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1. You YN, Baxter NN, Stewart A, Nelson H: Is the increasing rate of local excision for stage I rectal cancer in the United States justified?: a nationwide cohort study from the National Cancer Database. Ann Surg; 2007 May;245(5):726-33
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Is the increasing rate of local excision for stage I rectal cancer in the United States justified?: a nationwide cohort study from the National Cancer Database.
  • SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Despite the lack of level I/level II evidence supporting its oncologic adequacy, LE is performed for stage I rectal cancer.
  • METHODS: Surgical therapy for 35,179 patients with stage I rectal cancer diagnosed in 1989 to 2003 was examined over time, utilizing the National Cancer Database.

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  • (PMID = 17457165.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-4932
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA101695; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA076001; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA 101695; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U01 CA 76001
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1877081
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2. Gunderson LL, Jessup JM, Sargent DJ, Greene FL, Stewart A: Revised tumor and node categorization for rectal cancer based on surveillance, epidemiology, and end results and rectal pooled analysis outcomes. J Clin Oncol; 2010 Jan 10;28(2):256-63
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  • [Title] Revised tumor and node categorization for rectal cancer based on surveillance, epidemiology, and end results and rectal pooled analysis outcomes.
  • PURPOSE: The sixth edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) rectal cancer staging subdivided stage II into IIA (T3N0) and IIB (T4N0) and stage III into IIIA (T1-2N1M0), IIIB (T3-4N1M0), and IIIC (anyTN2M0).
  • Subsequent analyses supported revised substaging of stage III as a result of improved survival with T1-2N2 versus T3-4N2 and survival of T4N1 more similar to T3-4N2 than T3N1.
  • The AJCC Hindgut Taskforce sought population-based validation that depth of invasion interacts with nodal status to affect survival.
  • METHODS: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) population-based data from January 1992 to December 2004 for 35,829 patients with rectal cancer were compared with rectal pooled analysis data (3,791 patients).
  • RESULTS: SEER rectal cancer analyses confirm that T1-2N2 cancers have better prognosis than T3-4N2, T4bN1 have similar prognosis to T4N2, T1-2N1 have similar prognosis to T2N0/T3N0, and T1-2N2a have similar prognosis to T2N0/T3N0 (T1N2a) or T4aN0 (T2N2a).
  • CONCLUSION: This SEER population-based rectal cancer analysis validates the rectal pooled analyses and supports the shift of T1-2N2 lesions from IIIC to IIIA or IIIB and T4bN1 from IIIB to IIIC.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasm Staging / methods. Rectal Neoplasms / pathology. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 19949015.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2815714
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3. Beck DE, Reickert CA, Margolin DA, Whitlow CB, Timmcke AE, Hicks TC: Local recurrence, distant recurrence and survival of rectal cancer. Ochsner J; 2006;6(2):59-63
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Local recurrence, distant recurrence and survival of rectal cancer.
  • PURPOSE: To assess our institution's ability to minimize local and distant recurrence with a preference for sphincter preserving surgery in the management of rectal cancer.
  • Patients with Stage 0 (AJCC) disease and those treated for palliation were not included.
  • Clinical and pathologic stage, operation type, adjuvant therapy, recurrence, and survival were compared.
  • RESULTS: Rectal cancer was identified in 332 patients (mean follow-up: 5.5 years).
  • Cancer specific 5-year survival was 77% overall.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In rectal cancer, the therapeutic objectives are to control disease, limit recurrence, and preserve sphincter function; these goals were met for many patients at this institution.
  • Careful surgical technique and adjuvant therapy can allow successful treatment, even of advanced rectal cancers.

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  • (PMID = 21765795.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-5012
  • [Journal-full-title] The Ochsner journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ochsner J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3121568
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Rectal cancer / adjuvant therapy / local recurrence / survival
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4. O'Neill B, Brown G, Wotherspoon A, Burton S, Norman A, Tait D: Successful downstaging of high rectal and recto-sigmoid cancer by neo-adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy. Clin Med Oncol; 2008;2:135-44
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  • [Title] Successful downstaging of high rectal and recto-sigmoid cancer by neo-adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy.
  • The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility and downstaging of treating locally advanced tumours from high rectum to distal sigmoid with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT).
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: Seventeen patients with high rectal, rectosigmoid or distal sigmoid tumours above the peritoneal reflection received neoadjuvant CRT, selected on MRI findings indicating T4 disease or threatened circumferential resection margin.
  • Nine patients (52.9%) lowered pathologic disease AJCC stage, i.e. 'downstaged'.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Locally advanced high rectal and recto-sigmoid tumours may be treated with pre-operative CRT with acceptable toxicity, impressive down-staging, and clear surgical margins.

