[X] Close
You are about to erase all the values you have customized, search history, page format, etc.
Click here to RESET all values       Click here to GO BACK without resetting any value
Items 1 to 100 of about 8365
1. Bruno JJ 2nd, Snyder ME, Motzer RJ, Russo P: Renal cell carcinoma local recurrences: impact of surgical treatment and concomitant metastasis on survival. BJU Int; 2006 May;97(5):933-8
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Renal cell carcinoma local recurrences: impact of surgical treatment and concomitant metastasis on survival.
  • OBJECTIVE: To analyse the survival benefit of resecting local recurrence (LR) of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in the presence and absence of concomitant metastasis.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: From 1989 to 2004 we identified 34 patients with LRs (2.9%) of the 1165 radical nephrectomies performed for T1-4N0M0 disease.
  • The T stage of the initial nephrectomy was T1a in two cases, T1b in six, T2 in five, T3a in six, T3b in eight, T4 in six and unknown in one; 22 patients (65%) had clear cell histology.
  • Of the 11 patients in group I, three remain with no evidence of disease, three are alive with metastatic disease, and five died from disease.
  • By contrast, 21 of the 23 patients (91%) in groups II, III and IV died from disease.
  • However, if there is no metastatic disease, complete surgical resection of LRs is associated with improved survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell. Kidney Neoplasms. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Nephrectomy. Prospective Studies

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16643473.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-4096
  • [Journal-full-title] BJU international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BJU Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  •  go-up   go-down


2. Koneru R, Hotte SJ: Role of cytokine therapy for renal cell carcinoma in the era of targeted agents. Curr Oncol; 2009 May;16 Suppl 1:S40-4
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Role of cytokine therapy for renal cell carcinoma in the era of targeted agents.
  • Starting in the late 1980s, cytokines were considered the mainstay of treatment for locally advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma (rcc) because of a lack of improved survival with either chemotherapy or hormonal therapy alone.
  • Although complete tumour responses have occasionally been seen with high-dose il-2, this therapy is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and its approval has been based on limited nonrandomized evidence.
  • Newer anti-angiogenesis agents have been evaluated as single agents and in combination with INFalpha, and these are now considered the standard of care for most patients with rcc.
  • In the present paper, we discuss the evidence for the use of cytokine therapy in the setting of pre- and post-targeted therapy for RCC.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Am J Clin Oncol. 1989 Aug;12(4):350-4 [2667326.001]
  • [Cites] Urol Clin North Am. 1993 May;20(2):283-95 [7684167.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Urol. 1989 Feb;63(2):128-31 [2702395.001]
  • [Cites] Acta Oncol. 1990;29(2):155-62 [2185803.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2004 Apr 1;22(7):1188-94 [14981107.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2004 Mar;171(3):1071-6 [14767273.001]
  • [Cites] Med Oncol. 2003;20(3):271-81 [14514977.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2001 Oct 19;85(8):1130-6 [11710825.001]
  • [Cites] Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2000;(3):CD001425 [10908496.001]
  • [Cites] Semin Oncol. 2000 Apr;27(2):187-93 [10768597.001]
  • [Cites] Semin Oncol. 2000 Apr;27(2):177-86 [10768596.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1999 Sep;17(9):2859-67 [10561363.001]
  • [Cites] Can Urol Assoc J. 2007 Mar;1(1):27-38 [18542758.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 2007 Dec 22;370(9605):2103-11 [18156031.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2007 May 31;356(22):2271-81 [17538086.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 2005 May 15;11(10):3714-21 [15897568.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 1999 Jan 2;353(9146):14-7 [10023944.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1996 Sep 19;335(12):865-75 [8778606.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 1995 May;45(5):758-62 [7747370.001]
  • [Cites] J Biol Response Mod. 1988 Dec;7(6):540-5 [3145964.001]
  • (PMID = 19478896.001).
  • [ISSN] 1198-0052
  • [Journal-full-title] Current oncology (Toronto, Ont.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2687800
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Renal cancer / cytokines / interferon / interleukin-2 / therapy
  •  go-up   go-down


3. Escudier B, Choueiri TK, Oudard S, Szczylik C, Négrier S, Ravaud A, Chevreau C, Venner P, Champagne P, Croteau D, Dupont E, Hariton C, Bukowski RM: Prognostic factors of metastatic renal cell carcinoma after failure of immunotherapy: new paradigm from a large phase III trial with shark cartilage extract AE 941. J Urol; 2007 Nov;178(5):1901-5
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prognostic factors of metastatic renal cell carcinoma after failure of immunotherapy: new paradigm from a large phase III trial with shark cartilage extract AE 941.
  • PURPOSE: We analyzed prognostic factors, described survival and generated a prognostic model in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma in whom immunotherapy failed and who were potentially eligible for novel agents.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: An analysis of the relationship between clinical features and survival was performed in 300 patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma in whom immunotherapy had failed and who were subsequently treated as part of a single, phase III clinical trial with the anti-angiogenic agent Neovastat (shark cartilage extract AE 941).
  • Prognostic features associated with shorter survival on multivariate analysis were the number of metastatic sites (greater than 1), time from nephrectomy to metastatic disease (less than 2 years), high alkaline phosphatase, abnormal corrected serum Ca and high lactate dehydrogenase (greater than 1.5 x the upper limit of normal).
  • CONCLUSIONS: We identified 4 risk groups to predict survival in previously treated patients with renal cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / therapy. Immunotherapy / methods. Kidney Neoplasms / therapy. Tissue Extracts / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Alberta / epidemiology. Biopsy. Cartilage. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Follow-Up Studies. France / epidemiology. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Ohio / epidemiology. Poland / epidemiology. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models. Quebec / epidemiology. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Survival Rate. Treatment Failure

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov. clinical trials - ClinicalTrials.gov .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17868728.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-5347
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase III; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Tissue Extracts; 0 / shark cartilage extract
  •  go-up   go-down


Advertisement
4. Namboodiri N, Krishnamoorthy KM, Tharakan JA: Intra-atrial extension of Wilms' tumor. J Am Soc Echocardiogr; 2008 Jan;21(1):91.e3-4
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Intra-atrial extension of Wilms' tumor.
  • Echocardiography in a 4-year-old boy, with nephroblastoma of the left kidney, revealed a large homogenous mass in right atrium extending from inferior vena cava, and protruding through tricuspid valve into right ventricle during diastole.
  • Ultrasonography revealed the contiguous spread of the tumor through renal vein with near total caval occlusion.
  • Intracardiac extension of infradiaphragmatic tumors through caval route, although infrequent, can be seen with renal cell carcinoma, Wilms' tumor, hepatoma, lymphoma, and uterine and adrenal tumors.
  • Detection of a mass in right atrium in a child should alert the echocardiographer about the possibility of caval spread from a renal neoplasm.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Neoplasms / diagnosis. Kidney Neoplasms / diagnosis. Wilms Tumor / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Child, Preschool. Echocardiography. Fatal Outcome. Heart Atria / pathology. Heart Atria / ultrasonography. Hepatic Veins / pathology. Hepatic Veins / ultrasonography. Humans. Male. Renal Veins / pathology. Renal Veins / ultrasonography. Tricuspid Valve / pathology. Tricuspid Valve / ultrasonography. Vena Cava, Inferior / pathology. Vena Cava, Inferior / ultrasonography

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Wilms' tumor.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Wilms Tumor.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17628424.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-6795
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography : official publication of the American Society of Echocardiography
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Am Soc Echocardiogr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


5. Lainakis G, Bamias A: Targeting angiogenesis in renal cell carcinoma. Curr Cancer Drug Targets; 2008 Aug;8(5):349-58
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Targeting angiogenesis in renal cell carcinoma.
  • Angiogenesis is an important factor for cancer development and progression in humans.
  • Hereditary and sporadic renal cell carcinoma are characterized by inactivation of the Von-Hippel Lindau (VHL) gene, which results in hyperactivity of the hypoxia-inducible factor-a (HIFa).
  • The activity of these factors is associated with oncogenesis, growth, and metastatic potential of renal-cell carcinoma.
  • These data indicate that angiogenic factors are the promising therapeutic targets in this disease.
  • Surgery can cure the patients with renal cancer if disease is diagnosed at an early stage.
  • On the contrary, inoperable or metastatic disease is not curable.
  • Until recently, the only drugs approved for the treatment of advanced disease were the cytokines, interferon, and interleukin.
  • The common these in their development is the inhibition of angiogenesis, which may explain their significant activity in renal-cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / blood supply. Kidney Neoplasms / blood supply. Neovascularization, Pathologic / drug therapy


6. Li G, Feng G, Gentil-Perret A, Genin C, Tostain J: Serum carbonic anhydrase 9 level is associated with postoperative recurrence of conventional renal cell cancer. J Urol; 2008 Aug;180(2):510-3; discussion 513-4
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Serum carbonic anhydrase 9 level is associated with postoperative recurrence of conventional renal cell cancer.
  • PURPOSE: We explored the clinical usefulness of serum carbonic anhydrase 9 as a potential biomarker for conventional renal cell cancer.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study included 91 patients with conventional renal cell cancer and 32 healthy individuals.
  • A followup (median 38 months) was performed to track early recurrence after surgery for patients with localized disease.
  • RESULTS: The mean serum carbonic anhydrase 9 level in patients with metastatic conventional renal cell cancer (216.68 +/- 67.02 pg/ml) or localized conventional renal cell cancer (91.65 +/- 13.29 pg/ml) was significantly higher than in healthy individuals (14.59 +/- 6.22 pg/ml, p <0.001 and p = 0.001, respectively).
  • The mean serum carbonic anhydrase 9 level in patients with metastatic conventional renal cell cancer was significantly higher than in those with localized disease (p = 0.004).
  • Of patients with localized disease those with recurrence had a significantly higher serum carbonic anhydrase 9 than those without recurrence (p = 0.001).
  • On univariate analysis serum carbonic anhydrase 9, tumor stage, tumor grade and tumor size were associated with recurrence.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that serum carbonic anhydrase 9 is increased as the tumor progression occurs.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, Neoplasm / blood. Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Carbonic Anhydrases / blood. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / enzymology. Kidney Neoplasms / enzymology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / blood. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Analysis of Variance. Biopsy, Needle. Cohort Studies. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Nephrectomy / adverse effects. Nephrectomy / methods. Postoperative Complications. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models. ROC Curve. Risk Assessment. Sensitivity and Specificity. Statistics, Nonparametric. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Kidney cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov. clinical trials - ClinicalTrials.gov .
  • The Lens. Cited by Patents in .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [CommentIn] J Urol. 2008 Aug;180(2):433-4 [18550098.001]
  • (PMID = 18550116.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-3792
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; EC 4.2.1.1 / CA9 protein, human; EC 4.2.1.1 / Carbonic Anhydrases
  •  go-up   go-down


7. Merseburger AS, Kramer MW, Hennenlotter J, Serth J, Kruck S, Gracia A, Stenzl A, Kuczyk MA: Loss of galectin-3 expression correlates with clear cell renal carcinoma progression and reduced survival. World J Urol; 2008 Dec;26(6):637-42
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Loss of galectin-3 expression correlates with clear cell renal carcinoma progression and reduced survival.
  • OBJECTIVES: Galectin-3 is a member of the glycoprotein family, actively involved in various biological interactions including cell growth, cell adhesion, cell differentiation and apoptosis.
  • The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of galectin-3 in clear cell renal carcinoma and to assess its prognostic significance.
  • METHODS: The expression of galectin-3 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 149 clear cell renal carcinomas.
  • The levels were correlated to established clinical parameters such as nuclear grade, pathological stage, lymph node, distant metastasis, and patients' survival.
  • RESULTS: In normal kidney tissue, the expression of galectin-3 was found to be uniformly present in the tubular epithelial cells.
  • Univariate analysis could demonstrate an association with tumor-specific death with decreased galectin-3 expression, whereas multivariate analysis failed to prove the aforementioned observation.
  • CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that a loss of galectin-3 expression is involved in renal carcinogenesis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / metabolism. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / mortality. Galectin 3 / metabolism. Kidney Neoplasms / metabolism. Kidney Neoplasms / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Middle Aged. Predictive Value of Tests. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models


8. Yuan SM, Shinfeld A, Lavee J, Kuperstein R, Haizler R, Raanani E: Imaging morphology of cardiac tumours. Cardiol J; 2009;16(1):26-35
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Imaging morphology of cardiac tumours.
  • BACKGROUND: Cardiac tumours are very uncommon and are the topic of little investigation.
  • Imaging features offer reliable diagnostic evidence for cardiac tumours, but diagnostic confusion may arise when tumours with similar features are present.
  • METHODS: Between January 2003 and July 2008, 34 patients were operated on for cardiac tumours in this institute.
  • Thirty (88.2%) tumours were primary [19 (55.9%) myxomas, 8 (23.5%) papillary fibroelastomas, and 1 (2.9%) cavernous hemangioma were benign, 1 (2.9%) recurrent fibrous histiocytoma (undifferentiated sarcoma) and 1 (2.9%) leiomyosarcoma were malignant], and 4 (11.8%) were secondary [1 (2.9%) metastatic cardiac leiomyoma, and 3 (8.8%) were renal cell carcinomas].
  • RESULTS: Cardiac myxomas represented more than half of the cardiac tumours of this patient series, necessitating surgical resection.
  • Cardiac papillary fibroelastomas were valvular or subvalvular, mostly pedicled by a short stalk, and all of them were pound 1 cm in size.
  • Recurrent fibrous histiocytoma, leiomyosarcoma, intravenous leiomyoma and renal cell carcinoma resembled a myxoma on echocardiography due to their soft, friable, and mobile features.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Imaging morphology plays a key role in the preoperative differential diagnosis of cardiac tumours.
  • Imaging features could reliably predict primary versus secondary, and benign versus malignant among cardiac tumours.
  • The accurate preoperative imaging assessment of cardiac tumours necessitating surgical resection has become increasingly important in the decision-making of a surgical approach, method, and resection extent.
  • [MeSH-major] Diagnostic Imaging. Heart Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Biopsy. Cardiac Surgical Procedures. Diagnosis, Differential. Echocardiography, Doppler, Color. Echocardiography, Transesophageal. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Predictive Value of Tests. Preoperative Care. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Diagnostic Imaging.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19130413.001).
  • [ISSN] 1897-5593
  • [Journal-full-title] Cardiology journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cardiol J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  •  go-up   go-down


9. Gouttefangeas C, Stenzl A, Stevanović S, Rammensee HG: Immunotherapy of renal cell carcinoma. Cancer Immunol Immunother; 2007 Jan;56(1):117-28
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Immunotherapy of renal cell carcinoma.
  • Carcinomas of the kidney generally have a poor prognosis and respond minimally to classical radiotherapy or chemotherapy.
  • During the past few years, immunotherapeutical trials targeting renal cell tumor-associated antigens have also been reported, with diverse passive or active approaches using antibodies or aimed at activating tumor-directed T lymphocytes.
  • The following review presents the results and the progress made in the field, including classical cytokine treatments, non-myeloablative stem cell transplantation and antigen specific-based trials, with special focus on T-cell studies.
  • In consideration of the few specific molecular targets described so far for this tumor entity, current strategies which can lead to the identification of new relevant antigens will be discussed.
  • Hopefully these will very soon contribute to an improvement in renal cell carcinoma specific immunotherapy and its evaluation.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / therapy. Immunotherapy. Kidney Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antigens, Neoplasm / immunology. Cancer Vaccines / therapeutic use. Humans. T-Lymphocytes / immunology

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16676181.001).
  • [ISSN] 0340-7004
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer immunology, immunotherapy : CII
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Immunol. Immunother.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm; 0 / Cancer Vaccines
  • [Number-of-references] 116
  •  go-up   go-down


10. Shen SS, Truong LD, Ayala AG, Ro JY: Recently described and emphasized entities of renal neoplasms. Arch Pathol Lab Med; 2007 Aug;131(8):1234-43
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Recently described and emphasized entities of renal neoplasms.
  • CONTEXT: Recent advances of molecular biology and cytogenetics of renal cancer have resulted in the new classification of renal neoplasms and a number of subtypes are identified and emphasized.
  • In addition, rare nonepithelial renal neoplasms are identified and characterized.
  • Familiarity with these entities will help make the most accurate diagnosis and guide the treatment and follow-up of patients with renal neoplasm.
  • OBJECTIVE: To review the clinicopathologic entities of renal neoplasms that are recently defined or emphasized.
  • CONCLUSIONS: A number of new entities of renal neoplasms or genetically defined renal cell carcinomas have been identified or emphasized because of their unique genetic or molecular changes.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Chromosome Aberrations. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Molecular Biology / trends

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17683186.001).
  • [ISSN] 1543-2165
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of pathology & laboratory medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
  • [Number-of-references] 70
  •  go-up   go-down


11. Herr B, Zhou J, Dröse S, Brüne B: The interaction of superoxide with nitric oxide destabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha. Cell Mol Life Sci; 2007 Dec;64(24):3295-305
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • In renal carcinoma cells (RCC4) hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is constitutively expressed due to a von Hippel Lindau protein deficiency, but can be degraded by calpain, independently of the 26S proteasome, when exposed to hypoxia/nitric oxide (NO).
  • The inability of hypoxia/NO to degrade HIF-1alpha in respiratory-deficient RCC4-rho0 cells pointed to the requirement for mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species.
  • A prerequisite for O(2)(-) in combination with NO to destabilize HIF-1alpha was corroborated in RCC4-rho0 cells, when the redox cycler 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone was used as a source of superoxide.
  • [MeSH-minor] Calcium Signaling / drug effects. Calpain / metabolism. Cells, Cultured. Down-Regulation. Drug Interactions / physiology. Enzyme Activation / drug effects. Humans. Models, Biological. Oxidation-Reduction / drug effects

  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. NITRIC OXIDE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17989922.001).
  • [ISSN] 1420-682X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cellular and molecular life sciences : CMLS
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cell. Mol. Life Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit; 11062-77-4 / Superoxides; 31C4KY9ESH / Nitric Oxide; EC 3.4.22.- / Calpain
  •  go-up   go-down


12. Wierzbicki AS: Peroxisomal disorders affecting phytanic acid alpha-oxidation: a review. Biochem Soc Trans; 2007 Nov;35(Pt 5):881-6
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Peroxisomes are involved in the synthesis and degradation of complex fatty acids.
  • Investigation of these pathways and the diseases associated with mutations in enzymes involved in the degradation of phytanic acid have led to the clarification of the pathophysiology of Refsum's disease, rhizomelic chondrodysplasia and AMACR (alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase) deficiency.
  • The differential regulation and biology of these pathways is suggesting novel ways to treat the neuro-ophthalmological sequelae of Refsum's disease.
  • More recently, the discovery that AMACR and other peroxisomal beta-oxidation pathway enzymes are highly expressed in prostate and renal cell cancers has prompted active investigation into the role of these oxidation pathways and the peroxisome in the progression of obesity- and insulin resistance-related cancers.
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Oxidation-Reduction. Refsum Disease / genetics. Refsum Disease / metabolism. Refsum Disease / therapy


13. Zini L, Perrotte P, Jeldres C, Capitanio U, Pharand D, Arjane P, Lapointe S, Montorsi F, Patard JJ, Karakiewicz PI: Nephrectomy improves the survival of patients with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma. BJU Int; 2008 Dec;102(11):1610-4
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Nephrectomy improves the survival of patients with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma.
  • OBJECTIVES: To examine the cancer-specific survival of patients treated with nephrectomy and compared it to that of patients managed without surgery.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Of 43,143 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) identified in the 1988-2004 Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database, 7068 had locally advanced RCC and with no distant metastasis.
  • Multivariable Cox regression models, and matched and unmatched Kaplan-Meier survival analyses, were used to compare the effect of nephrectomy vs non-surgical therapy on cancer-specific survival.
  • Covariates and matching variables consisted of age, gender, tumour size and year of diagnosis.
  • RESULTS: The 1-, 2-, 5- and 10-year cancer-specific survival of patients who had nephrectomy was 88.9%, 88.1%, 68.6% and 57.5%, vs 44.8%, 30.6%, 14.5% and 10.6% for non-surgical therapy.
  • In multivariable analyses, relative to nephrectomy, non-surgical therapy was associated with a 5.8-fold higher rate of cancer-specific mortality (P < 0.001).
  • Non-surgical therapy was also associated with a 5.1-fold higher rate of cancer-specific mortality in matched analyses (P < 0.001).
  • Finally, competing-risks regression confirmed the statistical significance of the variable defining treatment type (nephrectomy vs non-surgical therapy) in multivariable and matched analyses (P < 0.001).
  • CONCLUSION: Relative to non-surgical treatment, nephrectomy improves the cancer-specific survival of patients with locally advanced RCC; our findings await prospective confirmation.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / mortality. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Nephrectomy / methods

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18710442.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-410X
  • [Journal-full-title] BJU international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BJU Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  •  go-up   go-down


14. Hoyle M, Green C, Thompson-Coon J, Liu Z, Welch K, Moxham T, Stein K: Cost-effectiveness of temsirolimus for first line treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Value Health; 2010 Jan-Feb;13(1):61-8
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cost-effectiveness of temsirolimus for first line treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma.
  • OBJECTIVES: To estimate the cost-effectiveness of temsirolimus compared to interferon-alpha for first line treatment of patients with advanced, poor prognosis renal cell carcinoma, from the perspective of the UK National Health Service.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / economics. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Sirolimus / analogs & derivatives

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cancer Chemotherapy.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. SIROLIMUS .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19804430.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4733
  • [Journal-full-title] Value in health : the journal of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Value Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase III; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Immunologic Factors; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 624KN6GM2T / temsirolimus; W36ZG6FT64 / Sirolimus
  •  go-up   go-down


15. Kamoshida S, Shiogama K, Shimomura R, Inada K, Sakurai Y, Ochiai M, Matuoka H, Maeda K, Tsutsumi Y: Immunohistochemical demonstration of fluoropyrimidine-metabolizing enzymes in various types of cancer. Oncol Rep; 2005 Nov;14(5):1223-30
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Immunohistochemical demonstration of fluoropyrimidine-metabolizing enzymes in various types of cancer.
  • Fluoropyrimidines [5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and its prodrugs] have been widely used in the treatment of solid cancers.
  • In order to know the tumor types susceptible to respective fluoropyrimidines, we investigated the expression of DPD, OPRT, TP and TS in various types of cancer with the immunoperoxidase method.
  • These four enzymes existed in all of the cancer types studied, such as pulmonary, gastric, colorectal, hepatic, cholecystic, pancreatic, renal, urocystic, and mammary cancers.
  • Respective types of cancers presented characteristic immunohistochemical features as follows: pulmonary adenocarcinoma, DPD- and TP-high; pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma, TS- and TP-high; intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma, TP-high; diffuse-type gastric adenocarcinoma, DPD-low and TS-high; colorectal adenocarcinoma, DPD- and TP-low, hepatocellular carcinoma, DPD-high, and TS- and OPRT-low; cholecystic adenocarcinoma, DPD- and TS-high; renal cell carcinoma, DPD-low, and OPRT- and TP-high; urocystic transitional cell carcinoma, DPD-high and OPRT-low; and mammary ductal carcinoma, OPRT-low, and TS- and TP-high.
  • The enzyme expression pattern in cancer tissue was generally similar to that of their normal counterparts.
  • However, TP immunoreactivity in adenocarcinomas of the lung, stomach and gallbladder, and urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder was stronger, and DPD immunoreactivity in adenocarcinoma of the breast was weaker, when compared with normal epithelial cells.
  • Non-epithelial cells were also positive for these enzymes.
  • These results indicated that the key enzymes influencing the effects of fluoropyrimidines differ from cancer to cancer.

