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1. Prosnitz RG, Patwardhan MB, Samsa GP, Mantyh CR, Fisher DA, McCrory DC, Cline KE, Gray RN, Morse MA: Quality measures for the use of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy in patients with colorectal cancer: a systematic review. Cancer; 2006 Nov 15;107(10):2352-60
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  • [Title] Quality measures for the use of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy in patients with colorectal cancer: a systematic review.
  • BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy (CT) and radiation therapy (RT) are essential components of adjuvant (preoperative or postoperative) therapy for many patients with colorectal cancer (CRC); however, quality measures (QMs) of these critical aspects of CRC treatment have not been characterized well.
  • The most useful QMs identified were 1) the percentage of patients with AJCC Stage III colon cancer who received postoperative CT and 2) the percentage of patients with Stage II or III rectal cancer who received chemoradiotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 17039499.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 39
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2. Gunderson LL, Jessup JM, Sargent DJ, Greene FL, Stewart A: Revised tumor and node categorization for rectal cancer based on surveillance, epidemiology, and end results and rectal pooled analysis outcomes. J Clin Oncol; 2010 Jan 10;28(2):256-63
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  • [Title] Revised tumor and node categorization for rectal cancer based on surveillance, epidemiology, and end results and rectal pooled analysis outcomes.
  • PURPOSE: The sixth edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) rectal cancer staging subdivided stage II into IIA (T3N0) and IIB (T4N0) and stage III into IIIA (T1-2N1M0), IIIB (T3-4N1M0), and IIIC (anyTN2M0).
  • Subsequent analyses supported revised substaging of stage III as a result of improved survival with T1-2N2 versus T3-4N2 and survival of T4N1 more similar to T3-4N2 than T3N1.
  • The AJCC Hindgut Taskforce sought population-based validation that depth of invasion interacts with nodal status to affect survival.
  • METHODS: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) population-based data from January 1992 to December 2004 for 35,829 patients with rectal cancer were compared with rectal pooled analysis data (3,791 patients).
  • RESULTS: SEER rectal cancer analyses confirm that T1-2N2 cancers have better prognosis than T3-4N2, T4bN1 have similar prognosis to T4N2, T1-2N1 have similar prognosis to T2N0/T3N0, and T1-2N2a have similar prognosis to T2N0/T3N0 (T1N2a) or T4aN0 (T2N2a).
  • CONCLUSION: This SEER population-based rectal cancer analysis validates the rectal pooled analyses and supports the shift of T1-2N2 lesions from IIIC to IIIA or IIIB and T4bN1 from IIIB to IIIC.
  • SEER outcomes support subdividing T4, N1, and N2 and revised substaging of stages II and III.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasm Staging / methods. Rectal Neoplasms / pathology. Survival Rate

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  • [CommentIn] J Clin Oncol. 2010 Aug 10;28(23):e397-8; author reply e399-400 [20547986.001]
  • (PMID = 19949015.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2815714
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3. Gunderson LL, Jessup JM, Sargent DJ, Greene FL, Stewart AK: Revised TN categorization for colon cancer based on national survival outcomes data. J Clin Oncol; 2010 Jan 10;28(2):264-71
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  • [Title] Revised TN categorization for colon cancer based on national survival outcomes data.
  • PURPOSE: The sixth edition of American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Cancer Staging Manual for colon cancer subdivided stage II into IIA (T3N0) and IIB (T4N0) and stage III into IIIA (T1-2N1M0), IIIB (T3-4N1M0), and IIIC (anyTN2M0).
  • Subsequent analyses supported revised substaging of stage III because of improved survival for T1-2N2 versus T3-4N2 and T4N1 survival was more similar to T3-4N2 than to T3N1.
  • The AJCC Hindgut Taskforce sought population-based validation that depth of invasion and nodal status interact to affect survival.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) population-based data from January 1992 to December 2004 for 109,953 colon cancer patients were compared with National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) data on 134,206 patients.