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  • (PMID = 21892276.001).
  • [ISSN] 1177-9314
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical medicine. Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Med Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] New Zealand
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3161699
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; chemoradiotherapy / chemotherapy / downstaging / radiotherapy / total mesorectal excision
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5. Georgescu SO, Neacşu CN, Vintilă D, Popa P, Forţu L, Nistor A, Ferariu D, Târcoveanu E: [Long-term results after surgery for colorectal adenocarcinoma, stage I-III. Problems of prognosis]. Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi; 2007 Oct-Dec;111(4):932-9
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  • [Title] [Long-term results after surgery for colorectal adenocarcinoma, stage I-III. Problems of prognosis].
  • [Transliterated title] Rezultate la distanţă după tratamentul chirurgical al adenocarcinomului colo-rectal stadiile I-III. Probleme de prognostic.
  • Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide.
  • STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study on 142 consecutively cases with stage I to III colorectal adenocarcinomas (TNM AJCC/UICC) in which patients underwent potentially curative surgery in one single public health service (1st Surgical Clinic Iaşi, Romania) between 2004 and 2005.
  • The surgical procedures performed were the following: right colectomy (n = 54; 30%); transverse colectomy (n = 2; 1.4%); left colectomy (n = 19; 13.4%); segmental colon resection with anastomosis (n = 5 ; 3.5%); Hartmann procedure (n = 18; 12.7%); anterior rectal resection (n = 11; 7.7%) and abdominoperineal resection (n = 33; 23.2%).
  • RESULTS: The factors with a significant negative influence in overall survival and 42-months survival rates were: the age over 70 years, the emergency surgery related to cancer's complications, the advanced AJCC/ UICC stage, vascular invasion, perineural invasion, the recurrence of disease, the moderate and lower differentiated adenocarcinoma and incomplete or not performed chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSION: Even with a radical surgical approach the advanced stage of colorectal adenocarcinoma has a low prognostic, but some other factors have also a high significance in postoperative outcome.

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  • (PMID = 18389783.001).
  • [ISSN] 0048-7848
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista medico-chirurgicală̆ a Societă̆ţ̜ii de Medici ş̧i Naturaliş̧ti din Iaş̧i
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi
  • [Language] rum
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Romania
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6. Hoshikawa T, Mukai M, Oida Y, Tajima T, Morikawa G, Nakamura T, Motojyuku M, Nakamura M, Makuuchi H: Pelvic recurrence after Miles' operation for anastomotic recurrence in a patient with stage I rectal cancer invading the proper muscle layer: Case report. Oncol Rep; 2007 Apr;17(4):743-6
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  • [Title] Pelvic recurrence after Miles' operation for anastomotic recurrence in a patient with stage I rectal cancer invading the proper muscle layer: Case report.
  • We performed D2 low anterior resection in a patient with stage I rectal cancer [pathological diagnosis: proper muscle (pm) invasion, n0, lymphatic invasion (ly), (-); venous invasion (v), (-); anal margin, (-)].
  • These findings suggest that the risk of local recurrence of rectal cancer is increased even in stage I disease if ONCs are found in the perinodal fat.
  • Further studies are required to examine the relationship between local recurrence and extranodal ONCs in patients with primary rectal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / diagnosis. Pelvis. Rectal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Rectal Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 17342309.001).
  • [ISSN] 1021-335X
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncol. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 68238-35-7 / Keratins
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7. Das P, Crane CH: Staging, prognostic factors, and therapy of localized rectal cancer. Curr Oncol Rep; 2009 May;11(3):167-74
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Staging, prognostic factors, and therapy of localized rectal cancer.
  • Many recent developments have taken place in the management of rectal cancer.
  • Appropriate staging plays an increasingly important role in rectal cancer, because many treatment decisions must be based on preoperative staging.
  • For stage II and III rectal cancer, preoperative chemo-radiation and radiotherapy have been accepted widely as a standard of care.
  • The German Rectal Cancer Trial demonstrated the superiority of preoperative chemoradiation over postoperative chemoradiation, whereas the trials from the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Fédération Francophone de Cancérologie Digestive showed the benefits of preoperative chemoradiation over preoperative long-course radiotherapy.
  • For stage I rectal cancer, local excision is being used increasingly, but recent studies show the need for caution with the use of this technique.
  • This article reviews recent studies on staging, prognostic factors, and therapy of localized rectal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Rectal Neoplasms / pathology. Rectal Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 19336008.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-6269
  • [Journal-full-title] Current oncology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Oncol Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 51
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8. Prosnitz RG, Patwardhan MB, Samsa GP, Mantyh CR, Fisher DA, McCrory DC, Cline KE, Gray RN, Morse MA: Quality measures for the use of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy in patients with colorectal cancer: a systematic review. Cancer; 2006 Nov 15;107(10):2352-60
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  • [Title] Quality measures for the use of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy in patients with colorectal cancer: a systematic review.
  • BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy (CT) and radiation therapy (RT) are essential components of adjuvant (preoperative or postoperative) therapy for many patients with colorectal cancer (CRC); however, quality measures (QMs) of these critical aspects of CRC treatment have not been characterized well.
  • The most useful QMs identified were 1) the percentage of patients with AJCC Stage III colon cancer who received postoperative CT and 2) the percentage of patients with Stage II or III rectal cancer who received chemoradiotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 17039499.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 39
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9. Platell CF: Changing patterns of recurrence after treatment for colorectal cancer. Int J Colorectal Dis; 2007 Oct;22(10):1223-31
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Changing patterns of recurrence after treatment for colorectal cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: The management of patients with colorectal cancer has changed appreciably over the last 16 years.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data was obtained from a prospective database that had recorded all patients presenting with colorectal cancer from 1996 to 2006.
  • This data was compared with a retrospective data set that included all patients treated with colorectal cancer at the same institution from 1989 to 1995.
  • There were more patients with rectal cancer and stage I cancer in the study group.
  • These changes were noted for both colon (16% vs 34%, p < 0.001) and rectal cancers (18% vs 50%, p < 0.001).
  • There was also a decrease in local recurrence in patients with rectal cancer (8.8% [95% CI 4.5%-13.1%] vs 33.6% [95% CI 23.6%-43.6%], p < 0.001).

