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1. Arikawa S, Uchida M, Shinagawa M, Tohnan T, Hayabuchi N: Significance of the " beak sign"in the differential diagnosis of uterine lipoleiomyoma from ovarian dermoid cyst. Kurume Med J; 2006;53(1-2):37-40
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  • [Title] Significance of the " beak sign"in the differential diagnosis of uterine lipoleiomyoma from ovarian dermoid cyst.
  • Although a series of imaging studies suggested a lipomatous tumor, diagnosis was difficult because the tumor appeared as a pedunculated mass extending from the uterine body.
  • To distinguish the tumor from an ovarian lipomatous tumor, the "beak sign" in a magnetic resonance imaging study was diagnostic in this case.
  • The purpose of this paper is to review lipomatous masses of the female pelvis, to discuss the differential diagnosis of the unusual imaging features, and to discuss imaging techniques to optimize pelvic mass characterization.
  • [MeSH-major] Leiomyoma / diagnosis. Lipoma / diagnosis. Ovarian Cysts / diagnosis. Uterine Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 17043394.001).
  • [ISSN] 0023-5679
  • [Journal-full-title] The Kurume medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Kurume Med J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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2. Walter M, Liang S, Ghosh S, Hornsby PJ, Li R: Interleukin 6 secreted from adipose stromal cells promotes migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Oncogene; 2009 Jul 30;28(30):2745-55
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  • [Title] Interleukin 6 secreted from adipose stromal cells promotes migration and invasion of breast cancer cells.
  • Although adipose tissue-derived estrogen contributes to obesity-associated risk for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer, the estrogen-independent impact of adipose tissue on tumor invasion and progression needs to be elucidated.
  • Here, we show that adipose stromal cells (ASCs) significantly stimulate migration and invasion of ER-negative breast cancer cells in vitro and tumor invasion in a co-transplant xenograft mouse model.
  • Our study also identifies cofilin-1, a known regulator of actin dynamics, as a determinant of the tumor-promoting activity of ASCs.
  • Depletion of IL-6 from the ASC-conditioned medium abrogated the stimulatory effect of ASCs on the migration and invasion of breast tumor cells.

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  • (PMID = 19483720.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-5594
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncogene
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncogene
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA093506-08; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA093506; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA093506-05A1; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA093506-05A1; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA93506; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA093506-08
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cofilin 1; 0 / Interleukin-6; 0 / ROCK1 protein, human; EC 2.7.11.1 / rho-Associated Kinases
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS111638; NLM/ PMC2806057
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3. Zemel MB, Sun X: Dietary calcium and dairy products modulate oxidative and inflammatory stress in mice and humans. J Nutr; 2008 Jun;138(6):1047-52
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  • Accordingly, this study was designed to study the effects of the short-term (3 wk) basal suboptimal Ca (0.4%), high-Ca (1.2% from CaCO(3)), and high-dairy (1.2% Ca from milk) obesigenic diets on oxidative and inflammatory stress in adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein-agouti transgenic mice.
  • Adipose tissue reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and NADPH oxidase mRNA and plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) were reduced by the high-Ca diet (P < 0.001) compared with the basal diet and ROS and MDA were further decreased by the high-dairy diet (P < 0.001).
  • The high-Ca and -dairy diets also resulted in suppression of adipose tissue tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA (P = 0.001) compared with the basal diet, whereas an inverse pattern was noted for adiponectin and IL-15 mRNA (P = 0.002).
  • These data demonstrate that dietary Ca suppresses adipose tissue oxidative and inflammatory stress.

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  • (PMID = 18492832.001).
  • [ISSN] 1541-6100
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of nutrition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Nutr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adiponectin; 0 / Calcium, Dietary; 0 / Dietary Carbohydrates; 0 / Dietary Fats; 9007-41-4 / C-Reactive Protein
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4. Nesaretnam K, Gomez PA, Selvaduray KR, Razak GA: Tocotrienol levels in adipose tissue of benign and malignant breast lumps in patients in Malaysia. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr; 2007;16(3):498-504
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Palm oil (from fruit) .

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  • [Title] Tocotrienol levels in adipose tissue of benign and malignant breast lumps in patients in Malaysia.
  • Data on dietary exposure to vitamin E by plasma or adipose tissue concentrations of alpha-tocopherol (alpha-T) in observational studies have failed to provide consistent support for the idea that alpha-T provides women with any protection from breast cancer.
  • In contrast, studies indicate that alpha, gamma, and delta-tocotrienols but not alpha-T have potent anti-proliferative effects in human breast cancer cells.
  • Our aim was to investigate whether there was a difference in tocopherol and tocotrienol concentrations in malignant and benign adipose tissue, in a Malaysian population consuming predominantly a palm oil diet.
  • The study was undertaken using fatty acid levels in breast adipose tissue as a biomarker of qualitative dietary intake of fatty acids.
  • The major fatty acids in breast adipose tissue of patients (benign and malignant) were oleic acid (45-46%), palmitic (28-29%) and linoleic (11-12%).
  • No differences were evident in the fatty acid composition of the two groups.
  • There was a significant difference (p=0.006) in the total tocotrienol levels between malignant (13.7 +/- 6.0 microg/g) and benign (20+/-6.0 microg/g) adipose tissue samples.
  • The study reveals that dietary intake influences adipose tissue fatty acid levels and that adipose tissue is a dynamic reservoir of fat soluble nutrients.
  • The higher adipose tissue concentrations of tocotrienols in benign patients provide support for the idea that tocotrienols may provide protection against breast cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / chemistry. Antioxidants / analysis. Breast Neoplasms / metabolism. Tocopherols / analysis. Tocotrienols / analysis

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  • (PMID = 17704032.001).
  • [ISSN] 0964-7058
  • [Journal-full-title] Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Asia Pac J Clin Nutr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antioxidants; 0 / Dietary Fats, Unsaturated; 0 / Plant Oils; 0 / Tocotrienols; 1406-18-4 / Vitamin E; 1406-66-2 / Tocopherols; 8002-75-3 / palm oil
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5. Prantl L, Muehlberg F, Navone NM, Song YH, Vykoukal J, Logothetis CJ, Alt EU: Adipose tissue-derived stem cells promote prostate tumor growth. Prostate; 2010 Nov 1;70(15):1709-15
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  • [Title] Adipose tissue-derived stem cells promote prostate tumor growth.
  • BACKGROUND: Recent evidence indicates that cancer stem cells play an important role in tumor initiation and maintenance.
  • Additionally, the effect of tissue-resident stem cells located in the surrounding healthy tissue on tumor progression has been demonstrated.
  • While most knowledge has been derived from studies of breast cancer cells, little is known regarding the influence of tissue resident stem cells on the tumor biology of prostate cancer.
  • (1) subcutaneous injection of 10(6) MDA PCa 118b human prostate cancer cells into the upper back or (2) subcutaneous injection of 10(6) MDA PCa 118b cells mixed directly with 10(5) GFP-labeled human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs).
  • Tumor growth and volumes over the ensuing 3 weeks were assessed using calipers and micro-computed tomography.
  • Immunohistochemistry was performed to identify engrafted hASCs in tumor sections.
  • RESULTS: At 3 weeks after injection, the mean tumor volume in the MDA PCa 118b/hASC co-injection group (1019.95 ± 73.49 mm(3)) was significantly higher than that in the MDA PCa 118b-only group (308.70 ± 21.06 mm(3)).
  • Engrafted hASCs exhibited the nuclear marker of proliferation Ki67 and expressed markers for endothelial differentiation, indicating their engraftment in tumor vessels.
  • CONCLUSION: Our study revealed for the first time that ASCs subcutaneously co-injected with prostate cancer cells engraft and promote tumor progression.
  • Further evaluation of the cross-talk between tumor and local tissue-resident stem cells may lead to new strategies for prostate cancer therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / cytology. Neoplastic Stem Cells / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Disease Models, Animal. Flow Cytometry. Immunophenotyping. Male. Mice. Mice, Nude. Neoplasm Transplantation / methods. Random Allocation. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 20564322.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0045
  • [Journal-full-title] The Prostate
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prostate
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA016672
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS612155; NLM/ PMC4977846
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6. Obora A, Kojima T, Kato T, Matsuda H, Horie H, Hashimoto H, Fukuta N, Takano Y, Okuda J, Ida K, Saio M: [An autopsy case of hepatocellular carcinoma in which sarcoma-like changes and peritoneal dissemination were observed after RFA/TACE treatment]. Gan To Kagaku Ryoho; 2009 Jul;36(7):1183-6
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  • Liver biopsy led to a diagnosis of well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma.
  • CT revealed pleural effusion/ascites and nodular tumor in the adipose tissue of the parietal peritoneum and mesentery around the liver.
  • Autopsy revealed a tumor involving the liver surface to the peritoneum, suggesting cancerous peritonitis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / therapy. Catheter Ablation. Chemoembolization, Therapeutic. Liver Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 19620814.001).
  • [ISSN] 0385-0684
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan to kagaku ryoho. Cancer & chemotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan To Kagaku Ryoho
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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7. Nishida J, Ehara S, Shiraishi H, Tada H, Satoh T, Okada K, Shimamura T: Clinical findings of hibernoma of the buttock and thigh: rare involvements and extremely high uptake of FDG-PET. Med Sci Monit; 2009 Jul;15(7):CS117-22

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  • BACKGROUND: Hibernoma is a rare adipose tissue tumor of the soft tissue and the term is derived from the histological similarities to the brown fat found in hibernating animals.
  • This was not typical of liposarcoma and suggestive of hibernoma.
  • Biopsy specimens revealed a proliferation of adipose cells with vacuolated granular eosinophilic cytoplasm.
  • CONCLUSIONS: While occurrences in the buttock or thigh are exceedingly rare, hibernoma should be included in the differential diagnosis of an adipose tissue tumor in the thigh, even though the imaging findings mimic liposarcoma.
  • A correct diagnosis should be established to prevent over-surgery.

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  • (PMID = 19564831.001).
  • [ISSN] 1643-3750
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical science monitor : international medical journal of experimental and clinical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Sci. Monit.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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8. Marsilia GM, Boscaino A, La Mura A, Ceriello A, De Ritis R: Hepatic angiomyolipoma and intramural small intestinal schwannoma: a coincidence or a relationship? Int J Surg Pathol; 2010 Dec;18(6):537-9
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  • Histologically, hepatic angiomyolipoma showed oncocytic features and scanty adipose tissue, the tumor cells expressed desmin, smooth muscle actin, S-100 protein and HMB45.
  • The tumor cells of intramural small intestinal mass were positive for S-100 protein and GFAP and negative for CD117, CD34 and desmin.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiomyolipoma / pathology. Jejunal Neoplasms / pathology. Liver Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / pathology. Neurilemmoma / pathology

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  • (PMID = 19282295.001).
  • [ISSN] 1940-2465
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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9. Kabasawa Y, Katsube K, Harada H, Nagumo K, Terasaki H, Perbal B, Okada N, Omura K: A male infant case of lipofibromatosis in the submental region exhibited the expression of the connective tissue growth factor. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod; 2007 May;103(5):677-82
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  • [Title] A male infant case of lipofibromatosis in the submental region exhibited the expression of the connective tissue growth factor.
  • METHODS: We examined morphological aspects of the tumor and immunohistochemical patterns.
  • RESULTS: Tumor proliferation was infiltrative, which did not show apparent encapsulation.
  • Positive immunoreactivity was found for CD-34, CD-99, Ki-67, and connective tissue growth factor/CCN2 in the fibrous region, S-100 in the adipose region, and Notch1 stain was observed in the eccrine sweat gland cells juxtaposed to the tumor adipose tissue, but no reactivity for Bcl-2, alphaSMA, Notch 2-4, CCN1, and CCN3.
  • Specific expression of CCN2 might be significant for the development of the tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Fibroma / pathology. Head and Neck Neoplasms / metabolism. Head and Neck Neoplasms / pathology. Lipoma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adipose Tissue / chemistry. Adipose Tissue / pathology. Antigens, CD / analysis. Antigens, CD34 / analysis. Cell Adhesion Molecules / analysis. Connective Tissue Growth Factor. Humans. Immediate-Early Proteins / biosynthesis. Immunohistochemistry. Infant. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins / biosynthesis. Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins / biosynthesis. Ki-67 Antigen / analysis. Male. Neoplasm Proteins / biosynthesis. Nephroblastoma Overexpressed Protein. Receptor, Notch1 / biosynthesis. S100 Proteins / analysis

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  • (PMID = 17466886.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-395X
  • [Journal-full-title] Oral surgery, oral medicine, oral pathology, oral radiology, and endodontics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / Antigens, CD34; 0 / CD99 protein, human; 0 / CTGF protein, human; 0 / Cell Adhesion Molecules; 0 / Immediate-Early Proteins; 0 / Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins; 0 / Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; 0 / Ki-67 Antigen; 0 / NOTCH1 protein, human; 0 / NOV protein, human; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / Nephroblastoma Overexpressed Protein; 0 / Receptor, Notch1; 0 / S100 Proteins; 139568-91-5 / Connective Tissue Growth Factor
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10. Novikov VV, Novikov GV, Fesenko EE: Effect of weak combined static and extremely low-frequency alternating magnetic fields on tumor growth in mice inoculated with the Ehrlich ascites carcinoma. Bioelectromagnetics; 2009 Jul;30(5):343-51

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  • [Title] Effect of weak combined static and extremely low-frequency alternating magnetic fields on tumor growth in mice inoculated with the Ehrlich ascites carcinoma.
  • It was shown that the exposure of mice with EAC to combined MFs causes structural changes in some organs (liver, adrenal glands), which are probably due to the total degradation of the tumor tissue.
  • In mice with transplanted EAC, the tumor tissue after exposure to weak MFs was practically absent, as distinct from control animals in which the invasion of the tumor into the adipose tissue surrounding the kidneys, mesenteric lymph nodes, and spermatic appendages was observed.
  • In animals without tumors, no pathological deviations from the norm in the structure of organs and tissues occurred after exposure to weak MF, indicating that this factor per se is not toxic to the organism.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Ehrlich Tumor / pathology. Carcinoma, Ehrlich Tumor / therapy. Magnetic Field Therapy / methods. Magnetics

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 19267367.001).
  • [ISSN] 1521-186X
  • [Journal-full-title] Bioelectromagnetics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bioelectromagnetics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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11. Kurita H, Kamata T, Koike T, Kobayashi H, Kurashina K: Intraoperative tissue staining of invaded oral carcinoma. Pathol Oncol Res; 2008 Dec;14(4):461-5
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  • [Title] Intraoperative tissue staining of invaded oral carcinoma.
  • The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of intraoperative tissue staining with consecutive application of 0.4% indigo carmine and 0.5% Congo red to demonstrate the extent and border of oral carcinoma invasion.
  • Once the oral tumor was resected, a vertical section of surgical specimen was taken from the central part of the tumor.
  • The extent and border of the invaded carcinoma were assessed on digital microscopic examination with tissue staining.
  • Tissue staining produced a brown-black stain on normal muscle, connective, and salivary tissues but not tumor and epithelial tissues.
  • It clearly demonstrated the extent and border of tumor invasion in 13 of 17 patients (76.5%); however, detection of remnant vital tumor cells in scar tissue after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and distinction between the tumor and adipose tissue scattered in the muscle tissue was difficult.
  • The results of this study showed that intraoperative tissue staining was a possible method in demonstrating the extent and border of carcinoma deeply invaded in the soft tissue and selecting the site for additional frozen section analysis, although the method needed some refinement.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / pathology. Carcinoma / surgery. Mouth Neoplasms / pathology. Mouth Neoplasms / surgery. Neoplasm Staging / methods. Staining and Labeling / methods

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  • (PMID = 18575826.001).
  • [ISSN] 1219-4956
  • [Journal-full-title] Pathology oncology research : POR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathol. Oncol. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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12. de Groot M, Appelman M, Spuls PI, de Rie MA, Bos JD: Initial experience with routine administration of etanercept in psoriasis. Br J Dermatol; 2006 Oct;155(4):808-14
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  • OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized: (i) that efficacy would be lower than that obtained in published phase II and III studies because (a) resistance to all conventional therapies as a reimbursement condition would select for more resistant cases and (b) inclusion would be more restricted to severe cases (higher PASI), and (ii) that efficacy would be lower in obese patients due to the possible role of adipose tissue in tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha homeostasis.
  • Additionally, we related the clinical effect to the body mass index (BMI), for adipose tissue is thought to have a possible role in TNF-alpha homeostasis.
  • Although fatigue is not identified as a side-effect of etanercept, 10% of our patients reported fatigue as an adverse event during etanercept treatment.
  • Finally, the BMI does not seem to influence the patients' response to etanercept, although further investigations would be needed to confirm this.
  • [MeSH-major] Dermatologic Agents / therapeutic use. Immunoglobulin G / therapeutic use. Psoriasis / drug therapy. Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 16965432.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0963
  • [Journal-full-title] The British journal of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dermatologic Agents; 0 / Immunoglobulin G; 0 / Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor; OP401G7OJC / Etanercept
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13. Cheng H, Dodge J, Mehl E, Liu S, Poulin N, van de Rijn M, Nielsen TO: Validation of immature adipogenic status and identification of prognostic biomarkers in myxoid liposarcoma using tissue microarrays. Hum Pathol; 2009 Sep;40(9):1244-51
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Validation of immature adipogenic status and identification of prognostic biomarkers in myxoid liposarcoma using tissue microarrays.
  • Expression profiling followed by tissue microarray validation linked to patient outcome is a powerful approach for validating biological mechanisms and identifying prognostic biomarkers.
  • We applied these techniques to independent series of primary myxoid liposarcomas in an effort to assess markers of adipose differentiation in myxoid liposarcoma and to identify prognostic markers that can be efficiently assessed by immunohistochemistry.
  • Candidate genes were selected based on analysis of expression profiles from 9 primary myxoid/round liposarcomas and 45 other soft tissue tumors, and by reference to publicly available data sets.
  • Protein products were validated on an adipose neoplasm tissue microarray, including 32 myxoid liposarcomas linked to patient outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipogenesis. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Liposarcoma, Myxoid / genetics. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / genetics. Tissue Array Analysis / methods

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  • (PMID = 19368956.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-8392
  • [Journal-full-title] Human pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hum. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 2; EC 2.7.10.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-ret; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, IGF Type 1
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14. Kuriu A, Shimono T, Kuwabara M, Ashikaga R, Hosono M, Murakami T: Fourth ventricular mixed germ cell tumor demonstrating adipose tissue in a young adult. Jpn J Radiol; 2010 Feb;28(2):166-8
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  • [Title] Fourth ventricular mixed germ cell tumor demonstrating adipose tissue in a young adult.
  • We report a case of fourth ventricular mixed germ cell tumor (GCT) in a 20-year-old man.
  • Neuroradiological investigations revealed a fourth ventricular hemorrhagic tumor with adipose tissue.
  • We suspected mixed GCT because adipose tissue was seen preoperatively, but mixed GCT occurring after childhood in this location has not previously been reported.
  • We describe herein the imaging findings for mixed GCT and discuss the differential diagnoses of fourth ventricular tumors with adipose tissue.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / pathology. Adipose Tissue / radiography. Brain Neoplasms / diagnosis. Fourth Ventricle / pathology. Fourth Ventricle / radiography. Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Biomarkers / blood. Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Cerebral Ventriculography / methods. Chorionic Gonadotropin / blood. Contrast Media. Diagnosis, Differential. Follow-Up Studies. Headache / etiology. Humans. Hydrocephalus / complications. Image Enhancement / methods. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Male. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / methods. Vomiting / etiology. Young Adult. alpha-Fetoproteins

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  • (PMID = 20182853.001).
  • [ISSN] 1867-108X
  • [Journal-full-title] Japanese journal of radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Jpn J Radiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Chorionic Gonadotropin; 0 / Contrast Media; 0 / alpha-Fetoproteins
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15. Prabhudesai AG, Dalton P, Kumar D, Finlayson CJ: Mechanised one-day fat clearance method to increase the lymph node yield in rectal cancer specimens. Br J Biomed Sci; 2005 Jan;62(3):120-123

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  • Here, a simple, effective and economical solution to the problem is described, which should be amenable to any laboratory with a spare or back-up tissue-processing machine.