  • RESULTS: SEER rectal cancer analyses confirm that T1-2N2 cancers have better prognosis than T3-4N2,T4bN1 have similar prognosis to T4N2, T1-2N1 have similar prognosis to T2N0/T3N0, and T1-2N2ahave similar prognosis to T2N0/T3N0 (T1N2a) or T4aN0 (T2N2a).
  • CONCLUSION: This SEER population-based colon cancer analysis is highly consistent with rectal cancer pooled analysis and SEER rectal cancer analyses, supporting the shift of T1-2N2 lesions from IIIC to IIIA/IIIB, shifting T4bN1 from IIIB to IIIC, subdividing T4/N1/N2, and revising substaging of stages II/III.
  • Survival outcomes by TN category for colon and rectal cancer are strikingly similar.
  • [MeSH-major] Colonic Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasm Staging / methods

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  • [Cites] Cancer. 2000 Apr 1;88(7):1739-57 [10738234.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2010 Jan 10;28(2):256-63 [19949015.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2002 Apr 1;20(7):1744-50 [11919230.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2002 May 1;94(9):2511-6 [12015777.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2002 Oct 1;54(2):386-96 [12243812.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Surg. 2002 Oct;236(4):416-21; discussion 421 [12368669.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Surg Oncol. 2003 Apr;10(3):213-8 [12679304.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Pathol. 2003 May;56(5):327-35 [12719450.001]
  • [Cites] Virchows Arch. 2003 Aug;443(2):133-8 [12844262.001]
  • [Cites] J Surg Oncol. 2003 Nov;84(3):120-6 [14598354.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2004 May 15;22(10):1785-96 [15067027.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2004 May 15;22(10):1797-806 [15067028.001]
  • [Cites] J Natl Cancer Inst. 2004 Oct 6;96(19):1420-5 [15467030.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Surg. 1968 Dec;116(6):875-81 [5723866.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1974 Oct;34(4):1278-92 [4424091.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1976 Jun;37(6):2861-5 [949706.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1978 Sep-Oct;4(9-10):801-7 [711549.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1983 Oct 1;52(7):1317-29 [6192900.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1985 Jan 1;55(1):61-71 [3965086.001]
  • [Cites] Histopathology. 1985 Dec;9(12):1319-27 [3830856.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 1986 Nov 1;2(8514):996-9 [2430152.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1987 Jan;13(1):5-10 [3804816.001]
  • [Cites] J Natl Cancer Inst. 1988 Mar 2;80(1):21-9 [3276900.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1989 Jul;17(1):55-62 [2745208.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Surg. 1989 Nov;76(11):1165-7 [2688803.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1991 Mar 14;324(11):709-15 [1997835.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2001 Jan 1;19(1):157-63 [11134208.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet Oncol. 2007 Jul;8(7):651-7 [17613427.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1999 Sep;17(9):2896-900 [10561368.001]
  • [Cites] J Natl Cancer Inst. 2000 Mar 1;92(5):388-96 [10699069.001]
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  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1994 Aug 25;331(8):502-7 [8041415.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 1994 Sep 10;344(8924):707-11 [7915774.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Clin Pathol. 1996 Aug;106(2):209-16 [8712176.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1997 May;15(5):2030-9 [9164215.001]
  • [Cites] Dis Colon Rectum. 1998 Aug;41(8):979-83 [9715152.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Surg. 1954 Jun;139(6):846-52 [13159135.001]
  • [Cites] CA Cancer J Clin. 2004 Nov-Dec;54(6):295-308 [15537574.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2005 Dec 1;23(34):8706-12 [16314630.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2006 Aug 1;24(22):3570-5 [16877723.001]
  • [CommentIn] J Clin Oncol. 2010 Aug 10;28(23):e397-8; author reply e399-400 [20547986.001]
  • [CommentIn] J Clin Oncol. 2010 Sep 20;28(27):e469; author reply e470 [20585093.001]
  • (PMID = 19949014.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2815715
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4. Jung SH, Kim HC, Yu CS, Chang HM, Ryu MH, Lee JL, Kim JS, Kim JC: [Clinicopathologic characteristics of colorectal neuroendocrine tumor]. Korean J Gastroenterol; 2006 Aug;48(2):97-103
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Clinicopathologic characteristics of colorectal neuroendocrine tumor].