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cancer Chemotherapy.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUOROURACIL .
  • The Lens. Cited by Patents in .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16211289.001).
  • [ISSN] 1021-335X
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncol. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; EC 1.3.1.2 / Dihydrouracil Dehydrogenase (NADP); EC 2.1.1.45 / Thymidylate Synthase; EC 2.4.2.10 / Orotate Phosphoribosyltransferase; EC 2.4.2.4 / Thymidine Phosphorylase; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
  •  go-up   go-down


16. Ofran Y, Ritz J: Targets of tumor immunity after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Clin Cancer Res; 2008 Aug 15;14(16):4997-9
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Targets of tumor immunity after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
  • The effectiveness of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematologic malignancies results from the donor immunity to antigens expressed in leukemia cells in the recipient.
  • Similar immune responses have now been identified in patients with renal cell cancer with tumor regression after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
  • Further studies to identify relevant antigens and mechanisms of resistance may improve the effectiveness of this approach in patients with solid tumors.

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transplantation.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Blood. 2005 Apr 1;105(7):2973-8 [15613541.001]
  • [Cites] Adv Immunol. 2006;90:133-73 [16730263.001]
  • [Cites] Annu Rev Immunol. 2007;25:267-96 [17134371.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Sci. 2007 Aug;98(8):1139-46 [17521316.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Invest. 2008 Mar;118(3):1099-109 [18292810.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 2004 Dec 1;10(23):7799-811 [15585611.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 2008 Aug 15;14(16):5260-9 [18698046.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Med. 2000 Sep;6(9):1018-23 [10973322.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Invest. 2000 Sep;106(5):705-14 [10974024.001]
  • [Cites] J Exp Med. 2003 May 19;197(10):1279-89 [12743171.001]
  • [Cites] Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1999 Jul 20;96(15):8639-44 [10411928.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Clin Pract Oncol. 2008 May;5(5):256-67 [18398414.001]
  • (PMID = 18698016.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / AI029530-170007; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / U19 AI029530; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / U19 AI029530-170007
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 13
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS78011; NLM/ PMC2586881
  •  go-up   go-down


17. Grignon D, Paner GP: Renal cell carcinoma and the renal sinus. Adv Anat Pathol; 2007 Mar;14(2):63-8
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Renal cell carcinoma and the renal sinus.
  • Renal sinus fat invasion was incorporated as one of the parameters for pT stage definition of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) only in the latest 2002 American Joint Committee on Cancer/tumor-node-metastasis staging protocol.
  • The current pT3a subcategory (in addition to adrenal gland involvement) groups 2 modes of extrarenal extension by RCC, either by peripheral perinephric fat extension or by renal sinus fat invasion.
  • Recent prospective studies have shown that with more directed gross sampling and histologic evaluation, renal sinus invasion is actually more commonly diagnosed than previously reported, or when compared with retrospectively sampled RCC nephrectomy specimens.
  • These studies have demonstrated that renal sinus invasion is the principal pathway for extrarenal extension for clear cell RCC; the incidence of which is related to size (tumors greater than 4 cm more frequently involve the renal sinus).
  • More significantly, a recent retrospective study of pT3a clear cell RCC nephrectomy specimens showed that tumors invading the renal sinus fat portend a more aggressive outcome than tumors invading only the peripheral perinephric fat.
  • Clear cell RCCs invading the renal sinus are more likely to have higher nuclear grade, regional lymph node involvement and sarcomatoid transformation than tumors invading only the perinephric fat.
  • Given the importance of renal sinus invasion, sampling strategies for nephrectomy specimens should be modified to focus in this region as appropriate and pathologists should be familiar with the histologic criteria for staging renal sinus invasion.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [CommentOn] J Urol. 2005 Oct;174(4 Pt 1):1218-21 [16145373.001]
  • [CommentOn] J Urol. 2005 Oct;174(4 Pt 1):1199-202; discussion 1202 [16145369.001]
  • (PMID = 17471114.001).
  • [ISSN] 1072-4109
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in anatomic pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv Anat Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comment; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


18. Procopio G, Verzoni E, Gevorgyan A, Mancin M, Pusceddu S, Catena L, Platania M, Guadalupi V, Martinetti A, Bajetta E: Safety and activity of sorafenib in different histotypes of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Oncology; 2007;73(3-4):204-9
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Safety and activity of sorafenib in different histotypes of advanced renal cell carcinoma.
  • BACKGROUND: The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety in unresectable or advanced renal carcinoma treated with sorafenib, in a situation closely similar to the everyday medical practice.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred and thirty-six patients have been treated with 400 mg b.i.d. of sorafenib administered orally until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.
  • Most of them had clear cell renal carcinoma (RCC), but other histological types such as papillary, chromophobe, Bellini ducts, sarcomatoid and mixed forms were also represented.
  • RESULTS: Overall disease control of 70.6% was achieved with 7.9% of partial remissions.
  • Response was observed in the majority of patients with RCC, but also in some patients with non-clear cell RCC.
  • Safety was acceptable, with the most common adverse events consisting of hand-foot skin reaction, cutaneous rash, diarrhoea, fatigue and hypertension.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The results confirm previous ones reported in the literature concerning the efficacy and the safety of sorafenib as second-line treatment in patients with RCC.
  • In addition, they disclose the hypothesis that sorafenib could be effective also in patients who underwent multiple previous treatments and in those with histology different from clear cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Benzenesulfonates / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pyridines / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Bone Neoplasms / secondary. Carcinoma, Papillary / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Papillary / secondary. Disease Progression. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Humans. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Liver Neoplasms / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Niacinamide / analogs & derivatives. Phenylurea Compounds. Prognosis. Remission Induction. Salvage Therapy. Survival Rate

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cancer Chemotherapy.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. NICOTINAMIDE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel
  • (PMID = 18418013.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-0232
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzenesulfonates; 0 / Phenylurea Compounds; 0 / Pyridines; 25X51I8RD4 / Niacinamide; 9ZOQ3TZI87 / sorafenib
  •  go-up   go-down


19. Sejima T, Miyagawa I: Significance of Fas expression alteration during tumor progression of renal cell carcinoma. Int J Urol; 2006 Mar;13(3):257-64
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Significance of Fas expression alteration during tumor progression of renal cell carcinoma.
  • BACKGROUND: In order to characterize the alteration of apoptotic regulatory molecule expression during tumor progression of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), we compared the expression between tumor and normal tissues, and evaluated the relationship of the expression in tumors with pathological and clinical characteristics.
  • METHODS: Competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) allowed the determination of Fas and bcl-2 mRNA and protein expression in surgically resected tumor and normal tissue of 50 RCC.
  • RESULTS: The mRNA expression of Fas and bcl-2 in RCC was significantly reduced compared to that in normal tissues.
  • In terms of relationships with pathological and clinical characteristics, the mRNA and protein expression of Fas in high-stage or high-grade tumors was significantly higher than that in low-stage or low-grade tumors.
  • Moreover, a statistically poor prognosis was observed in tumor cases expressing a high amount of mRNA.
  • In bcl-2 analysis, the mRNA and protein expression was significantly reduced in clear cell tumors compared to chromophobe cell tumors.
  • CONCLUSION: It is suggested that the reduced expression of Fas and bcl-2 in RCC compared with the expression in normal kidney is a prominent alteration of apoptotic regulatory molecules.
  • The alteration of the up-regulated Fas expression might be characterized during the tumor progression stage.
  • It is also suggested that the effect of alteration of bcl-2 expression might be minimal during the tumor progression stage because of the reduced expression in tumors of the clear cell type, which is the most dominant cell type in RCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / genetics. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Kidney Neoplasms / genetics. RNA, Neoplasm / genetics. Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antigens, CD95. Biomarkers, Tumor. Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. In Vitro Techniques. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16643620.001).
  • [ISSN] 0919-8172
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of urology : official journal of the Japanese Urological Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD95; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / FAS protein, human; 0 / RNA, Neoplasm; 0 / Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor
  •  go-up   go-down


20. Reu FJ, Bae SI, Cherkassky L, Leaman DW, Lindner D, Beaulieu N, MacLeod AR, Borden EC: Overcoming resistance to interferon-induced apoptosis of renal carcinoma and melanoma cells by DNA demethylation. J Clin Oncol; 2006 Aug 10;24(23):3771-9
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Overcoming resistance to interferon-induced apoptosis of renal carcinoma and melanoma cells by DNA demethylation.
  • Epigenetic editing of gene expression by aberrant methylation of DNA may help tumor cells escape attack from the innate and acquired immune systems.
  • Treatment of human ACHN renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and A375 melanoma cells with the DNA demethylating nucleoside analog 5-AZA-2'-deoxycytidine (5-AZA-dC) synergistically augmented antiproliferative effects of IFN- alpha (alpha) 2 and IFN-beta (beta).
  • Either 5-AZA-dC or an antisense to DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) overcame resistance to apoptosis induction by IFNs with up to 85% apoptotic cells resulting from the combinations.
  • No similar potentiation occurred in normal kidney epithelial cells.
  • As occurred with apoptosis-resistant melanoma cells in vitro, tumor growth inhibition in the nude mouse of human A375 melanoma xenografts resulted from treatment with 5-AZA-dC in combination with IFN-beta, an effect not resulting from either single agent.
  • The importance of epigenetic remodeling of expression of immune-modifying genes in tumor cells was further suggested by identifying reactivation of the cancer-testis antigens MAGE and RAGE in ACHN cells after DNMT1 depletion.
  • Thus, inhibitors of DNMT1 may have clinical relevance for immune modulation by augmentation of cytokine effects and/or expression of tumor-associated antigens.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / pharmacology. Apoptosis / drug effects. Azacitidine / analogs & derivatives. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. DNA Methylation / drug effects. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm / drug effects. Interferons / pharmacology. Melanoma, Experimental / drug therapy. Neoplasm Proteins / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / pharmacology. Blotting, Western. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. DNA (Cytosine-5-)-Methyltransferase / drug effects. DNA (Cytosine-5-)-Methyltransferase / metabolism. DNA Modification Methylases / pharmacology. Drug Synergism. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic / drug effects. Humans. Interferon-alpha / pharmacology. Interferon-beta / pharmacology. Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Mice. Mice, Nude. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Transplantation, Heterologous. Up-Regulation

  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. AZACITIDINE .
  • The Lens. Cited by Patents in .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16801630.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / XAF1 protein, human; 77238-31-4 / Interferon-beta; 776B62CQ27 / decitabine; 9008-11-1 / Interferons; EC 2.1.1.- / DNA Modification Methylases; EC 2.1.1.37 / DNA (Cytosine-5-)-Methyltransferase; EC 2.1.1.37 / DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 1; M801H13NRU / Azacitidine
  •  go-up   go-down


21. Agrawal S, Jha MS, Khurana N, Ansari MS, Dubey D, Srivastava A, Kapoor R, Kumar A, Jain M, Mandhani A: Nephron sparing surgery: A single institution experience. Indian J Urol; 2007 Jan;23(1):23-7
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVE: To report our experience in managing various benign and malignant renal tumors with nephron-sparing surgery.
  • Patient and tumor-related characteristics, treatment modality and complications were noted.
  • RESULTS: There were 26 patients (29 renal units), including three with bilateral lesions who underwent nephron-sparing surgery.
  • Mean tumor size was 4.7 cm (range 2-7.5 cm).
  • The remaining 16 (55.2%) malignant lesions included renal cell carcinoma (15) and metastatic adenocarcinoma (one).
  • Cancer-specific survival was 100% and overall survival was 92.3%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Nephron-sparing surgery is a safe and effective alternative to nephrectomy in both benign and malignant lesions of the kidney.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2000 Feb;163(2):442-5 [10647650.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2001 Feb;57(2):252-6 [11182331.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1999 Jan;161(1):33-4; discussion 34-5 [10037361.001]
  • [Cites] BJU Int. 2005 Mar;95 Suppl 2:35-40 [15720333.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1999 Sep;17(9):2868-75 [10561364.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 1997 Sep 1;80(5):992-3 [9307205.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1998 Sep;160(3 Pt 1):674-8 [9720519.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1994 May;151(5):1177-80 [8158754.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1995 May;153(5):1409-14 [7714953.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 1995 Jan;45(1):34-40; discussion 40-1 [7817478.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 1980 Mar;15(3):219-28 [7361352.001]
  • [Cites] Indian J Cancer. 2004 Jul-Sep;41(3):99-103 [15472406.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2004 Jul;64(1):31-4 [15245928.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2002 Jun;59(6):816-20 [12031359.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 1999 Dec;54(6):994-8 [10604696.001]
  • (PMID = 19675756.001).
  • [ISSN] 0970-1591
  • [Journal-full-title] Indian journal of urology : IJU : journal of the Urological Society of India
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Indian J Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2721489
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Kidney / kidney diseases / nephron sparing surgery
  •  go-up   go-down


22. Yao C, Zheng SB, Wu P, Zhang HJ, Jiang YD, Chen T, Qi H, Zhao GZ, Zhao JF: [Detection of Skp2 and p27kip1 expression in human renal cell carcinoma using tissue chip technique]. Nan Fang Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao; 2008 Apr;28(4):642-5
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Detection of Skp2 and p27kip1 expression in human renal cell carcinoma using tissue chip technique].
  • OBJECTIVE: To detect the expression of skp2 and p27kip1 in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) using tissue chip technique, and evaluate the relationship between the proteins and the biological behavior of RCC.
  • METHODS: Tissue chip technique and immunohistochemical SP method was used to detect the expression of skp2 and p27kip1 in normal and tumor tissues.
  • RESULTS: The positivity rate of Skp2 in RCC was significantly higher than that in normal renal tissues (P=0.025).
  • The positivity rate of Skp2 expression in RCC was significantly correlated to poor differentiation of the tumor (P=0.002), and was not associated with the patients gender, age, tumor size, lymph node metastasis and stages of RCC (P>0.05).
  • The positivity rate of p27kip1 in RCC was significantly lower than that in normal renal tissues (P=0.007).
  • The positivity rate of p27kip1 expression was inversely correlated to the malignancy and stage of RCC (P<0.05), but not with the patients' age, gender, lymph node metastasis and tumor size (P>0.05).
  • CONCLUSION: Overexpression of Skp2 protein may lead to decreased p27kip1 level in RCC, indicating its involvement in the carcinogenesis and development of RCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / metabolism. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27 / biosynthesis. Kidney Neoplasms / metabolism. S-Phase Kinase-Associated Proteins / biosynthesis

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18495610.001).
  • [ISSN] 1673-4254
  • [Journal-full-title] Nan fang yi ke da xue xue bao = Journal of Southern Medical University
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nan Fang Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / S-Phase Kinase-Associated Proteins; 147604-94-2 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27
  •  go-up   go-down


23. Kamath A, Helie M, Bifulco CB, Li WW, Concato J, Jain D: Lack of immunohistochemical detection of VEGF in prostate carcinoma. Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol; 2009 May;17(3):227-32
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Lack of immunohistochemical detection of VEGF in prostate carcinoma.
  • BACKGROUND: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in tumor angiogenesis and is a potential therapeutic target in prostatic adenocarcinoma (PrCa).
  • Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis has been used to demonstrate VEGF expression in PrCa, and in various other tumors including breast carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and gliomas.
  • EnVision+ system was used to overcome nonspecific staining.
  • RESULTS: Using different antibodies, positive staining of varying intensity was seen in benign glands, malignant glands, endothelial cells, and fibromuscular stroma.
  • However, the staining disappeared in all cases when EnVision+ system was used to block nonspecific staining except for focal and minimal staining in the endothelial cells.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that when nonspecific staining is blocked, no staining is found for VEGF within the prostate, in either benign or malignant glands.