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  • (PMID = 17393173.001).
  • [ISSN] 0179-1958
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of colorectal disease
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Colorectal Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
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10. Christoforidis D, Cho HM, Dixon MR, Mellgren AF, Madoff RD, Finne CO: Transanal endoscopic microsurgery versus conventional transanal excision for patients with early rectal cancer. Ann Surg; 2009 May;249(5):776-82
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Transanal endoscopic microsurgery versus conventional transanal excision for patients with early rectal cancer.
  • OBJECTIVE: To compare transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEMS) with conventional transanal excision (TAE) in terms of the quality of resection, local recurrence, and survival rates in patients with stage I rectal cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: Although TEMS is often considered a superior surgical technique to TAE, it is poorly suited for excising tumors in the lower third of the rectum.
  • METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed information on all patients with stage pT1 and pT2 rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent local excision from 1997 through mid-2006.
  • We found no significant differences in patient characteristics, adjuvant therapy, tumor stage, or adverse histopathologic features.
  • In our multivariate analysis, the tumor distance from the anal verge, the resection margin status, the T stage, and the use of adjuvant therapy--but not the surgical technique (i.e., TEMS or TAE) itself--were independent predictors of local recurrence and DFS.
  • However, the apparently better oncologic outcomes with TEMS can be partly explained by case selection of lower-risk tumors of the upper rectum.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / surgery. Endoscopy, Digestive System. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Rectal Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 19387326.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-1140
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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11. Christoforidis D, McNally MP, Jarosek SL, Madoff RD, Finne CO: Endocavitary contact radiation therapy for ultrasonographically staged T1 N0 and T2 N0 rectal cancer. Br J Surg; 2009 Apr;96(4):430-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Endocavitary contact radiation therapy for ultrasonographically staged T1 N0 and T2 N0 rectal cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term outcomes of patients undergoing endocavitary contact radiation therapy (ECR) for stage I rectal cancer.
  • METHODS: A database of patients treated with ECR for biopsy-proven rectal adenocarcinoma from July 1986 to June 2006 was reviewed retrospectively.
  • Only patients with primary, non-metastatic, ultrasonographically staged T1 N0 and T2 N0 cancer who had no adjuvant treatment were included.
  • CONCLUSION: ECR is a minimally invasive treatment option for early-stage rectal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Brachytherapy / methods. Rectal Neoplasms / radiotherapy

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2009 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
  • (PMID = 19283737.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2168
  • [Journal-full-title] The British journal of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br J Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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12. Kozak KR, Moody JS: The impact of T and N stage on long-term survival of rectal cancer patients in the community. J Surg Oncol; 2008 Sep 1;98(3):161-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The impact of T and N stage on long-term survival of rectal cancer patients in the community.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Use of the TNM staging system has been encouraged for rectal cancer patients.
  • METHODS: Patients who underwent surgery for rectal adenocarcinoma from 1988 to 2004 were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database.
  • Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed for subgroups of patients defined by T and N stage.
  • RESULTS: For the overall population of 30,826 patients, both T and N stage significantly impacted overall survival (P < 0.001).
  • N stage variably affected survival for subgroups of patients based on T stage, whereas T stage significantly affected survival regardless of N stage.
  • A previously developed risk classification system that assigns one of four risk levels outperformed AJCC group staging in this cohort.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Rectal cancer patients experience widely varying survival rates based on extent of disease.
  • A new risk classification system is proposed that provides better prognostic information than AJCC group staging, suggesting current rectal cancer staging systems may be improved with appropriate revisions.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / mortality. Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Rectal Neoplasms / mortality. Rectal Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 18615481.001).
  • [ISSN] 1096-9098
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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13. Eng C, Chang GJ, Das P, Rodriguez-Bigas M, Skibber JM, Qiao W, Rosner GL, Ukegbu LT, Wolff RA, Crane CH: Phase II study of capecitabine and oxaliplatin with concurrent radiation therapy (XELOX-XRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4116