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  • (PMID = 28700864.001).
  • [ISSN] 0967-4845
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of biomedical science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Biomed. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Adipose tissue / Colorectal neoplasms / Lymph node excision / Tissue preservation
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16. Carroll PA, Healy L, Lysaght J, Griffin M, Dunne B, Boyle MT, Reynolds JV, Kennedy MJ, Pidgeon G, Connolly EM: Mammary adipose tissue and cancer cell growth: The role of adipose tissue in the tumor microenvironment. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22009

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Mammary adipose tissue and cancer cell growth: The role of adipose tissue in the tumor microenvironment.
  • Adipose tissue is considered an important endocrine organ producing several important hormones and cytokines including leptin and adiponectin.
  • Mechanisms for the role of obesity in cancer states includes the excess or unregulated secretion of adipocytokines from adipose tissue, and potentially the metabolic syndrome (a cluster of co-morbidities linked to metabolic dysregulation).
  • Mammary adipose tissue is proposed to play a vital role in the microenvironment of normal and tumour states within the breast<sup>2</sup>.
  • Breast adipose tissue is a good candidate to investigate effects of obesity and metabolic disturbances on cancer states.
  • METHODS: Peritumoural (PT) adipose tissue adjacent to the tumour and distal adipose tissue (D) within the breast was sampled in 10 patients.
  • The tissue was processed and cultured for 72hrs in serum free minimal cytokine media.
  • The adipocytokine profile at the mRNA and protein level was measured in ACM and adipose tissue for comparative differences using RT-PCR, ELISA and Cytokine Profiler technology.
  • RESULTS: ACM from both sites promoted tumour cell survival.
  • This may be mediated through increased pro-inflammatory or pro- mitogenic adipocytokine production in adipose tissue surrounding tumour.

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  • (PMID = 27963182.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Scariot R, Giovanini AF, Torres-Pereira CC, Piazzetta CM, Costa DJ, Rebellato NL, Müller PR: Massive growth of an intraoral lipoma. J Contemp Dent Pract; 2008;9(7):115-21
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: Lipoma, a benign tumor of adipose tissue, is rarely seen in the oral cavity.
  • A clinical diagnosis of lipoma was established, and the treatment consisted of complete excision of the mass under local anesthesia.
  • [MeSH-major] Cheek / pathology. Lipoma / pathology. Mouth Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 18997924.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-3711
  • [Journal-full-title] The journal of contemporary dental practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Contemp Dent Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Spinelli C, Costanzo S, Severi E, Giannotti G, Massart F: A thoracic wall lipoblastoma in a 3-month-old infant: A case report and review of the literature. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2006 Sep;28(9):594-600

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  • Lipoblastoma is a rare benign tumor of adipose tissue seen almost always in infancy and early childhood.
  • Lipoblastoma is a tumor with good prognosis with no reported metastases, despite its potential for local invasion and rapid growth.
  • With the aim of both diagnosis and treatment, the lipomatous mass was removed by local resection.
  • In addition to the patient's age, histologic and cytogenetic analyses assisted the diagnosis of diffuse lipoblastoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Lipoma / genetics. Lipoma / pathology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / genetics. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology. Thoracic Wall / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17006266.001).
  • [ISSN] 1077-4114
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Berstein LM: [Hormones of adipose tissue (adipocytokines): ontogenetic and oncologic aspects]. Adv Gerontol; 2005;16:51-64
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Hormones of adipose tissue (adipocytokines): ontogenetic and oncologic aspects].
  • Being an important component of body composition, adipose tissue accepts a lot of hormonal signals and, besides, is able to produce hormone-like peptides, named adipokines or adipocytokines, and participate in the metabolism of steroid hormones.
  • Endocrine properties of adipose tissue are dependent of its volume, morphology (size and number of adipocytes), fat topography (visceral and subcutaneous fat), characteristics of distinct fat depot (including mammary fat), some features of genome, etc.
  • Certain characteristics of the adipose organ are formed and then realized in pre- and postnatal life (pregnancy and fetal programming), in duration of puberty, after menopause and with aging.
  • Adipocyte and non-adipocyte compartments of adipose tissue are involved into reactions of immunity/inflammation and into development of glucose intolerance and insulin resistance.
  • The balance among adipocytokines (adipocytokine net or lattice) with distinct properties (TNF-alpha, leptin and adiponectin as an examples) and between adipocytokines and steroid-producing capacity of adipose tissue is an important variable representing a basis for the modification of cardiovascular and oncological morbidity risk as well as a target for geroprotection and cancer prevention.

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  • (PMID = 16075677.001).
  • [ISSN] 1561-9125
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in gerontology = Uspekhi gerontologii
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv Gerontol
  • [Language] RUS
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adiponectin; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; 0 / Leptin; 0 / Peptide Hormones; 0 / Steroids; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
  • [Number-of-references] 87
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20. Cates JM, Coffing BN, Harris BT, Black CC: Calretinin expression in tumors of adipose tissue. Hum Pathol; 2006 Mar;37(3):312-21
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Calretinin expression in tumors of adipose tissue.
  • Although well established as a marker of mesothelial cells, calretinin is also expressed in several other tissue types, including adipose tissue.
  • Accordingly, immunohistochemical staining for calretinin has been described in an increasing number of neoplasms other than mesothelioma.
  • A detailed analysis of calretinin expression in lipogenic tumors has not yet been reported, however.
  • Given the known expression patterns of calretinin in normal tissues, we predicted that calretinin immunoreactivity would be detected in lipoma and the various histologic subtypes of liposarcoma, and that this marker might be of use in the differential diagnosis of selected fatty tumors.
  • Calretinin immunoreactivity was detected, at least focally, in all 10 samples of normal adipose tissue and in 22 of 23 lipomas or lipoma variants.
  • Pleomorphic variants of other sarcomas, including undifferentiated high-grade pleomorphic sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor also exhibited focal calretinin immunoreactivity in a minority of cases, as did some small round cell sarcomas.
  • These results suggest that calretinin immunoreactivity in normal and neoplastic adipose tissue is more ubiquitous than previously reported and may be a useful, albeit nonspecific marker of lipogenic differentiation.
  • However, its utility in the differential diagnosis of fatty tumors appears limited.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / metabolism. Lipoma / metabolism. Liposarcoma / metabolism. S100 Calcium Binding Protein G / metabolism. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Calbindin 2. Humans. Immunoenzyme Techniques. Retrospective Studies. Tissue Array Analysis

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  • (PMID = 16613326.001).
  • [ISSN] 0046-8177
  • [Journal-full-title] Human pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hum. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / CALB2 protein, human; 0 / Calbindin 2; 0 / S100 Calcium Binding Protein G
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21. Blüher M: Adipose tissue dysfunction in obesity. Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes; 2009 Jun;117(6):241-50
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Adipose tissue dysfunction in obesity.
  • Adipocyte and adipose tissue dysfunction belong to the primary defects in obesity and may link obesity to several health problems including increased risk of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, dementia, airway disease and some cancers.
  • However, not all obese individuals develop obesity related metabolic or cardiovascular disorders potentially due to a preserved normal adipose tissue architecture and function.
  • The majority of patients with obesity have an impaired adipose tissue function caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors which lead to adipocyte hypertrophy, hypoxia, a variety of stresses and inflammatory processes within adipose tissue.
  • Ectopic fat accumulation including visceral obesity may be considered as a consequence of adipose tissue dysfunction, which is further characterized by changes in the cellular composition, increased lipid storage and impaired insulin sensitivity in adipocytes, and secretion of a proinflammatory, atherogenic, and diabetogenic adipokine pattern.
  • This review focuses on the discussion of mechanisms causing or maintaining impaired adipose tissue function in obesity and potentially linking obesity to its associated disorders.
  • A model is proposed how different pathogenic factors and mechanisms may cause dysfunction of adipose tissue.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipocytes / metabolism. Adipokines / metabolism. Adipose Tissue / metabolism. Lipid Metabolism. Models, Biological. Obesity / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Atherosclerosis / epidemiology. Atherosclerosis / etiology. Atherosclerosis / genetics. Atherosclerosis / pathology. Atherosclerosis / physiopathology. Cell Hypoxia / genetics. Dementia / epidemiology. Dementia / etiology. Dementia / genetics. Dementia / pathology. Dementia / physiopathology. Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / epidemiology. Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / etiology. Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / genetics. Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / pathology. Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / physiopathology. Dyslipidemias / epidemiology. Dyslipidemias / etiology. Dyslipidemias / genetics. Dyslipidemias / pathology. Dyslipidemias / physiopathology. Fatty Liver / epidemiology. Fatty Liver / etiology. Fatty Liver / genetics. Fatty Liver / pathology. Fatty Liver / physiopathology. Humans. Hypertension / epidemiology. Hypertension / etiology. Hypertension / genetics. Hypertension / pathology. Hypertension / physiopathology. Incidence. Insulin Resistance / genetics. Lung Diseases / epidemiology. Lung Diseases / etiology. Lung Diseases / genetics. Lung Diseases / pathology. Lung Diseases / physiopathology. Neoplasms / epidemiology. Neoplasms / etiology. Neoplasms / genetics. Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasms / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 19358089.001).
  • [ISSN] 1439-3646
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental and clinical endocrinology & diabetes : official journal, German Society of Endocrinology [and] German Diabetes Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp. Clin. Endocrinol. Diabetes
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adipokines
  • [Number-of-references] 109
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22. Miscusi G, di Gioia CR, Patrizi G, Gravetz A, Redler A, Petrozza V: Anatomical lymph node mapping in normal mesorectal adipose tissue. Dis Colon Rectum; 2010 Dec;53(12):1640-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Anatomical lymph node mapping in normal mesorectal adipose tissue.
  • The adipose tissue was separated from the rectum and divided into 9 sections before fixing the specimen in paraffin, cutting into smaller portions, and staining with hematoxylin and eosin.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / anatomy & histology. Lymph Nodes / anatomy & histology. Rectum / anatomy & histology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Analysis of Variance. Cadaver. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging / methods. Rectal Neoplasms / pathology. Staining and Labeling

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  • (PMID = 21178858.001).
  • [ISSN] 1530-0358
  • [Journal-full-title] Diseases of the colon and rectum
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dis. Colon Rectum
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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23. McQueen C, Montgomery E, Dufour B, Olney MS, Illei PB: Giant hypopharyngeal atypical lipomatous tumor. Adv Anat Pathol; 2010 Jan;17(1):38-41
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Giant hypopharyngeal atypical lipomatous tumor.
  • Microscopically, they display an admixture of fibrovascular and adipose tissue that is coated by unremarkable squamous mucosa.
  • Here, we report a case that had scattered hyperchromatic cells and lipoblasts within the adipose tissue component.
  • In other anatomic sites similar appearing lesions have been interpreted as pedunculated liposarcomas/atypical lipomatous tumors that are more prone to local recurrences than classic giant fibrovascular polyps.
  • To confirm our suspicion of liposarcomatous differentiation, we performed immunohistochemistry for MDM2 and p53, 2 markers that are known to be negative in benign lipomatous lesions and positive in well-differentiated liposarcomas/atypical lipomatous tumors.
  • The scattered atypical hyperchromatic cells and the lipoblasts both exhibited strong nuclear staining for both markers and supported the diagnosis of pedunculated giant hypopharyngeal atypical lipomatous tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms / pathology. Liposarcoma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Polyps / diagnosis. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-mdm2 / metabolism. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 20032637.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-4031
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in anatomic pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv Anat Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; EC 6.3.2.19 / MDM2 protein, human; EC 6.3.2.19 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-mdm2
  • [Number-of-references] 51
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24. Bing C, Trayhurn P: New insights into adipose tissue atrophy in cancer cachexia. Proc Nutr Soc; 2009 Nov;68(4):385-92
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  • [Title] New insights into adipose tissue atrophy in cancer cachexia.
  • Profound loss of adipose and other tissues is a hallmark of cancer cachexia, a debilitating condition associated with increased morbidity and mortality.
  • Morphological examination has shown marked remodelling of adipose tissue in cancer cachexia.
  • It is characterised by the tissue containing shrunken adipocytes with a major reduction in cell size and increased fibrosis in the tissue matrix.
  • Although the molecular mechanisms remain to be established, evidence suggests that altered adipocyte metabolism may lead to adipose atrophy in cancer cachexia.
  • Both tumour and host-derived factors are implicated in adipose atrophy.
  • ZAG transcripts and protein expression in adipose tissue are up regulated in cancer cachexia but reduced with adipose tissue expansion in obesity.
  • Further elucidation of ZAG function in adipose tissue may lead to novel targets for preventing adipose atrophy in malignancy.

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  • (PMID = 19719894.001).
  • [ISSN] 1475-2719
  • [Journal-full-title] The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Proc Nutr Soc
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council / / BB/E015379/1; United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / 87972; United Kingdom / Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council / / BBE015379
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Seminal Plasma Proteins; 0 / Zn-alpha-2-glycoprotein
  • [Number-of-references] 85
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25. Murphy RA, Wilke MS, Perrine M, Pawlowicz M, Mourtzakis M, Lieffers JR, Maneshgar M, Bruera E, Clandinin MT, Baracos VE, Mazurak VC: Loss of adipose tissue and plasma phospholipids: relationship to survival in advanced cancer patients. Clin Nutr; 2010 Aug;29(4):482-7

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Loss of adipose tissue and plasma phospholipids: relationship to survival in advanced cancer patients.
  • BACKGROUND & AIMS: Extensive loss of adipose tissue is a key feature of cancer cachexia.
  • It is not known whether these processes coincide across the cancer trajectory nor has their relationship with survival been defined.
  • Changes in adipose tissue mass and plasma phospholipids were characterized within 500days prior to death and prognostic significance assessed.
  • METHODS: Adipose tissue rate of change was determined in a retrospective cohort of patients who died of colorectal and lung cancers (n=108) and who underwent >2 computed tomography scans in the last 500days of life.
  • Plasma phospholipid fatty acids were measured prospectively in a similar cohort of patients with metastatic cancer (n=72).
  • RESULTS: Accelerated loss of adipose tissue begins at 7months from death reaching an average loss of 29% of total AT 2months from death.
  • Plasma phospholipid fatty acids were 35% lower in patients closest to death versus those surviving >8months.
  • Losses of phospholipid fatty acids and adipose tissue occur in tandem and are predictive of survival.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Depletion of plasma phospholipids likely indicates a deficit of essential fatty acids in the periphery which may contribute to loss of adipose tissue.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue, White / metabolism. Adiposity. Cachexia / metabolism. Lipolysis. Neoplasms / physiopathology. Phospholipids / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Cohort Studies. Disease Progression. Fatty Acids / blood. Female. Humans. Intra-Abdominal Fat / metabolism. Male. Middle Aged. Muscle, Skeletal / metabolism. Neoplasm Metastasis. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Subcutaneous Fat / metabolism. Survival Analysis

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 19959263.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-1983
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Nutr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fatty Acids; 0 / Phospholipids
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31. López Fontana C, Maselli Artola ME, Vanrell Rodríguez MC, Di Milta Mónaco NA, Pérez Elizalde R, López Laur JD: [Advances on the influence of adipose tissue on prostate cancer]. Actas Urol Esp; 2009 Mar;33(3):242-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Advances on the influence of adipose tissue on prostate cancer].
  • [Transliterated title] Avances sobre la influencia del tejido adiposo en el adenocarcinoma de próstata.
  • Numerous studies have investigated the association between obesity and prostate cancer (CaP), although the results have not been concluding due to the great difficulty to evaluate the effects of obesity on the development of this type of tumor.
  • The aim of this study was to carry out a comprehensive over-view of the existing evidence about the role of adipose tissue in the prostate carcinogenesis.
  • CONCLUSION: Obesity may promote the progression of established PC rather than being a risk factor for the development of this tumour.
  • However, additional studies are needed to clarify the relationship between adipokines and PC before developing new preventive or treatment strategies for this tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / physiology. Obesity / complications. Prostatic Neoplasms / etiology


32. Williams G, Kolodny GM: Method for decreasing uptake of 18F-FDG by hypermetabolic brown adipose tissue on PET. AJR Am J Roentgenol; 2008 May;190(5):1406-9