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Enlarged Prostate (BPH).
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Prostate Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19098681.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-4058
  • [Journal-full-title] Applied immunohistochemistry & molecular morphology : AIMM
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Appl. Immunohistochem. Mol. Morphol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
  •  go-up   go-down


24. Naitoh Y, Kawauchi A, Soh J, Kamoi K, Miki T: Experimental study for electrovaporization of renal cell carcinoma using a new shape memory alloy probe. Urology; 2010 Jun;75(6):1509-13
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Experimental study for electrovaporization of renal cell carcinoma using a new shape memory alloy probe.
  • OBJECTIVES: To develop a new shape memory alloy probe for percutaneous treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) by electrovaporization, and investigate its efficacy and safety in experimental models.
  • The performance of this probe was tested using agar, dog kidney, and rat RCC models.
  • The area of >or=60 degrees C extended about 5 mm beyond the periphery of the vaporized part and corresponded with the histologic findings on the dog kidney that an irreversible heat denaturation occurred to the same extent.
  • The study on the RCC model also confirmed that about 5-mm extent of heat denaturation was seen in the muscular tissue adjacent to the tumor.
  • In the study using the RCC model, some remaining tissues close to the tumor were observed after vaporization.
  • However, dynamic magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated no enhancement in this area and no viable tumor cells were documented by histologic examination.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This novel tissue ablation system has potential as a viable option for percutaneous treatment of renal tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Catheter Ablation / instrumentation. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Alloys / therapeutic use. Animals. Disease Models, Animal. Dogs. Electrodes, Implanted. Equipment Design. Equipment Safety. Immunohistochemistry. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures / instrumentation. Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures / methods. Probability. Rats. Sensitivity and Specificity. Tissue Culture Techniques

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20206977.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Alloys
  •  go-up   go-down


25. Reuter VE: The pathology of renal epithelial neoplasms. Semin Oncol; 2006 Oct;33(5):534-43
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The pathology of renal epithelial neoplasms.
  • Renal epithelial neoplasms are morphologically diverse and are characterized by distinct genetic abnormalities.
  • In addition, our understanding of these morphologic differences has allowed us to develop a classification scheme that is more in keeping with their clinical behavior.
  • Clear cell carcinoma is the most common type of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and accounts for the majority of cases that develop metastatic disease.
  • Papillary carcinoma does not constitute a single morphologic, clinical, or genetic entity with some variants being highly aggressive while others are quite indolent.
  • Chromophobe RCC constitutes less than 10% of primary cases and appears to have a more indolent behavior than clear cell or papillary carcinoma.
  • Oncocytomas are benign, but some cases may be difficult to distinguish from eosinophilic variants of chromophobe RCC.
  • RCC, type unclassified, constitutes up to 7% of cases and represents a histologically and clinically heterogeneous category of tumors that does not fit neatly into any of the other well-defined categories.
  • We have entered the era in which pathologists apply their expertise in microscopy and in evaluating antigenic expression in complex cellular systems to aid in the development and characterization of targeted therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Papillary / pathology. Humans

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • The Lens. Cited by Patents in .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17045082.001).
  • [ISSN] 0093-7754
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 93
  •  go-up   go-down


26. Patard JJ: Incidental renal tumours. Curr Opin Urol; 2009 Sep;19(5):454-8
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Incidental renal tumours.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To analyze the current literature regarding incidental finding of renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • RECENT FINDINGS: RCC incidence rates continue to rise among all racial, age, tumour size categories, with the most rapid increase for localized disease and small tumours.
  • In parallel, it seems that mortality from RCC decreases in all these groups.
  • Computed tomography guided tumour biopsies are gaining more accuracy and acceptance, whereas minimal invasive treatments such as cryoablation or radiofrequency ablation are competing with nephron-sparing surgery in certain patient categories.
  • Finally, active surveillance is emerging as a new management modality for elderly patients with small renal masses.
  • SUMMARY: The emergence of incidental diagnosis of renal tumours which is related to the widespread use of imaging has played a pivotal role in the increased incidence of RCC and therefore potentially in improving survival in localized disease.
  • However, a significant proportion of treated tumours are benign or undetermined and active surveillance has proven safe in selected patients.
  • In conclusion, accurate tools are needed for a proper selection of patients with incidentally detected tumours, so that they can benefit from nephron-sparing surgery, ablative therapies or observation.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / diagnosis. Incidental Findings. Kidney Neoplasms / diagnosis

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19571758.001).
  • [ISSN] 1473-6586
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 48
  •  go-up   go-down


27. Gennigens C, Sautois B, Jerusalem G: [Everolimus (RAD001/Afinitor) in the treatment of metastatic cell carcinoma]. Rev Med Liege; 2010 Apr;65(4):212-6
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Everolimus (RAD001/Afinitor) in the treatment of metastatic cell carcinoma].
  • [Transliterated title] Le médicament du mois. Evérolimus (RAD001/Afinitor) dans le traitement du cancer du rein métastatique.
  • Renal cell carcinoma accounts for 3% of all malignant tumours.
  • Better knowledge of renal cell cancer biology drew attention on the fundamental role of angiogenesis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Sirolimus / analogs & derivatives

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. SIROLIMUS .
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 20499824.001).
  • [ISSN] 0370-629X
  • [Journal-full-title] Revue médicale de Liège
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Med Liege
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Belgium
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; 9HW64Q8G6G / Everolimus; EC 2.7.1.1 / MTOR protein, human; EC 2.7.1.1 / TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases; EC 2.7.11.1 / Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases; W36ZG6FT64 / Sirolimus
  • [Number-of-references] 14
  •  go-up   go-down


28. Byrne BJ, Horwitz M, Long GD, Gasparetto C, Sullivan KM, Chute J, Chao NJ, Rizzieri DA: Outcomes of a second non-myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation following graft rejection. Bone Marrow Transplant; 2008 Jan;41(1):39-43
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Outcomes of a second non-myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation following graft rejection.
  • We therefore report on 11 patients with hematologic malignancies, renal cell cancer or marrow failure who underwent a second reduced-intensity regimen for primary or secondary graft failure.
  • Four patients died from progressive disease 1-9 months after the second transplant.
  • [MeSH-major] Graft Rejection. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / therapy. Graft vs Host Disease / etiology. Humans. Kidney Neoplasms / therapy. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / therapy. Middle Aged. Myelodysplastic Syndromes / therapy. Transplantation, Homologous. Treatment Outcome

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Transplantation.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17982503.001).
  • [ISSN] 0268-3369
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone marrow transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA047741
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  •  go-up   go-down


29. Teh BS, Bloch C, Paulino AC, Shen S, Hinckley L, Baskin D, Butler EB, Amato R: Pathologic complete response in renal cell carcinoma brain metastases treated with stereotactic radiosurgery. Clin Genitourin Cancer; 2007 Jun;5(5):334-7
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pathologic complete response in renal cell carcinoma brain metastases treated with stereotactic radiosurgery.
  • Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is often regarded as a radiation-resistant tumor.
  • However, radiation therapy (RT) in the form of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or whole-brain irradiation has been used to treat brain metastases from RCC.
  • Herein, we present a case of a patient with brain metastases from RCC treated with SRS.
  • The diagnosis of clear-cell RCC was made in 2001 after right radical nephrectomy.
  • He was also found to have lung metastases at diagnosis.
  • Pathology revealed metastatic RCC.
  • The other 2 smaller brain lesions were treated at 20 Gy respectively with shaped-beam SRS using the BrainLab Novalis system.
  • Pathologic examination revealed necrotic tissues without any viable tumor identified.
  • The patient has since been doing very well, now 18 months after SRS and 5 years from the initial diagnosis.
  • This is the first reported case that demonstrates that precise high-dose radiation in the form of SRS can cause significant tumor cell death (pathologic complete response) in radiation-resistant brain metastases from RCC.
  • This finding also provides a rationale to deliver stereotactic body RT for primary and metastatic RCC extracranially.
  • A prospective clinical trial using stereotactic body RT for primary and metastatic RCC is under way.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / surgery. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Radiosurgery

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Brain Tumors.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17645831.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-7673
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical genitourinary cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Genitourin Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


30. Gibson TM, Weinstein SJ, Mayne ST, Pfeiffer RM, Selhub J, Taylor PR, Virtamo J, Albanes D, Stolzenberg-Solomon R: A prospective study of one-carbon metabolism biomarkers and risk of renal cell carcinoma. Cancer Causes Control; 2010 Jul;21(7):1061-9
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A prospective study of one-carbon metabolism biomarkers and risk of renal cell carcinoma.
  • OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have found associations between one-carbon metabolism factors and risk of several cancers, but little is known regarding renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • We conducted a nested case-control study within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study, a prospective study of Finnish male smokers aged 50-69 at baseline.
  • METHODS: Prediagnostic folate, vitamin B(6), vitamin B(12), cysteine, riboflavin, and homocysteine concentrations were measured in fasting serum from 224 incident RCC cases and 224 controls (matched on age and date of serum collection).
  • Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for potential confounders.
  • RESULTS: Serum folate tended to be inversely associated with RCC, compared to the first quartile, the odds ratios (95% CI) for subsequent quartiles were 0.62 (0.35-1.08), 0.52 (0.29-0.93), and 0.67 (0.37-1.20) (P-trend = 0.19).
  • When modeled as a threshold effect, subjects in the lowest serum folate quartile (<or=6.64 nmol/l), which corresponds to deficient folate status, had a significant increased RCC risk (OR = 1.68, 95% CI 1.06-2.65) compared to those with higher serum folate.
  • The other one-carbon metabolism biomarkers were not associated with RCC.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study in male smokers suggests that deficient folate status may increase risk of RCC, but confirmation is needed in other epidemiologic studies that include women and non-smokers.

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYSTEINE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FOLIC ACID .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYANOCOBALAMIN .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CARBON .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Riboflavin .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] J Nutr. 2000 Feb;130(2):129-32 [10720158.001]
  • [Cites] Curr Drug Metab. 2005 Feb;6(1):37-46 [15720206.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002 Aug;11(8):785-9 [12163335.001]
  • [Cites] Acta Oncol. 2002;41(4):381-8 [12234031.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003 Jan;57(1):81-8 [12548301.001]
  • [Cites] J Nutr. 2003 Mar;133 Suppl 3:941S-947S [12612180.001]
  • [Cites] Nicotine Tob Res. 2003 Jun;5(3):357-62 [12791531.001]
  • [Cites] Nutr Rev. 2004 Jun;62(6 Pt 2):S3-12; discussion S13 [15298442.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Epidemiol. 1986 Jul;124(1):17-27 [3521261.001]
  • [Cites] J Chromatogr. 1987 Nov 27;422:43-52 [3437026.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Epidemiol. 1988 Sep;128(3):655-66 [2458036.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 1992;62(2):165-72 [1517040.001]
  • [Cites] JAMA. 1993 Dec 8;270(22):2693-8 [8133587.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Epidemiol. 1994 Jan;4(1):1-10 [8205268.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Clin Nutr. 1994 Oct;60(4):559-66 [8092091.001]
  • [Cites] Gastroenterology. 2006 Oct;131(4):1271-83 [17030196.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2006 Dec;176(6 Pt 1):2353-8 [17085101.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Dec;15(12):2445-52 [17164369.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Invest. 2005;23(3):240-55 [15945510.001]
  • [Cites] J Am Coll Nutr. 2005 Aug;24(4):266-74 [16093404.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2005 Nov 20;117(4):648-54 [15929109.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2006 Jun 15;118(12):3133-9 [16425278.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Apr;83(4):835-41 [16600936.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Nutr Food Res. 2007 Mar;51(3):267-92 [17295418.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Sep;86(3):718-27 [17823438.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Physiol Biochem. 2007 Oct-Dec;113(4-5):234-58 [18158646.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2008 Apr 15;122(8):1710-5 [18098291.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Sep;17(9):2220-5 [18768486.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Sep;17(9):2226-30 [18768487.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009 Jun;18(6):1730-9 [19505906.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2010 Mar 15;126(6):1504-12 [19685494.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 1995 Jan 17;60(2):194-8 [7829215.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Genet. 1995 May;10(1):111-3 [7647779.001]
  • [Cites] J Natl Cancer Inst. 1999 Mar 17;91(6):535-41 [10088624.001]
  • [Cites] J Nutr. 1999 Apr;129(4):779-82 [10203550.001]
  • [Cites] JAMA. 1999 May 5;281(17):1628-31 [10235157.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2005 Jan 20;113(3):451-5 [15455348.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Feb;81(2):434-9 [15699232.001]
  • [Cites] Semin Oncol. 2000 Apr;27(2):115-23 [10768591.001]
  • (PMID = 20383577.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-7225
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer causes & control : CCC
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Causes Control
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / CCR NIH HHS / RC / N01-RC-45035; United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / Z01 CP010195-02; United States / CCR NIH HHS / RC / N01-RC-37004; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / TU2 CA105666; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CN / N01-CN-45165; United States / CCR NIH HHS / RC / N01RC37004; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CN / N01 CN045165; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / TU2-CA-105666
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0LVT1QZ0BA / Homocysteine; 7440-44-0 / Carbon; 8059-24-3 / Vitamin B 6; 935E97BOY8 / Folic Acid; K848JZ4886 / Cysteine; P6YC3EG204 / Vitamin B 12; TLM2976OFR / Riboflavin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS212030; NLM/ PMC2902168
  •  go-up   go-down


31. Muscarella LA, Barbano R, Augello B, Formica V, Micale L, Zelante L, D'Agruma L, Merla G: An 11-bp duplication in the promoter region of the VHL gene in a patient with cerebellar hemangioblastoma and renal oncocytoma. J Hum Genet; 2007;52(6):485-91
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] An 11-bp duplication in the promoter region of the VHL gene in a patient with cerebellar hemangioblastoma and renal oncocytoma.
  • Central nervous system hemangioblastomas are benign vascular tumours that may present sporadically or as manifestation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease.
  • VHL Syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized, besides hemangioblastomas, by susceptibility to multifocal and bilateral renal cell carcinoma and cysts, retinal angiomas, pheochromocytoma, epididymis cystoadenoma, pancreatic cysts and/or islet cell tumours.
  • Germline mutations of VHL tumour suppressor gene cause the VHL disease, while somatic mutations have been associated with sporadic hemangioblastomas and clear-cell renal carcinomas.
  • We propose that these molecular events, through a loss of pVHL function, lead to the onset of the VHL-related tumours in that individual.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoma, Oxyphilic / genetics. Cerebellar Neoplasms / genetics. Hemangioblastoma / genetics. Kidney Neoplasms / genetics. Promoter Regions, Genetic. Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein / genetics. von Hippel-Lindau Disease / genetics


32. Franovic A, Robert I, Smith K, Kurban G, Pause A, Gunaratnam L, Lee S: Multiple acquired renal carcinoma tumor capabilities abolished upon silencing of ADAM17. Cancer Res; 2006 Aug 15;66(16):8083-90
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Multiple acquired renal carcinoma tumor capabilities abolished upon silencing of ADAM17.
  • Malignancy is a manifestation of acquired defects in regulatory circuits that direct normal cell proliferation and homeostasis.
  • Most of these circuits operate through cell autonomous pathways, whereas others potentially involve the neighboring microenvironment.
  • We report that the metalloprotease ADAM17 plays a pivotal role in several acquired tumor cell capabilities by mediating the availability of soluble transforming growth factor-alpha, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligand, and thus the establishment of a key autocrine signaling pathway.
  • Silencing of ADAM17 in human renal carcinoma cell lines corrects critical features associated with cancer cells, including growth autonomy, tumor inflammation, and tissue invasion.
  • Highly malignant renal carcinoma cancer cells fail to form in vivo tumors in the absence of ADAM17, confirming the essential function of this molecule in tumorigenesis.
  • These data show that ligand shedding is a crucial step in endogenous EGFR activation and endorse prospective therapeutic strategies targeting ADAM17 in human cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] ADAM Proteins / deficiency. ADAM Proteins / genetics. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / genetics. Gene Silencing. Kidney Neoplasms / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Division. Cell Line, Tumor. Humans. RNA, Neoplasm / genetics. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction. Transforming Growth Factor alpha / physiology. von Hippel-Lindau Disease / genetics

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16912185.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-7445
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Neoplasm; 0 / Transforming Growth Factor alpha; EC 3.4.24.- / ADAM Proteins; EC 3.4.24.- / tumor necrosis factor-alpha convertase
  •  go-up   go-down


33. Murphy AJ, Viero S, Ho M, Thorner PS: Diagnostic utility of nestin expression in pediatric tumors in the region of the kidney. Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol; 2009 Dec;17(6):517-23
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Diagnostic utility of nestin expression in pediatric tumors in the region of the kidney.
  • Nestin is an intermediate filament that was first identified in neuroepithelial stem cells.
  • During embryogenesis, nestin is expressed in a number of cell types, including neural crest cells and developing myocytes.
  • We sought to determine the utility of nestin expression in distinguishing pediatric tumors in the region of the kidney.
  • Cases studied included Wilms tumor (n=24), nephroblastomatosis (n=6), renal cell carcinoma (n=19), renal clear cell sarcoma (n=9), mesoblastic nephroma (n=9), neuroblastoma (n=11), malignant rhabdoid tumor (n=8 including 2 renal), Ewing sarcoma (n=16 including 1 renal, 7 soft tissue, and 8 bone), intra-abdominal desmoplastic small round cell tumor (n=5), and rhabdomyosarcoma (n=8, all extrarenal).
  • All cases of Wilms tumor, mesoblastic nephroma, rhabdomyosarcoma, neuroblastoma, malignant rhabdoid tumor, and desmoplastic small round cell tumor were nestin-positive.
  • In Wilms tumor and nephroblastomatosis, nestin was expressed in blastema and glomeruloid structures, but not tubules.
  • The majority of Ewing sarcoma and renal cell carcinoma were negative.
  • Expression in clear cell sarcoma was variable with 5 cases negative and 4 cases positive.
  • Thus, nestin is a highly sensitive, but nonspecific, marker of Wilms tumor in the context of tumors that may occur in or around the kidney.
  • Nestin reactivity may be useful in differentiating Wilms tumor from Ewing sarcoma, renal cell carcinoma, or nestin-negative clear cell sarcoma.

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Bone Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Wilms Tumor.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • antibodies-online. View related products from antibodies-online.com (subscription/membership/fee required).
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19417621.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-4058
  • [Journal-full-title] Applied immunohistochemistry & molecular morphology : AIMM
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Appl. Immunohistochem. Mol. Morphol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Intermediate Filament Proteins; 0 / NES protein, human; 0 / Nerve Tissue Proteins; 0 / Nestin; 0 / WT1 Proteins
  •  go-up   go-down


34. Kuroda K, Horiguchi A, Sumitomo M, Asano T, Ito K, Hayakawa M, Asano T: Activated Akt prevents antitumor activity of gefitinib in renal cancer cells. Urology; 2009 Jul;74(1):209-15
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Activated Akt prevents antitumor activity of gefitinib in renal cancer cells.
  • OBJECTIVES: To investigate the mechanism of gefitinib resistance in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells.
  • Although epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is frequently overexpressed in RCC, gefitinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of EGFR, has only a limited antitumor effect on RCC.
  • METHODS: The effects of gefitinib on the activation status of EGFR and kinases downstream in its signaling cascade were examined in three gefitinib-resistant RCC cell lines: SKRC-44, KU20-01, and 786-O.
  • The changes in signaling cascades and cell survival that were induced by gefitinib in combination with either the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 or the knockdown of Akt expression by transient transfection with Akt small interfering RNA were examined in 786-O cells.
  • RESULTS: Gefitinib alone did not significantly reduce cell viability in any of the examined cell lines.
  • In 786-O cells, the phosphorylation of both extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt was inhibited by gefitinib used in combination with either LY294002 or the knockdown of Akt expression, and the viability of 786-O cells was suppressed significantly by gefitinib used in combination with LY294002 (P < .0001) or Akt small interfering RNA (P = .0044).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Constitutively activated Akt might prevent the antitumor efficacy of gefitinib in renal cell carcinoma, and the therapeutic effectiveness of gefitinib might be improved by inhibiting Akt activation.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Oncogene Protein v-akt / physiology. Quinazolines / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Signal Transduction. Tumor Cells, Cultured


35. Malizzia LJ, Hsu A: Temsirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor for treatment of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma. Clin J Oncol Nurs; 2008 Aug;12(4):639-46
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Temsirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor for treatment of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma.
  • Temsirolimus is a targeted therapy that inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a central regulator of tumor cell responses to growth stimuli.
  • Temsirolimus has a broad anticancer activity profile that impacts tumor cell growth, proliferation, and survival through its specific inhibition of mTOR.
  • In a randomized phase III trial that enrolled previously untreated patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and poor prognostic features, temsirolimus significantly prolonged overall survival compared with interferon-alpha, a standard therapy (p = 0.008).
  • Food and Drug Administration for treatment and is considered a first-line treatment for patients with advanced RCC with poor prognostic features.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Protein Kinases / drug effects. Sirolimus / analogs & derivatives
  • [MeSH-minor] Algorithms. Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic. Decision Trees. Drug Administration Schedule. Drug Delivery Systems. Drug Interactions. Drug Monitoring. Humans. Nurse's Role. Nursing Assessment. Oncology Nursing / methods. Patient Education as Topic. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Survival Rate. TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases. Treatment Outcome. United States / epidemiology

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cancer Chemotherapy.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. SIROLIMUS .
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18676330.001).
  • [ISSN] 1092-1095
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical journal of oncology nursing
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin J Oncol Nurs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 624KN6GM2T / temsirolimus; EC 2.7.- / Protein Kinases; EC 2.7.1.1 / MTOR protein, human; EC 2.7.1.1 / TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases; W36ZG6FT64 / Sirolimus
  • [Number-of-references] 47
  •  go-up   go-down


36. Froehner M, Hakenberg OW, Wirth MP: Molecular therapy in urologic oncology. Urol Int; 2007;79(1):1-7
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • During recent years, significant advances have been made in the field of molecular therapy in urologic oncology, mainly for advanced renal cell carcinoma.
  • In this hitherto largely treatment-refractory disease, several agents have been developed targeting the von Hippel-Lindau metabolic pathway which is involved in carcinogenesis and progression of the majority of renal cell carcinomas.
  • Although cure may not be expected, new drugs, such as the multikinase inhibitors sorafenib and sunitinib and the mammalian target of rapamycine inhibitor temsirolimus, frequently stabilize the disease course and may improve survival.
  • Fewer data are available supporting molecular therapies in prostate, bladder, and testicular cancers.
  • Preliminary data suggest a potential role of high-dose calcitriol and thalidomide in hormone-refractory prostate cancer, whereas targeted therapies in bladder and testicular cancers are still more or less limited to single-case experiences.
  • [MeSH-minor] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Humans. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Male. Molecular Biology. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17627159.001).
  • [ISSN] 0042-1138
  • [Journal-full-title] Urologia internationalis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urol. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Number-of-references] 43
  •  go-up   go-down


37. Sablin MP, Dreyer C, Colichi C, Bouattour M, Delbaldo C, Faivre S, Raymond E: Benefits from pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties of sunitinib for clinical development. Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol; 2010 Aug;6(8):1005-15
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Being well tolerated, this small molecule is now an essential treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumors refractory or intolerant to imatinib, two localizations associated with a poor prognosis.
  • Future developments include the extension of the indications of sunitinib in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, the evaluation of combinations with conventional cytotoxic and other targeted drugs and the development of strategy to overcome resistance to sunitinib.