  • BACKGROUND/AIMS: Colorectal neuroendocrine carcinoma is a rare neoplasm exhibiting fulminant progression and having poor prognosis.
  • The purpose of this study is to verify the clinicopathologic characteristics of colorectal neuroendocrine carcinoma.
  • METHODS: From June 1997 to December 2004 at Asan Medical Center, ten patients were originally identified as colorectal neuroendocrine carcinoma on the basis of H&E and immunohistochemical staining (IHC).
  • RESULTS: Ten patients (0.2%) with colorectal neuroendocrine tumors were identified from 4,512 patients with colorectal cancer; ten neuroendocrine carcinomas and three adenocarcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation.
  • Nine tumors were located in the rectum, two in the sigmoid, and each one in the transverse colon and cecum, respectively.
  • All patients were advanced at the time of diagnosis, with AJCC TNM staging: stage IIIB (n=2), stage IIIC (n=3), and stage IV (n=8).
  • Five patients who received chemotherapy showed median survival of 32 months (stage III) and 17.5 months (stage IV), whereas other five patients without chemotherapy died with a median survival of 6.2 months.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Neuroendocrine / pathology. Colorectal Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Biomarkers, Tumor / immunology. Biopsy. Chromogranin A / analysis. Chromogranin A / immunology. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Retrospective Studies. Sigmoid Neoplasms / drug therapy. Sigmoid Neoplasms / mortality. Sigmoid Neoplasms / pathology. Synaptophysin / analysis. Synaptophysin / immunology

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  • (PMID = 16929153.001).
  • [ISSN] 1598-9992
  • [Journal-full-title] The Korean journal of gastroenterology = Taehan Sohwagi Hakhoe chi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Korean J Gastroenterol
  • [Language] kor
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Chromogranin A; 0 / Synaptophysin
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5. Mehta PP, Griffin J, Ganta S, Rangraj M, Steichen F: Laparoscopic-assisted colon resections: long-term results and survival. JSLS; 2005 Apr-Jun;9(2):184-8
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  • [Title] Laparoscopic-assisted colon resections: long-term results and survival.
  • Anecdotal reports in the literature describe port-site and incisional tumor implantation in patients undergoing laparoscopic-assisted colectomies for colorectal malignancies.
  • This raises concerns about whether these incisional tumor sites are more common in these patients and whether their survival is compromised by the laparoscopic technique.
  • METHODS: The authors reviewed data from 110 patients who underwent laparoscopic-assisted colectomies for colorectal cancer to determine the long-term results and survival and to compare the safety and efficacy of laparoscopic-assisted colectomy to the safety and efficacy of open colectomy.
  • The American Joint Committee on Cancer staging for colorectal carcinomas and the Kaplan-Meier method were used to determine the survival curves.
  • RESULTS: Laparoscopic-assisted colon resections for colorectal malignancies were performed in 110 patients.
  • The ten-year survival rates for the various stages were 78% for stage I, 33% for stage II, 30% for stage III, and 0% for stage IV.
  • CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic-assisted colon resection of colorectal carcinomas is technically feasible and safe.

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  • (PMID = 15984707.001).
  • [ISSN] 1086-8089
  • [Journal-full-title] JSLS : Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons
  • [ISO-abbreviation] JSLS
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3015573
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6. Park IJ, Choi GS, Jun SH: Nodal stage of stage III colon cancer: the impact of metastatic lymph node ratio. J Surg Oncol; 2009 Sep 1;100(3):240-3
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  • [Title] Nodal stage of stage III colon cancer: the impact of metastatic lymph node ratio.
  • PURPOSE: We assessed which classification of lymph node metastasis better predicted outcomes in patients with colorectal carcinoma.