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Method for decreasing uptake of 18F-FDG by hypermetabolic brown adipose tissue on PET.
  • OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether use of a high-fat, very-low-carbohydrate protocol for preparing patients for PET decreases the frequency of (18)F-FDG uptake by hypermetabolic brown adipose tissue (BAT) on PET scans.
  • The categoric variables frequency of occurrence of hypermetabolic BAT (present or not) and the sex ratios of the groups before and after the change in preparation were compared by use of a chi-square test.
  • The continuous variables of age and blood glucose level were compared by use of a two-tailed Student's t test.
  • CONCLUSION: In this intention-to-treat analysis, use of a high-fat preparation protocol significantly lowered the frequency of uptake of FDG by hypermetabolic BAT on FDG PET studies.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue, Brown / metabolism. Diet. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 / pharmacokinetics. Positron-Emission Tomography. Radiopharmaceuticals / pharmacokinetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Blood Glucose / metabolism. Cohort Studies. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasms / metabolism. Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 18430862.001).
  • [ISSN] 1546-3141
  • [Journal-full-title] AJR. American journal of roentgenology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AJR Am J Roentgenol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Blood Glucose; 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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33. Schäffler A, Fürst A, Büchler C, Paul G, Rogler G, Schölmerich J, Herfarth H: Vascular endothelial growth factor secretion from mesenteric adipose tissue and from creeping fat in Crohn's disease. J Gastroenterol Hepatol; 2006 Sep;21(9):1419-23
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  • [Title] Vascular endothelial growth factor secretion from mesenteric adipose tissue and from creeping fat in Crohn's disease.
  • BACKGROUND: Creeping fat represents a characteristic feature of Crohn's disease (CD), and adipose tissue secretes adipocytokines and chemokines/growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: Adipose tissue was obtained from creeping fat of 10 patients with CD.
  • Mesenteric adipose tissue was resected from 13 patients with colon cancer (CC) and from seven patients with diverticulitis (DIV).
  • Three fat tissue specimens per well, and several wells (6-8) per patient were incubated ex vivo for 24 h.
  • RESULTS: There was stable VEGF secretion from mesenteric adipose tissue of patients with CC or DIV and from creeping fat of patients with CD.
  • Whereas the VEGF secretion rate was not different between patients with CD (465 +/- 98 pg/g fat per 24 h) and CC (399 +/- 48 pg/g fat per 24 h), VEGF secretion was significantly reduced in patients suffering from DIV (115 +/- 41 pg/g fat per 24 h; P < 0.0001 and P = 0.001, respectively).
  • The CD patients treated with steroids had significantly lower VEGF secretion rates (294 +/- 42 pg/g fat per 24 h) than CD patients not receiving steroids (607 +/- 105 pg/g fat per 24 h; P = 0.001).
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / secretion. Crohn Disease / metabolism. Mesentery. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / secretion
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Animals. Colonic Neoplasms / metabolism. Diverticulitis / metabolism. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Steroids / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 16911686.001).
  • [ISSN] 0815-9319
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Steroids; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
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34. van Kruijsdijk RC, van der Wall E, Visseren FL: Obesity and cancer: the role of dysfunctional adipose tissue. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 2009 Oct;18(10):2569-78
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Obesity and cancer: the role of dysfunctional adipose tissue.
  • Overweight and obesity are health problems of epidemic proportions, increasing the risk not only of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus but also of various types of cancer.
  • Obesity is strongly associated with changes in the physiological function of adipose tissue, leading to insulin resistance, chronic inflammation, and altered secretion of adipokines.
  • This article reviews these mechanisms, focusing on adipose tissue dysfunction as a unifying causal factor.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / physiopathology. Neoplasms / complications. Neoplasms / physiopathology. Obesity / complications. Obesity / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 19755644.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 152
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35. Doldan A, Otis CN, Pantanowitz L: Adipose tissue: a normal constituent of the uterine cervical stroma. Int J Gynecol Pathol; 2009 Jul;28(4):396-400
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  • [Title] Adipose tissue: a normal constituent of the uterine cervical stroma.
  • SUMMARY: Mature adipose tissue present in the uterine cervix is not well documented, and believed to represent heterotopic tissue.
  • The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and histogenesis of adipose tissue in a series of uterine cervix specimens.
  • The presence of cervical stromal and parametrial fat, pathologic diagnosis, number of prior cervical biopsies, and prior pregnancies were documented.
  • Those with cervical fat in cone/LEEP tissue had on average 2 prior cervical biopsies/case (range: 0 to 5), compared with 1.7 biopsies/case (range: 0 to 10) in those without identifiable fat.
  • Mature adipose tissue is a normal stromal constituent of the uterine cervix, which may be identified in up to 15% of excision specimens.
  • The presence of cervical fat seems to be unrelated to patient age, parity, parametrial adipose tissue, inflammation, or prior trauma.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / cytology. Cervix Uteri / cytology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / pathology. Conization. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Middle Aged. Parity. Pregnancy. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / pathology. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19483621.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-7151
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of gynecological pathology : official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Pathologists
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Gynecol. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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36. Siemińska L: [Adipose tissue. Pathophysiology, distribution, sex differences and the role in inflammation and cancerogenesis]. Endokrynol Pol; 2007 Jul-Aug;58(4):330-42

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Adipose tissue. Pathophysiology, distribution, sex differences and the role in inflammation and cancerogenesis].
  • The role of adipose tissue is energy storage, but there is increasing evidence that adipocytes and adipokines are involved in metabolic and inflammatory processes.
  • This paper reviews the pathophysiology of different adipose tissue depots.
  • Interrelationships between sex hormones, adipose tissue and risk factors are also discussed.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / physiopathology. Body Fat Distribution. Inflammation / physiopathology. Neoplasms / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 18058725.001).
  • [ISSN] 0423-104X
  • [Journal-full-title] Endokrynologia Polska
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Endokrynol Pol
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adipokines
  • [Number-of-references] 59
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37. Christensen CR, Clark PB, Morton KA: Reversal of hypermetabolic brown adipose tissue in F-18 FDG PET imaging. Clin Nucl Med; 2006 Apr;31(4):193-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Reversal of hypermetabolic brown adipose tissue in F-18 FDG PET imaging.
  • RESULTS: One of the most common causes of a false-positive study is the uptake of FDG in areas of hypermetabolic brown adipose tissue (HBAT).
  • Areas of involvement are often spatially closely related to important lymph node groups in the neck, axilla, and upper mediastinum, making critical differentiation difficult, even with PET-CT.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue, Brown / metabolism. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Radiopharmaceuticals. Tomography, Emission-Computed
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. False Positive Reactions. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasms / metabolism. Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging

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  • (PMID = 16550009.001).
  • [ISSN] 0363-9762
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical nuclear medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Nucl Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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38. Söderlund V, Larsson SA, Jacobsson H: Reduction of FDG uptake in brown adipose tissue in clinical patients by a single dose of propranolol. Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging; 2007 Jul;34(7):1018-22
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Reduction of FDG uptake in brown adipose tissue in clinical patients by a single dose of propranolol.
  • PURPOSE: Uptake in brown adipose tissue (hibernating fat) is sometimes seen at FDG-PET examinations.
  • We now re-examine patients with brown fat activity that could disguise tumour uptake after pre-treatment with propranolol (a non-selective beta-blocker) in order to reduce the uptake.
  • CONCLUSION: Pre-treatment with a single dose of propranolol blocks the FDG uptake in brown adipose tissue, thereby increasing the specificity of the examination.
  • The tumour uptake seems not to be impaired.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue, Brown / metabolism. Adipose Tissue, Brown / radionuclide imaging. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 / pharmacokinetics. Image Enhancement / methods. Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Propranolol / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 17225118.001).
  • [ISSN] 1619-7070
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Nucl. Med. Mol. Imaging
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18; 9Y8NXQ24VQ / Propranolol
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39. Rusiecki JA, Matthews A, Sturgeon S, Sinha R, Pellizzari E, Zheng T, Baris D: A correlation study of organochlorine levels in serum, breast adipose tissue, and gluteal adipose tissue among breast cancer cases in India. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 2005 May;14(5):1113-24
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A correlation study of organochlorine levels in serum, breast adipose tissue, and gluteal adipose tissue among breast cancer cases in India.
  • We used data from a breast cancer pilot study carried out in Kerala, India in 1997, for which organochlorine levels were measured in three biological media, blood serum, breast adipose tissue, and gluteal adipose tissue, of 37 fasting breast cancer cases (pretreatment).
  • Gas-liquid chromatography determined serum, breast adipose, and gluteal adipose tissue levels of dichlorodiphenyltricholorethane, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane, beta-benzene hexachloride, and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, PCB-153 and PCB-180.
  • Correlation plots were made and Spearman correlation coefficients (r) calculated for breast adipose tissue versus serum, gluteal adipose tissue versus serum, and breast adipose versus gluteal adipose tissue.
  • There were strong correlations among serum, breast adipose tissue, and gluteal adipose tissue concentrations for most organochlorines analyzed, one exception being gluteal versus serum for PCB-153.
  • Serum (ng/g) versus adipose ratios approached 1:1 for most of the organochlorine pesticide comparisons and did not vary by summary statistic.
  • These data indicate that blood serum reflects the present body burden of a range of organochlorines to the same extent as adipose tissue, and they support the view that serum may be collected in lieu of adipose tissue to obtain similar information.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / chemistry. Breast Neoplasms / chemistry. Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated / analysis. Insecticides / analysis. Pesticide Residues / analysis

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  • (PMID = 15894661.001).
  • [ISSN] 1055-9965
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Environmental Pollutants; 0 / Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated; 0 / Insecticides; 0 / Pesticide Residues
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40. Kamei Y, Suganami T, Kohda T, Ishino F, Yasuda K, Miura S, Ezaki O, Ogawa Y: Peg1/Mest in obese adipose tissue is expressed from the paternal allele in an isoform-specific manner. FEBS Lett; 2007 Jan 9;581(1):91-6
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  • [Title] Peg1/Mest in obese adipose tissue is expressed from the paternal allele in an isoform-specific manner.
  • In some human cancer tissues, an alternatively spliced variant of PEG1/MEST mRNA using a different promoter of a distinct first exon is expressed from both paternal and maternal alleles.
  • We previously reported that Peg1/Mest expression was markedly up-regulated in obese adipose tissue in mice.
  • Moreover, transgenic overexpression of Peg1/Mest in the adipose tissue resulted in the enlargement of adipocytes in size.
  • Given the potential pathophysiologic relevance in obesity, we examined the nature of increased expression of Peg1/Mest in obese adipose tissue.
  • In obese adipose tissue, expression of Peg1/Mest was increased, but not that of other imprinted genes tested.
  • The transcription rate of Peg1/Mest was increased in obese adipose tissue.
  • We also demonstrated that the abundantly expressed Peg1/Mest in obese adipose tissue retained monoallelic expression.
  • This is the first report of monoallelic induction of Peg1/Mest in adult tissues.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipocytes / metabolism. Adipose Tissue / metabolism. Alleles. Gene Expression Regulation. Genomic Imprinting. Obesity / metabolism. Proteins / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Alternative Splicing. Animals. Cell Line. Cell Size. Exons. Humans. Mice. Mice, Obese. Neoplasms / genetics. Neoplasms / metabolism. Neoplasms / pathology. Protein Isoforms / biosynthesis. Protein Isoforms / genetics. Transgenes

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  • (PMID = 17182038.001).
  • [ISSN] 0014-5793
  • [Journal-full-title] FEBS letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] FEBS Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Protein Isoforms; 0 / Proteins; 0 / mesoderm specific transcript protein
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41. Yamaguchi J, Ohtani H, Nakamura K, Shimokawa I, Kanematsu T: Prognostic impact of marginal adipose tissue invasion in ductal carcinoma of the breast. Am J Clin Pathol; 2008 Sep;130(3):382-8
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  • [Title] Prognostic impact of marginal adipose tissue invasion in ductal carcinoma of the breast.
  • This study aimed to investigate whether adipose tissue invasion (ATI) of cancer cells at the tumor margin influenced lymph node status and prognosis in patients with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.
  • Patients with ATI had a poorer prognosis than patients without ATI (10-year disease-free survival, 76% and 94%, respectively; P=.0323).
  • In addition, patients without ATI or LVI had neither lymph node metastasis (n=52) nor recurrent disease (n=53).
  • ATI is one of the biologic indicators of tumor aggressiveness.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / pathology. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis / pathology. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 18701411.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-9173
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of clinical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Clin. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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42. Russell ST, Tisdale MJ: The role of glucocorticoids in the induction of zinc-alpha2-glycoprotein expression in adipose tissue in cancer cachexia. Br J Cancer; 2005 Mar 14;92(5):876-81
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The role of glucocorticoids in the induction of zinc-alpha2-glycoprotein expression in adipose tissue in cancer cachexia.
  • Loss of adipose tissue in cancer cachexia in mice bearing the MAC16 tumour arises from an increased lipid mobilisation through increased expression of zinc-alpha2-glycoprotein (ZAG) in white (WAT) and brown (BAT) adipose tissue.
  • In mice bearing the MAC16 tumour, serum cortisol concentrations increased in parallel with weight loss, and the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU38486 (25 mg kg(-1)) attenuated both the loss of body weight and ZAG expression in WAT.
  • This suggests that glucocorticoids stimulate lipolysis through an increase in ZAG expression, and that they are responsible for the increase in ZAG expression seen in adipose tissue of cachectic mice.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipocytes / physiology. Adipose Tissue / metabolism. Cachexia / physiopathology. Glucocorticoids / pharmacology. Lipolysis / drug effects. Neoplasms, Experimental / physiopathology. Seminal Plasma Proteins / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] 3T3 Cells. Adipose Tissue, Brown / drug effects. Adipose Tissue, Brown / metabolism. Animals. Hydrocortisone / blood. Mice. Mice, Inbred Strains

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  • (PMID = 15714206.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0920
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Glucocorticoids; 0 / Seminal Plasma Proteins; 0 / Zn-alpha-2-glycoprotein; WI4X0X7BPJ / Hydrocortisone
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2361908
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43. Schäffler A, Fürst A, Büchler C, Paul G, Rogler G, Schölmerich J, Herfarth H: Secretion of RANTES (CCL5) and interleukin-10 from mesenteric adipose tissue and from creeping fat in Crohn's disease: regulation by steroid treatment. J Gastroenterol Hepatol; 2006 Sep;21(9):1412-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Secretion of RANTES (CCL5) and interleukin-10 from mesenteric adipose tissue and from creeping fat in Crohn's disease: regulation by steroid treatment.
  • BACKGROUND: Creeping fat represents a characteristic feature of Crohn's disease (CD) and adipose tissue is currently being recognized as a complex compartment secreting highly active molecules.
  • Pro- or anti-inflammatory adipose tissue-derived secretory products (adipocytokines) might play a role in the pathogenesis of CD.
  • METHODS: Adipose tissue specimens were obtained from creeping fat contiguous to the involved intestine of 10 patients with CD.
  • Mesenteric adipose tissue specimens resected in 13 patients with colon cancer (CC) and in seven patients with diverticulitis (DIV) served as controls.
  • Three fat tissue specimens per well and n = 6-8 wells per patient were incubated ex vivo for 24 h.
  • RESULTS: Both RANTES and IL-10 secretion could be demonstrated from total adipose tissue explants.
  • The RANTES secretion is increased from creeping fat in CD (3691 +/- 597 pg/g fat per 24 h) when compared to mesenteric adipose tissue from patients with CC (1690 +/- 191 pg/g fat per 24 h; P < 0.0001) or DIV (1672 +/- 336 pg/g fat per 24 h; P < 0.0001).
  • Crohn's disease patients receiving steroids had a higher secretion rate of RANTES and IL-10.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Both RANTES and IL-10 secretion can be detected from mesenteric adipose tissue and from creeping fat.
  • The elevated RANTES and IL-10 secretion from creeping fat in CD is not due to a CD-specific effect but caused by steroid treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / secretion. Chemokine CCL5 / secretion. Crohn Disease / drug therapy. Crohn Disease / metabolism. Interleukin-10 / secretion. Steroids / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. C-Reactive Protein / metabolism. Chemokines / secretion. Colonic Neoplasms / metabolism. Cytokines / secretion. Diverticulitis / metabolism. Female. Humans. Male. Mesentery / metabolism. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 16911685.001).
  • [ISSN] 0815-9319
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Chemokine CCL5; 0 / Chemokines; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Steroids; 130068-27-8 / Interleukin-10; 9007-41-4 / C-Reactive Protein
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44. Russell ST, Tisdale MJ: Effect of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on expression of a lipid mobilizing factor in adipose tissue in cancer cachexia. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids; 2005 Jun;72(6):409-14
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  • [Title] Effect of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on expression of a lipid mobilizing factor in adipose tissue in cancer cachexia.
  • Adipose tissue of mice bearing a cachexia-inducing murine tumour (MAC16) shows increased expression of zinc-alpha(2)-glycoprotein (ZAG), a lipolytic factor thought to be responsible for the increased lipolysis.
  • The anti-cachectic agent eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (0.5 g/kg) attenuated the loss of body weight in mice bearing the MAC16 tumour, and this was accompanied by downregulation of ZAG expression in both white and brown adipose tissue, as determined by Western blotting.
  • Glucocorticoids may be responsible for the increased ZAG expression in adipose tissue.
  • These results suggest that EPA may preserve adipose tissue in cachectic mice by downregulation of ZAG expression through interference with glucocorticoid signalling.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / metabolism. Cachexia / etiology. Eicosapentaenoic Acid / pharmacology. Gene Expression Regulation / drug effects. Neoplasms, Experimental / pathology. Peptides / genetics