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cancer Chemotherapy.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 20636223.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-7607
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert opinion on drug metabolism & toxicology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Indoles; 0 / Pyrroles; 0 / sunitinib
  •  go-up   go-down


38. Sacco E, Pinto F, Sasso F, Racioppi M, Gulino G, Volpe A, Bassi P: Paraneoplastic syndromes in patients with urological malignancies. Urol Int; 2009;83(1):1-11
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • INTRODUCTION: Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) may represent the main clinical problem in cancer patients; however, the knowledge of their clinical aspect remains quite poor among urologists.
  • OBJECTIVE: To provide urologists with an overview on main clinical aspects of PNS that have been reported to be associated to urological cancers.
  • RESULTS: All genitourinary tumors can cause a PNS, and renal cell carcinoma is the most frequent urological malignancy involved.
  • Prostate cancer is the second urological tumor associated with PNS which, conversely, are uncommon in bladder cancer and rare in testicular cancer.
  • Tumor neuroendocrine differentiation is involved in most endocrine PNS.
  • Important advances have been made on radionuclide scan methods in order to detect the primary tumor.
  • The most effective treatment strategy is always represented by the radical therapy of the underlying cancer, but specific therapeutic options are sometimes available.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Endocrine PNS are frequently associated with urological cancers, especially renal and prostate carcinoma.
  • PNS have been rarely reported in association with cancers of bladder, urethra and testicle.
  • [MeSH-major] Paraneoplastic Syndromes / diagnosis. Urogenital Neoplasms / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Humans. Male. Paraneoplastic Endocrine Syndromes / diagnosis. Paraneoplastic Endocrine Syndromes / etiology. Paraneoplastic Endocrine Syndromes / therapy

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • [ErratumIn] Urol Int. 2010;85(4):483 [21178389.001]
  • (PMID = 19641351.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-0399
  • [Journal-full-title] Urologia internationalis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urol. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Number-of-references] 70
  •  go-up   go-down


39. Weld KJ, Venkatesh R, Huang J, Landman J: Evolution of surgical technique and patient outcomes for laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. Urology; 2006 Mar;67(3):502-6; discussion 506-7
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Histopathologic examination revealed renal cell carcinoma in 60% of patients with no positive margins or recurrences at a mean follow-up of 25.3 months.
  • CONCLUSIONS: With experience, laparoscopic partial nephrectomy is a viable alternative to open partial nephrectomy for small renal masses.
  • At present, energy technologies and surgical pharmaceuticals are helpful adjuncts, but are not reliable for primary hemostasis and collecting system closure.
  • Adaptation of traditional open techniques, including vascular control, excision of the tumor with cold scissors, and suture reconstruction of the collecting system and parenchyma, remain necessary to consistently perform laparoscopic partial nephrectomy successfully.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Laparoscopy. Nephrectomy / methods. Nephrectomy / trends

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16527568.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


40. Dombrowski F, Klotz L, Bannasch P, Evert M: Renal carcinogenesis in models of diabetes in rats: metabolic changes are closely related to neoplastic development. Diabetologia; 2007 Dec;50(12):2580-90
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Renal carcinogenesis in models of diabetes in rats: metabolic changes are closely related to neoplastic development.
  • AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: There is an increased risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in human diabetes mellitus.
  • RESULTS: Irrespective of the cause of diabetes, diabetic but not normoglycaemic rats developed typical glycogenotic clear-cell AEL.
  • AEL showed strong proliferative activity, which was nearly completely inhibited by EGF receptor blockade (Gefitinib treatment).
  • Many findings suggested a stepwise development of RCCs from AEL.
  • Whereas the number and size of RCCs gradually increased in all diabetic groups, beginning at 6 months after onset of diabetes, normoglycaemic controls did not developed RCC.
  • After 28 months, up to 82% of diabetic animals had at least one RCC.
  • In contrast to the proximal tubules, the distal tubular system, including glycogenotic AEL, had the same levels of enzyme activities as RCC (e.g. high glycogen phosphorylase and synthase activity, lack of glucose 6-phosphatase activity) and the same expression patterns of cytokeratin 7 and several growth factors, along with their receptors and signal transduction proteins (TGF-alpha, EGF receptor, IGF-I, IGF-I receptor, IGF-II receptor, insulin receptor substrate 1, v-raf-1 murine leukemia viral oncogene homologue 1 and mitogen activated protein kinase kinase 1).
  • In addition, direct morphological transitions between distal tubules, AEL and RCCs were frequently observed.
  • All these findings indicate a common origin and a precursor-product relationship of AEL and RCCs.
  • CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Nephrocarcinogenesis in diabetic rats results from sustained hyperglycaemia, resulting in an adaptive metabolic response, altered growth factor signalling and subsequent neoplastic transformation of the tubular epithelial cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental / complications. Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental / metabolism. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Proliferation. Disease Models, Animal. Disease Progression. Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins / metabolism. Keratin-7 / metabolism. Kidney / pathology. Male. Precancerous Conditions / enzymology. Precancerous Conditions / metabolism. Precancerous Conditions / pathology. Rats. Rats, Inbred Lew. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Signal Transduction. Streptozocin. Time Factors

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. STREPTOZOTOCIN .
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Diabetologia. 1999 Jan;42(1):107-12 [10027588.001]
  • [Cites] Lab Invest. 1994 Nov;71(5):688-99 [7967522.001]
  • [Cites] Virchows Arch. 2000 Feb;436(2):119-26 [10755601.001]
  • [Cites] Diabetes. 1990 Dec;39(12):1490-7 [2174008.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 1994 Nov;70(5):950-3 [7947103.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Pathol. 1996 Apr;148(4):1249-56 [8644865.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Pathol. 1997 Mar;150(3):1071-87 [9060843.001]
  • [Cites] Gan. 1966 Dec;57(6):595-604 [5981257.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Carcinog. 1997 Jul;19(3):213-9 [9254888.001]
  • [Cites] J Immunol. 2004 Dec 1;173(11):6993-7002 [15557196.001]
  • [Cites] Transplantation. 1994 Aug 15;58(3):349-54 [8053060.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2006 Feb 1;66(3):1833-43 [16452245.001]
  • [Cites] J Bioenerg Biomembr. 1997 Aug;29(4):303-13 [9387091.001]
  • [Cites] Toxicol Pathol. 1998 Nov-Dec;26(6):769-76 [9864094.001]
  • [Cites] Diabetologia. 2000 Oct;43(10):1205-23 [11079738.001]
  • [Cites] Diabetologia. 1990 Jun;33(6):334-8 [2199279.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Rev Cancer. 2004 Aug;4(8):579-91 [15286738.001]
  • [Cites] Nature. 1967 Jun 17;214(5094):1254-5 [6066123.001]
  • [Cites] J Hepatol. 2000 Oct;33(4):580-600 [11059863.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 1995 Sep 4;62(5):501-7 [7665217.001]
  • [Cites] Trends Endocrinol Metab. 2006 Oct;17(8):328-36 [16956771.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Pathol. 1998 Feb;152(2):341-5 [9466558.001]
  • [Cites] APMIS. 1988 Aug;96(8):749-54 [3137943.001]
  • [Cites] J Am Soc Nephrol. 1997 Mar;8(3):436-44 [9071712.001]
  • [Cites] Carcinogenesis. 1992 Dec;13(12):2329-34 [1473241.001]
  • [Cites] Z Krebsforsch Klin Onkol Cancer Res Clin Oncol. 1974;81(3-4):311-31 [4372828.001]
  • [Cites] Lab Invest. 2000 Sep;80(9):1399-411 [11005208.001]
  • [Cites] Lab Invest. 1992 Oct;67(4):506-11 [1434530.001]
  • [Cites] Virchows Arch B Cell Pathol Incl Mol Pathol. 1989;57(5):275-83 [2570488.001]
  • [Cites] Z Krebsforsch Klin Onkol Cancer Res Clin Oncol. 1978 Aug 24;92(1):63-86 [151405.001]
  • [Cites] Semin Oncol. 1983 Dec;10(4):378-84 [6320450.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 1989 Jun 15;43(6):1029-33 [2543641.001]
  • [Cites] Adv Enzyme Regul. 1986;25:279-96 [2949538.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Invest. 2005;23(3):240-55 [15945510.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Pathol. 1957 Nov-Dec;33(6):1035-57 [13478656.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Pathol. 1996 Dec;149(6):2089-94 [8952541.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2004 Nov 1;64(21):8093-100 [15520221.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1995 Sep 15;55(18):4182-7 [7664295.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 1995 Aug;1(8):913-20 [9816062.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 1974 Jan;34(1):158-60 [4272120.001]
  • [Cites] Prog Histochem Cytochem. 1991;23(1-4):61-72 [1947168.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Urol. 2007 May;14(5):393-7 [17511719.001]
  • (PMID = 17952403.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-186X
  • [Journal-full-title] Diabetologia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Diabetologia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; 0 / Keratin-7; 5W494URQ81 / Streptozocin
  •  go-up   go-down


41. Hogervorst JG, Schouten LJ, Konings EJ, Goldbohm RA, van den Brandt PA: Lung cancer risk in relation to dietary acrylamide intake. J Natl Cancer Inst; 2009 May 6;101(9):651-62
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Lung cancer risk in relation to dietary acrylamide intake.
  • In epidemiological studies, positive associations between dietary acrylamide intake and the risks of endometrial, ovarian, estrogen receptor-positive breast, and renal cell cancers have been observed.
  • The association between dietary acrylamide intake and lung cancer risk is not known.
  • METHODS: We conducted a case-cohort study among 58 279 men and 62 573 women (aged 55-69 years) in the Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer.
  • Intakes of acrylamide-containing foods and risk factors for cancer were assessed with a self-administered questionnaire at baseline in 1986 and combined with acrylamide levels in relevant Dutch foods to assess total dietary acrylamide intake.
  • Incident lung cancer cases in the total cohort were detected by computerized record linkages to the Netherlands Cancer Registry and the Netherlands Pathology Registry.
  • Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the risk of lung cancer associated with acrylamide intakes were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models that controlled for smoking (status, quantity, and duration) and other lung cancer risk factors.
  • RESULTS: After 13.3 years of follow-up (September 17, 1986 up to January 1, 2000) there were 2649 cases of primary, histologically verified lung cancer (International Classification of Diseases for Oncology-3 code: C34) when cases with prevalent cancer at baseline (other than skin cancer) were excluded.
  • The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio of lung cancer for a 10-microg/d increment of acrylamide intake was 1.03 (95% CI = 0.96 to 1.11) for men and 0.82 (95% CI = 0.69 to 0.96) for women.
  • The hazard ratio of lung cancer for the highest (median intake [microg/d]: men = 37.6 and women = 36.8) vs the lowest (median intake [microg/d]: men = 10.8 and women = 9.5) quintile of acrylamide intake was 1.03 (95% CI = 0.77 to 1.39, P(trend) = .85) for men and 0.45 (95% CI = 0.27 to 0.76, P(trend) = .01) for women.
  • The inverse association in women was strongest for adenocarcinoma (hazard ratio for highest vs lowest tertile of intake = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.21 to 0.78; P(trend) = .01).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Acrylamide intake was not associated with lung cancer risk in men but was inversely associated in women, most strongly for adenocarcinoma.
  • This finding suggests that acrylamide is involved in human carcinogenesis through pathways other than genotoxicity.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / chemically induced. Adenocarcinoma / epidemiology. Aged. Case-Control Studies. Diet Surveys. Endometrial Neoplasms / chemically induced. Endometrial Neoplasms / epidemiology. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Gonadal Steroid Hormones / blood. Humans. Male. Medical Record Linkage. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Netherlands / epidemiology. Odds Ratio. Ovarian Neoplasms / chemically induced. Ovarian Neoplasms / epidemiology. Proportional Hazards Models. Prospective Studies. Registries. Risk Assessment. Risk Factors. Sex Factors. Smoking / adverse effects

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Lung Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Lung Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ACRYLAMIDE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [CommentIn] J Natl Cancer Inst. 2009 May 6;101(9):618-21 [19401554.001]
  • (PMID = 19401552.001).
  • [ISSN] 1460-2105
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the National Cancer Institute
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Natl. Cancer Inst.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carcinogens; 0 / Gonadal Steroid Hormones; 20R035KLCI / Acrylamide
  •  go-up   go-down


42. Deger SM, Mutluay R, Ebinc FA, Arinsoy T, Sindel S: Renal cell carcinoma associated immunosuppressive therapy: a case report with Wegener's granulomatosis. Rheumatol Int; 2009 Nov;30(1):119-21
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Renal cell carcinoma associated immunosuppressive therapy: a case report with Wegener's granulomatosis.
  • Development of uroepithelial tumors after cyclophosphamide and azathioprine therapy in Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) have been reported in the literature but renal cell carcinoma (RCC), rarely.
  • RCC associated with WG has been previously reported in a few cases.
  • Here, we report a case, which developed RCC 8 years after initiation of WG.
  • Long-term immunosuppressive treatment is a risk factor for the development of malignancies; it should be suggested that RCC in our patient might be due to immunosuppressive therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Azathioprine / adverse effects. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / chemically induced. Cyclophosphamide / adverse effects. Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis / drug therapy. Immunosuppressive Agents / adverse effects. Kidney Neoplasms / chemically induced


43. Bademci G: Extremely delayed renal cell carcinoma metastasis mimicking convexity meningioma. Turk Neurosurg; 2008 Oct;18(4):400-3
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Extremely delayed renal cell carcinoma metastasis mimicking convexity meningioma.
  • Imaging characterictics may not always differentiate between meningioma and metastatic tumors.
  • A 68-year-old-woman who had been operated for renal cell carcinoma 20 years ago presented with new symptoms of an intracranial mass lesion.
  • The pathology examination revealed metastatic carcinoma.
  • Such tumors that satisfy several criteria for a diagnosis of meningioma, but prove instead to be metastatic carcinoma form the focus of our discussion.
  • A meticulous clinical evaluation and histopathological diagnosis is essential in patients with an intracranial mass whether the lesion looks like a primary or metastatic tumor on the first evaluation.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Meningioma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Nephrectomy. Neurosurgical Procedures. Tomography, X-Ray Computed


44. Hernández Toriz N, Flores Ojeda R, Ixquiac Pineda G: [Renal tumor in a pelvic kidney. Case report]. Arch Esp Urol; 2006 Oct;59(8):826-9
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Renal tumor in a pelvic kidney. Case report].
  • [Transliterated title] Tumor renal en riñón ectópico pelvico presentación de un caso.
  • OBJECTIVE: An uncommon association of renal cell carcinoma in a pelvic kidney is described, the literature is reviewed.
  • METHODS: A case of renal cell carcinoma in a pelvic kidney is presented, and the literature briefly reviewed, with special reference to six cases reported.
  • RESULTS: Renal cell carcinoma in a pelvic kidney is uncommon, the paucity of previous reports of this association is surprising.
  • Besides renal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant renal tumour in the adult and renal ectopy is relatively common more cases of this association would be expected.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Renal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant renal tumour in the adult and renal ectopy is relatively common, the actual incidence among autopsy series is 1 in 900, it has been an uncommon association, with only six cases reported.
  • The surgical approach to ectopic kidneys merits caution because of the uncertain vascular anatomy, and vascular studies may be indicated to avoid complications, the present case is important because it represent the most common urological cancers at our institution with an unusual presentation.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / diagnosis. Kidney Neoplasms / diagnosis. Kidney Pelvis

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17153507.001).
  • [ISSN] 0004-0614
  • [Journal-full-title] Archivos españoles de urología
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Esp. Urol.
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Number-of-references] 9
  •  go-up   go-down


45. Hu J, La Vecchia C, DesMeules M, Negri E, Mery L, Canadian Cancer Registries Epidemiology Research Group: Nutrient and fiber intake and risk of renal cell carcinoma. Nutr Cancer; 2008;60(6):720-8
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Nutrient and fiber intake and risk of renal cell carcinoma.
  • This study examines the association between nutrient and fiber intake and the risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • Between 1994 and 1997 in 8 Canadian provinces, mailed questionnaires were completed by 1,138 incident, histologically confirmed cases of RCC and 5,039 population controls.
  • Intakes of total fat, saturated fat, monounsaturated fat, trans-fat, and cholesterol were associated with the risk of RCC; the ORs for the highest vs. the lowest quartile were 1.67, 1.53 and 1.46, 1.31, and 1.48, respectively.
  • Sucrose was related to the risk of RCC.
  • High fiber intake was inversely associated with RCC risk.
  • The findings suggest that a diet low in fats and cholesterol and rich in fiber could favorably affect the risk of RCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / etiology. Dietary Fats / administration & dosage. Dietary Fiber / administration & dosage. Kidney Neoplasms / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Case-Control Studies. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Odds Ratio. Risk

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Dietary Fats.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Dietary Fiber.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19005971.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-7914
  • [Journal-full-title] Nutrition and cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nutr Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dietary Fats
  • [Investigator] Paulse B; Dewar R; Dryer D; Kreiger N; Robson D; Fincham S; Le N; Vecchia CL; Negri E
  •  go-up   go-down


46. Akbari ME, Hosseini SJ, Rezaee A, Hosseini MM, Rezaee I, Sheikhvatan M: Incidence of genitourinary cancers in the Islamic Republic of Iran: a survey in 2005. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev; 2008 Oct-Dec;9(4):549-52
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Incidence of genitourinary cancers in the Islamic Republic of Iran: a survey in 2005.
  • We here report the incidence of different types of genitourinary cancers among the Iranian population according to the records of the Iran Ministry of Health and Medical Education.
  • In a population-based cancer-registry study in 2005, all recorded data in pathology laboratories, freestanding cancer clinics and treatment centers, physician offices, and other state central registries were obtained with the assistance of Iran Universities of Medical Sciences and sent to the Diseases Management Center in the Health Ministry.
  • The prevalences of urological cancers were as follows: bladder cancer 48.3%; prostate cancer 33.4%; renal cell carcinoma 10.3%; renal pelvis and ureter cancer 0.75%; testicular cancer 6.15%; penile cancer 0.15%; urethral cancer 0.45%; and other unspecified urinary cancers 0.43%.
  • The male to female ratios for the various common urological cancers varied between 1.69 (renal cell carcinoma) and 7.75 (unspecified urinary cancers).
  • The incidence of prostate cancer among our population was dramatically higher than in other countries of Asia.
  • However, bladder cancer was found to be the commonest of the genitourinary cancers, especially in elderly patients, among our population.
  • [MeSH-major] Urogenital Neoplasms / diagnosis. Urogenital Neoplasms / epidemiology

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19256736.001).
  • [ISSN] 2476-762X
  • [Journal-full-title] Asian Pacific journal of cancer prevention : APJCP
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Asian Pac. J. Cancer Prev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Thailand
  •  go-up   go-down


47. Hammers HJ, Verheul HM, Salumbides B, Sharma R, Rudek M, Jaspers J, Shah P, Ellis L, Shen L, Paesante S, Dykema K, Furge K, Teh BT, Netto G, Pili R: Reversible epithelial to mesenchymal transition and acquired resistance to sunitinib in patients with renal cell carcinoma: evidence from a xenograft study. Mol Cancer Ther; 2010 Jun;9(6):1525-35
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Reversible epithelial to mesenchymal transition and acquired resistance to sunitinib in patients with renal cell carcinoma: evidence from a xenograft study.
  • Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) targeting angiogenesis via inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway have changed the medical management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma.
  • To address this question, we obtained an excisional biopsy of a skin metastasis from a patient with clear cell renal carcinoma who initially had a response to sunitinib and eventually progressed with therapy.
  • Tumor pieces were grafted s.c. in athymic nude mice.
  • Tumor size, microvascular density, and pericyte coverage were determined.
  • A tumor-derived cell line was established and assessed in vitro for potential direct antitumor effects of sunitinib.
  • At a dose of 40 mg/kg, sunitinib caused regression of the subcutaneous tumors.
  • More interestingly, histologic examination of the original skin metastasis revealed evidence of epithelial to mesenchymal transition, whereas the xenografts showed reversion to the clear cell phenotype.
  • In vitro studies showed no inhibitory effect on tumor cell growth at pharmacologically relevant concentrations.
  • In conclusion, the histologic examination in this xenograft study suggests that reversible epithelial to mesenchymal transition may be associated with acquired tumor resistance to TKIs in patients with clear cell renal carcinoma.