  • METHODS: We identified 318 patients (176 men) with stage III colon cancer who underwent curative resection.
  • Lymph node disease was stratified by the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging and LNR, with the latter categorized into groups with LNR <0.059 (n = 67), 0.059-0.23 (n = 171), and >0.23 (n = 80).
  • Within each TNM stage, 3-year DFS rates differed according to LNR, but, within each LNR subgroup, 3-year DFS did not differ according to TNM stage.
  • When both TNM stage and LNR subgroup were considered, 3-year DFS was stratified into four groups, which differed significantly (P < 0.0001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Re-stratified lymph node staging, reflecting both LNR and TNM stage, can predict survival in patients with LN-positive colon cancer, especially when more than 12 lymph nodes harvested.
  • [MeSH-major] Colonic Neoplasms / mortality. Colonic Neoplasms / pathology. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Lymphatic Metastasis

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  • (PMID = 19330780.001).
  • [ISSN] 1096-9098
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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7. Davidoff AJ, Rapp T, Onukwugha E, Zuckerman IH, Hanna N, Pandya N, Mullins CD: Trends in disparities in receipt of adjuvant therapy for elderly stage III colon cancer patients: the role of the medical oncologist evaluation. Med Care; 2009 Dec;47(12):1229-36
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  • [Title] Trends in disparities in receipt of adjuvant therapy for elderly stage III colon cancer patients: the role of the medical oncologist evaluation.
  • BACKGROUND: Race disparities in adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer patients have been documented, and medical oncologist evaluation is a critical step in the treatment process.
  • SUBJECTS: Patients age >65, white or African American race, diagnosed with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage III colon cancer between 1997 and 2002. N = 7176.
  • RESULTS: Initial adjusted oncologist evaluation rates were higher for whites compared with African American patients (58.7% vs. 42.9%), but changes over time reduced the race gap substantially.
  • [MeSH-major] African Americans / statistics & numerical data. Colonic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Colonic Neoplasms / ethnology. European Continental Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data. Healthcare Disparities / trends. Medical Oncology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Female. Fluorouracil / therapeutic use. Health Manpower / trends. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. SEER Program. Socioeconomic Factors

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  • (PMID = 19786906.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-1948
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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8. Wang J, Hassett JM, Dayton MT, Kulaylat MN: Lymph node ratio: role in the staging of node-positive colon cancer. Ann Surg Oncol; 2008 Jun;15(6):1600-8

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Lymph node ratio: role in the staging of node-positive colon cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: Recent literature has shown that lymph node ratio (LNR) is superior to the number of positive lymph nodes (pLNs) in predicting the prognosis in several malignances other than colon cancer.
  • We hypothesize that LNR may play a similar role in stage III colon cancer.
  • METHODS: We included 24,477 stage III colon cancer cases from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registry.
  • RESULTS: The 5-year survival for patients with stage IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC was 71.3%, 51.7%, and 34.0%, respectively (P < .0001).
  • There was no survival difference among LNR1 to LNR4 for stage IIIA patients.
  • In stage IIIB patients, the 5-year survival for those with LNR1 to LNR4 was 63.5%, 54.7%, 44.4%, and 34.2%, respectively (P < .0001).
  • In stage IIIC patients, the 5-year survival for those with LNR2 to LNR4 was 49.6%, 41.7%, and 25.2%, respectively (P < .0001).
  • LNR is an independent predictor of survival after adjusting patient's age, tumor size, tumor grade, race, number of pLNs, and total number of LNs harvested. (RR 2.30, 95% CI 2.08-2.55).
  • CONCLUSION: Patients with stage IIIB and IIIC colon cancer represent a heterogeneous group of patients with the majority either overstaged or understaged.
  • LNR is a more accurate prognostic method for stage III colon cancer patients.
  • We propose an algorithm to incorporate LNR into current AJCC staging system.