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  • (PMID = 15899583.001).
  • [ISSN] 0952-3278
  • [Journal-full-title] Prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and essential fatty acids
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prostaglandins Leukot. Essent. Fatty Acids
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Glucocorticoids; 0 / Peptides; 0 / Seminal Plasma Proteins; 0 / Zn-alpha-2-glycoprotein; 0 / lipid mobilizing substance; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone; AAN7QOV9EA / Eicosapentaenoic Acid
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45. Calabro P, Yeh ET: Obesity, inflammation, and vascular disease: the role of the adipose tissue as an endocrine organ. Subcell Biochem; 2007;42:63-91
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  • [Title] Obesity, inflammation, and vascular disease: the role of the adipose tissue as an endocrine organ.
  • With the growing prevalence of obesity, scientific interest in the biology of adipose tissue has been extended to the secretory products of adipocytes, since they are increasingly shown to influence several aspects in the pathogenesis of obesity-related diseases Until relatively recently, the role of fat itself in the development of obesity and its consequences was considered to be a passive one; adipocytes were considered to be little more than storage cells for fat.
  • This production of pro-atherogenic chemokines by adipose tissue is of particular interest since their local secretion, e.g. by perivascular adipose depots, may provide a novel mechanistic link between obesity and the associated vascular complications.
  • Moreover, on a molecular level, we are beginning to comprehend how such variables as hormonal control, exercise, food intake, and genetic variation interact and result in a given phenotype, and how pharmacological intervention may modulate adipose tissue biology.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipocytes / metabolism. Adipose Tissue / metabolism. Endocrine Glands / metabolism. Obesity / metabolism. Peptide Hormones / metabolism. Vascular Diseases / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Diabetes Mellitus / genetics. Diabetes Mellitus / immunology. Diabetes Mellitus / metabolism. Diabetes Mellitus / pathology. Humans. Inflammation / genetics. Inflammation / immunology. Inflammation / metabolism. Inflammation / pathology. Insulin Resistance / genetics. Insulin Resistance / immunology. Neoplasms / genetics. Neoplasms / immunology. Neoplasms / metabolism. Neoplasms / pathology. Osteogenesis / genetics. Osteogenesis / immunology. Signal Transduction / genetics. Signal Transduction / immunology

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  • (PMID = 17612046.001).
  • [ISSN] 0306-0225
  • [Journal-full-title] Sub-cellular biochemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Subcell. Biochem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Peptide Hormones
  • [Number-of-references] 191
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46. Schauer H, Lechleitner M, Pülzl P, Piza-Katzer H: Microvascular transplantation of adipose tissue and serum level of adipocyte products. Aesthetic Plast Surg; 2008 May;32(3):459-63
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  • [Title] Microvascular transplantation of adipose tissue and serum level of adipocyte products.
  • Microvascular transplantation of subcutaneous adipose tissue is an essential step in reconstructive surgery after breast carcinoma.
  • Serum levels of adipose tissue products may serve as indicators for transplant function.
  • This study aimed to determine serum leptin and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha plasma levels pre-, intra-, and postoperatively in 20 patients undergoing reconstructive breast surgery and in 7 women undergoing abdominoplasty operation.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipocytes / transplantation. Adipose Tissue / blood supply. Adipose Tissue / transplantation. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Breast Neoplasms / surgery. Carcinoma / pathology. Carcinoma / surgery. Microsurgery / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Abdomen / surgery. Adult. Female. Humans. Leptin / blood. Mammaplasty. Microcirculation. Pilot Projects. Postoperative Care. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures / methods. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / blood

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  • (PMID = 18392886.001).
  • [ISSN] 0364-216X
  • [Journal-full-title] Aesthetic plastic surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Aesthetic Plast Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Leptin; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
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47. Kucerova L, Altanerova V, Matuskova M, Tyciakova S, Altaner C: Adipose tissue-derived human mesenchymal stem cells mediated prodrug cancer gene therapy. Cancer Res; 2007 Jul 1;67(13):6304-13
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  • [Title] Adipose tissue-derived human mesenchymal stem cells mediated prodrug cancer gene therapy.
  • Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSC) are considered to be a promising source of autologous stem cells in personalized cell-based therapies.
  • Tumor tracking properties of MSC provide an attractive opportunity for targeted transgene delivery into the sites of tumor formation.
  • In the present study, we addressed whether the suicide gene introduction into human AT-MSC could produce a tumor-specific prodrug converting cellular vehicle for targeted chemotherapy.
  • Gene manipulation of human AT-MSC did not sensitize CD-AT-MSC to 5-FC, thus overcoming the inherent disadvantage of suicide effect on cellular vehicle.
  • CD-AT-MSC in combination with 5-FC augmented the bystander effect and selective cytotoxicity on target tumor cells HT-29 in direct coculture in vitro.
  • We confirmed directed migration ability of AT-MSC and CD-AT-MSC toward tumor cells HT-29 in vitro.
  • Moreover, we achieved significant inhibition of s.c. tumor xenograft growth by s.c. or i.v. administered CD-AT-MSC in immunocompromised mice treated with 5-FC.
  • We confirmed the ability of CD-AT-MSC to deliver the CD transgene to the site of tumor formation and mediate strong antitumor effect in vivo.
  • Taken together, these data characterize MSC derived from adipose tissue as suitable delivery vehicles for prodrug converting gene and show their utility for a personalized cell-based targeted cancer gene therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / metabolism. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Flucytosine / pharmacology. Gene Expression Regulation. Genetic Therapy / methods. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells / cytology. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Prodrugs / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line, Tumor. Cytosine Deaminase / genetics. Cytosine Deaminase / metabolism. Female. Humans. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Neoplasm Transplantation

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  • (PMID = 17616689.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Prodrugs; D83282DT06 / Flucytosine; EC 3.5.4.1 / Cytosine Deaminase
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48. Plaza JA, Wakely PE Jr, Suster S: Lipoblastic nerve sheath tumors: report of a distinctive variant of neural soft tissue neoplasm with adipocytic differentiation. Am J Surg Pathol; 2006 Mar;30(3):337-44
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  • [Title] Lipoblastic nerve sheath tumors: report of a distinctive variant of neural soft tissue neoplasm with adipocytic differentiation.
  • Benign nerve sheath tumors of soft tissue can occasionally adopt unusual or unfamiliar morphologic appearances that may introduce difficulties for diagnosis, such as multinucleation, bizarre nuclei, intranuclear vacuoles, and other degenerative changes.
  • Tumor cells adopting a signet-ring or lipoblast-like configuration, however, are mostly associated with epithelial malignancies, liposarcoma and melanoma, and have been only rarely observed in spindle cell tumors of soft tissue.
  • We report 5 cases of benign nerve sheath neoplasms that displayed prominent signet-ring cells with lipoblast-like features.
  • The cases presented as solitary soft tissue masses in the groin, thigh, retroperitoneum, and shoulder in 4 men and 1 woman between the ages of 31 to 57 years.
  • Four tumors predominantly showed features of schwannoma and one of neurofibroma; however, intimately admixed with the spindle cell population, there were also numerous scattered mature adipocytes as well as lipoblast-like cells displaying a signet-ring cell appearance.
  • The signet-ring cells were negative for mucin stains, cytokeratin, EMA, CEA, and several other differentiation markers.
  • The signet-ring cells contained large cytoplasmic lipid droplets that displaced the nuclei to the periphery, consistent with lipoblastic differentiation, whereas complex, interdigitating cytoplasmic processes covered by basal lamina material characteristic of nerve sheath differentiation could be identified in the spindle cells.
  • The presence of mature fat and signet-ring lipoblast-like cells within a nerve sheath neoplasm is quite rare and may signify a process of aberrant differentiation.
  • Neurogenic tumors should be added in the differential diagnosis of spindle cell tumors capable of displaying prominent signet-ring cell features.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / pathology. Nerve Sheath Neoplasms / pathology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Adult. Carcinoma, Signet Ring Cell / pathology. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Microscopy, Electron, Transmission. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 16538053.001).
  • [ISSN] 0147-5185
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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49. Jotzu C, Alt E, Welte G, Li J, Hennessy BT, Devarajan E, Krishnappa S, Pinilla S, Droll L, Song YH: Adipose tissue-derived stem cells differentiate into carcinoma-associated fibroblast-like cells under the influence of tumor-derived factors. Anal Cell Pathol (Amst); 2010;33(2):61-79
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  • [Title] Adipose tissue-derived stem cells differentiate into carcinoma-associated fibroblast-like cells under the influence of tumor-derived factors.
  • Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAF) are considered to contribute to tumor growth, invasion and metastasis.
  • Since human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) are locally adjacent to breast cancer cells and might directly interact with tumor cells, we investigated whether CAFs may originate from hASCs.
  • The conditioned medium from MDAMB231 and MCF7 contains significant amounts of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGFβ1) and the differentiation of hASCs towards CAFs is dependent on TGFβ1 signaling via Smad3 in hASCs.
  • Additionally, we found that these hASC-derived CAF-like cells exhibit functional properties of CAFs, including the ability to promote tumor cell invasion in an in vitro invasion assay, as well as increased expression of stromal-cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and CCL5.
  • Taken together, these data suggest that hASCs are a source of CAFs which play an important role in the tumor invasion.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipocytes / cytology. Cell Differentiation. Fibroblasts / cytology. Neoplasms / pathology. Stem Cells / cytology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. Humans. Signal Transduction

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  • (PMID = 20978328.001).
  • [ISSN] 2210-7185
  • [Journal-full-title] Analytical cellular pathology (Amsterdam)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anal Cell Pathol (Amst)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4605656
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50. Parysow O, Mollerach AM, Jager V, Racioppi S, San Roman J, Gerbaudo VH: Low-dose oral propranolol could reduce brown adipose tissue F-18 FDG uptake in patients undergoing PET scans. Clin Nucl Med; 2007 May;32(5):351-7
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  • [Title] Low-dose oral propranolol could reduce brown adipose tissue F-18 FDG uptake in patients undergoing PET scans.
  • Fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake in brown adipose tissue (BAT) may generate FDG-PET scan misinterpretation.
  • The aim of this observational study was to present a cohort of patients with high FDG uptake in BAT who underwent a second scan after receiving a low dose of propranolol, to determine whether the use of this premedication could improve the diagnostic confidence of FDG-PET scans by inhibition FDG uptake in BAT, and also whether administration of this drug affects tracer uptake in tumors.
  • Basal and postpropranolol BAT SUVmax, and tumor SUVmax (when present) were measured.
  • In 11 patients, the basal mean tumor SUVmax was 8.07+/-6.4, and 7.88+/-5.9 in postpropranolol scans (P=0.53).
  • This was not observed in postpropranolol scans.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In this patient cohort, there was significant reduction of FDG uptake in BAT following propranolol administration, allowing for adequate interpretation of FDG-PET and software-fused FDG-PET with CT images, particularly in the mediastinal area, without affecting tumor tracer uptake.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / drug effects. Adipose Tissue / pathology. Adrenergic beta-Antagonists / administration & dosage. Drug Interactions. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 / pharmacokinetics. Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms / pathology. Positron-Emission Tomography / instrumentation. Positron-Emission Tomography / methods. Propranolol / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 17452860.001).
  • [ISSN] 0363-9762
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical nuclear medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Nucl Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic beta-Antagonists; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18; 9Y8NXQ24VQ / Propranolol
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51. Muñoz-de-Toro M, Durando M, Beldoménico PM, Beldoménico HR, Kass L, García SR, Luque EH: Estrogenic microenvironment generated by organochlorine residues in adipose mammary tissue modulates biomarker expression in ERalpha-positive breast carcinomas. Breast Cancer Res; 2006;8(4):R47
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  • [Title] Estrogenic microenvironment generated by organochlorine residues in adipose mammary tissue modulates biomarker expression in ERalpha-positive breast carcinomas.
  • INTRODUCTION: Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant disease in women.
  • To test the hypothesis that the amount and quality of organochlorine residues in adipose tissue adjacent to breast carcinoma affect the biological behavior of the tumor, we studied biomarker expression in breast carcinoma and the OCC body burden in patients from an urban area adjacent to Paraná fluvial system, Argentina.
  • METHODS: The studied patients were 55 women who had undergone excision biopsies of a breast lesion diagnosed as invasive breast carcinoma.
  • Analysis of OCC residues in breast adipose tissue was conducted by electron-capture gas-liquid chromatography.
  • Estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha), progesterone receptor (PR) and proliferative activity (Ki-67) levels were measured in paraffin-embedded biopsies of breast tumors by immunohistochemistry.
  • RESULTS: All patients had high levels of organochlorine pesticides in their breast adipose tissue.
  • In the subgroup of ERalpha-positive breast carcinoma patients, however, there was a positive correlation between PR expression (an estrogen-induced protein) in the neoplastic cells and OCC levels in adipose tissue surrounding the tumor.
  • More significantly, all the ERalpha-positive breast carcinomas from postmenopausal women exhibited high proliferation when organochlorine levels in the surrounding adipose tissue reached levels higher than 2600 ppb.
  • No associations were found between the organochlorine body burden and any other marker of tumor aggressiveness, such as node involvement or tumor size.
  • CONCLUSION: The present results support the hypothesis that organochlorine residues in adipose tissue adjacent to breast carcinoma generate an estrogenic microenvironment that may influence the biological behavior of the tumor through ERalpha activation and ERalpha-dependent proliferation.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / metabolism. Breast / drug effects. Breast Neoplasms / metabolism. Estrogen Receptor alpha / metabolism. Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Argentina. Biomarkers, Tumor / biosynthesis. Cross-Sectional Studies. Estrogens / metabolism. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Pesticide Residues. Postmenopause. Urban Population

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  • (PMID = 16859517.001).
  • [ISSN] 1465-542X
  • [Journal-full-title] Breast cancer research : BCR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Breast Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Estrogen Receptor alpha; 0 / Estrogens; 0 / Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated; 0 / Pesticide Residues
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1779466
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52. Lin G, Yang R, Banie L, Wang G, Ning H, Li LC, Lue TF, Lin CS: Effects of transplantation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells on prostate tumor. Prostate; 2010 Jul 1;70(10):1066-73
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  • [Title] Effects of transplantation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells on prostate tumor.
  • The present study tested the hypothesis that stromal cells of the adipose tissue might be recruited by cancer cells to help tumor growth.
  • One week later, adipose tissue-derived stromal or stem cells (ADSC) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, as control) was transplanted similarly to the left flank.
  • Tumor size was monitored for the next 34 days; afterwards, the mice were sacrificed and their tumors harvested for histological examination.
  • The involvement of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis was tested by migration assay in the presence of a specific inhibitor AMD3100.
  • RESULTS: Throughout the entire course, the average size of PC3 tumors in ADSC-treated mice was larger than in PBS-treated mice.
  • ADSC were identified inside the tumors of ADSC-treated mice; CXCR4 expression was also detected.
  • Capillary density was twice as high in the tumors of ADSC-treated mice than in the tumors of PBS-treated mice.
  • VEGF expression was similar but FGF2 expression was significantly higher in tumors of ADSC-treated mice than in the tumors of PBS-tread mice.
  • ADSC helps tumor growth by increasing tumor vascularity, and which was mediated by FGF2.

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  • (PMID = 20232361.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0045
  • [Journal-full-title] The Prostate
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prostate
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK045370; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK045370-13; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R37 DK045370-13; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R37 DK045370; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK045370
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CXCR4 protein, mouse; 0 / Chemokine CXCL12; 0 / Cxcl12 protein, mouse; 0 / Heterocyclic Compounds; 0 / Receptors, CXCR4; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; 0 / vascular endothelial growth factor A, mouse; 103107-01-3 / Fibroblast Growth Factor 2; 155148-31-5 / JM 3100
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS196734; NLM/ PMC2877148
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53. Ishikawa T, Banas A, Hagiwara K, Iwaguro H, Ochiya T: Stem cells for hepatic regeneration: the role of adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells. Curr Stem Cell Res Ther; 2010 Jun;5(2):182-9
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  • [Title] Stem cells for hepatic regeneration: the role of adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells.
  • One alternative is regenerative medicine, which holds promise for the development of a cell-based therapy enabling hepatic regeneration through transplantation of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) or hepatocyte-like cells generated from AT-MSCs.
  • These autologous cells are immuno-compatible and exhibit controlled differentiation and multi-functional abilities and do not undergo post-transplantation rejection or unwanted differentiation such as formation of teratomas.
  • AT-MSC-based therapies may provide a novel approach for hepatic regeneration and hepatocyte differentiation and thereby support hepatic function in diseased individuals.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / pathology. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / therapy. Liver Cirrhosis / therapy. Liver Neoplasms / therapy. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells / metabolism. Stem Cell Niche / pathology. Stem Cell Transplantation
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Differentiation. Hepatocytes / metabolism. Hepatocytes / pathology. Humans. Immune Tolerance. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells / metabolism. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells / pathology. Liver Regeneration. Regenerative Medicine

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  • (PMID = 19941447.001).
  • [ISSN] 2212-3946
  • [Journal-full-title] Current stem cell research & therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Stem Cell Res Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United Arab Emirates
  • [Number-of-references] 76
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54. Rydén M, Agustsson T, Laurencikiene J, Britton T, Sjölin E, Isaksson B, Permert J, Arner P: Lipolysis--not inflammation, cell death, or lipogenesis--is involved in adipose tissue loss in cancer cachexia. Cancer; 2008 Oct 1;113(7):1695-704
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  • [Title] Lipolysis--not inflammation, cell death, or lipogenesis--is involved in adipose tissue loss in cancer cachexia.
  • A key feature of cancer cachexia is loss of white adipose tissue (WAT) because of increased adipocyte lipolysis and possibly reduced lipid synthesis (lipogenesis).
  • However, the messenger RNA expression of IL-6 and other cytokine or leukocyte markers, as well as WAT secretion of IL-6, were not altered in the patients with cachexia.
  • Thus, the elevated serum levels of IL-6 that were observed in cachexia were not derived from WAT.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The current findings indicated that subcutaneous WAT does not contribute to the systemic inflammatory reaction and does not induce adipocyte insulin resistance in cancer cachexia.
  • Moreover, increased fat cell lipolysis, not reduced lipogenesis or adipocyte cell death, appeared to be the primary cause of fat loss in this condition.
  • [MeSH-major] Cachexia / etiology. Cell Death. Inflammation / complications. Lipogenesis. Lipolysis. Neoplasms / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Adipocytes. Adipose Tissue, White. Aged. Cell Count. Cytokines / analysis. Female. Humans. Interleukin-6 / metabolism. Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating / immunology. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 18704987.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Interleukin-6
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55. BOSANSKA L, PETRAK O, ZELINKA T, MRAZ M, WIDIMSKY J Jr, HALUZIK M: The effect of pheochromocytoma treatment on subclinical inflammation and endocrine function of adipose tissue. Physiol Res; 2009;58(3):319-25
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  • [Title] The effect of pheochromocytoma treatment on subclinical inflammation and endocrine function of adipose tissue.
  • The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of surgical removal of pheochromocytoma on the endocrine function of adipose tissue and subclinical inflammation as measured by circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) levels.
  • Anthropometric measures, biochemical parameters, serum CRP, leptin, adiponectin and resistin levels were measured at the time of diagnosis and six months after surgical removal of pheochromocytoma.
  • Serum leptin, adiponectin and resistin levels were not affected by the surgery.