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2006 Jan 1;24(1):16-24 [16330672.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2006 Jan 1;24(1):25-35 [16314617.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2006 Jun 1;24(16):2505-12 [16636341.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2006 Sep 1;66(17):8814-21 [16951198.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Invest. 2006 Oct;116(10):2610-21 [17016557.001]
  • [Cites] PLoS Med. 2006 Mar;3(3):e47 [16417408.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2007 Apr 1;67(7):3171-6 [17409424.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Cancer Ther. 2007 Jun;6(6):1683-91 [17541031.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 2003 Jan;9(1):327-37 [12538485.001]
  • [Cites] Histol Histopathol. 2003 Apr;18(2):551-5 [12647806.001]
  • [Cites] J Cell Sci. 2004 Jun 1;117(Pt 13):2827-39 [15169839.001]
  • [Cites] Genome Biol. 2004;5(10):R80 [15461798.001]
  • [Cites] Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2004 Dec;41(4):390-4 [15390189.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Cell Biol. 1996 Sep;16(9):4604-13 [8756616.001]
  • [Cites] Nature. 1999 May 20;399(6733):271-5 [10353251.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 2007 Jul 1;13(13):3765-70 [17606705.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Oncol. 2007 Aug;31(2):277-83 [17611683.001]
  • [Cites] J Cell Physiol. 2007 Nov;213(2):374-83 [17680632.001]
  • [Cites] Front Biosci. 2008;13:2335-55 [17981716.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Surg Oncol. 2007 Dec;14(12):3629-37 [17909916.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Rev Cancer. 2008 Aug;8(8):592-603 [18650835.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2009 Jan 10;27(2):235-41 [19064974.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 2009 Mar 28;373(9669):1119-32 [19269025.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Pathol. 2009 May;174(5):1588-93 [19342369.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2009 Aug 1;27(22):3584-90 [19487381.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Biotechnol. 2005 Mar;23(3):329-36 [15711537.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2005 Jul 1;65(13):5628-37 [15994935.001]
  • [Cites] Nucleic Acids Res. 2005;33(20):e175 [16284200.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2005 Dec 1;65(23):10801-9 [16322226.001]
  • [Cites] Nature. 2006 Jan 19;439(7074):353-7 [16273092.001]
  • (PMID = 20501804.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-8514
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular cancer therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cancer Ther.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] None / None / / P30 CA006973-48; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / S10 RR026824; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / S10 RR026824-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA006973-48
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Indoles; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Pyrroles; 0 / sunitinib; EC 6.3.2.19 / Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS274514; NLM/ PMC3049816
  •  go-up   go-down


48. Deguchi Y, Shimada K, Nara S, Esaki M, Sakamoto Y, Kosuge T, Hiraoka N: Pancreaticojejunostomy with invagination of the punched pancreatic remnant after medial pancreatectomy and enucleation for multiple metastases of renal cell carcinoma: report of a case. Surg Today; 2009;39(12):1086-90
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pancreaticojejunostomy with invagination of the punched pancreatic remnant after medial pancreatectomy and enucleation for multiple metastases of renal cell carcinoma: report of a case.
  • We report the successful resection of multiple pancreatic metastases of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), achieved by performing medial pancreatectomy and enucleation, preserving as much of the pancreatic parenchyma as possible.
  • Considering the unusual behavior of RCC metastasis and the difficulty in predicting the pattern of recurrence, we should devise the optimal surgical strategy to provide cancer-free surgical margins and preserve as much of the pancreatic parenchyma as possible.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology. Pancreatic Neoplasms / secondary. Pancreatic Neoplasms / surgery. Pancreaticojejunostomy / methods


49. Lang JM, Harrison MR: Pazopanib for the treatment of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma. Clin Med Insights Oncol; 2010 Oct 01;4:95-105
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pazopanib for the treatment of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma.
  • Dramatic advances in the care of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma have occurred over the last ten years, including insights into the molecular pathogenesis of this disease, that have now been translated into paradigm-changing therapeutic strategies.
  • This review will discuss the scientific rationale for the development of pazopanib, as well as preclinical and clinical trials that led to approval of pazopanib for patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma.
  • Finally, an algorithm utilizing Level I evidence for the treatment of patients with this disease will be proposed.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Hum Mutat. 1999;13(6):464-75 [10408776.001]
  • [Cites] Anticancer Res. 1999 Mar-Apr;19(2C):1537-40 [10365140.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2005 Feb 10;23(5):965-72 [15613696.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2005 Dec 8;353(23):2477-90 [16339096.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2007 Jan 11;356(2):115-24 [17215529.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2007 Jan 11;356(2):125-34 [17215530.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2007 May 31;356(22):2271-81 [17538086.001]
  • [Cites] CA Cancer J Clin. 2009 Jul-Aug;59(4):225-49 [19474385.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 2009 Jun 15;15(12):4220-7 [19509175.001]
  • [Cites] Future Oncol. 2009 Jun;5(5):703-12 [19519209.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2010 Jan 20;28(3):475-80 [20008644.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Adv Hematol Oncol. 2010 Apr;8(4):232-3 [20505644.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1999 Aug;17(8):2530-40 [10561319.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer J Sci Am. 2000 Feb;6 Suppl 1:S55-7 [10685660.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer. 2001 Nov;37(17):2199-203 [11677107.001]
  • [Cites] J Pathol. 2002 Feb;196(2):186-93 [11793370.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2003 Dec;170(6 Pt 1):2163-72 [14634372.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2004 Dec 15;22(24):4991-5004 [15611513.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2005 Feb 1;23(4):832-41 [15681528.001]
  • [Cites] Cell Mol Life Sci. 2006 Mar;63(5):601-15 [16465447.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Cancer Ther. 2007 Jul;6(7):2012-21 [17620431.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2008 Aug 1;26(22):3743-8 [18669461.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2009 Mar 10;27(8):1280-9 [19171708.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer. 2009 May 15;115(10 Suppl):2306-12 [19402073.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2009 Aug 1;27(22):3584-90 [19487381.001]
  • [Cites] Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2009 Dec;10(18):3091-102 [19954277.001]
  • [Cites] Expert Rev Anticancer Ther. 2009 Dec;9(12):1793-805 [19954291.001]
  • [Cites] Drugs Today (Barc). 2009 Sep;45(9):651-61 [19956806.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2010 Feb 20;28(6):1061-8 [20100962.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2010 May 1;28(13):2144-50 [20368553.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2010 May 1;28(13):2137-43 [20368558.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2010 Apr 27;102(9):1371-7 [20389299.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Genet. 1994 May;7(1):85-90 [7915601.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2003 Jul 31;349(5):427-34 [12890841.001]
  • (PMID = 20981133.001).
  • [ISSN] 1179-5549
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical Medicine Insights. Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Med Insights Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K12 CA087718; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA009614
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2956476
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; GW786034 / VEGF / VEGFR TKI / pazopanib / renal cell carcinoma / tyrosine kinase inhibitor
  •  go-up   go-down


50. Jones J, Libermann TA: Genomics of renal cell cancer: the biology behind and the therapy ahead. Clin Cancer Res; 2007 Jan 15;13(2 Pt 2):685s-692s
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Genomics of renal cell cancer: the biology behind and the therapy ahead.
  • Renal cell cancer (RCC) is the most lethal of the urological cancers and accounts for 3% of all adult malignancies.
  • Despite numerous recent advances in diagnostic imaging, surgical therapy, and basic molecular understanding, many patients still experience metastatic disease.
  • For metastatic disease patients, response rates to conventional therapies rarely exceed 15% to 25% and are associated with serious adverse effects.
  • Nevertheless, to achieve this goal, it is important to delineate the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer development and progression.
  • Genomic approaches have revolutionized the field of cancer research and have led to the rapid discovery of multiple, parallel disease hypotheses, which ultimately have to be validated in large cohorts of patients and in downstream biological experiments for translation into clinical applications.
  • The variable course of RCC and, until recently, a paucity of therapeutic options in the event of metastasis have led to the search for diagnostic and prognostic markers.
  • We and others have used transcriptional profiling to classify different subtypes of RCC and to identify subtype- and metastasis-specific gene signatures predictive for outcome.
  • We discuss herein recent genomic approaches to RCC and the emerging biological pathways underlying RCC development and progression.
  • We also speculate how genomics may affect drug development and the management of patients with RCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / genetics. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / therapy. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Kidney Neoplasms / genetics. Kidney Neoplasms / therapy

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Kidney cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • The Lens. Cited by Patents in .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17255294.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA 101942
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 63
  •  go-up   go-down


51. Ormanov D, Kirilov S, Ianev K, Georgiev M, Simeonov P, Dimitrov P, Bonev K, Vasilev V, Mavrov Kh, Panchev P: [Local recurrence of the renal cell carcinoma in renal fossa after complete radical nephrectomy. What are the risk factors?]. Khirurgiia (Sofiia); 2008;(1-2):34-6
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Local recurrence of the renal cell carcinoma in renal fossa after complete radical nephrectomy. What are the risk factors?].
  • The local recurrence of the renal cell carcinoma in renal fossa after complete radical nephrectomy is uncommon.
  • For the period of 1999-2005 we evaluated 11 patients who underwent surgery for isolated renal cell carcinoma recurrence, all of them without clinical presence of distal metastases.
  • These 9 patients represent 1.41% of the whole number of radical nephrectomies for RCC (637) which took place in our department for the same period of time.
  • The tumor stage of the primary tumor varied from T1 to T3a.
  • The current article has the purpose to present newer the data for the factors, which may be directly related to the risk of developing local recurrence in the renal fossa after complete radical nephrectomy--the initial tumor stage of the RCC, the relationship between the primary tumor and the histological type of the recurrent masses.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Nephrectomy / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Risk Factors

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18983006.001).
  • [ISSN] 0450-2167
  • [Journal-full-title] Khirurgii︠a︡
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Khirurgiia (Sofiia)
  • [Language] bul
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Bulgaria
  •  go-up   go-down


52. Choudhary S, Rajesh A, Mayer NJ, Mulcahy KA, Haroon A: Renal oncocytoma: CT features cannot reliably distinguish oncocytoma from other renal neoplasms. Clin Radiol; 2009 May;64(5):517-22
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Renal oncocytoma: CT features cannot reliably distinguish oncocytoma from other renal neoplasms.
  • AIM: To retrospectively review the computed tomography (CT) imaging features of a series of histologically confirmed renal oncocytomas and to determine whether imaging features are predictive of this subtype of benign renal epithelial tumour.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: From May 2001 to October 2007, 21 patients with 28 renal masses, confirmed as renal oncocytoma on histological examination of the resection specimen, were identified from the pathology database at our institution.
  • The preoperative imaging findings were retrospectively analysed to determine characteristic features, if any, to predict this rare subtype of benign renal tumour.
  • In 18 (64.3%) lesions the enhancement of the tumour was isodense to renal cortex.
  • Ten (35.7%) lesions were hypodense to renal cortex.
  • CONCLUSION: Renal oncocytoma is typically described as being hypervascular and homogeneous, with a characteristic central stellate scar on CT.
  • The present study demonstrates that these imaging features are found in only a small proportion of these tumours.
  • Therefore, imaging characteristics alone are unreliable when differentiating between oncocytoma and renal cell carcinoma, and histopathological diagnosis remains the reference standard.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoma, Oxyphilic / radiography. Kidney Neoplasms / radiography
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / diagnosis. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Tomography, Spiral Computed / methods. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / methods

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Oncocytoma renal.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19348848.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-229X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Radiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  •  go-up   go-down


53. Shiota M, Eto M, Yokomizo A, Tada Y, Takeuchi A, Masubuchi D, Inokuchi J, Tatsugami K, Kuroiwa K, Uchiumi T, Seki N, Naito S: Sorafenib with doxorubicin augments cytotoxicity to renal cell cancer through PERK inhibition. Int J Oncol; 2010 Jun;36(6):1521-31
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Sorafenib with doxorubicin augments cytotoxicity to renal cell cancer through PERK inhibition.
  • Although cytokine therapy involving interleukin-2 or interferon-alpha has been employed for metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC) treatment, these therapies yielded limited response and benefit.
  • Recently, several molecular-targeted agents have become available, and one newly developed anti-RCC agent, sorafenib (BAY 43-9006), is known to target multiple kinases.
  • In this study, sorafenib was found to inhibit phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor-2alpha (eIF2alpha) and induce cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and increase cell death.
  • One of eIF2alpha kinases, PERK was responsible for eIF2alpha phosphorylation in RCC cells and PERK knockdown induced cell death similar to sorafenib treatment.
  • The efficiency of sorafenib treatment correlated with phosphorylation level of eIF2alpha and nuclear Nrf2 expression level in eight RCC cell lines.
  • Furthermore, sorafenib made Caki-1 and 786-O cells, but not ACHN cells sensitive to oxidative stress exerted by both hydrogen peroxide and doxorubicin.
  • In addition, PERK knockdown sensitized Caki-1 and 786-O cells, but not ACHN cells to oxidative stress.
  • In conclusion, levels of phospho-eIF2alpha and nuclear Nrf2 expression level in RCC might be a predictor of outcome in sorafenib treatment.
  • In addition, PERK inhibition as well as sorafenib plus doxorubicin might be a promising therapeutic approach for RCC characterized by high levels of phosphorylated-eIF2alpha and nuclear Nrf2.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / pharmacology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / enzymology. Kidney Neoplasms / enzymology. eIF-2 Kinase / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Benzenesulfonates / administration & dosage. Blotting, Western. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Nucleus / metabolism. Cell Separation. Doxorubicin / administration & dosage. Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-2 / drug effects. Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-2 / metabolism. Flow Cytometry. Gene Knockdown Techniques. Humans. Hydrogen Peroxide / pharmacology. NF-E2-Related Factor 2 / drug effects. NF-E2-Related Factor 2 / metabolism. Niacinamide / analogs & derivatives. Oxidants / pharmacology. Oxidative Stress / drug effects. Phenylurea Compounds. Phosphorylation / drug effects. Pyridines / administration & dosage. RNA, Small Interfering

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Kidney cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DOXORUBICIN .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. HYDROGEN PEROXIDE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. NICOTINAMIDE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 20428777.001).
  • [ISSN] 1791-2423
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Benzenesulfonates; 0 / Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-2; 0 / NF-E2-Related Factor 2; 0 / Oxidants; 0 / Phenylurea Compounds; 0 / Pyridines; 0 / RNA, Small Interfering; 25X51I8RD4 / Niacinamide; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; 9ZOQ3TZI87 / sorafenib; BBX060AN9V / Hydrogen Peroxide; EC 2.7.10.- / PERK kinase; EC 2.7.11.1 / eIF-2 Kinase
  •  go-up   go-down


54. Mellon MJ, Ahn M, Jiménez JA, Kao C, Gardner TA: Anti-angiogenic gene therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma produces tumor growth suppression in an athymic nude mouse model. J Urol; 2008 Feb;179(2):737-42
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Anti-angiogenic gene therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma produces tumor growth suppression in an athymic nude mouse model.
  • PURPOSE: We investigated the anti-angiogenic and antitumor properties of 2 adenoviral vectors expressing the endostatin-angiostatin fusion protein Ad-EndoAngio and the soluble, endothelium specific tyrosine kinase receptor Ad-Tie2 in a mouse renal cell carcinoma xenograft model.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 29 bilateral subcutaneous renal cell carcinomas were induced in athymic nude mice.
  • On days 2 and 10 following tumor establishment the mice were intratumorally injected with an adenoviral vector in the right flank only.
  • Seven treatment groups were randomly assigned, including the control group of 7 mice, the Ad-GFP control group of 7, the Ad-Tie2 group of 9, the Ad-EndoAngio group of 8, the Ad-GFP plus Ad-Tie2 group of 7, the Ad-GFP plus Ad-EndoAngio group of 9 and the Ad-EndoAngio plus Ad-Tie2 group of 8.
  • Tumor volume was measured biweekly for 60 days.
  • After establishing skin windows overlying the tumors dual photon optical imaging was used to qualitatively assess the tumor vasculature.
  • RESULTS: Tumors treated with Ad-EndoAngio, Ad-GFP plus Ad-EndoAngio and Ad-EndoAngio plus Ad-Tie2 demonstrated 82%, 83% and 87% growth reduction, respectively, compared to controls (p <0.001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Adenoviral vectors expressing endostatin-angiostatin fusion protein have effective anti-angiogenic action against human renal cell carcinoma cells as well as potential as a novel treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Angiostatic Proteins / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / therapy. Genetic Therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / therapy

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Genes and Gene Therapy.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18082201.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-3792
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / P50 DK061594-03; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA80825-01A2; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / T32 CA111198
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Angiostatic Proteins
  •  go-up   go-down


55. Strobel O, Hackert T, Hartwig W, Bergmann F, Hinz U, Wente MN, Fritz S, Schneider L, Büchler MW, Werner J: Survival data justifies resection for pancreatic metastases. Ann Surg Oncol; 2009 Dec;16(12):3340-9
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Uni- and multivariate analysis were performed to identify parameters associated with overall and disease-free survival.
  • Primary tumors included 31 (70%) renal cell carcinomas (RCC) and 13 other primary tumors.
  • Pancreatic metastases occurred after a median interval of 6.9 years after resection of the primary tumor.
  • Twenty-five patients (57%) had additional extrapancreatic disease.
  • With a median follow-up of 32.1 months, overall 3- and 5-year survivals were 70.2% and 56.8%, disease-free 3- and 5-year survivals were 37.2% and 33%, respectively.
  • Additional extrapancreatic disease, a disease-free interval of less than 36 months, and non-RCC entity were associated with shorter overall survival.
  • Previous recurrence, non-RCC primary tumors, and a disease-free interval of less than 36 months were associated with shorter disease-free survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / mortality. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Pancreatic Neoplasms / mortality. Pancreatic Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Perioperative Care. Prognosis. Prospective Studies. Survival Rate. Young Adult

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Pancreatic Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19777190.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-4681
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


56. Han XN, Peng LR, Liu GH, Wang J: [Multiphasic spiral CT scanning features in 100 patients with small renal cell carcinoma]. Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi; 2007 May;29(5):382-5
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Multiphasic spiral CT scanning features in 100 patients with small renal cell carcinoma].
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of multiphasic spiral computed tomography (SCT) in the differential diagnosis of small renal cell carcinoma.
  • METHODS: The data of 100 patients with small renal cell carcinoma (< or = 3.0 cm) proved by pathology were retrospectively reviewed in order to analyze the features of SCT during plain, corticomedullary and excretory phases.
  • RESULTS: There were 38 tumor masses in the left kidney and 62 in the right one.
  • According to the 2004 WHO histological classification criteria for the tumors of the kidney.
  • Seventy-six patients had clear cell renal cell carcinoma, 4 multilocular clear cell renal cell carcinomas, 9 papillary renal cell carcinoma, 4 chromophobe renal cell carcinomas and 7 unclassified renal cell carcinomas.
  • Clear cell renal cell carcinoma exhibited rich blood supply and inhomogeneous density due to hemorrhage, necrosis or cystic degeneration.
  • Multilocular clear cell renal cell carcinoma presented as a multilocular cystic mass with thin wall and septa, instead of an expansile nodule.
  • Papillary renal cell carcinoma showed inhomogeneous density and hypovascular distribution.
  • Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma was relatively homogeneous and hypovascular.
  • Compared with clear cell renal cell carcinoma, unclassified renal cell carcinoma showed inhomogeneous density and hypervascular distribution with more invading growth features than the other subtypes.
  • CONCLUSION: Commonly encountered subtypes of the small renal cell carcinoma exhibit their own specific features in multiphasic spiral CT, which may be helpful in differential diagnosis, but each subtype should be differentiated from the renal oncocytoma, cystic nephroma, complex renal cyst, renal angiomyolipoma with minimal fat and renal infiltrating urothelial carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / radiography. Kidney Neoplasms / radiography. Tomography, Spiral Computed / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Carcinoma, Papillary / radiography. Child. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17892138.001).
  • [ISSN] 0253-3766
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua zhong liu za zhi [Chinese journal of oncology]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  •  go-up   go-down


