgery. Retrospective Studies. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Young Adult


98. Nouraei SA, Huys QJ, Chatrath P, Powles J, Harcourt JP: Screening patients with sensorineural hearing loss for vestibular schwannoma using a Bayesian classifier. Clin Otolaryngol; 2007 Aug;32(4):248-54
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  • [Title] Screening patients with sensorineural hearing loss for vestibular schwannoma using a Bayesian classifier.
  • OBJECTIVES: Selecting patients with asymmetrical sensorineural hearing loss for further investigation continues to pose clinical and medicolegal challenges, given the disparity between the number of symptomatic patients, and the low incidence of vestibular schwannoma as the underlying cause.
  • We developed and validated a diagnostic model using a generalisation of neural networks, for detecting vestibular schwannomas from clinical and audiological data, and compared its performance with six previously published clinical and audiological decision-support screening protocols.
  • PARTICIPANTS: Clinical and audiometric details of 129 patients with, and as many age and sex-matched patients without vestibular schwannomas, as determined with magnetic resonance imaging.
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The ability to diagnose a patient as having or not having vestibular schwannoma.
  • RESULTS: A Gaussian Process Ordinal Regression Classifier was trained and cross-validated to classify cases as 'with' or 'without' vestibular schwannoma, and its diagnostic performance was assessed using receiver operator characteristic plots.
  • DISCUSSION: The Gaussian Process ORdinal Regression Classifier increased the flexibility and specificity of the screening process for vestibular schwannoma when applied to a sample of matched patients with and without this condition.
  • [MeSH-major] Hearing Loss, Sensorineural / diagnosis. Hearing Loss, Sensorineural / etiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / complications. Neuroma, Acoustic / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 17651265.001).
  • [ISSN] 1749-4478
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical otolaryngology : official journal of ENT-UK ; official journal of Netherlands Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology & Cervico-Facial Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Otolaryngol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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99. Stangerup SE, Thomsen J, Tos M, Cayé-Thomasen P: Long-term hearing preservation in vestibular schwannoma. Otol Neurotol; 2010 Feb;31(2):271-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Long-term hearing preservation in vestibular schwannoma.
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term hearing during "wait and scan" management of vestibular schwannomas.
  • SUBJECTS: During a 33-year period, from 1976 to 2008, 1,144 patients with vestibular schwannoma were allocated to observation by the wait and scan policy, with annual magnetic resonance imaging and audiologic examination.
  • CONCLUSION: Most vestibular schwannoma patients with 100% speech discrimination at diagnosis maintain good hearing even after many years of observation.
  • [MeSH-major] Hearing Loss / etiology. Hearing Loss / prevention & control. Neuroma, Acoustic / complications. Neuroma, Acoustic / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Audiometry, Pure-Tone. Databases, Factual. Denmark / epidemiology. Disease Progression. Female. Hearing / physiology. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Speech Perception. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19887973.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-4505
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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100. Whitehouse K, Foroughi M, Shone G, Hatfield R: Vestibular schwannomas - when should conservative management be reconsidered? Br J Neurosurg; 2010 Apr;24(2):185-90
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Vestibular schwannomas - when should conservative management be reconsidered?
  • OBJECTIVE: To document the natural history of vestibular schwannomas treated conservatively, and to find if there are any predictive factors for growth and need for active intervention.
  • SUBJECTS: Eighty-eight patients managed conservatively for unilateral vestibular schwannoma and that have had at least two radiological investigations.
  • RESULTS: Of the 88 patients, the average size of schwannoma at diagnosis was 10.88 mm.
  • 51.1% of schwannomas grew, 12.5% shrank and 36.4% remained the same size.
  • [MeSH-major] Microsurgery / methods. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / radiography. Radiosurgery / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Burden

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  • (PMID = 19886818.001).
  • [ISSN] 1360-046X
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br J Neurosurg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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