  • [MeSH-major] Colonic Neoplasms / pathology. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Neoplasm Staging / methods

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  • [CommentIn] Ann Surg Oncol. 2008 Jun;15(6):1557-8 [18363073.001]
  • (PMID = 18327530.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-4681
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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9. Lee HY, Choi HJ, Park KJ, Shin JS, Kwon HC, Roh MS, Kim C: Prognostic significance of metastatic lymph node ratio in node-positive colon carcinoma. Ann Surg Oncol; 2007 May;14(5):1712-7

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prognostic significance of metastatic lymph node ratio in node-positive colon carcinoma.
  • BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of the lymph node ratio between metastatic and examined lymph nodes (LNR) in patients with stage III colon cancer.
  • METHODS: A review was made of 201 patients (106 men) with stage III colon cancer of R0 resection.
  • Lymph node (LN) disease was stratified both by the American Joint Committee on Cancer and the International Union Against Cancer nodal staging system (pN) and by quartiles of the LNR.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Ratio-based LN staging, which reflects the number of LNs examined and the quality of LN dissection, is a potent modality for prognostic stratification in patients with LN-positive colon cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Colonic Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Chemotherapy, Adjuvant. Combined Modality Therapy. Digestive System Surgical Procedures. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] Ann Surg Oncol. 2007 Aug;14(8):2175-6 [17525836.001]
  • (PMID = 17253102.001).
  • [ISSN] 1068-9265
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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10. Miao Y, Everly JJ, Gross TG, Tevar AD, First MR, Alloway RR, Woodle ES: De novo cancers arising in organ transplant recipients are associated with adverse outcomes compared with the general population. Transplantation; 2009 May 15;87(9):1347-59
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] De novo cancers arising in organ transplant recipients are associated with adverse outcomes compared with the general population.
  • BACKGROUND: Transplant recipients are at increased risk of malignancy; however, the influence of transplantation on cancer outcomes has not been rigorously defined.
  • METHODS: De novo nonsmall cell lung cancer, colon cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, bladder cancer, renal cell cancer (RCC), and malignant melanoma data in 635 adult (>18 years of age) transplant recipients (from the Israel Penn International Transplant Tumor Registry) were compared with data from 1,282,984 adults in the general population (from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database).
  • RESULTS: Compared with the general population, transplant patients were more likely to have early stage (AJCC stage 0-II) RCC, but more advanced (AJCC stage >II) colon cancer, breast cancer, bladder cancer, and malignant melanoma.
  • Compared with the general population, disease-specific survival was worse in the transplant population for colon cancer (all stages), nonsmall cell lung cancer (stage II), breast cancer (stage III), prostate cancer (stage II, III, and IV), bladder cancer (stage III), and RCC (stage IV).
  • Multivariate analyses demonstrated transplantation to be a negative risk factor for survival for each cancer studied, and transplantation and cancer stage at diagnosis to be the most profound negative survival predictors.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Breast Neoplasms / epidemiology. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Colonic Neoplasms / epidemiology. Colonic Neoplasms / pathology. Female. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / epidemiology. Lung Neoplasms / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Patient Selection. Registries. Survival Analysis. Survivors. Testicular Neoplasms / epidemiology. Testicular Neoplasms / pathology. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19424035.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-6080
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplantation
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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11. Georgescu SO, Neacşu CN, Vintilă D, Popa P, Forţu L, Nistor A, Ferariu D, Târcoveanu E: [Long-term results after surgery for colorectal adenocarcinoma, stage I-III. Problems of prognosis]. Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi; 2007 Oct-Dec;111(4):932-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Long-term results after surgery for colorectal adenocarcinoma, stage I-III. Problems of prognosis].
  • [Transliterated title] Rezultate la distanţă după tratamentul chirurgical al adenocarcinomului colo-rectal stadiile I-III. Probleme de prognostic.
  • Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide.
  • STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study on 142 consecutively cases with stage I to III colorectal adenocarcinomas (TNM AJCC/UICC) in which patients underwent potentially curative surgery in one single public health service (1st Surgical Clinic Iaşi, Romania) between 2004 and 2005.