57. Ramoner R, Rahm A, Gander H, Stollenwerk B, Falkensammer C, Leonhartsberger N, Thurnher M: Serum antibodies against Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a new prognostic indicator in metastatic renal-cell carcinoma. Cancer Immunol Immunother; 2008 Aug;57(8):1207-14
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Serum antibodies against Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a new prognostic indicator in metastatic renal-cell carcinoma.
  • PURPOSE: A recent study reported that a diet rich in bread and refined cereals might have an unfavorable role in the development of renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • To test whether an underlying intolerance of bread ingredients is responsible for the unfavorable influence of bread on RCC, we examined patient sera for the presence of food-specific IgG.
  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A commercial test was used to detect food-specific IgG directed against a panel of 113 food antigens in sera of 54 patients with metastatic RCC.
  • RESULTS: We found that RCC patients with elevated serum levels of IgG antibodies against S. cerevisiae, commonly known as baker's yeast and yet another bread component, have an unfavorable clinical course.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that serum levels of IgG against S. cerevisiae may predict survival in patients with metastatic RCC.
  • The data suggest not cereals but baker's yeast being the critical component of bread that may cause immune deviation and impaired immunosurveillance in predisposed RCC patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / blood. Immunoglobulin G / blood. Kidney Neoplasms / blood. Saccharomyces cerevisiae / immunology

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18322685.001).
  • [ISSN] 0340-7004
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer immunology, immunotherapy : CII
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Immunol. Immunother.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunoglobulin G
  •  go-up   go-down


58. Frey UH, Lümmen G, Jäger T, Jöckel KH, Schmid KW, Rübben H, Müller N, Siffert W, Eisenhardt A: The GNAS1 T393C polymorphism predicts survival in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Clin Cancer Res; 2006 Feb 1;12(3 Pt 1):759-63
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The GNAS1 T393C polymorphism predicts survival in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma.
  • PURPOSE: G proteins mediate signaling from cell surface receptors to specific intracellular proteins.
  • In vitro cancer cell line studies revealed a link between the Galphas protein and proapoptotic processes.
  • We have recently shown that TT genotypes of the GNAS1 T393C polymorphism display increased transcription of Galphas and a more favorable clinical course in bladder and colorectal cancer patients compared both with TC or CC genotypes.
  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: In the present study, 150 patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma surgically treated by nephrectomy with curative intent were retrospectively genotyped to elucidate a potential association between T393C genotypes and clinical outcome.
  • RESULTS: The C-allele frequency in the renal cell carcinoma patient group was 0.51, which is not significantly different from that of a healthy blood donor group.
  • Kaplan-Meier curves for tumor progression, development of metastasis, and tumor-related death showed a significant association of the T393C polymorphism with outcome (5-year cancer-specific survival rates: TT, 91%; TC, 81%; CC, 69%; P = 0.015).
  • Multivariate Cox proportional analysis of a 10-year follow-up confirmed the T393C polymorphism as an independent prognostic factor in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.
  • Homozygous CC patients were at highest risk for progression (hazard ratio, 2.48; P = 0.009) or tumor-related death (hazard ratio, 3.15; P = 0.018) compared with T-allele carriers.
  • CONCLUSION: Our results show that besides tumor stage, lymph node status, and tumor grade, the GNAS1 T393C status is a novel independent host factor for disease progression in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma and provides further evidence for the T393C polymorphism as a general prognostic tumor marker.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / genetics. GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, Gs / genetics. Kidney Neoplasms / genetics. Polymorphism, Genetic
  • [MeSH-minor] Disease Progression. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Genotype. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Nephrectomy / methods. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.
  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16467086.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.6.1.- / GNAS protein, human; EC 3.6.5.1 / GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, Gs
  •  go-up   go-down


59. Sardari Nia P, Hendriks J, Friedel G, Van Schil P, Van Marck E: Distinct angiogenic and non-angiogenic growth patterns of lung metastases from renal cell carcinoma. Histopathology; 2007 Sep;51(3):354-61
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Distinct angiogenic and non-angiogenic growth patterns of lung metastases from renal cell carcinoma.
  • AIMS: We have recently evaluated a classification of non-small-cell lung cancer based upon the presence of an angiogenic or a non-angiogenic growth pattern.
  • The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that lung metastases of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) can grow without eliciting angiogenesis and give rise to the same set of growth patterns.
  • METHODS AND RESULTS: Tissue sections of 24 patients with lung metastases from clear cell RCC were analysed.
  • Double-labelling with antibodies to CD34 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was performed to determine the endothelial cell proliferation fraction (ECPF) and the microvessel density (MVD).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrates that highly angiogenic primary tumours can give rise to non-angiogenic metastases.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Neovascularization, Pathologic / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antigens, CD34 / analysis. Blood Vessels / chemistry. Blood Vessels / pathology. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Lung / blood supply. Lung / chemistry. Lung / pathology. Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen / analysis. Pulmonary Alveoli / blood supply. Pulmonary Alveoli / chemistry. Pulmonary Alveoli / pathology


60. Benincasa E, Conti A, Bossone G, Gallà DA, Gianciotta A, Zuccaro SM, Madaio R: A case of complete clinical response with sorafenib in a patient with thyroid gland metastases from renal cell carcinoma 17 years from diagnosis. Tumori; 2009 May-Jun;95(3):403
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A case of complete clinical response with sorafenib in a patient with thyroid gland metastases from renal cell carcinoma 17 years from diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Benzenesulfonates / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Pyridines / therapeutic use. Thyroid Neoplasms / drug therapy. Thyroid Neoplasms / secondary

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cancer Chemotherapy.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Thyroid Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. NICOTINAMIDE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19688987.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-8916
  • [Journal-full-title] Tumori
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tumori
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Letter
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzenesulfonates; 0 / Phenylurea Compounds; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Pyridines; 25X51I8RD4 / Niacinamide; 9ZOQ3TZI87 / sorafenib
  •  go-up   go-down


61. Aron M, Nguyen MM, Stein RJ, Gill IS: Impact of gender in renal cell carcinoma: an analysis of the SEER database. Eur Urol; 2008 Jul;54(1):133-40
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Impact of gender in renal cell carcinoma: an analysis of the SEER database.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate gender differences in initial presentation, pathology, and outcomes with renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: The 1973-2004 Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) 17-registries database was analyzed for renal tumors from 1988 to 2004 coded as primary site "kidney and renal pelvis."
  • Tumor variables included size, stage at diagnosis, grade, and histology.
  • Primary outcome variables included overall and cancer-specific survival.
  • Females presented with smaller tumors (5.9 vs. 6.1cm, p<0.0001) of lower grade (p<0.0001).
  • Males had a higher incidence of regional or metastatic spread of renal carcinoma (p<0.0001).
  • Median overall survival from time of diagnosis was 130 mo for females versus 110 mo for males (p<0.0001).
  • In comparisons of males and females, 5-yr cancer-specific survival was 78% versus 81%, and 5-yr overall survival was 65% versus 69% (p<0.0001).
  • On multivariate analysis, cancer-specific survival was similar (HR, 1.00, p=0.960), whereas overall survival was significantly longer for females (HR, 0.92, p<0.0001).
  • Older age at diagnosis, larger tumor size, higher grade, higher SEER historic stage, and sarcomatoid, collecting duct, or "other" histology were related to worse cancer-specific and overall survival.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Men present with larger, higher stage, higher grade RCC than women.
  • Overall survival is better in women, whereas cancer-specific survival is not significantly different.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / epidemiology. Kidney Neoplasms / epidemiology

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [CommentIn] Eur Urol. 2008 Jul;54(1):141-2 [18160206.001]
  • [CommentIn] Eur Urol. 2008 Jul;54(1):140-1 [18160208.001]
  • (PMID = 18160207.001).
  • [ISSN] 0302-2838
  • [Journal-full-title] European urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  •  go-up   go-down


62. Saidi RF, Remine SG: Isolated gastric metastasis from renal cell carcinoma 10 years after radical nephrectomy. J Gastroenterol Hepatol; 2007 Jan;22(1):143-4
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Isolated gastric metastasis from renal cell carcinoma 10 years after radical nephrectomy.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Stomach Neoplasms / secondary

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Stomach Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17201902.001).
  • [ISSN] 0815-9319
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Letter
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  •  go-up   go-down


63. Begley J, Ribas A: Targeted therapies to improve tumor immunotherapy. Clin Cancer Res; 2008 Jul 15;14(14):4385-91
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Targeted therapies to improve tumor immunotherapy.
  • Durable tumor regression and potential cures of metastatic solid cancers can be achieved by a variety of cellular immunotherapy strategies, including cytokine therapy, dendritic cell-based vaccines, and immune-activating antibodies, when used in so-called immune-sensitive cancers such as melanoma and renal cell carcinoma.
  • However, these immunotherapy strategies have very low tumor response rates, usually in the order of 5% to 10% of treated patients.
  • We propose that the antitumor activity of adequately stimulated tumor antigen-specific T cells is limited by local factors within the tumor milieu and that pharmacologic modulation of this milieu may overcome tumor resistance to immunotherapy.
  • By understanding the mechanisms of cancer cell immune escape, it may be possible to design rational combinatorial approaches of novel therapies able to target immunosuppressive or antiapoptotic molecules in an attempt to reverse resistance to immune system control.
  • Ideal candidates for immunosensitizing drugs would be targeted drugs that block key oncogenic mechanisms in cancer cells resulting in a proapoptotic cancer cell milieu and at the same time do not negatively interfere with critical lymphocyte functions.
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Delivery Systems / methods. Immunotherapy / methods. Neoplasms / immunology. Neoplasms / therapy. Tumor Escape / immunology

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cancer Immunotherapy.
  • The Lens. Cited by Patents in .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18628452.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 56
  •  go-up   go-down


64. Zorn KC, Orvieto MA, Mikhail AA, Lotan T, Gerber GS, Shalhav AL, Steinberg GD: Solitary ureteral metastases of renal cell carcinoma. Urology; 2006 Aug;68(2):428.e5-7
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Solitary ureteral metastases of renal cell carcinoma.
  • Metachronous presentation of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) to the ureter is extremely rare.
  • We report a solitary metachronous metastatic RCC in the contralateral ureter 14 months after right radical nephrectomy for Fuhrman grade 2 pT3a clear cell disease after the patient re-presented with gross hematuria.
  • Pathologic examination confirmed metastatic RCC.
  • To date, only 51 cases of metastatic RCC to the ureter have been reported, with only 6 occurring metachronously in the contralateral ureter.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Ureteral Neoplasms / secondary

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16904477.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 15
  •  go-up   go-down


65. Bhatia A, Das A, Kumar Y, Kochhar R: Renal cell carcinoma metastasizing to duodenum: a rare occurrence. Diagn Pathol; 2006;1:29
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Renal cell carcinoma metastasizing to duodenum: a rare occurrence.
  • BACKGROUND: Duodenal metastasis is rare in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and early detection, especially in case of a solitary mass, helps in planning further therapy.
  • CASE PRESENTATION: We present the case report of a 55 year old male with duodenal metastasis of RCC.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Endoscopy. 1996 Feb;28(2):249-53 [8739742.001]
  • [Cites] Rev Esp Enferm Dig. 1996 May;88(5):361-3 [8764545.001]
  • [Cites] Jpn J Clin Oncol. 2000 May;30(5):241-5 [10857504.001]
  • [Cites] Surg Today. 2001;31(2):180-3 [11291718.001]
  • [Cites] Trop Gastroenterol. 2001 Jan-Mar;22(1):47-9 [11398249.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1975 Dec;114(6):836-8 [1195458.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2002 Jul;126(7):856-8 [12088459.001]
  • [Cites] Mt Sinai J Med. 2004 Mar;71(2):127-30 [15029404.001]
  • [Cites] Kaohsiung J Med Sci. 2004 Mar;20(3):137-41 [15124899.001]
  • [Cites] Neth J Med. 2004 Jun;62(6):201-5 [15460501.001]
  • [Cites] World J Surg Oncol. 2005 Jul 20;3:48 [16029517.001]
  • [Cites] Gac Med Mex. 2005 Nov-Dec;141(6):543-6 [16381513.001]
  • [Cites] Gastrointest Endosc. 1990 May-Jun;36(3):304-6 [2365217.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Gastroenterol. 1978 May;69(5):582-5 [308314.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1987 Sep;138(3):611-3 [3498049.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Urol. 1966 Apr;38(2):133-7 [5295908.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1981 Jul;126(1):17-23 [7253072.001]
  • [Cites] Postgrad Med J. 1996 Mar;72(845):178-9 [8731713.001]
  • (PMID = 16972996.001).
  • [ISSN] 1746-1596
  • [Journal-full-title] Diagnostic pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Diagn Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1578589
  •  go-up   go-down


66. Rendon RA: New surgical horizons: the role of cytoreductive nephrectomy for metastatic kidney cancer. Can Urol Assoc J; 2007 Jun;1(2 Suppl):S62-8
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] New surgical horizons: the role of cytoreductive nephrectomy for metastatic kidney cancer.
  • Renal cell carcinoma is the most lethal urologic malignancy.
  • Up to 30% of patients with kidney cancer have metastatic disease and 30% of those treated for local or locally advanced disease will progress to metastases.
  • Radical nephrectomy is the standard treatment for the management of nondisseminated kidney cancer, but the role of cytoreductive nephrectomy for patients with metastatic disease is controversial.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1978 Aug;120(2):148-52 [78992.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Urol. 1989 Feb;63(2):128-31 [2702395.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1995 Jul;154(1):35-40 [7539867.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1997 Nov;158(5):1675-8 [9334576.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1997 Nov;158(5):1691-5 [9334580.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1998 Apr;159(4):1168-73 [9507824.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1999 Feb;17(2):523-8 [10080595.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2001 Mar 15;19(6):1649-57 [11250993.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 2001 Sep 22;358(9286):966-70 [11583750.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2003 Oct;62(4):636-40 [14550433.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2003 Dec;62(6):1018-23 [14665347.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2004 Mar;171(3):1071-6 [14767273.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 2004 Sep 15;10(18 Pt 2):6335S-41S [15448027.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2005 Jun;173(6):1853-62 [15879764.001]
  • [Cites] BJU Int. 2005 Sep;96(4):483-8 [16104896.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Clin Pract Urol. 2004 Nov;1(1):26-30 [16474463.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2006 Sep;68(3):528-32 [16979706.001]
  • [Cites] BJU Int. 2006 Dec;98(6):1228-32 [17034508.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2006 Nov;176(5):1990-5; discussion 1995 [17070231.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2004 Nov;64(5):930-4 [15533480.001]
  • [Cites] Expert Rev Anticancer Ther. 2007 Jan;7(1):73-8 [17187521.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1986 Aug;136(2):376-9 [3735498.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 1982 Aug;20(2):177-81 [7112827.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Clin Oncol. 1982 Dec;5(6):649-55 [7165009.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1995 Jul;154(1):32-4 [7776449.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1994 Nov;152(5 Pt 1):1399-403 [7933169.001]
  • [Cites] J Surg Oncol. 1994 Jan;55(1):7-13 [8289458.001]
  • [Cites] Semin Urol Oncol. 1996 Nov;14(4):230-6 [8946623.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1997 Sep;158(3 Pt 1):740-5 [9258071.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 1999 Mar;53(3):496-501 [10096373.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1999 Dec;162(6):1934-7 [10569541.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2000 Jan;55(1):36-40 [10654891.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2001 Jul;166(1):63-7 [11435824.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2001 Dec 6;345(23):1655-9 [11759643.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2001 Dec 6;345(23):1711-2 [11759660.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2002 Jan;59(1):9-14 [11796271.001]
  • [Cites] BJU Int. 2002 Apr;89(6):523-5 [11942956.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2002 Dec;168(6):2395-400 [12441925.001]
  • [Cites] Urol Clin North Am. 2003 Aug;30(3):581-8 [12953756.001]
  • [Cites] BJU Int. 2003 Dec;92(9):901-5 [14632843.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2004 Nov;64(5):925-9 [15533479.001]
  • [Cites] World J Urol. 2005 Jul;23(3):191-5 [15791469.001]
  • [Cites] World J Urol. 2005 Jul;23(3):155-60 [15988593.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1977 Oct;118(4):538-42 [916044.001]
  • (PMID = 18542787.001).
  • [ISSN] 1911-6470
  • [Journal-full-title] Canadian Urological Association journal = Journal de l'Association des urologues du Canada
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Can Urol Assoc J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2422951
  •  go-up   go-down


67. Doval DC, Bhatia K, Pavithran K, Sharma JB, Vaid AK, Hazarika D: Breast carcinoma with metastasis to the gallbladder: an unusual case report with a short review of literature. Hepatobiliary Pancreat Dis Int; 2006 May;5(2):305-7
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Breast carcinoma with metastasis to the gallbladder: an unusual case report with a short review of literature.
  • Gallbladder metastases are very rare and usually arise from malignant melanoma, renal cell carcinoma and cervical carcinoma.
  • Breast carcinoma metastatic to the gallbladder is extremely rare and only 4 cases have been reported in the English literature.
  • We hereby report a 54-year-old lady who was diagnosed as having breast carcinoma and underwent modified radical mastectomy.
  • Being considered a patient with metastatic breast carcinoma she was subjected to taxane and anthracycline-based palliative chemotherapy.
  • Later she had CNS involvement and died of the progressive disease soon after few months.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Carcinoma, Lobular / secondary. Gallbladder Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy, Fine-Needle. Cholecystectomy / methods. Disease Progression. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Mastectomy, Modified Radical / methods. Middle Aged. Rare Diseases. Risk Assessment

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Breast Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Gallbladder Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16698597.001).
  • [ISSN] 1499-3872
  • [Journal-full-title] Hepatobiliary & pancreatic diseases international : HBPD INT
  • [ISO-abbreviation] HBPD INT
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Number-of-references] 15
  •  go-up   go-down


68. Nguyen QN, Shiu AS, Rhines LD, Wang H, Allen PK, Wang XS, Chang EL: Management of spinal metastases from renal cell carcinoma using stereotactic body radiotherapy. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2010 Mar 15;76(4):1185-92
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Management of spinal metastases from renal cell carcinoma using stereotactic body radiotherapy.
  • PURPOSE: To evaluate the outcomes associated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in the management of spinal metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: SBRT was used in the treatment of patients with spinal metastases from RCC.
  • Effectiveness of SBRT with respect to tumor control and palliation of pain was assessed using patient-reported outcomes.
  • The actuarial 1-year spine tumor progression free survival was 82.1%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The data support SBRT as a safe and effective treatment modality that can be used to achieve good tumor control and palliation of pain associated with RCC spinal metastases.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms. Radiosurgery / methods. Spinal Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Pain / surgery. Radiotherapy Dosage

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov. clinical trials - ClinicalTrials.gov .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 19632064.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-355X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


69. Hara W, Tran P, Li G, Su Z, Puataweepong P, Adler JR Jr, Soltys SG, Chang SD, Gibbs IC: Cyberknife for brain metastases of malignant melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. Neurosurgery; 2009 Feb;64(2 Suppl):A26-32
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cyberknife for brain metastases of malignant melanoma and renal cell carcinoma.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of CyberKnife (Accuray, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for patients with brain metastases of malignant melanoma and renal cell carcinoma.
  • Sixty-two patients with 145 brain metastases of renal cell carcinoma or melanoma were identified.
  • Forty-four patients had malignant melanoma, and 18 patients had renal cell carcinoma.
  • The mean tumor volume was 1.47 mL (range, 0.02-35.7 mL), and the mean prescribed dose was 20 Gy (range, 14-24 Gy).
  • One-year intracranial progression-free survival was 38%, and local control was 87%.
  • Intracranial control was impacted by whole-brain radiotherapy (P = 0.01), previous chemotherapy (P = 0.01), and control of the primary at the time of SRS (P = 0.02).
  • Surgical resection had no effect on intracranial or local control.
  • CONCLUSION: CyberKnife radiosurgery provided excellent local control with acceptable toxicity in patients with melanoma or renal cell brain metastases.
  • Initial SRS alone appeared to be a reasonable option, as survival was dictated by systemic disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Brain Neoplasms / surgery. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Melanoma / secondary. Radiosurgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Combined Modality Therapy. Cranial Irradiation. Humans. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Kidney Neoplasms / mortality. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Skin Neoplasms / mortality. Skin Neoplasms / pathology. Treatment Outcome


70. Murphy MJ, Chartier M, Beauchemin C, Berke A, Kerr P, Hoss D, Grant-Kels JM: Cutaneous metastasis of renal cell carcinoma with Zellballen-like inflammatory reaction pattern on immunohistochemical studies. Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol; 2006 Jun;14(2):178-80
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cutaneous metastasis of renal cell carcinoma with Zellballen-like inflammatory reaction pattern on immunohistochemical studies.
  • Skin tumors show variable infiltration by subtypes of inflammatory cells.
  • The composition of these cellular infiltrates, particularly tumor-associated macrophages and dendritic cell numbers, may be responsible for skin tumor progression or regression.
  • In addition, these cells may give rise to diagnostic dilemmas on immunohistochemical studies.
  • The authors report on the local inflammatory reaction to a metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the skin.
  • Histologic examination and immunohistochemical studies demonstrated zellballen-like changes with S-100-positive spindled cells identified around and within tumor cell nests.
  • The role of tumorassociated macrophages and dendritic cells in the skin is discussed.