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  • (PMID = 18637714.001).
  • [ISSN] 0862-8408
  • [Journal-full-title] Physiological research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Physiol Res
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Czech Republic
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / ADIPOQ protein, human; 0 / Adiponectin; 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Leptin; 0 / RETN protein, human; 0 / Resistin; 9007-41-4 / C-Reactive Protein
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56. He M, Aisner S, Benevenia J, Patterson F, Aviv H, Hameed M: p16 immunohistochemistry as an alternative marker to distinguish atypical lipomatous tumor from deep-seated lipoma. Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol; 2009 Jan;17(1):51-6

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  • [Title] p16 immunohistochemistry as an alternative marker to distinguish atypical lipomatous tumor from deep-seated lipoma.
  • Atypical lipomatous tumor (ALT)/well-differentiated liposarcoma (WDLPS) is a locally aggressive malignant mesenchymal neoplasm, resembling ordinary lipoma in many clinical aspects.
  • Fifty cases of lipomatous neoplasms, with cytogenetic results, from 45 patients were collected from the archives in Department of Pathology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey/New Jersey Medical School during 1998 to 2006.

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  • (PMID = 18779733.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-4058
  • [Journal-full-title] Applied immunohistochemistry & molecular morphology : AIMM
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Appl. Immunohistochem. Mol. Morphol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; EC 6.3.2.19 / MDM2 protein, human; EC 6.3.2.19 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-mdm2
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57. Baba S, Jacene HA, Engles JM, Honda H, Wahl RL: CT Hounsfield units of brown adipose tissue increase with activation: preclinical and clinical studies. J Nucl Med; 2010 Feb;51(2):246-50
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  • [Title] CT Hounsfield units of brown adipose tissue increase with activation: preclinical and clinical studies.
  • Brown adipose tissue (BAT) densities assessed as CT Hounsfield units (HUs) were evaluated in a rodent model and in patients to determine whether HUs changed in relation to BAT activity.
  • The maximum standardized uptake values and CT HUs of BAT were measured, and tissues were examined in the laboratory.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue, Brown / radiography. Adipose Tissue, Brown / radionuclide imaging. Tomography, X-Ray Computed
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Animals. Cold Temperature. Female. Fluorine Radioisotopes. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Humans. In Vitro Techniques. Lipid Metabolism. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasms / metabolism. Neoplasms / radiography. Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Positron-Emission Tomography. Radiopharmaceuticals. Rats. Rats, Inbred Lew. Retrospective Studies. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20124047.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-5667
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Nucl. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fluorine Radioisotopes; 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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58. Bershtein LM, Kovalevskiĭ AIu, Poroshina TE, Revskoĭ SIu, Kotov AV, Kovalenko IG, Tsyrlina EV, Semiglazov VF, Turkevich EA, Pozharisskiĭ KM: [Progenotoxic shift in mammary adipose tissue (adipogenotoxicosis): association with clinical and biological characteristics of breast cancer]. Vopr Onkol; 2008;54(3):294-302
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  • [Title] [Progenotoxic shift in mammary adipose tissue (adipogenotoxicosis): association with clinical and biological characteristics of breast cancer].
  • The study is concerned with identification of a relationship between levels of production and accumulation of compounds capable of hormonal and progenotoxic effects in mammary fat, on the one hand, and characteristics of tumor tissue in breast cancer, on the other.
  • Mammary fat was sampled at a distance of 1.5-2 cm from tumor edge (79 pts.).
  • Levels were assayed of leptin, adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), nitric oxide (NO), thiobarbiturate-reactive products (TBRP) and DNA oxidative damage marker (8-OH-dG) from 4hr-incubates of fat tissue culture.
  • Radio-competitive and immunohistochemical methods were used to assay estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptor levels in tumor and tumor-related expression of cytokeratins 5/6 ("basal") and 7/8 ("luminal" epithelium), respectively.
  • As far as hormonal properties of mammary fat were concerned, there were direct correlations between aromatase concentration, on the one hand, and tumor stage and size, on the other, and adiponectin secretion and CK7 expression in tumor.
  • The following main relationships were identified by comparison of the clinico-biological characteristics of tumor and markers of proinflammatory/progenotoxic properties of mammary adipose tissue: tendency toward direct correlation with IL-6 and 8-OH-dG in fat (tumor progress stage); direct correlation with TNF-alpha secretion rate (malignancy grade); lymph node involvement--tendency toward direct correlation with NO generation; CK5 expression in tumor--tendency toward direct correlation with 8-OH-dG, TBRP and CD68 fat infiltration; CK7 expression in tumor--tendency toward inverse correlation with NO generation in adipose tissue; ER-negative phenotype of tumor--tendency toward higher generation of TBRP, NO and TNF/leptin in fat.
  • Hence, shift toward predominance of proinflammatory/progenotoxic properties of mammary adipose tissue (adipogenotoxicosis) is associated with signs of less favorable course of tumor process in the mammary gland which calls for working out adequate measures.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / metabolism. Biomarkers, Tumor / biosynthesis. Breast Neoplasms / metabolism. Nerve Tissue Proteins / biosynthesis. Nitric Oxide / biosynthesis. Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances / analysis

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  • (PMID = 18652233.001).
  • [ISSN] 0507-3758
  • [Journal-full-title] Voprosy onkologii
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vopr Onkol
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Nerve Tissue Proteins; 0 / Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances; 31C4KY9ESH / Nitric Oxide
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59. Yee LD, Lester JL, Cole RM, Richardson JR, Hsu JC, Li Y, Lehman A, Belury MA, Clinton SK: Omega-3 fatty acid supplements in women at high risk of breast cancer have dose-dependent effects on breast adipose tissue fatty acid composition. Am J Clin Nutr; 2010 May;91(5):1185-94
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  • [Title] Omega-3 fatty acid supplements in women at high risk of breast cancer have dose-dependent effects on breast adipose tissue fatty acid composition.
  • BACKGROUND: Preclinical evidence of the preventive benefits of omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in breast cancer continues to fuel interest in the potential role of dietary fat content in reducing breast cancer risk.
  • The dose of fish-oil/omega-3 PUFAs needed to achieve maximal target tissue effects for breast cancer prevention remains undefined.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine the dose effects of omega-3 fatty acids on breast adipose tissue fatty acid profiles, we conducted a study of 4 doses of omega-3 PUFAs in women at high risk of breast cancer.
  • Subjects made monthly visits, at which time pill counts were made and fasting blood samples were collected to determine fatty acid profiles; anthropometric measurements were made, breast adipose tissue samples were collected, and laboratory tests of toxicity (alanine aminotransferase, LDL cholesterol, and platelet function) were made at baseline and at 3 and 6 mo.
  • RESULTS: All doses led to increased serum and breast adipose tissue EPA and DHA concentrations, but the response to 0.84 g DHA+EPA/d was less than the maximum possible response with > or = 2.52 g/d.
  • Body mass index attenuated the dose response for serum tissue DHA and EPA (P = 0.015 and 0.027, respectively) and breast adipose tissue DHA (P = 0.0022) in all of the treatment groups.
  • Body mass index and baseline fatty acid concentrations modulated the dose-response effects of omega-3 PUFA supplements on serum EPA and DHA and breast adipose tissue DHA.

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  • (PMID = 20335550.001).
  • [ISSN] 1938-3207
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of clinical nutrition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Clin. Nutr.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / UL1 RR025755; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01-RR00034; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA16058-29S1; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA37447
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dietary Fats; 0 / Fatty Acids; 0 / Fatty Acids, Omega-3; 0 / Lipids; 25167-62-8 / Docosahexaenoic Acids; AAN7QOV9EA / Eicosapentaenoic Acid; EC 2.6.1.2 / Alanine Transaminase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2854898
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60. Ociepa-Zawal M, Rubis B, Wawrzynczak D, Wachowiak R, Trzeciak WH: Accumulation of environmental estrogens in adipose tissue of breast cancer patients. J Environ Sci Health A Tox Hazard Subst Environ Eng; 2010;45(3):305-12
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  • [Title] Accumulation of environmental estrogens in adipose tissue of breast cancer patients.
  • Although the estrogenic properties of numerous chloroorganic pesticides have been widely recognized, population studies do not give clear results indicating the link between the exposure to these compounds and breast cancer development.
  • To examine the possible correlation between environmental estrogen levels in adipose tissue and breast cancer stage, grade, receptor status and onset of the disease, adipose tissue was isolated from 54 breast cancer patients and 23 healthy individuals.
  • The levels of most environmental estrogens did not differ between the patients and the controls, except the beta-HCH (beta-hexachlorocyclohexane) level, which was higher in the patients than in the healthy individuals.
  • Significantly higher levels of DDE (1,1-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-2,2-dichloroethene) and DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenol)ethane) (P < 0.05) were observed in the patients with late onset of the disease which was probably due to the time of exposure.
  • We also evidenced that estrogen-independent cancer was more frequent in the patients exposed to numerous risk factors in which higher levels of HCB (hexachlorobenzene), gamma-HCH (gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane), DDD and DDT in adipose tissue were detected.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / metabolism. Breast Neoplasms / metabolism. Environmental Pollutants / metabolism. Estrogens / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 20390871.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-4117
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of environmental science and health. Part A, Toxic/hazardous substances & environmental engineering
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Environ Sci Health A Tox Hazard Subst Environ Eng
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Environmental Pollutants; 0 / Estrogens; 319-85-7 / beta-hexachlorocyclohexane; 4M7FS82U08 / Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene; 59NEE7PCAB / Lindane; CIW5S16655 / DDT; V14159DF29 / Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane
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61. Finley DS, Calvert VS, Inokuchi J, Lau A, Narula N, Petricoin EF, Zaldivar F, Santos R, Tyson DR, Ornstein DK: Periprostatic adipose tissue as a modulator of prostate cancer aggressiveness. J Urol; 2009 Oct;182(4):1621-7
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  • [Title] Periprostatic adipose tissue as a modulator of prostate cancer aggressiveness.
  • PURPOSE: Adipose tissue has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of various disease states, including prostate cancer.
  • We investigated the association of cytokines and growth factors secreted by periprostatic adipose tissue with pathological features of aggressive prostate cancer.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Periprostatic adipose tissue was harvested from patients undergoing radical prostatectomy and cultured for 24 hours to generate conditioned medium or snap frozen immediately for functional signaling profiling.
  • Multiplex analysis of the periprostatic adipose tissue conditioned medium was used to detect cytokine levels and compared to patient matched serum from 7 patients.
  • Interleukin-6 in serum and periprostatic adipose tissue conditioned medium was further analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and correlated with clinical variables, such as age, body mass index and Gleason score, in 45 patients.
  • Interleukin-6 expression in periprostatic adipose tissue was determined by immunohistochemistry.
  • Reverse phase protein microarray technology was used to analyze cell signaling networks in periprostatic adipose tissue.
  • RESULTS: Interleukin-6 in periprostatic adipose tissue conditioned medium was approximately 375 times greater than that in patient matched serum and levels correlated with pathological grade.
  • This finding was further extended by cell signaling analysis of periprostatic adipose tissue, which showed greater phosphorylation on Stat3 with high grade tumors (any component of Gleason score 4 or 5).
  • Moreover, cell signaling analysis of periprostatic adipose tissue identified activated signaling molecules, including STAT3, that correlated with Gleason score.
  • Since STAT3 is interleukin-6 regulated, these findings suggest that periprostatic adipose tissue may have a role in modulating prostate cancer aggressiveness by serving as a source of interleukin-6.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / secretion. Cytokines / secretion. Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins / secretion. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Disease Progression. Humans. Interleukin-6 / analysis. Interleukin-6 / secretion. Male

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  • [CommentIn] J Urol. 2009 Oct;182(4):1255-6 [19683299.001]
  • [CommentIn] Eur Urol. 2010 Mar;57(3):541-2 [20135758.001]
  • (PMID = 19683746.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-3792
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; 0 / Interleukin-6
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62. Banas A, Teratani T, Yamamoto Y, Tokuhara M, Takeshita F, Quinn G, Okochi H, Ochiya T: Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a source of human hepatocytes. Hepatology; 2007 Jul;46(1):219-28
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  • [Title] Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a source of human hepatocytes.
  • The goal of the present study was to examine the in vitro hepatic differentiation potential of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs).
  • We used AT-MSCs from different age patients and found that, after incubation with specific growth factors (hepatocyte growth factor [HGF], fibroblast growth factor [FGF1], FGF4) the CD105(+) fraction of AT-MSCs exhibited high hepatic differentiation ability in an adherent monoculture condition.
  • CONCLUSION: Adipose tissue is a source of multipotent stem cells that can be easily isolated, selected, and induced into mature, transplantable hepatocytes.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / cytology. Hepatocytes / cytology. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells / cytology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antigens, CD / analysis. Cell Differentiation. Female. Gastrectomy. Humans. Male. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation. Middle Aged. Stem Cells / cytology. Stomach Neoplasms / pathology. Stomach Neoplasms / surgery. Tissue and Organ Harvesting

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  • (PMID = 17596885.001).
  • [ISSN] 0270-9139
  • [Journal-full-title] Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hepatology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD
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63. Nazeer T, Kee KH, Ro JY, Jennings TA, Ross J, Mian BM, Shen SS, Suh JH, Lee MJ, Ayala AG: Intraprostatic adipose tissue: a study of 427 whole mount radical prostatectomy specimens. Hum Pathol; 2009 Apr;40(4):538-41
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Intraprostatic adipose tissue: a study of 427 whole mount radical prostatectomy specimens.
  • Tumor Gleason grade and stage provide extremely valuable prognostic information and play an important role in therapeutic decision making and patient counseling.
  • A biopsy or radical prostatectomy specimen revealing carcinoma extending into extraprostatic tissue permits a T3 classification.
  • This is most easily recognized, particularly in a needle biopsy, when tumor is seen to invade the adipose tissue.
  • The existence of intraprostatic adipose tissue is somewhat controversial.
  • To investigate this, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded whole-mount radical prostatectomy specimens from 427 patients with adenocarcinoma were evaluated for intraprostatic adipose tissue.
  • Intraprostatic adipose tissue was identified in 17 (3.98%) of cases.
  • Intraprostatic adipose tissue was located in the peripheral zone in 15 cases and in the central zone in 2.
  • Intraprostatic adipose tissue, although uncommon, does exist.
  • The small size of foci of adipose tissue and its admixture with benign glands are useful morphologic clues in distinguishing it from extraprostatic fat.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Adipose Tissue / anatomy & histology. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology

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  • [CommentIn] Hum Pathol. 2011 May;42(5):759 [21492748.001]
  • (PMID = 19121845.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-8392
  • [Journal-full-title] Human pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hum. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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64. Selva DM, Lecube A, Hernández C, Baena JA, Fort JM, Simó R: Lower zinc-alpha2-glycoprotein production by adipose tissue and liver in obese patients unrelated to insulin resistance. J Clin Endocrinol Metab; 2009 Nov;94(11):4499-507
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  • [Title] Lower zinc-alpha2-glycoprotein production by adipose tissue and liver in obese patients unrelated to insulin resistance.
  • OBJECTIVE: The main aim of the study was to compare serum levels of ZAG and its expression (mRNA levels and protein) in adipose tissue and the liver between obese and nonobese subjects.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Samples of serum, sc adipose tissue (SAT), visceral adipose tissue (VAT), and liver were obtained from 20 obese subjects during bariatric surgery.
  • ZAG expression was significantly lower in the adipose tissue (SAT and VAT) and liver of obese patients than in control subjects.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / metabolism. Insulin Resistance / physiology. Liver / metabolism. Obesity / blood. Seminal Plasma Proteins / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Body Mass Index. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular. Cell Line. Cell Line, Tumor. DNA Primers. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Female. Gastric Bypass. Humans. Liver Neoplasms. Male. Middle Aged. Polymerase Chain Reaction. RNA, Messenger / genetics

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  • [CommentIn] J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009 Dec;94(12):4668-70 [19959754.001]
  • (PMID = 19622624.001).
  • [ISSN] 1945-7197
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA Primers; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Seminal Plasma Proteins; 0 / Zn-alpha-2-glycoprotein
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65. Clément S, Juge-Aubry C, Sgroi A, Conzelmann S, Pazienza V, Pittet-Cuenod B, Meier CA, Negro F: Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 secreted by adipose tissue induces direct lipid accumulation in hepatocytes. Hepatology; 2008 Sep;48(3):799-807
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  • [Title] Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 secreted by adipose tissue induces direct lipid accumulation in hepatocytes.
  • For many years, adipose tissue has been mainly considered as an inert reservoir for storing triglycerides.
  • Since the discovery that adipocytes may secrete a variety of bioactive molecules (hormones, chemokines, and cytokines), an endocrine and paracrine role for white adipose tissue (WAT) in the regulation of energy balance and other physiological processes has been established, particularly with regard to brain and muscle.
  • CONCLUSION: The monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 secreted by adipose tissue may induce steatosis not only recruiting macrophages but also acting directly on hepatocytes.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue, White / metabolism. Chemokine CCL2 / metabolism. Hepatocytes / metabolism. Lipid Metabolism / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Apolipoproteins B / metabolism. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / metabolism. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / pathology. Cell Line, Tumor. Cells, Cultured. Culture Media, Conditioned / pharmacology. Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors. Fatty Liver / metabolism. Fatty Liver / pathology. Humans. Liver Neoplasms / metabolism. Liver Neoplasms / pathology. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (GTP) / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 18570214.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-3350
  • [Journal-full-title] Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hepatology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Apolipoproteins B; 0 / CCL2 protein, human; 0 / Ccl2 protein, mouse; 0 / Chemokine CCL2; 0 / Culture Media, Conditioned; EC 2.7.11.24 / Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases; EC 4.1.1.32 / Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (GTP)
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66. Tanas MR, Sthapanachai C, Nonaka D, Melamed J, Oliveira AM, Erickson-Johnson MR, Rubin BP: Pseudosarcomatous fibroblastic/myofibroblastic proliferation in perinephric adipose tissue adjacent to renal cell carcinoma: a lesion mimicking well-differentiated liposarcoma. Mod Pathol; 2009 Sep;22(9):1196-200
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  • [Title] Pseudosarcomatous fibroblastic/myofibroblastic proliferation in perinephric adipose tissue adjacent to renal cell carcinoma: a lesion mimicking well-differentiated liposarcoma.
  • Cytologically atypical stromal cells were found in the perinephric adipose tissue, mimicking well-differentiated liposarcoma in 12 of 59 (20%) consecutive nephrectomy specimens that were resected for renal cell carcinoma.
  • Of 59, 10 (17%) renal cell carcinomas invaded through the renal capsule into the perinephric adipose tissue.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Fibroblasts / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Liposarcoma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adipose Tissue / pathology. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence