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II study of capecitabine and oxaliplatin with concurrent radiation therapy (XELOX-XRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal.
  • : 4116 Background: Definitive therapy for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the anal canal consists of external beam radiotherapy with concurrent 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C or cisplatin.
  • The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tolerability and efficacy of XELOX-XRT as definitive treatment for anal cancer.
  • METHODS: Patients with histologically proven SCC of the anal canal, AJCC Stage II-IIIB (T<sub>2-4</sub> or N+M<sub>0</sub>), ECOG PS 0-1, HIV<sup>-</sup>, and no prior therapy were eligible for XELOX-based chemoradiotherapy.
  • Response was determined by CT/MRI, digital rectal examination, and proctoscopy.
  • Therefore, the chemotherapy schedule was modified and only 1 of 9 patients in Group 2 developed grade 3 diarrhea.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The combination of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy (XELOX-XRT) is effective for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal.

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  • (PMID = 27961220.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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14. Wortham AH, Schreiber D, Rineer J, Katsoulakis E, Sroufe R, Marienberg E, Nwokedi E, Han P, Choi K, Rotman M: Overall survival using local excision techniques with and without radiation compared with APR for stage I rectal cancer: A SEER based analysis. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):4032

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Overall survival using local excision techniques with and without radiation compared with APR for stage I rectal cancer: A SEER based analysis.
  • : 4032 Background: The standard of care for Stage I rectal cancer is radical resection.
  • This analysis compares the outcomes of sphincter sparing treatment with radical surgery in Stage I rectal cancer.
  • METHODS: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER) registry, we performed a query of patients with Stage T1-2N0 (T=4 cm or less) rectal adenocarcinoma between 1988 and 2003 who were treated with either local excision alone (LE), local excision followed by radiotherapy (LE+RT) or abdominoperineal resection (APR).
  • Subgroup survival analysis was performed by T-stage (T1 vs T2).
  • CONCLUSIONS: According to this analysis, there was no statistical difference in survival for patients with Stage I rectal carcinoma undergoing APR versus LE+RT.

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  • (PMID = 27961548.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. Kurt M, Ozkan L, Yilmazlar T, Ercan I, Zorluoglu A, Memik F, Engin K: Postoperative concomitant chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer. Hepatogastroenterology; 2005 Sep-Oct;52(65):1411-5
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  • [Title] Postoperative concomitant chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer.
  • METHODOLOGY: Thirty-eight patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were enrolled in the study.
  • Ranges of total radiation doses were between 50.4 Gy and 61.2 Gy with a median of 59.4 Gy with fraction size of 1.8 Gy five times weekly.
  • Administration of chemotherapy concomitant with radiotherapy (p=0.089), AJCC stage III (p=0.079), Duke's stage C (p=0.079), presence of lymph node involvement (p=0.079) and presence of local recurrence (p=0.066) appeared to be effecting distant metastasis although differences did not reach statistically significance.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our results have provided further evidence of the ability of postoperative chemoradiotherapy to delay and prevent local recurrence and metastasis of rectal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Rectal Neoplasms / drug therapy. Rectal Neoplasms / radiotherapy