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Skin Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16785786.001).
  • [ISSN] 1541-2016
  • [Journal-full-title] Applied immunohistochemistry & molecular morphology : AIMM
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Appl. Immunohistochem. Mol. Morphol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / S100 Proteins
  •  go-up   go-down


71. Miura T, Nakamura J, Kimura K, Yamada S, Miura T, Yanagi M, Yamazaki H, Usuda H, Emura I, Takahashi T: Thyroid Metastasis of Gastric Cancer: A Rare Occasion With Poor Prognosis. Gastroenterology Res; 2010 Oct;3(5):219-222
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Thyroid Metastasis of Gastric Cancer: A Rare Occasion With Poor Prognosis.
  • : A 68-year-old man was diagnosed as having advanced gastric cancer.
  • Computed tomography showed a thyroid tumor with trachea deviation.
  • This tumor exhibited mosaic echogenecity in ultrasonography.
  • Signet-ring cell carcinoma was found by means of fine needle aspiration biopsy.
  • This tumor gradually became swollen and the thyroid hormone levels in blood were increased without any clinical symptom.
  • Autopsy disclosed that the left lobe of the thyroid gland was highly invaded by malignant cells and that lymphogenic rather than angiogenic metastasis was highly probable.
  • Thyroid metastasis of gastric cancer is extremely rare.
  • Ultrasonography is a very useful modality especially when coupled with recently developed fine needle aspiration biopsy in differential diagnosis of thyroid tumors once malignancy is suspected.
  • Therapeutic strategy largely depends on the nature of primary malignant tumor.
  • If the tumor is slowly progressive such as renal cell carcinoma and breast cancer, extirpation of thyroid tumors may extend life expectancy.
  • In conclusion, the metastatic thyroid tumor of gastric cancer is rare and shows poor prognosis.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 27957001.001).
  • [ISSN] 1918-2805
  • [Journal-full-title] Gastroenterology research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gastroenterology Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Fine needle aspiration biopsy / Gastric cancer / Thyroid metastasis
  •  go-up   go-down


72. Karadam SY, Ertabaklar H, Sari C, Dayanir Y, Ertuğ S: [Should cystic echinococcosis be investigated in patients having high eosinophil counts?]. Turkiye Parazitol Derg; 2009;33(3):203-6
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Transliterated title] Eozinofil sayisi yüksek olanlarda kistik ekinokokkozis araştirilmali mi?
  • One patient, in which an antibody response was detected, had a history of renal cell carcinoma surgery.
  • In one patient (0.11%), CE was detected in the liver and the diagnosis was confirmed by surgery.
  • In conclusion, eosinophilia is not a sufficient indicator for CE alone and this parasite should be sought in patients with clinical and radiological signs.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19851964.001).
  • [ISSN] 1300-6320
  • [Journal-full-title] Turkiye parazitolojii dergisi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Turkiye Parazitol Derg
  • [Language] TUR
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Turkey
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Helminth
  •  go-up   go-down


73. Matin SF, Ahrar K: Nephron-sparing probe ablative therapy: long-term outcomes. Curr Opin Urol; 2008 Mar;18(2):150-6
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Recent follow-up studies have been published that further highlight their possible roles as relevant treatment options for select patients with renal cell carcinoma.
  • RECENT FINDINGS: Three- and five-year outcomes following cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation have recently been published, respectively, each showing 93-98% cancer-specific survival in small cohorts.
  • These findings are mitigated by the probability that some of the treated small tumors may have been benign and those that were malignant may have been indolent.
  • Given the limitations of current imaging techniques and the indolent growth rate of many of these tumors, however, continued stringent selection criteria and rigorous follow-up of all patients undergoing ablative therapy is required.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Catheter Ablation / methods. Cryosurgery / methods. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18303535.001).
  • [ISSN] 0963-0643
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 48
  •  go-up   go-down


74. Escudier B, Albiges L, Blesius A, Loriot Y, Massard C, Fizazi K: How to select targeted therapy in renal cell cancer. Ann Oncol; 2010 Oct;21 Suppl 7:vii59-62
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] How to select targeted therapy in renal cell cancer.
  • Treatment of renal cell carcinoma has dramatically changed in the past 5 years, with the approval of six new drugs since 2006.
  • Selecting a targeted agent in metastatic renal cell carcinoma should take into account various parameters, including the status of the disease, the histology, the status of the patient and finally the availability of the drugs in each country.

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Kidney cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 20943644.001).
  • [ISSN] 1569-8041
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Oncol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  •  go-up   go-down


75. Klatte T, Böhm M, Nelius T, Filleur S, Reiher F, Allhoff EP: Evaluation of peri-operative peripheral and renal venous levels of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors and their relevance in patients with renal cell carcinoma. BJU Int; 2007 Jul;100(1):209-14
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Evaluation of peri-operative peripheral and renal venous levels of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors and their relevance in patients with renal cell carcinoma.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate peri-operative peripheral and renal venous plasma levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor type BB (PDGF-BB), transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, endostatin, and thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) in relation to pathological variables and prognosis, as pro- and anti-angiogenic factors are important for tumour growth and treatment of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study included 74 consecutive patients with sporadic RCC who had tumour nephrectomy.
  • Renal venous blood was collected in a subgroup of 33 patients during surgery.
  • The variables were analysed using quantitative enzyme-linked immunoassay kits, and associated with pathological variables and disease-specific survival.
  • Renal venous VEGF, PDGF-BB and TGF-beta1 levels were higher than in the general venous blood pool.
  • Renal venous VEGF levels were correlated with tumour diameter and associated with grade and vascular invasion.
  • After a mean follow-up of 30 months, higher peripheral preoperative, early peripheral postoperative and renal venous VEGF levels were associated with a poorer prognosis.
  • However, in a multivariate analysis only Tumour-Node-Metastasis stage and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status were independent prognosticators of disease-specific survival.
  • VEGF, PDGF-BB and TGF-beta1 are higher in the renal vein than in the general venous blood pool.
  • Higher renal venous and peripheral levels of VEGF might be associated with a poorer prognosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / blood. Kidney Neoplasms / blood. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor / metabolism. Thrombospondin 1 / metabolism. Transforming Growth Factor beta1 / metabolism. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / metabolism

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17428240.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-4096
  • [Journal-full-title] BJU international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BJU Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Endostatins; 0 / Platelet-Derived Growth Factor; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-sis; 0 / Thrombospondin 1; 0 / Transforming Growth Factor beta1; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; 0 / platelet-derived growth factor BB
  •  go-up   go-down


76. Antonelli A, Cozzoli A, Simeone C, Zani D, Zanotelli T, Portesi E, Cosciani Cunico S: Surgical treatment of adrenal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma: a single-centre experience of 45 patients. BJU Int; 2006 Mar;97(3):505-8
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Surgical treatment of adrenal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma: a single-centre experience of 45 patients.
  • OBJECTIVE: To report, in a retrospective study, the diagnostic problems and oncological results of surgery in patients with either synchronous or metachronous adrenal metastasis, which are uncommon in renal cancer, at 2-10% of patients.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Of 1179 patients treated for renal cancer between 1987 and 2003, 914 had renal surgery with concomitant ipsilateral adrenalectomy (routinely in 875 and for abnormal findings on computed tomography, CT, in 39) and 15 contralateral adrenalectomy (all after suspicious findings on CT).
  • During the follow-up after renal surgery, another 14 patients had adrenalectomy for CT evidence of an abnormal adrenal gland, contralateral to the previous renal tumour in 12 and bilaterally in two.
  • RESULTS: Of 914 ipsilateral adrenal glands removed during renal surgery, 854 (93.5%) were normal on pathological examination, 28 (3%) had a benign pathology, six (0.8%) were directly infiltrated by the tumour and 26 (2.7%) were metastatic.
  • Of 29 contralateral glands removed because of suspicious CT findings (15 at diagnosis of renal cancer, 14 during the follow-up) there was no abnormality in one (3.4%), a benign pathology in seven (24%) and a metastasis in 21 (72%).
  • Thus there were 32 synchronous (incidence 2.7%; ipsilateral to the renal tumour in 24, contralateral in six and bilateral in two), and 13 metachronous adrenal metastases (incidence 1.0%; contralateral in 11 and bilateral in two).
  • The metachronous metastases were diagnosed at a mean (range) interval of 30.6 (8-73) months after renal surgery.
  • No ipsilateral adrenal metastases were discovered at diagnosis or during the follow-up in the 382 patients with an organ-confined renal tumour of <4 cm in diameter.
  • Twenty-seven patients with an isolated adrenal metastasis (synchronous in 14, metachronous in 13) had statistically significantly (P < 0.001) better survival than the 18 (all synchronous) with multiple sites of metastatic disease.
  • CONCLUSION: Sparing the ipsilateral adrenal is advisable only for organ-confined renal tumours of <4 cm in diameter; clinical local staging of renal cancer is the best predictor of the risk of adrenal metastasis.
  • Some patients with isolated adrenal metastasis could be treated by metastasectomy, with long-term survival free of disease and confirming that, even if in a few and unselectable patients, removing all the neoplastic bulk can be curative.
  • Nevertheless, the high rate of relapse underlines the need for an effective systemic therapy, and more so for widespread metastatic disease that currently cannot be cured.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / surgery. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenalectomy / methods. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Disease Progression. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Sensitivity and Specificity. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / methods. Treatment Outcome


77. Bukowski RM: Tyrosine kinase inhibitors in advanced renal cell carcinoma: the evolving treatment paradigm. Clin Genitourin Cancer; 2009 Jan;7(1):9-10
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Tyrosine kinase inhibitors in advanced renal cell carcinoma: the evolving treatment paradigm.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. NICOTINAMIDE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [CommentOn] Clin Genitourin Cancer. 2009 Jan;7(1):20-3 [19213663.001]
  • [CommentOn] Clin Genitourin Cancer. 2009 Jan;7(1):11-9 [19213662.001]
  • (PMID = 19213661.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-7673
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical genitourinary cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Genitourin Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comment; Editorial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Benzenesulfonates; 0 / Indoles; 0 / Phenylurea Compounds; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Pyridines; 0 / Pyrroles; 0 / sunitinib; 25X51I8RD4 / Niacinamide; 9ZOQ3TZI87 / sorafenib; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
  •  go-up   go-down


78. Lane BR, Campbell SC, Remer EM, Fergany AF, Williams SB, Novick AC, Weight CJ, Magi-Galluzzi C, Zhou M: Adult cystic nephroma and mixed epithelial and stromal tumor of the kidney: clinical, radiographic, and pathologic characteristics. Urology; 2008 Jun;71(6):1142-8
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Adult cystic nephroma and mixed epithelial and stromal tumor of the kidney: clinical, radiographic, and pathologic characteristics.
  • OBJECTIVES: Adult cystic nephroma (CN) and mixed epithelial and stromal tumor (MEST) are benign renal tumors readily distinguished from cystic renal cell carcinoma and other malignant variants based on histopathology.
  • Nephron-sparing surgery was performed for 16 tumors (50%), including 5 suspected preoperatively and 3 that were 7 cm or greater.
  • Two patients with CN had concomitant renal cell carcinoma.
  • At mean follow-up of 4.5 years (range: 1 to 18), no patient had novel or recurrent tumors develop.
  • Pedunculation of a multiloculated cystic lesion may allow for preoperative suspicion of these lesions in the proper clinical setting.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / radiography

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18313107.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


79. Hashimoto T, Yamamoto S, Togo Y, Ueda Y, Higuchi Y, Maruyama T, Kondoh N, Nojima M, Mori Y, Hirota S, Shima H: [Spontaneous rupture of renal cell carcinoma: a case report]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2007 Jan;53(1):49-52
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Spontaneous rupture of renal cell carcinoma: a case report].
  • Computed tomography (CT) showed a huge hematoma above the left kidney, which was diagnosed as spontaneous rupture of the kidney.
  • Suspecting renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with multiple liver metastasis, we performed left radical nephrectomy and partial hepatectomy.
  • A pathological study revealed a small RCC of 2 cm in diameter in the middle of the left kidney.
  • In spontaneous renal rupture secondary to renal tumors, imaging studies such as CT or MRI sometimes fail to demonstrate primary lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Diseases / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Diseases.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17310769.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  •  go-up   go-down


80. Shkapova EA, Kurtasova LM, Savchenko AA: Cell sensitivity to reaferon in patients with renal cell cancer after reaferon therapy. Bull Exp Biol Med; 2007 Jul;144(1):80-2
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cell sensitivity to reaferon in patients with renal cell cancer after reaferon therapy.
  • Individual sensitivity of blood neutrophils to IFN-alpha2a was studied in vitro in patients with renal cell cancer before and after the first course of reaferon therapy.
  • Cell sensitivity changed after reaferon therapy in 85% patients.
  • This necessitates evaluation of individual cell sensitivity not only before therapy, but also before the next course of therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Interferon Type I / therapeutic use. Interferon-alpha / pharmacology. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Neutrophils / drug effects

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Kidney cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18256759.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-4888
  • [Journal-full-title] Bulletin of experimental biology and medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bull. Exp. Biol. Med.
  • [Language] eng; rus
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interferon Type I; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 76543-88-9 / interferon alfa-2a; 99210-65-8 / interferon alfa-2b
  •  go-up   go-down


81. Argani P, Netto GJ, Parwani AV: Papillary renal cell carcinoma with low-grade spindle cell foci: a mimic of mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma. Am J Surg Pathol; 2008 Sep;32(9):1353-9
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Papillary renal cell carcinoma with low-grade spindle cell foci: a mimic of mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma.
  • The solid variant of papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC) is distinguishable genetically from mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma (MTSC) of the kidney by the presence of trisomy for chromosomes 7 and 17; however, at the morphologic and immunohistochemical levels, these neoplasms overlap significantly.
  • The key morphologic feature distinguishing these two is thought to be the low grade of the spindle cell areas of MTSC; spindle cell areas in PRCC generally signify sarcomatoid change and are high grade.
  • We report 5 cases of PRCC with low-grade spindle cell foci, closely mimicking MTSC.
  • All tumors were predominantly solid, featuring compact areas of low-grade spindle cells lining thin, angulated tubules.
  • These cases further reported morphologic overlap between MTSC and PRCC.
  • Before a diagnosis of metastatic MTSC or MTSC with unusual morphology is rendered, the possibility of PRCC with low-grade spindle cell foci should be considered.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous / pathology. Carcinoma / pathology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17 / genetics. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 7 / genetics. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence. Male. Middle Aged. Trisomy


82. Diner EK, Linehan M, Walther M: Response of papillary renal cell carcinoma in a solitary kidney to high dose interleukin therapy. Int J Urol; 2005 Nov;12(11):996-7
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Response of papillary renal cell carcinoma in a solitary kidney to high dose interleukin therapy.
  • Kidney cancer affects 36 000 Americans annually and is responsible for nearly 12 000 deaths every year in the US.
  • Treatment with interleukin-2 (IL-2), the only FDA approved therapy for patients with advanced kidney cancer, is associated with a 10% complete response and a 12% partial response.
  • To date, clear cell renal carcinoma has been the only histological type associated with response to IL-2-based therapy.
  • In the current report, we describe a response to IL-2 therapy in a patient with type I papillary renal carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Interleukin-2 / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy


83. Lee JE, Giovannucci E, Smith-Warner SA, Spiegelman D, Willett WC, Curhan GC: Intakes of fruits, vegetables, vitamins A, C, and E, and carotenoids and risk of renal cell cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 2006 Dec;15(12):2445-52
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Intakes of fruits, vegetables, vitamins A, C, and E, and carotenoids and risk of renal cell cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: Fruits and vegetables rich in antioxidants have been proposed to reduce the risk of renal cell cancer.
  • However, few prospective studies have examined the intakes of fruits, vegetables, and antioxidant vitamins in relation to the risk of renal cell cancer.
  • METHODS: We prospectively examined the associations between the intakes of fruits, vegetables, vitamins A, C, and E, and carotenoids and risk of renal cell cancer in women and men.
  • RESULTS: A total of 248 (132 women and 116 men) incident renal cell cancer cases were ascertained during 2,316,525 person-years of follow-up.
  • The consumption of fruits and vegetables was associated with a decreased risk of renal cell cancer in men (multivariate RR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.25-0.81, for >or=6 servings of fruit and vegetable intake/d versus <3 servings/d; P test for trend = 0.02), but not in women (multivariate RR, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.66-2.07, for the same contrast; P test for trend = 0.25; P test for between-studies heterogeneity = 0.02).
  • Intakes of vitamins A and C from food and carotenoids were inversely associated with the risk of renal cell cancer in men only, but we cannot exclude the possibility that this was due to other factors in fruit and vegetables.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Fruit and vegetable consumption may reduce the risk of renal cell cancer in men.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / epidemiology. Carotenoids. Diet Records. Fruit. Vegetables. Vitamins

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Kidney cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Sodium ascorbate .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. L-Ascorbic Acid .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. VITAMIN A .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17164369.001).
  • [ISSN] 1055-9965
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA55075; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA87969
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antioxidants; 0 / Vitamins; 11103-57-4 / Vitamin A; 1406-18-4 / Vitamin E; 36-88-4 / Carotenoids; PQ6CK8PD0R / Ascorbic Acid
  •  go-up   go-down


84. Banumathy G, Cairns P: Signaling pathways in renal cell carcinoma. Cancer Biol Ther; 2010 Oct 1;10(7):658-64
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Signaling pathways in renal cell carcinoma.
  • Renal cell carcinoma (RCC), the most lethal type of genitourinary cancer, is generally resistant to chemotherapy and radiation therapy.
  • Surgical excision of the tumor at a localized stage remains the mainstay for curative therapy.
  • A number of drugs developed in recent years have shown limited to significant efficacy in treating RCC.
  • These drugs act by blocking critical signaling pathways associated with RCC tumor growth and survival, and angiogenesis.
  • Beyond well-validated signaling targets such as VHL, VEGFR and mTOR, additional pathways including HGF/c-MET and Wnt/β-catenin have emerged as important to RCC pathogenesis.
  • Mutations in one or more components of these signaling networks may affect tumor response to therapy.
  • This review summarizes the state of knowledge about signaling pathways in RCC and discusses the known genetic and epigenetic alterations that underlie dysregulation of these pathways.


85. McRoberts RJ, Beard D, Walsh TS: A study of blood product use in patients with major trauma in Scotland: analysis of a major trauma database. Emerg Med J; 2007 May;24(5):325-9
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A study of blood product use in patients with major trauma in Scotland: analysis of a major trauma database.
  • 27.4% of patients received > or =8 units of red cell concentrate (RCC) within the first 24 h of hospitalisation.
  • Of these, 35 patients would require > or =8 units of RCC within the first 24 h.
  • Of these 67 patients, an estimated 35 patients (28 of whom had a blunt form of trauma) require > or =8 units of RCC during the first 24 h in hospital.