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  • (PMID = 19525929.001).
  • [ISSN] 1530-0285
  • [Journal-full-title] Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mod. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
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67. Urbanet R, Pilon C, Calcagno A, Peschechera A, Hubert EL, Giacchetti G, Gomez-Sanchez C, Mulatero P, Toffanin M, Sonino N, Zennaro MC, Giorgino F, Vettor R, Fallo F: Analysis of insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue of patients with primary aldosteronism. J Clin Endocrinol Metab; 2010 Aug;95(8):4037-42
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  • [Title] Analysis of insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue of patients with primary aldosteronism.
  • OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to assess the effect of high aldosterone levels on insulin sensitivity of adipose tissue in humans.
  • METHODS: Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) was obtained from patients with aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA; n=14) and, as controls, nonfunctioning adenoma (NFA; n=14) undergoing laparoscopic adrenalectomy.
  • The impairment was prevented by RU486 but not by eplerenone.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Gene expression of insulin signaling/inflammatory molecules was similar in VAT of APA and NFA patients, not supporting an effect of aldosterone excess on insulin sensitivity of adipose tissues.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adiponectin / genetics. Adiponectin / metabolism. Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms / genetics. Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms / metabolism. Adrenocortical Adenoma / genetics. Adrenocortical Adenoma / metabolism. Adrenocorticotropic Hormone / blood. Aldosterone / blood. Analysis of Variance. Blotting, Western. Female. Humans. Hydrocortisone / blood. Immunohistochemistry. Male. RNA, Messenger / genetics. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. Receptors, Mineralocorticoid / genetics. Receptors, Mineralocorticoid / metabolism. Renin / blood. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 20484481.001).
  • [ISSN] 1945-7197
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adiponectin; 0 / Insulin; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Receptors, Mineralocorticoid; 4964P6T9RB / Aldosterone; 9002-60-2 / Adrenocorticotropic Hormone; EC 3.4.23.15 / Renin; WI4X0X7BPJ / Hydrocortisone
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68. Mamalakis G, Hatzis C, de Bree E, Sanidas E, Tsiftsis DD, Askoxylakis J, Daskalakis M, Tsibinos G, Kafatos A: Adipose tissue fatty acids in breast cancer patients versus healthy control women from Crete. Ann Nutr Metab; 2009;54(4):275-82
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  • [Title] Adipose tissue fatty acids in breast cancer patients versus healthy control women from Crete.
  • BACKGROUND: Few studies have implemented biomarkers of fatty acid intake in relation to breast cancer.
  • AIMS: To examine possible differences in adipose tissue fatty acid composition between breast cancer patients and healthy control women.
  • The relationship between tumor promotion and adipose tissue fatty acid synthesis was also investigated.
  • Histological tumor grading and breast cancer staging were assessed.
  • Fatty acids were determined by gas chromatography in gluteal adipose tissue.
  • RESULTS: Conditional logistic regression analysis controlling for potential confounders indicated that elevated adipose monounsaturated fatty acids and oleic acid are associated with reduced odds of breast cancer [OR (T2 vs. T1) 0.15; 95% CI 0.03-0.64, and OR (T2 vs. T1) 0.18; 95% CI 0.04-0.71, respectively].
  • Adipose myristic acid was associated with an increase in breast cancer risk [OR (T3 vs. T1) 5.66; 95% CI 1.3-23.9].
  • CONCLUSIONS: Adipose oleic acid is inversely related, whereas adipose myristic acid is positively related to breast cancer risk.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / chemistry. Fatty Acids / analysis. Subcutaneous Fat / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Biomarkers / analysis. Buttocks. Case-Control Studies. Female. Greece. Humans. Middle Aged. Myristic Acid / analysis. Neoplasm Staging. Oleic Acid / analysis. Risk Factors. Statistics as Topic. Tumor Burden. Young Adult

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 19641305.001).
  • [ISSN] 1421-9697
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of nutrition & metabolism
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Nutr. Metab.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Fatty Acids; 0I3V7S25AW / Myristic Acid; 2UMI9U37CP / Oleic Acid
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69. Macciò A, Madeddu C, Mantovani G: Adipose tissue as target organ in the treatment of hormone-dependent breast cancer: new therapeutic perspectives. Obes Rev; 2009 Nov;10(6):660-70
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  • [Title] Adipose tissue as target organ in the treatment of hormone-dependent breast cancer: new therapeutic perspectives.
  • Breast cancer is the female malignant neoplasia with the highest incidence in the industrialized world.
  • In the last few years, thanks to aromatase inhibitors, the hormone therapy for oestrogen-dependent breast cancer has evolved in terms of efficacy and tolerability; at the same time, it has enabled us to better define the role of oestrogens in the etiopathogenesis of this tumour.
  • The present review will discuss important findings on the therapeutic aspects of adipose tissue and adipokines as a target for treatment of hormone-dependent breast cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / drug effects. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Aromatase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Breast Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent / drug therapy. Obesity / complications

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  • (PMID = 19460113.001).
  • [ISSN] 1467-789X
  • [Journal-full-title] Obesity reviews : an official journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Obes Rev
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adipokines; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Aromatase Inhibitors; 0 / Estrogens
  • [Number-of-references] 81
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70. Zhang Y, Daquinag A, Traktuev DO, Amaya-Manzanares F, Simmons PJ, March KL, Pasqualini R, Arap W, Kolonin MG: White adipose tissue cells are recruited by experimental tumors and promote cancer progression in mouse models. Cancer Res; 2009 Jun 15;69(12):5259-66
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  • [Title] White adipose tissue cells are recruited by experimental tumors and promote cancer progression in mouse models.
  • The connection between obesity and accelerated cancer progression has been established, but the mediating mechanisms are not well understood.
  • We have shown that stromal cells from white adipose tissue (WAT) cooperate with the endothelium to promote blood vessel formation through the secretion of soluble trophic factors.
  • Here, we hypothesize that WAT directly mediates cancer progression by serving as a source of cells that migrate to tumors and promote neovascularization.
  • To test this hypothesis, we have evaluated the recruitment of WAT-derived cells by tumors and the effect of their engraftment on tumor growth by integrating a transgenic mouse strain engineered for expansion of traceable cells with established allograft and xenograft cancer models.
  • Our studies show that entry of adipose stromal and endothelial cells into systemic circulation leads to their homing to and engraftment into tumor stroma and vasculature, respectively.
  • We show that recruitment of adipose stromal cells by tumors is sufficient to promote tumor growth.
  • Finally, we show that migration of stromal and vascular progenitor cells from WAT grafts to tumors is also associated with acceleration of cancer progression.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / pathology. Disease Models, Animal. Neoplasms, Experimental / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Disease Progression. Mice. Mice, Transgenic

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  • (PMID = 19491274.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-7445
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA140388
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS111837; NLM/ PMC3857703
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71. Cavarretta IT, Altanerova V, Matuskova M, Kucerova L, Culig Z, Altaner C: Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells expressing prodrug-converting enzyme inhibit human prostate tumor growth. Mol Ther; 2010 Jan;18(1):223-31
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  • [Title] Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells expressing prodrug-converting enzyme inhibit human prostate tumor growth.
  • The ability of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs), engineered to express the suicide gene cytosine deaminase::uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CD::UPRT), to convert the relatively nontoxic 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the highly toxic antitumor 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) together with their ability to track and engraft into tumors and micrometastases makes these cells an attractive tool to activate prodrugs directly within the tumor mass.
  • In a pilot preclinical study, we observed that coinjections of human bone metastatic PC cells along with the transduced AT-MSCs into nude mice treated with 5-FC induced a complete tumor regression in a dose dependent manner or did not even allow the establishment of the tumor.
  • More importantly, we also demonstrated that the therapeutic cells were effective in significantly inhibiting PC tumor growth after intravenous administration that is a key requisite for any clinical application of gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapies.
  • [MeSH-major] Cytosine Deaminase / physiology. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells / metabolism. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells / physiology. Pentosyltransferases / physiology. Prostatic Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line, Tumor. Flucytosine / pharmacology. Fluorouracil / pharmacology. Humans. Male. Mice. Mice, Nude

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  • (PMID = 19844197.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-0024
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular therapy : the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] D83282DT06 / Flucytosine; EC 2.4.2.- / Pentosyltransferases; EC 2.4.2.9 / uracil phosphoribosyltransferase; EC 3.5.4.1 / Cytosine Deaminase; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2839205
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72. Sakayama K, Kidani T, Tanji N, Yamamoto H, Masuno H: The synthesis and activity of lipoprotein lipase in the subcutaneous adipose tissue of patients with musculoskeletal sarcomas. Anticancer Res; 2008 Jul-Aug;28(4B):2081-6
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  • [Title] The synthesis and activity of lipoprotein lipase in the subcutaneous adipose tissue of patients with musculoskeletal sarcomas.
  • The purpose of this study was to explore the triacylglycerol (TG) deposition and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity in the adipose tissue of patients with muculoskeletal sarcoma.
  • Subcutaneous adipose tissue was obtained from the thighs of 19 patients with musculoskeletal sarcomas (sarcoma group) and 20 patients with osteoarthritis of the hip joint (control group) at surgery.
  • The adipose tissue was homogenized and aliquots of the homogenate were used to measure the TG content and to prepare an acetone/ether powder to measure the LPL activity.
  • The TG content was higher, but not significantly, in the sarcoma group than in the control group.
  • These results indicated that LPL was up-regulated at the transcriptional/translational level, thus resulting in an increased TG deposition in the adipose tissue of patients with muculoskeletal sarcoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / enzymology. Bone Neoplasms / enzymology. Lipoprotein Lipase / metabolism. Muscle Neoplasms / enzymology. Sarcoma / enzymology

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  • (PMID = 18751379.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Triglycerides; EC 3.1.1.34 / Lipoprotein Lipase
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73. Otani K, Kitayama J, Kaisaki S, Ishigami H, Hidemura A, Fujishiro M, Omata M, Nagawa H: Early gastric cancer shows different associations with adipose tissue volume depending on histological type. Gastric Cancer; 2008;11(2):86-95
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  • [Title] Early gastric cancer shows different associations with adipose tissue volume depending on histological type.
  • BACKGROUND: Visceral obesity is known to be a risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
  • METHODS: A total of 210 patients who underwent endoscopic resection or surgical gastrectomy and whose disease was pathologically diagnosed as early GC were investigated for total fat area (TFA), visceral fat area (VFA), and subcutaneous fat area (SFA) with Fat Scan software, using a CT slice at the umbilical level, and the relationships of these findings with clinical and pathological data were analyzed.
  • RESULTS: TFA, VFA, and SFA values in GC patients were not significantly different from the values in CRC patients.
  • These values did not differ with the location of the GC.
  • CONCLUSION: GC has different associations with adipose tissue volume according to its histological type.
  • As compared with differentiated GC, lower adipose tissue volume may be a preferential environment for the development and progression of undifferentiated GC.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / physiopathology. Body Composition / physiology. Stomach Neoplasms / pathology. Subcutaneous Fat / physiopathology

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  • [CommentIn] Gastric Cancer. 2008;11(2):67-8 [18595011.001]
  • (PMID = 18595015.001).
  • [ISSN] 1436-3291
  • [Journal-full-title] Gastric cancer : official journal of the International Gastric Cancer Association and the Japanese Gastric Cancer Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gastric Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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74. Brorson H, Ohlin K, Olsson G, Karlsson MK: Breast cancer-related chronic arm lymphedema is associated with excess adipose and muscle tissue. Lymphat Res Biol; 2009;7(1):3-10
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  • [Title] Breast cancer-related chronic arm lymphedema is associated with excess adipose and muscle tissue.
  • This study evaluated whether dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) could be used to estimate the excess fat, muscle, and bone tissue in patients with arm lymphedema.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Both excess fat and muscle volume contributed to the total excess volume in nonpitting arm lymphedema; excess soft tissue developed the first few years after breast cancer surgery.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / pathology. Arm / pathology. Breast Neoplasms / surgery. Lymphedema / diagnosis. Muscle, Skeletal / pathology. Postoperative Complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Absorptiometry, Photon. Adult. Aged. Bone and Bones / pathology. Bone and Bones / radiography. Chronic Disease. Female. Humans. Lymph Node Excision. Mastectomy. Middle Aged


75. Ide F, Shimoyama T, Kaneko T, Horie N: Pacinian neuroma in adipose herniation of the buccal mucosa. Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg; 2006 Dec;35(12):1162-3
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  • [Title] Pacinian neuroma in adipose herniation of the buccal mucosa.
  • An interesting case of a trauma-induced tender mass of the buccal mucosa in a 45-year-old man was presented.
  • Microscopically, the mature adipose tissue is unique in that it contained a single enlarged Pacinian corpuscle near the deep margin.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / pathology. Mouth Neoplasms / pathology. Neuroma / pathology. Pacinian Corpuscles / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17008055.001).
  • [ISSN] 0901-5027
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
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76. Tanas MR, Rubin BP, Tubbs RR, Billings SD, Downs-Kelly E, Goldblum JR: Utilization of fluorescence in situ hybridization in the diagnosis of 230 mesenchymal neoplasms: an institutional experience. Arch Pathol Lab Med; 2010 Dec;134(12):1797-803
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  • [Title] Utilization of fluorescence in situ hybridization in the diagnosis of 230 mesenchymal neoplasms: an institutional experience.
  • CONTEXT: Mesenchymal neoplasms harbor characteristic translocations and amplification of gene regions amenable to evaluation by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine the utility of FISH in the diagnosis of mesenchymal neoplasms.
  • DESIGN: Two hundred thirty soft tissue cases analyzed by FISH were reviewed retrospectively.
  • RESULTS: Morphologic patterns where FISH was used included high-grade round cell sarcomas (n  =  67), nonmyogenic spindle cell sarcomas (n  =  40), low-grade myxoid neoplasms (n  =  34), adipocytic neoplasms (n  =  20), and melanocytic neoplasms (n  =  19).
  • Fifty cases did not fit into the previously mentioned categories.
  • SYT FISH (96% of monophasic synovial sarcomas were positive; 0% of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor were positive) and DDIT3 FISH (100% of myxoid/round cell liposarcomas; no other neoplasm positive) were very sensitive and specific.
  • EWSR1 FISH was very sensitive and specific in the differential diagnosis of melanocytic neoplasms (88% of clear cell sarcomas were positive; all melanomas were negative).
  • EWSR1 FISH was sensitive among high-grade round cell sarcomas (positive in 100% of desmoplastic small round cell tumors and 96% of Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumors) but not specific because clear cell sarcoma, extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma, and a subset of round cell liposarcomas also harbor rearrangements of EWSR1.
  • FUS FISH was very sensitive in detecting low-grade fibromyxoid sarcomas (91% positive) but not specific because most myxoid/round cell liposarcomas also contain rearrangements of FUS.
  • All atypical lipomatous tumors were positive for amplification of MDM2, whereas all lipomas were negative.
  • CONCLUSION: FISH is a useful adjunct in the diagnosis of mesenchymal neoplasms.
  • [MeSH-major] In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence / methods. Melanoma / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Adipose Tissue / diagnosis. Sarcoma / diagnosis. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Chromosome Aberrations. Humans. Molecular Diagnostic Techniques

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  • (PMID = 21128778.001).
  • [ISSN] 1543-2165
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of pathology & laboratory medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
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77. Brorson H, Ohlin K, Olsson G, Nilsson M: Adipose tissue dominates chronic arm lymphedema following breast cancer: an analysis using volume rendered CT images. Lymphat Res Biol; 2006;4(4):199-210
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  • [Title] Adipose tissue dominates chronic arm lymphedema following breast cancer: an analysis using volume rendered CT images.
  • The objective of the present study was to obtain empirical evidence confirming clinical observations of the presence of excess adipose tissue in patients with chronic nonpitting arm lymphedema following breast cancer.
  • Liposuction aspirate was analyzed in terms of the distribution of adipose tissue and free fluid (lymph).
  • The amount of excess adipose tissue in the lymphedematous arm was estimated using VR-CT.
  • The aspirate removed under bloodless conditions, achieved by use of a tourniquet, contained 93% adipose tissue.
  • VR-CT was able to estimate the amount of excess adipose tissue in the lymphedematous arm, showing a mean excess amount of fat of 81%.
  • Excess adipose tissue dominates nonpitting chronic arm lymphedema.
  • Liposuction can completely remove the excess adipose tissue, leading to complete reduction of the lymphedema.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / radiography. Arm / radiography. Breast Neoplasms / surgery. Lymphedema / therapy. Mastectomy / adverse effects. Postoperative Complications / therapy