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  • (PMID = 16201085.001).
  • [ISSN] 0172-6390
  • [Journal-full-title] Hepato-gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hepatogastroenterology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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16. Gallego-Plazas J, Menárguez-Pina F, Maestre-Peiró A, González-Orozco V, Andreu F, Escudero-Barea MJ, Morcillo MA: Feasibility of adequate resectable rectal cancer treatment in a third-level hospital. Clin Transl Oncol; 2009 Mar;11(3):172-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Feasibility of adequate resectable rectal cancer treatment in a third-level hospital.
  • PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility, concerning compliance to protocol and recommended clinical practice guidelines, as well as efficacy results of multidisciplinary treatment (surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy) of resectable rectal cancer in a third-level hospital devoid of radiotherapy and clinical oncology units.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective, single-institution analysis was completed for 45 consecutive patients diagnosed with resectable rectal cancer who entered an officially proposed multidisciplinary treatment protocol from October 1998 to September 2003.
  • Adequacy of patient inclusion, according to clinical stage, was reviewed.
  • RESULTS: According to an independent board review, 3 patients (6.7%) with stage I rectal cancer, 31 patients (68.9%) with stage II and 11 patients (24.4%) with stage III rectal cancer were included.
  • A statistically significant relationship between pathologic stage (grouped I-II vs. III) and the use of adjuvant chemotherapy was found (p=0.033; chi-square test).
  • With a median follow-up of 65.46 months, a total of 10 recurrences have been diagnosed, all of them in stage III patients.
  • CONCLUSION: Multidisciplinary treatment of resectable rectal cancer in a third-level hospital is feasible.
  • [MeSH-major] Rectal Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 19293055.001).
  • [ISSN] 1699-048X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical & translational oncology : official publication of the Federation of Spanish Oncology Societies and of the National Cancer Institute of Mexico
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Transl Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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17. Unsal D, Akyurek N, Uner A, Erpolat OP, Han U, Akmansu M, Mentes BB, Dursun A: Gelatinase B expression as a prognostic factor in patients with stage II/III rectal carcinoma treated by postoperative adjuvant therapy. Am J Clin Oncol; 2008 Feb;31(1):55-63
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  • [Title] Gelatinase B expression as a prognostic factor in patients with stage II/III rectal carcinoma treated by postoperative adjuvant therapy.
  • This retrospective study was aimed both to examine the gelatinase expression status in patients with rectal cancer and to investigate their prognostic value on survival.
  • METHODS: Sixty patients who underwent postoperative adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for Stage II and III rectal carcinoma were included.
  • Expressions of MMP-2, MMP-9, and tissue inhibitors of MMP (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded primary rectal cancers and graded for the intensity and the percentage of cells stained.
  • The ratio of tumors with positive MMP-9 expression was increased according to N stage (P = 0.005), AJCC stage (P = 0.005), and tumor differentiation (P = 0.017).
  • CONCLUSION: MMP-9 expression was observed in the tumors of patients with Stage II and III rectal carcinoma in comparable values and was characterized by poor overall survival and disease-free survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / enzymology. Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 / metabolism. Rectal Neoplasms / enzymology. Rectal Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 18376229.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-453X
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1; 127497-59-0 / Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2; EC 3.4.24.24 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 2; EC 3.4.24.35 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 9
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18. Rottoli M, Bona S, Rosati R, Elmore U, Bianchi PP, Spinelli A, Bartolucci C, Montorsi M: Laparoscopic rectal resection for cancer: effects of conversion on short-term outcome and survival. Ann Surg Oncol; 2009 May;16(5):1279-86
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Laparoscopic rectal resection for cancer: effects of conversion on short-term outcome and survival.
  • BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic rectal resection (LRR) is an oncologically safe procedure.
  • Conversion was associated with higher body mass index (BMI) (27.3 versus 24.9 kg/m(2), P < 0.001) and American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage IV (26.9% versus 4.8%, P < 0.001), and resulted in longer operative time (342 versus 285 min, P = 0.006) and increased intraoperative complication rate (31% versus 5%, P < 0.001).
  • After exclusion of stage IV patients from the analysis, 5-year disease-free survival was 71.1% in CR group and 85.3% in NCR group (P = 0.17), while the overall recurrence rate was 26.3% in CR patients and 11.4% in NCR patients (P = 0.07).
  • [MeSH-major] Colectomy / mortality. Rectal Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 19252948.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-4681
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Rades D, Kuhn H, Schultze J, Homann N, Brandenburg B, Schulte R, Krull A, Schild SE, Dunst J: Prognostic factors affecting locally recurrent rectal cancer and clinical significance of hemoglobin. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2008 Mar 15;70(4):1087-93
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prognostic factors affecting locally recurrent rectal cancer and clinical significance of hemoglobin.
  • PURPOSE: To investigate potential prognostic factors, including hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy, for associations with survival and local control in patients with unirradiated locally recurrent rectal cancer.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Ten potential prognostic factors were investigated in 94 patients receiving radiotherapy for recurrent rectal cancer: age (<or=68 vs. >or=69 years), gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0-1 vs. 2-3), American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage (<or=II vs. III vs. IV), grading (G1-2 vs. G3), surgery, administration of chemotherapy, radiation dose (equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions: <or=50 vs. >50 Gy), and hemoglobin levels before (<12 vs. >or=12 g/dL) and during (majority of levels: <12 vs. >or=12 g/dL) radiotherapy.
  • RESULTS: Improved survival was associated with better performance status (p<0.001), lower AJCC stage (p=0.023), surgery (p=0.011), chemotherapy (p=0.003), and hemoglobin levels>or=12 g/dL both before (p=0.031) and during (p<0.001) radiotherapy.
  • On multivariate analyses, performance status, AJCC stage, and hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy maintained significance.
  • Improved local control was associated with better performance status (p=0.040), lower AJCC stage (p=0.010), lower grading (p=0.012), surgery (p<0.001), chemotherapy (p<0.001), and hemoglobin levels>or=12 g/dL before (p<0.001) and during (p<0.001) radiotherapy.
  • CONCLUSION: Predictors for outcome in patients who received radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer were performance status, AJCC stage, chemotherapy, surgery, extent of resection, histologic grading, and hemoglobin levels both before and during radiotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Hemoglobins / analysis. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Rectal Neoplasms