  • The surgical procedures performed were the following: right colectomy (n = 54; 30%); transverse colectomy (n = 2; 1.4%); left colectomy (n = 19; 13.4%); segmental colon resection with anastomosis (n = 5 ; 3.5%); Hartmann procedure (n = 18; 12.7%); anterior rectal resection (n = 11; 7.7%) and abdominoperineal resection (n = 33; 23.2%).
  • RESULTS: The factors with a significant negative influence in overall survival and 42-months survival rates were: the age over 70 years, the emergency surgery related to cancer's complications, the advanced AJCC/ UICC stage, vascular invasion, perineural invasion, the recurrence of disease, the moderate and lower differentiated adenocarcinoma and incomplete or not performed chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSION: Even with a radical surgical approach the advanced stage of colorectal adenocarcinoma has a low prognostic, but some other factors have also a high significance in postoperative outcome.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Anastomosis, Surgical. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Postoperative Complications / mortality. Prognosis. Prospective Studies. Romania. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 18389783.001).
  • [ISSN] 0048-7848
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista medico-chirurgicală̆ a Societă̆ţ̜ii de Medici ş̧i Naturaliş̧ti din Iaş̧i
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi
  • [Language] rum
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Romania
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12. Rivera CA, Ahlberg NC, Taglia L, Kumar M, Blunier A, Benya RV: Expression of GRP and its receptor is associated with improved survival in patients with colon cancer. Clin Exp Metastasis; 2009;26(7):663-71
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Expression of GRP and its receptor is associated with improved survival in patients with colon cancer.
  • Epithelial cells lining the adult human colon do not normally express gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) or its receptor (GRPR), but both can be up regulated post malignant transformation.
  • However, controversy exists as to the contribution these proteins make to tumor cell behavior once present.
  • Since GRPR activation promotes proliferation, it has been assumed that their aberrant expression promotes colon cancer (CC) growth and progression.
  • Yet we have contended that when expressed, GRP/GRPR benefits the host since in vitro studies demonstrate they enhance tumor cell attachment to the extracellular matrix and promote CC cytolysis by natural killer lymphocytes.
  • To do this we identified all CC diagnosed at a single institution from 1998 to 2002 that were classified as AJCC stage II or III (n = 88); of these 50 (57%) had sufficient tissues remaining for study.
  • [MeSH-major] Colonic Neoplasms / metabolism. Gastrin-Releasing Peptide / metabolism. Receptors, Bombesin / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19430935.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-7276
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical & experimental metastasis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Exp. Metastasis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-094346
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Receptors, Bombesin; 80043-53-4 / Gastrin-Releasing Peptide
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13. Tanaka M, Sethi S, Li D, Bland G, Hamilton SR, Abbruzzese JL, Eng C: CHFR methylation as an epigenetic marker for recurrence of colon cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4043

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] CHFR methylation as an epigenetic marker for recurrence of colon cancer.
  • : 4043 Background: Currently, no definitive epigenetic markers exist to predict recurrence and overall survival (OS) of colorectal cancer patients after surgical resection.
  • Promoter hypermethylation of the ID4 (inhibitor of DNA binding), RECK (reversion-inducing cysteine rich protein with Kazal motifs), and CHFR (checkpoint with forkhead-associated and RING finger domains) genes have been associated with reduced mRNA and protein expression in colorectal cancer.
  • The purpose of this study was to determine the association of methylation of these genes and also MINT1 (methylated in tumor loci) with recurrence-free survival (RFS) and OS in colon cancer patients.
  • METHODS: DNA methylation was quantitatively evaluated using pyrosequencing in tissue samples from 64 patients with AJCC stage II and III colon cancer without HNPCC seen at M.D.
  • RESULTS: There were 19 stage II (30%) and 45 stage III (70%) patients.
  • Methylation of the CHFR promoter is a potential epigenetic marker for colon cancer recurrence and overall survival.

