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1. Gunderson LL, Jessup JM, Sargent DJ, Greene FL, Stewart AK: Revised TN categorization for colon cancer based on national survival outcomes data. J Clin Oncol; 2010 Jan 10;28(2):264-71
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  • [Title] Revised TN categorization for colon cancer based on national survival outcomes data.
  • PURPOSE: The sixth edition of American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Cancer Staging Manual for colon cancer subdivided stage II into IIA (T3N0) and IIB (T4N0) and stage III into IIIA (T1-2N1M0), IIIB (T3-4N1M0), and IIIC (anyTN2M0).
  • Subsequent analyses supported revised substaging of stage III because of improved survival for T1-2N2 versus T3-4N2 and T4N1 survival was more similar to T3-4N2 than to T3N1.
  • The AJCC Hindgut Taskforce sought population-based validation that depth of invasion and nodal status interact to affect survival.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) population-based data from January 1992 to December 2004 for 109,953 colon cancer patients were compared with National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) data on 134,206 patients.
  • RESULTS: SEER rectal cancer analyses confirm that T1-2N2 cancers have better prognosis than T3-4N2,T4bN1 have similar prognosis to T4N2, T1-2N1 have similar prognosis to T2N0/T3N0, and T1-2N2ahave similar prognosis to T2N0/T3N0 (T1N2a) or T4aN0 (T2N2a).
  • CONCLUSION: This SEER population-based colon cancer analysis is highly consistent with rectal cancer pooled analysis and SEER rectal cancer analyses, supporting the shift of T1-2N2 lesions from IIIC to IIIA/IIIB, shifting T4bN1 from IIIB to IIIC, subdividing T4/N1/N2, and revising substaging of stages II/III.
  • Survival outcomes by TN category for colon and rectal cancer are strikingly similar.

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  • [CommentIn] J Clin Oncol. 2010 Sep 20;28(27):e469; author reply e470 [20585093.001]
  • (PMID = 19949014.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2815715
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2. Gunderson LL, Jessup JM, Sargent DJ, Greene FL, Stewart A: Revised tumor and node categorization for rectal cancer based on surveillance, epidemiology, and end results and rectal pooled analysis outcomes. J Clin Oncol; 2010 Jan 10;28(2):256-63
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Revised tumor and node categorization for rectal cancer based on surveillance, epidemiology, and end results and rectal pooled analysis outcomes.
  • PURPOSE: The sixth edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) rectal cancer staging subdivided stage II into IIA (T3N0) and IIB (T4N0) and stage III into IIIA (T1-2N1M0), IIIB (T3-4N1M0), and IIIC (anyTN2M0).
  • Subsequent analyses supported revised substaging of stage III as a result of improved survival with T1-2N2 versus T3-4N2 and survival of T4N1 more similar to T3-4N2 than T3N1.
  • The AJCC Hindgut Taskforce sought population-based validation that depth of invasion interacts with nodal status to affect survival.
  • METHODS: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) population-based data from January 1992 to December 2004 for 35,829 patients with rectal cancer were compared with rectal pooled analysis data (3,791 patients).
  • RESULTS: SEER rectal cancer analyses confirm that T1-2N2 cancers have better prognosis than T3-4N2, T4bN1 have similar prognosis to T4N2, T1-2N1 have similar prognosis to T2N0/T3N0, and T1-2N2a have similar prognosis to T2N0/T3N0 (T1N2a) or T4aN0 (T2N2a).
  • CONCLUSION: This SEER population-based rectal cancer analysis validates the rectal pooled analyses and supports the shift of T1-2N2 lesions from IIIC to IIIA or IIIB and T4bN1 from IIIB to IIIC.
  • SEER outcomes support subdividing T4, N1, and N2 and revised substaging of stages II and III.

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  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1987 Jan;13(1):5-10 [3804816.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 1986 Nov 1;2(8514):996-9 [2430152.001]
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  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1994 Aug 25;331(8):502-7 [8041415.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 1994 Sep 10;344(8924):707-11 [7915774.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1995 Jul 15;32(4):1025-9 [7607922.001]
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  • [Cites] Cancer. 1999 Nov 15;86(10):1952-8 [10570418.001]
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  • [Cites] Cancer. 1974 Oct;34(4):1278-92 [4424091.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1976 Jun;37(6):2861-5 [949706.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1978 Sep-Oct;4(9-10):801-7 [711549.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1983 Oct 1;52(7):1317-29 [6192900.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1985 Jan 1;55(1):61-71 [3965086.001]
  • [Cites] Histopathology. 1985 Dec;9(12):1319-27 [3830856.001]
  • [CommentIn] J Clin Oncol. 2010 Aug 10;28(23):e397-8; author reply e399-400 [20547986.001]
  • (PMID = 19949015.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2815714
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3. Prosnitz RG, Patwardhan MB, Samsa GP, Mantyh CR, Fisher DA, McCrory DC, Cline KE, Gray RN, Morse MA: Quality measures for the use of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy in patients with colorectal cancer: a systematic review. Cancer; 2006 Nov 15;107(10):2352-60
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Quality measures for the use of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy in patients with colorectal cancer: a systematic review.
  • BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy (CT) and radiation therapy (RT) are essential components of adjuvant (preoperative or postoperative) therapy for many patients with colorectal cancer (CRC); however, quality measures (QMs) of these critical aspects of CRC treatment have not been characterized well.
  • The most useful QMs identified were 1) the percentage of patients with AJCC Stage III colon cancer who received postoperative CT and 2) the percentage of patients with Stage II or III rectal cancer who received chemoradiotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 17039499.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 39
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4. Miao Y, Everly JJ, Gross TG, Tevar AD, First MR, Alloway RR, Woodle ES: De novo cancers arising in organ transplant recipients are associated with adverse outcomes compared with the general population. Transplantation; 2009 May 15;87(9):1347-59
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: Transplant recipients are at increased risk of malignancy; however, the influence of transplantation on cancer outcomes has not been rigorously defined.
  • METHODS: De novo nonsmall cell lung cancer, colon cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, bladder cancer, renal cell cancer (RCC), and malignant melanoma data in 635 adult (>18 years of age) transplant recipients (from the Israel Penn International Transplant Tumor Registry) were compared with data from 1,282,984 adults in the general population (from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database).
  • RESULTS: Compared with the general population, transplant patients were more likely to have early stage (AJCC stage 0-II) RCC, but more advanced (AJCC stage >II) colon cancer, breast cancer, bladder cancer, and malignant melanoma.
  • Compared with the general population, disease-specific survival was worse in the transplant population for colon cancer (all stages), nonsmall cell lung cancer (stage II), breast cancer (stage III), prostate cancer (stage II, III, and IV), bladder cancer (stage III), and RCC (stage IV).
  • Multivariate analyses demonstrated transplantation to be a negative risk factor for survival for each cancer studied, and transplantation and cancer stage at diagnosis to be the most profound negative survival predictors.