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  • (PMID = 17892921.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hemoglobins
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20. Bittner N, Wallner K, Merrick G, Orio P, Nurani R, True L: The time gap between Pd-103 prostate brachytherapy and supplemental beam radiation does not impact on rectal morbidity or likelihood of cure. Am J Clin Oncol; 2008 Jun;31(3):231-6
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  • [Title] The time gap between Pd-103 prostate brachytherapy and supplemental beam radiation does not impact on rectal morbidity or likelihood of cure.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine whether treatment gap between supplemental beam radiation and brachytherapy implant affects rectal morbidity and likelihood of cure in the treatment of intermediate-risk prostate cancer.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Five hundred sixty-eight patients with AJCC clinical stage T1c-T2a prostate cancer, Gleason score 7 to 9 and/or prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 10 to 20 ng/mL, were randomized to implantation with Pd-103 (90 vs. 115 Gy) with 44 Gy versus 20 Gy preimplant supplemental beam radiation, respectively.
  • Treatment-related morbidity was monitored by mailed questionnaires, using a modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group rectal morbidity criteria at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months.
  • Patients who reported grade 1 or worse rectal morbidity were interviewed by telephone to clarify details regarding their rectal bleeding.
  • RESULTS: Persistent rectal bleeding occurred in 36 of the 548 evaluable patients (7%).
  • The mean gap among rectal bleeders was 3.8 days and among nonbleeders was 4.8 days (P = 0.236).
  • Higher R100 and external beam dose of 44 Gy were significant predictors of rectal bleeding on univariate and multivariate analysis.
  • [MeSH-major] Brachytherapy / adverse effects. Brachytherapy / methods. Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage / etiology. Prostatic Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Rectal Diseases / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Disease-Free Survival. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy Dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Rectum. Tomography, X-Ray Computed


21. Chen CC, Yang SH, Lin JK, Lin TC, Chen WS, Jiang JK, Wang HS, Chang SC: Is it reasonable to add preoperative serum level of CEA and CA19-9 to staging for colorectal cancer? J Surg Res; 2005 Apr;124(2):169-74
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  • [Title] Is it reasonable to add preoperative serum level of CEA and CA19-9 to staging for colorectal cancer?
  • BACKGROUND: Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) are the most common tumor markers for colorectal cancer.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study population was patients (n = 574, 67.1 +/- 11.3 years old, 397 males) who received potentially curative resection of colorectal adenocarcinoma (stage I-III) between January 1994 and August 2002, including preoperative measurements of CEA and CA19-9.
  • Survival was analyzed for AJCC staging, CEA (+) versus (-), CA19-9 (+) versus (-), and four groups.
  • However, the combined use of the two markers revealed a significant survival benefit (P = 0.035) of group 1 ("-" for both markers) over 4 ("+" for both) in stage II.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Patients with an elevated level of both CEA and CA19-9 in stage II of colorectal cancer have a significantly poorer prognosis than those with normal levels of these markers.

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  • (PMID = 15820244.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-4804
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of surgical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Surg. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / CA-19-9 Antigen; 0 / Carcinoembryonic Antigen
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22. Herstein A, Wallner K, Merrick G, Mitsuyama H, Armstrong J, True L, Cavanagh W, Butler W: I-125 versus Pd-103 for low-risk prostate cancer: long-term morbidity outcomes from a prospective randomized multicenter controlled trial. Cancer J; 2005 Sep-Oct;11(5):385-9
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  • [Title] I-125 versus Pd-103 for low-risk prostate cancer: long-term morbidity outcomes from a prospective randomized multicenter controlled trial.
  • METHODS: As of June 14th, 2002, 352 of a planned total of 600 patients with 1997 American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) clinical stage T1c-T2a prostatic carcinoma (Gleason grade 2-6, PSA 4-10 ng/mL) had been randomized to implantation with I-125 (144 Gy, TG-43) or Pd-103 (125 Gy, NIST-99).
  • Rectal doses were expressed as the R100, defined as the rectal volume (cc) that received at least 100% of the prescription dose.
  • RESULTS: The AUA scores peaked at the 1-month postimplant time point for both isotopes and gradually declined.