78. Brees DJ, Elwell MR, Tingley FD 3rd, Sands SB, Jakowski AB, Shen AC, Cai JH, Finkelstein MB: Pharmacological effects of nicotine on norepinephrine metabolism in rat brown adipose tissue: relevance to nicotinic therapies for smoking cessation. Toxicol Pathol; 2008 Jun;36(4):568-75
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  • [Title] Pharmacological effects of nicotine on norepinephrine metabolism in rat brown adipose tissue: relevance to nicotinic therapies for smoking cessation.
  • To investigate potential mechanisms for partial and full nicotinic agonists to contribute to development of hibernomas, the effects of nicotine on rat brown adipose tissue (BAT) were studied.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue, Brown / drug effects. Nicotine / pharmacology. Nicotinic Agonists / pharmacology. Norepinephrine / metabolism. Smoking Cessation
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Benzazepines / toxicity. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Female. Lipoma / chemically induced. Lipoma / metabolism. Male. Mediastinal Neoplasms / chemically induced. Mediastinal Neoplasms / metabolism. Quinoxalines / toxicity. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Sex Factors. Varenicline

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  • (PMID = 18467676.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-1601
  • [Journal-full-title] Toxicologic pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Toxicol Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Benzazepines; 0 / Nicotinic Agonists; 0 / Quinoxalines; 6M3C89ZY6R / Nicotine; W6HS99O8ZO / Varenicline; X4W3ENH1CV / Norepinephrine
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79. Knower KC, To SQ, Simpson ER, Clyne CD: Epigenetic mechanisms regulating CYP19 transcription in human breast adipose fibroblasts. Mol Cell Endocrinol; 2010 Jun 10;321(2):123-30
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Epigenetic mechanisms regulating CYP19 transcription in human breast adipose fibroblasts.
  • In post-menopausal women, adipose becomes the major site for estrogen production, where basal CYP19 transcription is driven by distal promoter I.4.
  • In breast adipose fibroblasts (BAFs), CYP19 expression is elevated in the presence of tumour-derived factors through use of promoters I.3 and II.
  • Promoter I.4 and I.3/II-derived mRNA were not dependent on the CpG methylation status within respective promoters.
  • [MeSH-major] Aromatase / metabolism. Breast Neoplasms / metabolism. Epigenesis, Genetic. Fibroblasts / metabolism. Gene Expression Regulation. Promoter Regions, Genetic
  • [MeSH-minor] Adipose Tissue / cytology. Adipose Tissue / metabolism. Cell Line, Tumor. CpG Islands / genetics. DNA Methylation / physiology. DNA-Cytosine Methylases / metabolism. Female. Humans. RNA, Messenger / metabolism

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  • [Copyright] Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
  • (PMID = 20211687.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-8057
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular and cellular endocrinology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cell. Endocrinol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Messenger; EC 1.14.14.1 / Aromatase; EC 2.1.1.- / DNA modification methylase SssI; EC 2.1.1.- / DNA-Cytosine Methylases
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80. Reynolds P, Hurley SE, Petreas M, Goldberg DE, Smith D, Gilliss D, Mahoney ME, Jeffrey SS: Adipose levels of dioxins and risk of breast cancer. Cancer Causes Control; 2005 Jun;16(5):525-35
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  • [Title] Adipose levels of dioxins and risk of breast cancer.
  • We collected breast adipose tissue and analyzed it for all 17 2,3,7,8-substitituted PCDD/PCDFs.
  • One notable exception was octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (OCDD), for which the odds ratio for the second and third tertiles appeared modestly elevated (OR = 1.22, 95% CI: 0.47:3.16 and OR = 1.62, 95% CI: 0.64:4.12, respectively), though the test for trend was not significant (p = 0.36).
  • CONCLUSION: Breast cancer risk was not associated with adipose levels of PCDD/PCDFs.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / metabolism. Breast Neoplasms / metabolism. Dioxins / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 15986107.001).
  • [ISSN] 0957-5243
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer causes & control : CCC
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Causes Control
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dioxins
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81. Gelfand MJ, O'hara SM, Curtwright LA, Maclean JR: Pre-medication to block [(18)F]FDG uptake in the brown adipose tissue of pediatric and adolescent patients. Pediatr Radiol; 2005 Oct;35(10):984-90
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  • [Title] Pre-medication to block [(18)F]FDG uptake in the brown adipose tissue of pediatric and adolescent patients.
  • BACKGROUND: Radiopharmaceutical uptake of [(18)F]2-deoxy-2-glucose (FDG) in brown adipose tissue is noted on 15-20% of positron emission tomography (PET) scans in children and adolescents.
  • One report suggests that moderate-dose oral diazepam can partly or completely block FDG uptake in brown adipose tissue.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine whether [(18)F]FDG uptake in brown adipose tissue can be adequately blocked by pre-medication other than moderate-dose oral diazepam.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and eighteen [(18)F]FDG PET body imaging studies were performed in 69 pediatric patients with a variety of solid tumors.
  • Six body regions in the neck and chest were reviewed for [(18)F]FDG uptake in brown adipose tissue.
  • RESULTS: [(18)F]FDG uptake in brown adipose tissue was most often seen in the lateral neck region and superior and lateral to the lungs (in 36 and 39 studies, respectively).
  • Brown adipose tissue uptake was thought to interfere potentially with image interpretation (visual grades 2 and 3) in 19 studies-in 6 of 23 (26.1%) studies after no pre-medication and no opiates for pain, in 10 of 34 (29.4%) after low-dose oral diazepam, in 0 of 9 (0%) after moderate-dose oral diazepam, in 3 of 45 (6.7%) after intravenous fentanyl, and in 0 of 7 (0%) after opiates prescribed for pain.
  • Intravenous fentanyl reduced the grade of brown adipose tissue compared to no drug (P=0.0039) and low-dose diazepam (P=0.0024).
  • SUMMARY: The frequency of interfering [(18)F]FDG uptake in brown adipose tissue is reduced by intravenous fentanyl pre-medication, which appears to be an effective alternative to the existing standard pre-medication, moderate-dose oral diazepam.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue, Brown / metabolism. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 / pharmacokinetics. Positron-Emission Tomography. Premedication. Radiopharmaceuticals / pharmacokinetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Analgesics, Opioid / pharmacology. Child. Child, Preschool. Diazepam / pharmacology. Female. Fentanyl / pharmacology. Humans. Hypnotics and Sedatives / pharmacology. Infant. Injections, Intravenous. Male. Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Retrospective Studies. Thorax

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  • [ErratumIn] Pediatr Radiol. 2011 Apr;41(4):542
  • (PMID = 15988582.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-0449
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Radiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics, Opioid; 0 / Hypnotics and Sedatives; 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18; Q3JTX2Q7TU / Diazepam; UF599785JZ / Fentanyl
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82. Suster S, Morrison C: Sclerosing poorly differentiated liposarcoma: clinicopathological, immunohistochemical and molecular analysis of a distinct morphological subtype of lipomatous tumour of soft tissue. Histopathology; 2008 Feb;52(3):283-93
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  • [Title] Sclerosing poorly differentiated liposarcoma: clinicopathological, immunohistochemical and molecular analysis of a distinct morphological subtype of lipomatous tumour of soft tissue.
  • AIMS: To present eight cases of a distinctive morphological subtype of lipomatous tumour of soft tissue.
  • Four cases arose de novo and four cases presented as local recurrences of previously resected liposarcomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Liposarcoma / pathology. Oncogene Proteins, Fusion / genetics. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-mdm2 / genetics. RNA-Binding Protein FUS / genetics. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / pathology. Transcription Factor CHOP / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Immunoenzyme Techniques. In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Sclerosis / pathology. Translocation, Genetic

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  • (PMID = 18269578.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2559
  • [Journal-full-title] Histopathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Histopathology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Oncogene Proteins, Fusion; 0 / RNA-Binding Protein FUS; 0 / TLS-CHOP fusion protein, human; 147336-12-7 / Transcription Factor CHOP; EC 6.3.2.19 / MDM2 protein, human; EC 6.3.2.19 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-mdm2
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83. Rigotti G, Marchi A, Galiè M, Baroni G, Benati D, Krampera M, Pasini A, Sbarbati A: Clinical treatment of radiotherapy tissue damage by lipoaspirate transplant: a healing process mediated by adipose-derived adult stem cells. Plast Reconstr Surg; 2007 Apr 15;119(5):1409-22; discussion 1423-4
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  • [Title] Clinical treatment of radiotherapy tissue damage by lipoaspirate transplant: a healing process mediated by adipose-derived adult stem cells.
  • BACKGROUND: There is evidence that stem cells contribute to the restoration of tissue vascularization and organ function.
  • The objective of this study was to assess the presence of adipose-derived adult stem cells left in their natural scaffold in the purified lipoaspirate and to assess the clinical effectiveness of lipoaspirate transplantation in the treatment of radiation side effects.
  • Therapy outcomes were assessed by symptoms classification according to the LENT-SOMA scale, cytofluorimetric characterization, and ultrastructural evaluation of targeted tissue.
  • Ultrastructure of target tissue systematically exhibited progressive regeneration, including neovessel formation and improved hydration.
  • [MeSH-major] Adult Stem Cells / physiology. Breast Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Radiation Injuries / surgery. Stem Cell Transplantation. Subcutaneous Fat / cytology

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  • [CommentIn] Plast Reconstr Surg. 2008 Aug;122(2):680; author reply 680-1 [18626408.001]
  • (PMID = 17415234.001).
  • [ISSN] 1529-4242
  • [Journal-full-title] Plastic and reconstructive surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Plast. Reconstr. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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84. Witt PM, Christensen JH, Schmidt EB, Dethlefsen C, Tjønneland A, Overvad K, Ewertz M: Marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in adipose tissue and breast cancer risk: a case-cohort study from Denmark. Cancer Causes Control; 2009 Nov;20(9):1715-21
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  • [Title] Marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in adipose tissue and breast cancer risk: a case-cohort study from Denmark.
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the content of marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in adipose tissue, a biomarker for the long-term intake of seafood, and the subsequent development of breast cancer (BC).
  • DESIGN: We designed a case-cohort study based on a cohort of healthy Danish women, who in the 1990 s donated adipose tissue biopsies to a biobank in order to investigate the role of diet for the development of cancer and chronic disease.
  • During follow-up, incident cases of BC were identified through national registries, and the content of n-3 PUFA in adipose tissue was compared between cases and the cohort sample.
  • CONCLUSION: This study does not indicate any association between the content of total or individual marine n-3 PUFA in adipose tissue and development of BC.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / chemistry. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Breast Neoplasms / chemistry. Fatty Acids, Omega-3 / analysis
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Case-Control Studies. Denmark. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 19711189.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-7225
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer causes & control : CCC
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Causes Control
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Fatty Acids, Omega-3
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85. Dahlman I, Mejhert N, Linder K, Agustsson T, Mutch DM, Kulyte A, Isaksson B, Permert J, Petrovic N, Nedergaard J, Sjölin E, Brodin D, Clement K, Dahlman-Wright K, Rydén M, Arner P: Adipose tissue pathways involved in weight loss of cancer cachexia. Br J Cancer; 2010 May 11;102(10):1541-8
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  • [Title] Adipose tissue pathways involved in weight loss of cancer cachexia.
  • BACKGROUND: The regulatory gene pathways that accompany loss of adipose tissue in cancer cachexia are unknown and were explored using pangenomic transcriptome profiling.
  • METHODS: Global gene expression profiles of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue were studied in gastrointestinal cancer patients with (n=13) or without (n=14) cachexia.
  • RESULTS: Cachexia was accompanied by preferential loss of adipose tissue and decreased fat cell volume, but not number.
  • Adipose tissue pathways regulating energy turnover were upregulated, whereas genes in pathways related to cell and tissue structure (cellular adhesion, extracellular matrix and actin cytoskeleton) were downregulated in cachectic patients.
  • Transcriptional response elements for hepatic nuclear factor-4 (HNF4) were overrepresented in the promoters of extracellular matrix and adhesion molecule genes, and adipose HNF4 mRNA was downregulated in cachexia.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Cancer cachexia is characterised by preferential loss of adipose tissue; muscle mass is less affected.
  • Loss of adipose tissue is secondary to a decrease in adipocyte lipid content and associates with changes in the expression of genes that regulate energy turnover, cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix, which suggest high tissue remodelling.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / metabolism. Cachexia / genetics. Neoplasms / genetics. Signal Transduction / genetics. Weight Loss / genetics

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  • (PMID = 20407445.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-1827
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2869165
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86. Reddy MP, Ramaswamy MR: FDG uptake in brown adipose tissue mimicking an adrenal metastasis: source of false-positive interpretation. Clin Nucl Med; 2005 Apr;30(4):257-8
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  • [Title] FDG uptake in brown adipose tissue mimicking an adrenal metastasis: source of false-positive interpretation.
  • Brown adipose tissue (BAT) uptake of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) poses a significant challenge to positron emission tomography interpretation.
  • BAT is not only localized to the supraclavicular areas, but is also seen in the neck, mediastinum, axillae, costovertebral junctions, and retrocrural and periadrenal regions.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue, Brown / metabolism. Adipose Tissue, Brown / radionuclide imaging. Diagnostic Errors / prevention & control. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 / pharmacokinetics. Lung Neoplasms / metabolism. Lung Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / metabolism. Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / radionuclide imaging. Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / secondary. Diagnosis, Differential. False Positive Reactions. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Radiopharmaceuticals / pharmacokinetics

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  • (PMID = 15764884.001).
  • [ISSN] 0363-9762
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical nuclear medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Nucl Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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87. Gehmert S, Gehmert S, Prantl L, Vykoukal J, Alt E, Song YH: Breast cancer cells attract the migration of adipose tissue-derived stem cells via the PDGF-BB/PDGFR-beta signaling pathway. Biochem Biophys Res Commun; 2010 Jul 30;398(3):601-5
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  • [Title] Breast cancer cells attract the migration of adipose tissue-derived stem cells via the PDGF-BB/PDGFR-beta signaling pathway.
  • The origin of vascular cells in tumors is unknown, but it is believed that tumors use cells from the host to build new vessels.
  • To determine whether adipose tissue stem cells (ASCs) could be attracted by cancer cells, we performed migration assays in which ASCs were seeded on a transwell migration system top chamber and tumor-conditioned medium was placed in the bottom chamber.
  • Our data showed that a significant number of ASCs migrated toward the tumor-conditioned medium (p<0.0001), and migration of human ASCs significantly (p<0.0001) increased in response to increased concentrations of recombinant PDGF-BB.
  • These data suggest that tumor cell-derived PDGF-BB is an important factor in governing the microenvironment interaction between tumor cells and local tissue-resident stem cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / pathology. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Cell Movement. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor / metabolism. Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor beta / metabolism. Stem Cells / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antibodies, Neutralizing / immunology. Cell Line, Tumor. Culture Media, Conditioned. Female. Humans. Mice. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-sis. Signal Transduction

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20603108.001).
  • [ISSN] 1090-2104
  • [Journal-full-title] Biochemical and biophysical research communications
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Neutralizing; 0 / Culture Media, Conditioned; 0 / Platelet-Derived Growth Factor; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-sis; 0 / platelet-derived growth factor BB; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor beta
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88. Campbell KL, Makar KW, Kratz M, Foster-Schubert KE, McTiernan A, Ulrich CM: A pilot study of sampling subcutaneous adipose tissue to examine biomarkers of cancer risk. Cancer Prev Res (Phila); 2009 Jan;2(1):37-42
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  • [Title] A pilot study of sampling subcutaneous adipose tissue to examine biomarkers of cancer risk.
  • Examination of adipose tissue biology may provide important insight into mechanistic links for the observed association between higher body fat and risk of several types of cancer, in particular colorectal and breast cancer.
  • We tested two different methods of obtaining adipose tissue from healthy individuals.
  • Two subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue samples were obtained per individual (i.e., right and left lower abdominal regions) using two distinct methods (method A: 14-gauge needle with incision, versus method B: 16-gauge needle without incision).
  • Gene expression was examined at the mRNA level for leptin, adiponectin, aromatase, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in flash-frozen tissue, and at the protein level for leptin, adiponectin, IL-6, and TNF-alpha following short-term culture.
  • For detectable genes, relative gene expression in adipose tissue obtained by methods A and B was similar for adiponectin (r = 0.64, P = 0.06) and leptin (r = 0.80, P = 0.01), but not for aromatase (r = 0.37,P = 0.34).
  • Protein levels in tissue culture supernatant exhibited good intra-assay agreement [coefficient of variation (CV), 1-10%], with less agreement for intraindividual agreement (CV, 17-29%) and reproducibility, following one freeze-thaw cycle (CV, >14%).
  • Subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies from healthy, overweight individuals provide adequate amounts for RNA extraction, gene expression, and other assays of relevance to cancer prevention research.