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  • (PMID = 27961567.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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14. Chen CC, Yang SH, Lin JK, Lin TC, Chen WS, Jiang JK, Wang HS, Chang SC: Is it reasonable to add preoperative serum level of CEA and CA19-9 to staging for colorectal cancer? J Surg Res; 2005 Apr;124(2):169-74
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Is it reasonable to add preoperative serum level of CEA and CA19-9 to staging for colorectal cancer?
  • BACKGROUND: Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) are the most common tumor markers for colorectal cancer.
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of adding them into the current staging system by analyzing their prognostic significance.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study population was patients (n = 574, 67.1 +/- 11.3 years old, 397 males) who received potentially curative resection of colorectal adenocarcinoma (stage I-III) between January 1994 and August 2002, including preoperative measurements of CEA and CA19-9.
  • Survival was analyzed for AJCC staging, CEA (+) versus (-), CA19-9 (+) versus (-), and four groups.
  • However, the combined use of the two markers revealed a significant survival benefit (P = 0.035) of group 1 ("-" for both markers) over 4 ("+" for both) in stage II.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Patients with an elevated level of both CEA and CA19-9 in stage II of colorectal cancer have a significantly poorer prognosis than those with normal levels of these markers.
  • We recommend adding both CEA and CA19-9 to the current staging system.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging / methods. Preoperative Care. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 15820244.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-4804
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of surgical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Surg. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / CA-19-9 Antigen; 0 / Carcinoembryonic Antigen
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15. Bilimoria KY, Bentrem DJ, Rock CE, Stewart AK, Ko CY, Halverson A: Outcomes and prognostic factors for squamous-cell carcinoma of the anal canal: analysis of patients from the National Cancer Data Base. Dis Colon Rectum; 2009 Apr;52(4):624-31
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Outcomes and prognostic factors for squamous-cell carcinoma of the anal canal: analysis of patients from the National Cancer Data Base.
  • PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to assess survival and prognostic factors for anal carcinoma in the population.
  • METHODS: Patients with squamous-cell carcinoma of the anal canal were identified from the National Cancer Data Base (1985-2000).
  • Concordance was calculated to assess agreement between American Joint Committee on Cancer stage and actual outcome.
  • RESULTS: Nineteen thousand one hundred ninety-nine patients with anal carcinoma were identified (Stage I, 25.3 percent; Stage II, 51.8 percent; Stage III, 17.1 percent; Stage IV, 5.7 percent).
  • The American Joint Committee on Cancer (6th edition) staging system provided good survival discrimination by stage: I, 69.5 percent; II, 59.0 percent; III, 40.6 percent; and IV, 18.7 percent (concordance index, 0.663).
  • On multivariable analysis, patients with anal carcinoma had a higher risk of death if they were male, >or=65 years old, black, living in lower median incomes areas, and had more advanced T stage tumors, nodal or distant metastases, or poorly differentiated cancers (P < 0.0001).
  • CONCLUSION: Although tumor characteristics and staging affect prognosis, patient factors, such as gender, race, and socioeconomic status, are also important prognostic factors for squamous-cell carcinoma of the anal canal.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / mortality. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Neoplasm Metastasis. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 19404066.001).
  • [ISSN] 1530-0358
  • [Journal-full-title] Diseases of the colon and rectum
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dis. Colon Rectum
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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16. Di Fabio F, Shrier I, Bégin LR, Gordon PH: Absence of prognostic value of nuclear shape factor analysis in colorectal carcinoma: relevance of interobserver and intraobserver variability. Dis Colon Rectum; 2008 Dec;51(12):1781-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Absence of prognostic value of nuclear shape factor analysis in colorectal carcinoma: relevance of interobserver and intraobserver variability.
  • METHODS: Ninety-eight patients who underwent colorectal carcinoma resection were prospectively enrolled.
  • RESULTS: The nuclear shape factor mean values by American Joint Committee on Cancer stage were: 0.73 (0.07) in Stage I, 0.74 (0.06) in Stage II, and 0.75 (0.05) in Stage III carcinomas (P = 0.78, ANOVA).