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  • [CommentIn] Cancer J. 2005 Sep-Oct;11(5):383-4 [16259868.001]
  • (PMID = 16259869.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-9117
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer journal (Sudbury, Mass.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Iodine Radioisotopes; 0 / Radioisotopes; 5TWQ1V240M / Palladium
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23. Cheung R, Tucker SL, Lee AL, Dong L, Kamat A, Pisters L, Kuban DA: Assessing the impact of an alternative biochemical failure definition on radiation dose response for high-risk prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2005 Jan 1;61(1):14-9
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  • [Title] Assessing the impact of an alternative biochemical failure definition on radiation dose response for high-risk prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy.
  • We assessed the effect of using an alternative failure definition on the dose-response characteristics of high-risk prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy alone.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: This study included 363 high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiotherapy alone from 1987 to 1999.
  • These patients have one or more of the following: 1992 American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) digital rectal examination (DRE) stage > or = cT3, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) > 20 ng/mL, and/or biopsy Gleason score > or = 8.
  • At 5 years, TCD50 (95% CI), the dose to achieve 50% tumor control, for high-risk prostate cancer, is 70.4 (68.0-72.9) Gy using CN + 2 [ASTRO: 75.5 (70.7-80.2) Gy].
  • These changes in dose-response characteristics as well as the time dependence of dose response should be noted when investigators design dose escalation trials for the high-risk prostate cancer patients.


24. Gunderson LL, Jessup JM, Sargent DJ, Greene FL, Stewart AK: Revised TN categorization for colon cancer based on national survival outcomes data. J Clin Oncol; 2010 Jan 10;28(2):264-71
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Revised TN categorization for colon cancer based on national survival outcomes data.
  • PURPOSE: The sixth edition of American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Cancer Staging Manual for colon cancer subdivided stage II into IIA (T3N0) and IIB (T4N0) and stage III into IIIA (T1-2N1M0), IIIB (T3-4N1M0), and IIIC (anyTN2M0).
  • Subsequent analyses supported revised substaging of stage III because of improved survival for T1-2N2 versus T3-4N2 and T4N1 survival was more similar to T3-4N2 than to T3N1.
  • The AJCC Hindgut Taskforce sought population-based validation that depth of invasion and nodal status interact to affect survival.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) population-based data from January 1992 to December 2004 for 109,953 colon cancer patients were compared with National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) data on 134,206 patients.
  • N1 and N2 were stratified by number of involved positive lymph nodes (N+): N1a/N1b (1 v 2-3), N2a/N2b (4 to 6 v > or = 7).
  • RESULTS: SEER rectal cancer analyses confirm that T1-2N2 cancers have better prognosis than T3-4N2,T4bN1 have similar prognosis to T4N2, T1-2N1 have similar prognosis to T2N0/T3N0, and T1-2N2ahave similar prognosis to T2N0/T3N0 (T1N2a) or T4aN0 (T2N2a).
  • CONCLUSION: This SEER population-based colon cancer analysis is highly consistent with rectal cancer pooled analysis and SEER rectal cancer analyses, supporting the shift of T1-2N2 lesions from IIIC to IIIA/IIIB, shifting T4bN1 from IIIB to IIIC, subdividing T4/N1/N2, and revising substaging of stages II/III.
  • Survival outcomes by TN category for colon and rectal cancer are strikingly similar.

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  • (PMID = 19949014.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2815715
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25. Yi SK, Yoder M, Zaner K, Hirsch AE: Palliative radiation therapy of symptomatic recurrent bladder cancer. Pain Physician; 2007 Mar;10(2):285-90
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Palliative radiation therapy of symptomatic recurrent bladder cancer.
  • RT is effective at palliating both locally advanced and metastatic cancer, including related symptoms of pain, bleeding, or obstruction.
  • There are also data that support RT palliation for locally advanced or recurrent rectal, prostate, and gynecological cancers.
  • With regard to bladder cancer there is some evidence of the benefit of palliative RT for the control of urinary symptoms and hematuria; however, there is little evidence for the use of palliative RT for pain associated with locally recurrent bladder cancer.
  • We report a case of locally advanced recurrent bladder cancer which was refractory to medical pain management, and was found to be highly responsive to palliative RT.
  • CASE REPORT: An 80-year-old woman with recurrent bladder cancer and intractable pelvic pain refractory to oral and transdermal pain medications, received palliative pelvic RT to a dose of 50 Gy (5000 cGy) in 25 fractions with complete resolution of pain.
  • The patient was originally found to have dysuria, frequency, and hematuria, secondary to an invasive high grade transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder with an adenocarcinoma component, AJCC pT2b N1 M0 Stage IV, for which she underwent a radical cystectomy, total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, partial vaginectomy, and ileal conduit reconstruction.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Palliative radiation therapy has been well studied in the setting of bone metastases and treatment of hematuria for locally advanced bladder cancer.
  • There is little data that we are aware of on the use of RT for pain control with patients that have recurrent, locally advanced bladder cancer.
  • RT is an excellent option for pain management in recurrent bladder cancer and should be offered to patients whose pain is not otherwise optimally controlled.
  • Palliative RT is an important component in the multimodality approach to cancer pain management and optimization of quality of life.