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  • (PMID = 19139016.001).
  • [ISSN] 1940-6215
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer prevention research (Philadelphia, Pa.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Prev Res (Phila)
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA116847-040004; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U54 CA116847-040004; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA 77572-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA077572-01A1; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA077572; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA077572-01A1; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U54 CA116847
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adiponectin; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Interleukin-6; 0 / Leptin; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; EC 1.14.14.1 / Aromatase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS99607; NLM/ PMC2785801
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89. Acar GO, Cansiz H, Acioğlu E, Yağiz C, Dervişoğlu S: Atypical lipomatous tumour of the head and neck region with dyspnea and dysphagia: a case report. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol; 2007 Aug;264(8):947-50
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  • [Title] Atypical lipomatous tumour of the head and neck region with dyspnea and dysphagia: a case report.
  • Liposarcoma is one of the most common soft tissue sarcomas in adults.
  • Atypical lipomatous tumour (ALT) rarely occurs in the head and neck region.
  • Histopathologic grade of these tumours affect prognosis of this disease.
  • In this article, a case of a huge ALT arising from the head and neck region and invading nearly entire left hemi-facial region is presented.
  • Clinical and histopathologic features and therapeutic approaches related to this tumour are discussed reviewing the literature.
  • [MeSH-major] Deglutition Disorders / etiology. Dyspnea / etiology. Head and Neck Neoplasms / complications. Liposarcoma / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 17361411.001).
  • [ISSN] 0937-4477
  • [Journal-full-title] European archives of oto-rhino-laryngology : official journal of the European Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies (EUFOS) : affiliated with the German Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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90. Binh MB, Sastre-Garau X, Guillou L, de Pinieux G, Terrier P, Lagacé R, Aurias A, Hostein I, Coindre JM: MDM2 and CDK4 immunostainings are useful adjuncts in diagnosing well-differentiated and dedifferentiated liposarcoma subtypes: a comparative analysis of 559 soft tissue neoplasms with genetic data. Am J Surg Pathol; 2005 Oct;29(10):1340-7
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  • [Title] MDM2 and CDK4 immunostainings are useful adjuncts in diagnosing well-differentiated and dedifferentiated liposarcoma subtypes: a comparative analysis of 559 soft tissue neoplasms with genetic data.
  • Atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcoma (ALT-WDLPS) and dedifferentiated liposarcoma (DDLPS) may be difficult to distinguish from benign adipose tumors and from poorly differentiated sarcomas, respectively.
  • We examined a series of 559 soft tissue tumors (44 ALT-WDLPS, 61 DDLPS, 49 benign adipose tumors, and 405 non-ALT-WDLPS/DDLPS sarcomas) for MDM2 and CDK4 expression using immunohistochemistry.
  • MDM2 and CDK4 immunoexpressions were compared with gene amplification status (as assessed by quantitative PCR and/or comparative genomic hybridization) in 241 neoplasms.
  • Most ALT-WDLPS/DDLPS expressed MDM2 (97%) and CDK4 (92%) as opposed to few benign adipose tumors (MDM2, 5%; CDK4, 2%) and a limited number of non-ALT-WDLSP/DDLPS sarcomas (MDM2, 19%; CDK4, 6%).
  • The sensitivity and specificity of MDM2 and CDK4 immunostainings in identifying ALT-WDLPS/DDLPS among other soft tissue tumors were 97% and 92%, and 83% and 95%, respectively.
  • MDM2 and CDK4 immunostainings were particularly useful to separate ALT-WDLPS from the large group of differentiated adipose tumors, and to distinguish DDLPS from poorly differentiated sarcomas.
  • In conclusion, MDM2 and CDK4 immunostainings, which correlate with gene amplification, are helpful adjuncts to differentiate ALT-WDLPS from benign adipose tumors and to separate DDLPS from poorly differentiated sarcomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4 / metabolism. Liposarcoma / diagnosis. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-mdm2 / metabolism. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Diagnosis, Differential. Gene Amplification. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Sensitivity and Specificity

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  • (PMID = 16160477.001).
  • [ISSN] 0147-5185
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 2.7.11.22 / CDK4 protein, human; EC 2.7.11.22 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4; EC 6.3.2.19 / MDM2 protein, human; EC 6.3.2.19 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-mdm2
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91. Sarzani R, Bordicchia M, Marcucci P, Bedetta S, Santini S, Giovagnoli A, Scappini L, Minardi D, Muzzonigro G, Dessì-Fulgheri P, Rappelli A: Altered pattern of cannabinoid type 1 receptor expression in adipose tissue of dysmetabolic and overweight patients. Metabolism; 2009 Mar;58(3):361-7
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  • [Title] Altered pattern of cannabinoid type 1 receptor expression in adipose tissue of dysmetabolic and overweight patients.
  • In overweight patients (OW), the increased peripheral activity of the endocannabinoid system in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) may be mediated by cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor expression.
  • We determined whether CB1 receptor splice variants and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in perirenal and subcutaneous adipose tissues are associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS).
  • Gene expression with multiple-primers real-time polymerase chain reaction (TaqMan; Applied Biosystem, Weiterstadt, Germany) was performed to study VAT and paired subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) mRNA from 36 consecutive patients undergoing nephrectomy.
  • In addition, patients with the MetS (n = 22) showed higher CB1 expression in perirenal adipose tissues (P = .007).
  • Visceral adipose CB1 expression correlated with BMI.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / physiopathology. Body Mass Index. Metabolic Diseases / physiopathology. Overweight / physiopathology. Receptor, Cannabinoid, CB1 / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Alternative Splicing. Body Weight / genetics. DNA, Single-Stranded / genetics. Exons. Gene Expression Regulation. Genetic Variation. Humans. Kidney Neoplasms / genetics. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Metabolic Syndrome X / genetics. Obesity / genetics. RNA, Messenger / genetics

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  • (PMID = 19217452.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-8600
  • [Journal-full-title] Metabolism: clinical and experimental
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Metab. Clin. Exp.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Single-Stranded; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Receptor, Cannabinoid, CB1
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92. Figueras M, Busquets S, Carbó N, Almendro V, Argilés JM, López-Soriano FJ: Cancer cachexia results in an increase in TNF-alpha receptor gene expression in both skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Int J Oncol; 2005 Sep;27(3):855-60

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  • [Title] Cancer cachexia results in an increase in TNF-alpha receptor gene expression in both skeletal muscle and adipose tissue.
  • The mRNA content of both TNF-alpha and its receptors (TNFR1 and TNFR2) in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue from cachectic rats has been assessed.
  • The implantation of the Yoshida AH-130 ascites hepatoma resulted in substantial decrease in skeletal muscle TNF-alpha expression as early as at day 2 following tumour implantation.
  • In adipose tissue the expression of the TNF-alpha gene was significantly increased at all the time points studied, whereas TNF-alpha receptors expression followed a similar pattern to that observed in skeletal muscle.
  • Western blot analysis indicated that the TNFR1 protein followed an identical pattern to that observed in the mRNA content both in muscle and adipose tissue.
  • It is concluded that, during experimental cancer cachexia, the contribution of muscle-produced TNF-alpha is decreased; however, significant changes were observed in relation with TNF-alpha receptors at the skeletal muscle level that could possibly be related to the muscle wasting process associated with tumour growth.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / metabolism. Cachexia / physiopathology. Liver Neoplasms, Experimental / physiopathology. Muscle, Skeletal / metabolism. Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blotting, Western. Cell Line, Tumor. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Male. Models, Biological. RNA, Messenger / genetics. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. Rats. Rats, Wistar. Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I / genetics. Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I / metabolism. Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type II / genetics. Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type II / metabolism. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction. Time Factors. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / genetics. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 16077938.001).
  • [ISSN] 1019-6439
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor; 0 / Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I; 0 / Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type II; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
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93. Vicioso L, Gallego E, Sanz A: Cutaneous mixed tumor with lipomatous stroma. J Cutan Pathol; 2006 Sep;33 Suppl 2:35-8
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  • [Title] Cutaneous mixed tumor with lipomatous stroma.
  • AIM: Mixed tumors are usually composed of two components, one epithelial and the other mesenchymal.
  • The latter component is commonly myxoid or myxochondroid; a massively lipomatous stroma is very unusual.
  • To date, only two cases of mixed tumor of the skin have been reported with this type of stroma.
  • METHODS AND RESULTS: We report the case of a 61-year-old man with a mixed tumor situated on the hand, an unusual site for these tumors, with over 90% of the tumor composed of adipose tissue.
  • The tumor was a well-circumscribed, 4.5-cm mass, with the gross appearance of a lipoma.
  • The lipomatous stroma contained nests and ribbons of epithelial cells, with occasional tubular structures, surrounded by a scarce amount of fibromyxoid tissue.
  • Immunohistochemical study showed findings similar to those seen in classic mixed tumors.
  • CONCLUSION: Together with a few other cases in the skin and parotid gland, this report shows how massive adipose differentiation can arise in a mixed tumor of the skin.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / pathology. Fibroma / pathology. Mixed Tumor, Malignant / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Differentiation. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 16972952.001).
  • [ISSN] 0303-6987
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cutaneous pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cutan. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
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94. Guerrero J, Tobar N, Cáceres M, Espinoza L, Escobar P, Dotor J, Smith PC, Martínez J: Soluble factors derived from tumor mammary cell lines induce a stromal mammary adipose reversion in human and mice adipose cells. Possible role of TGF-beta1 and TNF-alpha. Breast Cancer Res Treat; 2010 Jan;119(2):497-508
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  • [Title] Soluble factors derived from tumor mammary cell lines induce a stromal mammary adipose reversion in human and mice adipose cells. Possible role of TGF-beta1 and TNF-alpha.
  • In the case of breast tissue, in which stroma is mainly a fatty tissue, this response presumably occurs at the expense of the adipose cells, the most abundant stromal phenotype, generating a tumoral fibrous structure rich in fibroblast-like cells.
  • In this study, we aimed to determine the cellular mechanisms by which factors present in the media conditioned by MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines induce a reversion of adipose cells to a fibroblastic phenotype.
  • We demonstrated that soluble factors generated by these cell lines stimulated the reversion of mammary adipose phenotype evaluated as intracellular lipid content and expression of C/EBP alpha and PPAR gamma.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipocytes / metabolism. Breast Neoplasms / metabolism. Cell Transdifferentiation. Fibroblasts / metabolism. Transforming Growth Factor beta1 / metabolism. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] 3T3-L1 Cells. Animals. Blotting, Western. CCAAT-Enhancer-Binding Proteins / metabolism. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Size. Culture Media, Conditioned / metabolism. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Mice. PPAR gamma / metabolism. Phenotype. Recombinant Proteins / metabolism. Signal Transduction

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  • (PMID = 19649705.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-7217
  • [Journal-full-title] Breast cancer research and treatment
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Breast Cancer Res. Treat.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Letter; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CCAAT-Enhancer-Binding Proteins; 0 / CEBPA protein, human; 0 / CEBPA protein, mouse; 0 / Culture Media, Conditioned; 0 / PPAR gamma; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 0 / Transforming Growth Factor beta1; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
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95. Mentzel T, Toennissen J, Rütten A, Schaller J: Palmar atypical lipomatous tumour with spindle cell features (well-differentiated spindle cell liposarcoma): a rare neoplasm arising in an unusual anatomical location. Virchows Arch; 2005 Mar;446(3):300-4
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  • [Title] Palmar atypical lipomatous tumour with spindle cell features (well-differentiated spindle cell liposarcoma): a rare neoplasm arising in an unusual anatomical location.
  • Lipomatous tumours, both benign and malignant, arising on the hands are uncommon.
  • We present a rare atypical lipomatous tumour with spindle cell features (synonym: well-differentiated spindle cell liposarcoma) arising on the left palm of a 54-year-old male patient.
  • The neoplasm presented as a long-standing, exophytic neoplasm measuring 9 x 9 cm.
  • The well-circumscribed neoplasm was completely excised, and margins were tumour free.
  • Histologically, the neoplasm showed features closely resembling spindle cell lipoma, being composed of mature adipocytic cells associated with bland, neuroid spindle cells staining positively for CD34.
  • However, focally, atypia of adipocytic and stromal cells as well as scattered lipoblasts were noted, and immunohistochemical stainings showed focal overexpression of MDM 2 and CDK4.
  • Aypical lipomatous tumour with spindle cell features may arise very rarely in palmar location and has to be distinguished from a number of benign and malignant mesenchymal neoplasms.
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 15719245.001).
  • [ISSN] 0945-6317
  • [Journal-full-title] Virchows Archiv : an international journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Virchows Arch.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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96. Vilalta M, Dégano IR, Bagó J, Aguilar E, Gambhir SS, Rubio N, Blanco J: Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells as vehicles for tumor bystander effect: a model based on bioluminescence imaging. Gene Ther; 2009 Apr;16(4):547-57
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  • [Title] Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells as vehicles for tumor bystander effect: a model based on bioluminescence imaging.
  • Human adipose tissue mesenchymal stromal cells (AMSCs) share common traits, including similar differentiation potential and cell surface markers, with their bone marrow counterparts.
  • Owing to their general availability, higher abundance and ease of isolation AMSCs may be convenient autologous delivery vehicles for localized tumor therapy.
  • We demonstrate a model for tumor therapy development based on the use of AMSCs expressing renilla luciferase and thymidine kinase, as cellular vehicles for ganciclovir-mediated bystander killing of firefly luciferase expressing tumors, and noninvasive bioluminescence imaging to continuously monitor both, tumor cells and AMSCs.
  • We show that the therapy delivering AMSCs survive long time within tumors, optimize the ratio of AMSCs to tumor cells for therapy, and asses the therapeutic effect in real time.
  • Treatment of mice bearing prostate tumors plus therapeutic AMSCs with the prodrug ganciclovir induced bystander killing effect, reducing the number of tumor cells to 1.5 % that of control tumors.
  • Thus, AMSCs could be useful vehicles to deliver localized therapy, with potential for clinical application in inoperable tumors and surgical borders after tumor resection.
  • This approach, useful to evaluate efficiency of therapeutic models, should facilitate the selection of cell types, dosages, therapeutic agents and treatment protocols for cell-based therapies of specific tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Bystander Effect. Genetic Therapy / methods. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. Prostatic Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adipose Tissue / cytology. Animals. Cell Differentiation. Cell Proliferation. Ganciclovir / administration & dosage. Genes, Transgenic, Suicide. Genetic Vectors. Humans. Lentivirus / genetics. Luminescent Measurements. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Mice, Nude. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays / methods

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  • (PMID = 19092860.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-5462
  • [Journal-full-title] Gene therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gene Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] P9G3CKZ4P5 / Ganciclovir
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97. Jara-Lazaro AR, Akhilesh M, Thike AA, Lui PC, Tse GM, Tan PH: Predictors of phyllodes tumours on core biopsy specimens of fibroepithelial neoplasms. Histopathology; 2010 Aug;57(2):220-32
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  • [Title] Predictors of phyllodes tumours on core biopsy specimens of fibroepithelial neoplasms.
  • AIMS: To establish histological and biological parameters that can predict phyllodes tumours on core biopsy specimens of indeterminate fibroepithelial neoplasms.
  • Cases in which phyllodes tumour was favoured, or could not be ruled out, were evaluated for stromal cellularity/distribution, nuclear atypia and mitoses, stromal overgrowth, epithelial fronding, epithelial hyperplasia, configuration of lesional edge, presence of pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia and of adipose tissue.
  • Of 261 core biopsy specimens of fibroepithelial lesions, 98 (37%) comprised cases in which phyllodes tumour could not be excluded and 57 (58%) had subsequent open surgical excisions.
  • Marked stromal hypercellularity (5/5; 100%) and nuclear atypia (1/1; 100%), stromal overgrowth (17/17; 100%), mitoses > or =2/10 high-power fields (18/18; 100%) and ill-defined lesional borders (16/16 phyllodes tumours; 100%) were features in core biopsy specimens that exclusively predicted phyllodes tumour on excision.
  • Immunohistochemical markers Ki67 > or =5% and topoisomerase IIalpha> or =5%, and reduced or patchy CD34 on core biopsy specimens correlated significantly with a diagnosis of phyllodes.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / diagnosis. Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Fibroadenoma / diagnosis. Fibroadenoma / pathology. Phyllodes Tumor / diagnosis. Phyllodes Tumor / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antigens, CD34 / metabolism. Antigens, Neoplasm / metabolism. Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Biopsy, Needle. DNA Topoisomerases, Type II / metabolism. DNA-Binding Proteins / metabolism. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Ki-67 Antigen / metabolism. Middle Aged. Predictive Value of Tests. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20716164.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2559
  • [Journal-full-title] Histopathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Histopathology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD34; 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / Ki-67 Antigen; EC 5.99.1.3 / DNA Topoisomerases, Type II; EC 5.99.1.3 / DNA topoisomerase II alpha
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98. Femia A, Klein PA: Letter: Iatrogenic lipomatosis: a rare manifestation of treatment with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist. Dermatol Online J; 2010;16(4):15
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  • Lipomas are common benign neoplasms of adipose tissue.
  • [MeSH-major] Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / drug therapy. Hypoglycemic Agents / adverse effects. Lipoma / chemically induced. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / chemically induced. PPAR gamma / agonists. Skin Neoplasms / chemically induced. Thiazolidinediones / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adipose Tissue / drug effects. Aged. Female. Humans. Iatrogenic Disease

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  • (PMID = 20409422.001).
  • [ISSN] 1087-2108
  • [Journal-full-title] Dermatology online journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dermatol. Online J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Letter
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hypoglycemic Agents; 0 / PPAR gamma; 0 / Thiazolidinediones; X4OV71U42S / pioglitazone
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99. Porter RG Sr, Leonetti JP, Ksiazek J, Anderson D: Association between adipose graft usage and postoperative headache after retrosigmoid craniotomy. Otol Neurotol; 2009 Aug;30(5):635-9
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  • [Title] Association between adipose graft usage and postoperative headache after retrosigmoid craniotomy.
  • INTERVENTION(S): All patients underwent retrosigmoid craniotomy for removal of cerebellopontine angle tumors and received either an abdominal fat graft closure or a standard wound closure.
  • Fifty-two respondents received adipose grafts; 33 did not.
  • The adipose group demonstrated significantly less chronic postcraniotomy headaches (11.9% versus 30.3%; p < 0.05).
  • Additionally, the adipose group described less severe headaches at all time frames studied with significant differences at 1 month (1.59 versus 2.29; p < 0.05) and 3 months (1.37 versus 2.06; p < 0.05) using the modified headache severity scale.
  • CONCLUSION: When compared with standard wound closure without adipose grafting, use of an abdominal fat graft during retrosigmoid craniotomy wound closure is associated with both decreased incidence of chronic postoperative headache and decreased severity of postoperative headaches at all time intervals studied.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / transplantation. Craniotomy / adverse effects. Headache / etiology. Headache / surgery. Postoperative Complications / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Cerebellar Neoplasms / surgery. Cerebellopontine Angle / surgery. Child. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Surveys and Questionnaires. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19628998.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-4505
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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100. Raaschou-Nielsen O, Pavuk M, Leblanc A, Dumas P, Philippe Weber J, Olsen A, Tjønneland A, Overvad K, Olsen JH: Adipose organochlorine concentrations and risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal Danish women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 2005 Jan;14(1):67-74
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  • [Title] Adipose organochlorine concentrations and risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal Danish women.
  • Our purpose was to examine associations between organochlorines and the development of breast cancer in a large prospective study using stored adipose tissue.
  • We measured concentrations of 14 pesticides and 18 polychlorinated biphenyls in adipose tissue, collected upon enrollment, and estimated relative risk (RR) of breast cancer using conditional logistic regression.
  • CONCLUSION: The results do not support that higher organochlorine body levels increase the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / chemistry. Breast Neoplasms / epidemiology. Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated / analysis

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  • (PMID = 15668478.001).
  • [ISSN] 1055-9965
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated; 0 / Pesticide Residues; DFC2HB4I0K / Polychlorinated Biphenyls
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