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  • (PMID = 19424035.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-6080
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplantation
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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5. Rivera CA, Ahlberg NC, Taglia L, Kumar M, Blunier A, Benya RV: Expression of GRP and its receptor is associated with improved survival in patients with colon cancer. Clin Exp Metastasis; 2009;26(7):663-71
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Expression of GRP and its receptor is associated with improved survival in patients with colon cancer.
  • Epithelial cells lining the adult human colon do not normally express gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) or its receptor (GRPR), but both can be up regulated post malignant transformation.
  • Since GRPR activation promotes proliferation, it has been assumed that their aberrant expression promotes colon cancer (CC) growth and progression.
  • To do this we identified all CC diagnosed at a single institution from 1998 to 2002 that were classified as AJCC stage II or III (n = 88); of these 50 (57%) had sufficient tissues remaining for study.

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  • (PMID = 19430935.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-7276
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical & experimental metastasis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Exp. Metastasis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-094346
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Receptors, Bombesin; 80043-53-4 / Gastrin-Releasing Peptide
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6. Chen CC, Yang SH, Lin JK, Lin TC, Chen WS, Jiang JK, Wang HS, Chang SC: Is it reasonable to add preoperative serum level of CEA and CA19-9 to staging for colorectal cancer? J Surg Res; 2005 Apr;124(2):169-74
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Is it reasonable to add preoperative serum level of CEA and CA19-9 to staging for colorectal cancer?
  • BACKGROUND: Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) are the most common tumor markers for colorectal cancer.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study population was patients (n = 574, 67.1 +/- 11.3 years old, 397 males) who received potentially curative resection of colorectal adenocarcinoma (stage I-III) between January 1994 and August 2002, including preoperative measurements of CEA and CA19-9.
  • Survival was analyzed for AJCC staging, CEA (+) versus (-), CA19-9 (+) versus (-), and four groups.
  • However, the combined use of the two markers revealed a significant survival benefit (P = 0.035) of group 1 ("-" for both markers) over 4 ("+" for both) in stage II.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Patients with an elevated level of both CEA and CA19-9 in stage II of colorectal cancer have a significantly poorer prognosis than those with normal levels of these markers.

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  • (PMID = 15820244.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-4804
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of surgical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Surg. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / CA-19-9 Antigen; 0 / Carcinoembryonic Antigen
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7. Lu PY, Turner R, Roberts V, Ho YH: Colorectal carcinoma among Indigenous people: a public hospital-based study in Townsville and Cairns, North Queensland, Australia. ANZ J Surg; 2005 Nov;75(11):972-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • INTRODUCTION: There are very little clinical and pathological data on colorectal cancer among Indigenous people in Australia.
  • METHODS: A retrospective study on Indigenous patients treated for colorectal cancer at the Townsville and Cairns Base Hospitals from 1999 to 2004 was carried out in order to better characterise this disease in the Indigenous population.
  • The majority (56%) of the tumours were left-sided, being in the sigmoid colon, rectosigmoid junction and rectum.
  • Of the patients, 60% had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system Stage I and II disease at presentation.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Comparisons were made with available data on colorectal cancer in the general Australian population.

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  • (PMID = 16336390.001).
  • [ISSN] 1445-1433
  • [Journal-full-title] ANZ journal of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] ANZ J Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Australia
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8. Tanaka M, Sethi S, Li D, Bland G, Hamilton SR, Abbruzzese JL, Eng C: CHFR methylation as an epigenetic marker for recurrence of colon cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4043

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] CHFR methylation as an epigenetic marker for recurrence of colon cancer.
  • : 4043 Background: Currently, no definitive epigenetic markers exist to predict recurrence and overall survival (OS) of colorectal cancer patients after surgical resection.
  • Promoter hypermethylation of the ID4 (inhibitor of DNA binding), RECK (reversion-inducing cysteine rich protein with Kazal motifs), and CHFR (checkpoint with forkhead-associated and RING finger domains) genes have been associated with reduced mRNA and protein expression in colorectal cancer.
  • The purpose of this study was to determine the association of methylation of these genes and also MINT1 (methylated in tumor loci) with recurrence-free survival (RFS) and OS in colon cancer patients.
  • METHODS: DNA methylation was quantitatively evaluated using pyrosequencing in tissue samples from 64 patients with AJCC stage II and III colon cancer without HNPCC seen at M.D.
  • RESULTS: There were 19 stage II (30%) and 45 stage III (70%) patients.
  • Methylation of the CHFR promoter is a potential epigenetic marker for colon cancer recurrence and overall survival.

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  • (PMID = 27961567.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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