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  • (PMID = 17387350.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-3159
  • [Journal-full-title] Pain physician
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pain Physician
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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26. Chan KK, Dassanayake B, Deen R, Wickramarachchi RE, Kumarage SK, Samita S, Deen KI: Young patients with colorectal cancer have poor survival in the first twenty months after operation and predictable survival in the medium and long-term: analysis of survival and prognostic markers. World J Surg Oncol; 2010;8:82
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Colorectal Cancer.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Young patients with colorectal cancer have poor survival in the first twenty months after operation and predictable survival in the medium and long-term: analysis of survival and prognostic markers.
  • OBJECTIVES: This study compares clinico-pathological features in young (<40 years) and older patients (>50 years) with colorectal cancer, survival in the young and the influence of pre-operative clinical and histological factors on survival.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: A twelve year prospective database of colorectal cancer was analysed.
  • RESULTS: Young patients comprised 13.4 percent of 397 with colorectal cancer.
  • Cancer proximal to the splenic flexure was present more in young than in older patients.
  • Ninety four percent of young cancer deaths were within 20 months of operation.
  • American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage 4 and use of pre-operative chemoradiation in rectal cancer was associated with poor survival in the young.
  • CONCLUSION: If patients, who are less than 40 years old with colorectal cancer, survive twenty months after operation, the prognosis improves and their survival becomes predictable.

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  • (PMID = 20840793.001).
  • [ISSN] 1477-7819
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Surg Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2954852
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27. Stewart D, Yan Y, Kodner IJ, Birnbaum E, Fleshman J, Myerson R, Dietz D: Salvage surgery after failed chemoradiation for anal canal cancer: should the paradigm be changed for high-risk tumors? J Gastrointest Surg; 2007 Dec;11(12):1744-51
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Salvage surgery after failed chemoradiation for anal canal cancer: should the paradigm be changed for high-risk tumors?
  • It is common belief that patients failing chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for squamous cell cancer of the anus (SCCA) can be salvaged with subsequent surgery.
  • Initial tumors were AJCC stage 2 (16 cases), 3A (3 cases), and 4 (1 case).
  • [MeSH-major] Anus Neoplasms / surgery. Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / surgery. Salvage Therapy


28. Lu PY, Turner R, Roberts V, Ho YH: Colorectal carcinoma among Indigenous people: a public hospital-based study in Townsville and Cairns, North Queensland, Australia. ANZ J Surg; 2005 Nov;75(11):972-6
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Health.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Colorectal carcinoma among Indigenous people: a public hospital-based study in Townsville and Cairns, North Queensland, Australia.
  • INTRODUCTION: There are very little clinical and pathological data on colorectal cancer among Indigenous people in Australia.
  • METHODS: A retrospective study on Indigenous patients treated for colorectal cancer at the Townsville and Cairns Base Hospitals from 1999 to 2004 was carried out in order to better characterise this disease in the Indigenous population.
  • The majority (56%) of the tumours were left-sided, being in the sigmoid colon, rectosigmoid junction and rectum.
  • Of the patients, 60% had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system Stage I and II disease at presentation.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Comparisons were made with available data on colorectal cancer in the general Australian population.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Queensland / epidemiology. Rectal Neoplasms / epidemiology. Sigmoid Neoplasms / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 16336390.001).
  • [ISSN] 1445-1433
  • [Journal-full-title] ANZ journal of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] ANZ J Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Australia
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29. Bejrananda T, Phukaoloun M, Boonpipattanapong T, Wanitsuwan W, Kanngern S, Sangthong R, Sangkhathat S: WT1 expression as an independent marker of poor prognosis in colorectal cancers. Cancer Biomark; 2010-2011;8(1):35-42
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  • Of 157 CRCs, 83 were colonic and 74 were rectal cancers.
  • Univariate analysis by Log-rank test showed that AJCC stage, tumor site (rectal cancer), number of positive cells > 120 and high staining intensity (score ++/+++) were significantly associated with poorer survival (p-value < 0.01).
  • Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that the staining intensity, high tumor stage and rectal site were independent factors indicating poorer survival.
  • Our findings indicate that WT1 expression is a marker of poor prognosis in CRCs, independent of AJCC staging.

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  • (PMID = 21896989.001).
  • [ISSN] 1875-8592
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer biomarkers : section A of Disease markers
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Biomark
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / WT1 Proteins
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