  • We failed to confirm a prognostic value for nuclear shape factor in colorectal carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / diagnosis. Cell Nucleus Shape. Colonic Neoplasms / diagnosis. Rectal Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Image Processing, Computer-Assisted. Neoplasm Staging. Observer Variation. Predictive Value of Tests. Prognosis. Reproducibility of Results. Survival Rate

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  • [CommentIn] Dis Colon Rectum. 2009 Aug;52(8):1523; author reply 1524 [19617771.001]
  • (PMID = 18581174.001).
  • [ISSN] 1530-0358
  • [Journal-full-title] Diseases of the colon and rectum
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dis. Colon Rectum
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Bilchik AJ, DiNome M, Saha S, Turner RR, Wiese D, McCarter M, Hoon DS, Morton DL: Prospective multicenter trial of staging adequacy in colon cancer: preliminary results. Arch Surg; 2006 Jun;141(6):527-33; discussion 533-4
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  • [Title] Prospective multicenter trial of staging adequacy in colon cancer: preliminary results.
  • HYPOTHESIS: Lymph node evaluation is an important prognostic factor in colorectal cancer (CRC).
  • A 25% recurrence rate in patients with node-negative CRC suggests that current staging practices are inadequate.
  • Focused analysis of the sentinel node (SN) by multiple sectioning and immunohistochemistry improves staging accuracy.
  • SETTING: Tertiary referral cancer centers.
  • PATIENTS: Between March 2001 and June 2005, 132 patients were enrolled with clinical stage I and II CRC in a prospective multicenter trial (R01-CA90484).
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Micrometastases greater than 0.2 mm but less than 2 mm and isolated tumor cells less than 0.2 mm were defined according to the sixth edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer Cancer Staging Manual.
  • Thirty-three patients (30%) were classified as stage I; 46 (41%), stage II, and 32 (29%), stage III.
  • Of the 6 false-negative results, 4 were attributed to lymphatic channels obliterated by tumor.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In a multicenter trial, ultrastaging of colon cancer is feasible and accurate.
  • In stage II CRC, 24% of patients had nodal carcinoma cells not detected by conventional staging methods.
  • Surgical technique (adequate lymph node retrieval) and focused pathological analysis may improve staging accuracy and the selection of patients for chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Colonic Neoplasms / pathology. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Colectomy. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Prospective Studies. Rosaniline Dyes

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  • (PMID = 16785352.001).
  • [ISSN] 0004-0010
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of surgery (Chicago, Ill. : 1960)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA090848
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Rosaniline Dyes; 39N9K8S2A4 / iso-sulfan blue
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18. Kim JS, Hur H, Min BS, Sohn SK, Cho CH, Kim NK: Oncologic outcomes of self-expanding metallic stent insertion as a bridge to surgery in the management of left-sided colon cancer obstruction: comparison with nonobstructing elective surgery. World J Surg; 2009 Jun;33(6):1281-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Oncologic outcomes of self-expanding metallic stent insertion as a bridge to surgery in the management of left-sided colon cancer obstruction: comparison with nonobstructing elective surgery.
  • BACKGROUND: Self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) have been used as a bridge to surgery in patients with obstruction by colorectal cancer, but the oncologic safety of this technique has not yet been established.
  • METHODS: Between October 1999 and July 2007, 35 patients who had left-sided colon malignancy obstruction and underwent surgical resection after SEMS insertion (group A) were matched to 350 patients who underwent elective surgery for nonobstructing left-sided colon cancer based on stage II, III, and IV malignancies according to the 2001 American Joint Committee on Cancer (group B).
  • CONCLUSIONS: These data show that insertion of SEMS as a bridge to surgery in the management of left-sided colon cancer obstruction is possibly associated with adverse oncologic outcomes compared with nonobstructing elective surgery, but it is unclear what magnitude of this effect is related to the underlying obstruction rather than to the SEMS.

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  • (PMID = 19363580.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-2323
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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