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Blood Transfusion and Donation.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Wounds and Injuries.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] J Trauma. 2002 Aug;53(2):291-5; discussion 295-6 [12169936.001]
  • [Cites] J Trauma. 2003 May;54(5):898-905; discussion 905-7 [12777902.001]
  • [Cites] Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 2003 Jun;14 Suppl 1:S35-8 [14567534.001]
  • [Cites] Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 2003 Dec;14(8):713-7 [14614349.001]
  • [Cites] Crit Care Med. 2004 Jan;32(1):39-52 [14707558.001]
  • [Cites] Transfusion. 2006 Jun;46(6):919-33 [16734808.001]
  • [Cites] Unfallchirurg. 2004 Jul;107(7):563-74 [15179555.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Surg. 1998 Sep;133(9):947-52 [9749845.001]
  • [Cites] Emerg Med J. 2005 Jan;22(1):60-3 [15611550.001]
  • [Cites] J Trauma. 2005 Jul;59(1):8-15; discussion 15-8 [16096533.001]
  • [Cites] Transfusion. 2004 Jun;44(6):809-13 [15157244.001]
  • (PMID = 17452697.001).
  • [ISSN] 1472-0213
  • [Journal-full-title] Emergency medicine journal : EMJ
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Emerg Med J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2658474
  •  go-up   go-down


86. Ingold B, Wild PJ, Nocito A, Amin MB, Storz M, Heppner FL, Moch H: Renal cell carcinoma marker reliably discriminates central nervous system haemangioblastoma from brain metastases of renal cell carcinoma. Histopathology; 2008 May;52(6):674-81
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Renal cell carcinoma marker reliably discriminates central nervous system haemangioblastoma from brain metastases of renal cell carcinoma.
  • AIMS: The distinction between central nervous system (CNS) metastases of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and CNS haemangioblastoma still poses a challenge to the pathologist.
  • Since both entities occur in von Hippel-Lindau disease, this aggravates the issue.
  • The antibody renal cell carcinoma marker (RCC-ma) has been suggested to identify primary RCCs specifically, but its value for diagnosing metastases of RCC is controversial.
  • The aim was to assess two distinct clones of the RCC-ma for their potential to: (i) identify primary RCCs and (ii) differentiate between CNS metastases of clear cell RCC and CNS haemangioblastomas.
  • METHODS AND RESULTS: Using tissue microarrays, 77% (n = 363; PN-15) and 66% (n = 355; 66.4C2) of clear cell RCCs, and 93% (PN-15) and 74% (66.4C2) of papillary RCCs (n = 46) were immunopositive for RCC-ma, whereas none of the investigated chromophobe RCCs (n = 22) or any of the oncocytomas (n = 15) showed immunoreactivity.
  • Importantly, 50.9% of CNS metastases of clear cell RCCs (n = 55) exhibited RCC-ma expression, whereas all CNS haemangioblastomas (71) were negative.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Both RCC-ma clones, despite some variation in their sensitivity to detect clear cell and papillary RCCs, are of value in differentiating subtypes of primary RCC and are excellent markers for discriminating clear cell lesions in the brain.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal. Brain Neoplasms / diagnosis. Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Hemangioblastoma / diagnosis. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / pathology. Humans. Neprilysin / immunology. Tissue Array Analysis

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Brain Tumors.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18393979.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2559
  • [Journal-full-title] Histopathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Histopathology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; EC 3.4.24.11 / Neprilysin
  •  go-up   go-down


87. Kodama Y, Abo D, Sakuhara Y, Sawada A, Watanabe Y, Funakubo M, Shimizu T, Miyasaka K: MR-guided percutaneous cryoablation for bilateral multiple renal cell carcinomas. Radiat Med; 2005 Jun;23(4):303-7
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] MR-guided percutaneous cryoablation for bilateral multiple renal cell carcinomas.
  • A 35-year-old woman with five renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) was treated by percutaneous cryoablation.
  • She had two RCCs in the left kidney and three in the right.
  • Cryoablation was performed using a high-pressure argon-based system with 2- or 3-mm cryoprobes under magnetic resonance (MR) guidance.
  • Three tumors were completely ablated.
  • Two tumors were residual, as they were so close to nearby organs that we were forced to stop the freezing to avoid complications.
  • No complications were encountered, and renal function was preserved.
  • In conclusion, MR-guided cryoablation is a safe procedure even when RCCs are bilateral and multiple.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Cryosurgery / methods. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Magnetic Resonance Imaging

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - MRI Scans.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16012408.001).
  • [ISSN] 0288-2043
  • [Journal-full-title] Radiation medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiat Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  •  go-up   go-down


88. Pitt M, Crathorne L, Moxham T, Bond M, Hyde C: Everolimus for the second-line treatment of advanced and/or metastatic renal cell cancer: a critique of the submission from Novartis. Health Technol Assess; 2010 Oct;14(Suppl. 2):41-6
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Everolimus for the second-line treatment of advanced and/or metastatic renal cell cancer: a critique of the submission from Novartis.
  • This paper represents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report into the clinical efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of everolimus plus best supportive care (BSC) for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) which has progressed following or on vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted therapy (sunitinib, sorafenib, bevacizumab), compared to BSC alone.
  • The submitting manufacturer's case for clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness was mainly based on a well-conducted randomised controlled trial (RCT), Renal Cell Cancer Treatment with Oral RAD001 Given Daily-1 (RECORD-1), comparing BSC plus everolimus with BSC plus placebo and a de novo economic model.
  • The ERG judged that if potential errors in the model were corrected, the ICERs offered by the submitting manufacturer would overstate the cost-effectiveness of everolimus for the second-line treatment of metastatic RCC (that this ICER would be a higher value).
  • Concerning the estimates of cost-effectiveness in RCC, the observations in the ERG report provide strong further support for research collecting rigorous estimates of utilities associated with the main health states likely to be experienced by patients with renal cell cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Sirolimus / analogs & derivatives

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Kidney cancer.
  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Metastatic cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. SIROLIMUS .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 21047490.001).
  • [ISSN] 2046-4924
  • [Journal-full-title] Health technology assessment (Winchester, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Health Technol Assess
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 9HW64Q8G6G / Everolimus; W36ZG6FT64 / Sirolimus
  •  go-up   go-down


89. Jilani G, Mohamed D, Wadia H, Ramzi K, Meriem J, Houssem L, Samir G, Nawfel BR: Cutaneous metastasis of renal cell carcinoma through percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy: case report. Dermatol Online J; 2010;16(2):10
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cutaneous metastasis of renal cell carcinoma through percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy: case report.
  • A 39-year-old man, who had undergone left nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma of clear cell type, was noted to have a solitary nodular shadow in the right lung on chest X-ray.
  • Percutaneous needle biopsy of the lung was performed via the right anterior chest wall and the histologic findings showed metastasis from renal carcinoma.
  • Histological examination of a biopsy of the skin tumor revealed features of metastatic renal cell carcinoma of clear cell type.
  • After treatment, the patient remains disease free after one year of follow-up.
  • This case represents an unusual clinical presentation of metastatic renal cell carcinoma that appears to have been translocated to the skin by the needle biopsy.
  • [MeSH-major] Biopsy, Fine-Needle / adverse effects. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplasm Seeding. Skin Neoplasms / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / secondary


90. Bibert S, Aebischer D, Desgranges F, Roy S, Schaer D, Kharoubi-Hess S, Horisberger JD, Geering K: A link between FXYD3 (Mat-8)-mediated Na,K-ATPase regulation and differentiation of Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. Mol Biol Cell; 2009 Feb;20(4):1132-40
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A link between FXYD3 (Mat-8)-mediated Na,K-ATPase regulation and differentiation of Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells.
  • In normal tissue, FXYD3 is mainly expressed in stomach and colon, but it is also overexpressed in cancer cells, suggesting a role in tumorogenesis.
  • We show that FXYD3 silencing has no effect on cell proliferation but promotes cell apoptosis and prevents cell differentiation of human colon adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2), which is reflected by a reduction in alkaline phosphatase and villin expression, a change in several other differentiation markers, and a decrease in transepithelial resistance.
  • Inhibition of cell differentiation in FXYD3-deficient cells is accompanied by an increase in the apparent Na+ and K+ affinities of Na,K-ATPase, reflecting the absence of Na,K-pump regulation by FXYD3.
  • In addition, we observe a decrease in the maximal Na,K-ATPase activity due to a decrease in its turnover number, which correlates with a change in Na,K-ATPase isozyme expression that is characteristic of cancer cells.
  • Overall, our results suggest an important role of FXYD3 in cell differentiation of Caco-2 cells.
  • One possibility is that FXYD3 silencing prevents proper regulation of Na,K-ATPase, which leads to perturbation of cellular Na+ and K+ homeostasis and changes in the expression of Na,K-ATPase isozymes, whose functional properties are incompatible with Caco-2 cell differentiation.
  • [MeSH-major] Cell Differentiation. Epithelial Cells / cytology. Epithelial Cells / enzymology. Intestines / cytology. Membrane Proteins / metabolism. Neoplasm Proteins / metabolism. Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Apoptosis. Caco-2 Cells. Cell Proliferation. Down-Regulation. Gene Silencing. Humans. Isoenzymes / metabolism. Potassium / metabolism. RNA, Small Interfering / metabolism. Sodium / metabolism

  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. POTASSIUM, ELEMENTAL .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. SODIUM .
  • The Lens. Cited by Patents in .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] J Biol Chem. 2000 Jan 21;275(3):1976-86 [10636900.001]
  • [Cites] PLoS One. 2008;3(8):e2988 [18714339.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Biol Cell. 2001 Feb;12(2):279-95 [11179415.001]
  • [Cites] Brain Res Mol Brain Res. 2001 Jan 31;86(1-2):189-92 [11165386.001]
  • [Cites] Anticancer Res. 2000 Nov-Dec;20(6D):5151-4 [11326687.001]
  • [Cites] J Bioenerg Biomembr. 2001 Oct;33(5):425-38 [11762918.001]
  • [Cites] EMBO J. 2002 Jul 1;21(13):3264-73 [12093728.001]
  • [Cites] J Biol Chem. 2002 Oct 25;277(43):40650-8 [12189145.001]
  • [Cites] Biochim Biophys Acta. 2003 Aug 21;1650(1-2):73-91 [12922171.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Oncol. 2004 Jan;24(1):97-105 [14654946.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Biol Cell. 2004 Mar;15(3):1364-73 [14699059.001]
  • [Cites] FEBS Lett. 2004 Apr 9;563(1-3):151-4 [15063740.001]
  • [Cites] Biochem J. 1968 Aug;109(1):51-9 [5669848.001]
  • [Cites] Biochemistry. 1981 Nov 10;20(23):6684-91 [6272846.001]
  • [Cites] Bioessays. 1990 Sep;12(9):403-8 [2256904.001]
  • [Cites] J Biol Chem. 1991 Jun 15;266(17):11126-30 [1710217.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Physiol. 1992 Mar;262(3 Pt 1):C743-51 [1312783.001]
  • [Cites] J Cell Biol. 1993 May;121(3):579-86 [8387529.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 1993 Sep 30;55(3):498-505 [8397167.001]
  • [Cites] J Gen Physiol. 1994 Apr;103(4):605-23 [8057080.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 1994 Dec;9(12):3417-26 [7970700.001]
  • [Cites] J Biol Chem. 1995 Feb 3;270(5):2176-82 [7836447.001]
  • [Cites] Biol Cell. 1994;81(3):215-22 [7696974.001]
  • [Cites] Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1995 Jun 20;92(13):6092-6 [7597086.001]
  • [Cites] Anal Chem. 1996 Mar 1;68(5):850-8 [8779443.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Cell Biol. 1997 Mar;17(3):1503-12 [9032278.001]
  • [Cites] Electrophoresis. 1997 Oct;18(11):2071-7 [9420172.001]
  • [Cites] J Biol Chem. 1951 Nov;193(1):265-75 [14907713.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Biol Cell. 2005 May;16(5):2363-71 [15743908.001]
  • [Cites] Semin Nephrol. 2005 Sep;25(5):292-303 [16139684.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2006 Jan 1;118(1):43-54 [16003754.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2006 Feb;290(2):F241-50 [16403837.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2006 Jan 15;66(2):763-9 [16424007.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2006 Oct 9;95(7):921-7 [16953238.001]
  • [Cites] J Biol Chem. 2006 Dec 22;281(51):39142-51 [17077088.001]
  • [Cites] Tissue Antigens. 2006 Dec;68(6):509-17 [17176442.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Physiol Cell Physiol. 2007 Mar;292(3):C1179-91 [17050615.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Protoc. 2006;1(4):1732-42 [17487156.001]
  • [Cites] Proteomics. 2007 Jun;7(13):2201-15 [17549793.001]
  • [Cites] J Immunol. 2007 Aug 1;179(3):2005-12 [17641068.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Biol Cell. 2007 Nov;18(11):4245-60 [17699589.001]
  • [Cites] Nature. 2007 Dec 13;450(7172):1043-9 [18075585.001]
  • [Cites] Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens. 2008 Sep;17(5):526-32 [18695395.001]
  • [Cites] Genomics. 2000 Aug 15;68(1):41-56 [10950925.001]
  • (PMID = 19109419.001).
  • [ISSN] 1939-4586
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular biology of the cell
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Biol. Cell
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / FXYD3 protein, human; 0 / Isoenzymes; 0 / Membrane Proteins; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / RNA, Small Interfering; 9NEZ333N27 / Sodium; EC 3.6.3.9 / Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase; RWP5GA015D / Potassium
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2642742
  •  go-up   go-down


91. Grünwald V, Kalanovic D, Merseburger AS: Management of sunitinib-related adverse events: an evidence- and expert-based consensus approach. World J Urol; 2010 Jun;28(3):343-51
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: The advance of medical treatment in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has fostered the development of diverse continuous oral therapies with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), among these sunitinib remains the mainstay of therapy for most of the patients.
  • Based on its clinical activity, disease control over a period of 11 months can be expected with sunitinib treatment.
  • Today, numerous publications address these questions and offer advice from experienced centers.
  • However, these reviews summarize single or oligo-center experiences.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Indoles / adverse effects. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / adverse effects. Pyrroles / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Consensus. Diarrhea / chemically induced. Diarrhea / drug therapy. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Early Detection of Cancer. Evidence-Based Medicine. Fatigue / chemically induced. Fatigue / therapy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Hypertension / chemically induced. Hypertension / drug therapy. Male. Mouth Diseases / chemically induced. Mouth Diseases / therapy. Practice Guidelines as Topic. Risk Assessment. Skin Diseases / chemically induced. Skin Diseases / drug therapy. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Dtsch Arztebl Int. 2008 Mar;105(13):232-7 [19629201.001]
  • [Cites] Urologe A. 2006 Oct;45(10 ):1333-42; quiz 1343 [17021905.001]
  • [Cites] Can Urol Assoc J. 2007 Jun;1(2 Suppl):S41-54 [18542784.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 2007 Dec 15;370(9604):2011-9 [18083403.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2007 Jan 11;356(2):115-24 [17215529.001]
  • [Cites] Onkologie. 2007 Oct;30(10 ):519-24 [17890892.001]
  • [Cites] FASEB J. 2001 Mar;15(3):645-58 [11259383.001]
  • [Cites] Onkologie. 2009 Mar;32(3):129-38 [19295254.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Exp Med. 2007 Dec;7(4):127-34 [18188524.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2007 May 31;356(22):2271-81 [17538086.001]
  • [Cites] Support Care Cancer. 2008 Jun;16(6):557-66 [18274784.001]
  • [Cites] Hautarzt. 2008 Oct;59(10):814-20 [18766322.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2007 Jul;11(3):238-46 [17350337.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Cancer. 2006 Dec;42(18):3127-39 [17098419.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Oncol. 2009 Sep;20(9):1535-42 [19474115.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2009 Jul;297(1):R1-5 [19439616.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Urol. 2008 May;53(5):917-30 [18054825.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2008 Nov 10;26(32):5204-12 [18838713.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Genitourin Cancer. 2006 Dec;5 Suppl 1:S24-30 [17239281.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2008 Jan 3;358(1):95-7 [18172185.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Oncol. 2009 May;20(5):807-15 [19150949.001]
  • [Cites] Clin J Oncol Nurs. 2007 Oct;11(5):659-66 [17962174.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Urol. 2009 Jan;55(1):250-2 [20050019.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2009 Aug 1;27(22):3584-90 [19487381.001]
  • [Cites] Oncologist. 2008 Sep;13(9):1001-11 [18779536.001]
  • (PMID = 20458483.001).
  • [ISSN] 1433-8726
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Indoles; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Pyrroles; V99T50803M / sunitinib
  • [Number-of-references] 30
  •  go-up   go-down


92. Lamers CH, van Elzakker P, van Steenbergen SC, Sleijfer S, Debets R, Gratama JW: Retronectin-assisted retroviral transduction of primary human T lymphocytes under good manufacturing practice conditions: tissue culture bag critically determines cell yield. Cytotherapy; 2008;10(4):406-16
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Retronectin-assisted retroviral transduction of primary human T lymphocytes under good manufacturing practice conditions: tissue culture bag critically determines cell yield.
  • BACKGROUND: For our clinical immunogene therapy study for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients, we had developed a protocol for gene transduction and expansion of human T cells in compliance with good manufacturing practice (GMP) criteria.
  • Critical to our successful clinical-scale transductions of patient T cells was the use of Retronectin in combination with Lifecell X-foldtrade mark cell culture bags.
  • METHODS: In our current study, we evaluated two alternative types of bags for the Retronectin-mediated retroviral transduction of human T cells: the Miltenyi DC-generation bag and the Takara CultiLife Spin bag.
  • RESULTS: In static transductions, but not in spinoculation, the DC-generation bags and CultiLife Spin bags performed as well as Lifecell X-foldtrade mark bags in Retronectin-assisted retroviral transduction of human T cells with respect to transduction efficiency, lymphocyte subset composition and lymphocyte function.
  • However, both types of bags performed less well than Lifecell X-foldtrade mark cell culture bags in terms of cell yield.
  • DISCUSSION: Adjusted numbers of cells at the start of transduction should be used when using the Miltenyi or Takara bags in order to compensate for the lower cell yield following transduction.
  • [MeSH-major] Cell Culture Techniques / instrumentation. Retroviridae / metabolism. T-Lymphocytes / physiology. Transduction, Genetic / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / immunology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / therapy. Cells, Cultured. Cytotoxicity, Immunologic. Humans. Immunotherapy, Adoptive / methods. Materials Testing

  • The Lens. Cited by Patents in .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18574773.001).
  • [ISSN] 1477-2566
  • [Journal-full-title] Cytotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cytotherapy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  •  go-up   go-down


93. Nakada C, Matsuura K, Tsukamoto Y, Tanigawa M, Yoshimoto T, Narimatsu T, Nguyen LT, Hijiya N, Uchida T, Sato F, Mimata H, Seto M, Moriyama M: Genome-wide microRNA expression profiling in renal cell carcinoma: significant down-regulation of miR-141 and miR-200c. J Pathol; 2008 Dec;216(4):418-27
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Genome-wide microRNA expression profiling in renal cell carcinoma: significant down-regulation of miR-141 and miR-200c.
  • We investigated expression profiles of microRNA (miRNA) in renal cell carcinoma [clear cell carcinomas (CCC) and chromophobe renal cell carcinomas (ChCC)] and in normal kidneys by using a miRNA microarray platform which covers a total of 470 human miRNAs (Sanger miRBase release 9.1).
  • We found that 43 miRNAs were differentially expressed between CCC and normal kidney, of which 37 were significantly down-regulated in CCC and the other 6 were up-regulated.
  • We also found that 57 miRNAs were differentially expressed between ChCC and normal kidney, of which 51 were significantly down-regulated in ChCC and the other 6 were up-regulated.
  • Together, these observations indicate that expression of miRNAs tends to be down-regulated in both CCC and ChCC compared with normal kidney.
  • Indeed, in all cases of CCC analysed, both miR-141 and miR-200c were down-regulated in comparison with normal kidney.
  • Furthermore, we found that overexpression of miR-141 and miR-200c caused down-regulation of ZFHX1B and up-regulation of E-cadherin in two renal carcinoma cell lines, ACHN and 786-O.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / genetics. Down-Regulation. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Kidney Neoplasms / genetics. MicroRNAs / genetics

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18925646.001).
  • [ISSN] 1096-9896
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cadherins; 0 / Homeodomain Proteins; 0 / MIRN141 microRNA, human; 0 / MIRN200 microRNA, human; 0 / MicroRNAs; 0 / Repressor Proteins; 0 / ZEB2 protein, human
  •  go-up   go-down


94. Fujimoto E, Yano T, Sato H, Hagiwara K, Yamasaki H, Shirai S, Fukumoto K, Hagiwara H, Negishi E, Ueno K: Cytotoxic effect of the Her-2/Her-1 inhibitor PKI-166 on renal cancer cells expressing the connexin 32 gene. J Pharmacol Sci; 2005 Feb;97(2):294-8
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cytotoxic effect of the Her-2/Her-1 inhibitor PKI-166 on renal cancer cells expressing the connexin 32 gene.
  • We have reported that connexin (Cx) 32 acts as a tumor suppressor gene in renal cancer cells partly due to Her-2 inactivation.
  • Here, we determined if a Her-2/Her-1 inhibitor (PKI-166) can enhance the tumor-suppressive effect of Cx32 in Caki-2 cells from human renal cell carcinoma.
  • The expression of Cx32 in Caki-2 cells was required for PKI-166-induced cytotoxic effect at lower doses.
  • These results suggest that PKI-166 further supports the tumor-suppressive effect of the Cx32 gene in renal cancer cells through the induction of apoptosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Connexins / biosynthesis. Growth Inhibitors / toxicity. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Pyrimidines / toxicity. Pyrroles / toxicity. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / antagonists & inhibitors. Receptor, ErbB-2 / antagonists & inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Genes, erbB-1 / drug effects. Humans

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Kidney cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 15699574.001).
  • [ISSN] 1347-8613
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pharmacological sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pharmacol. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Connexins; 0 / Growth Inhibitors; 0 / PKI 166; 0 / Pyrimidines; 0 / Pyrroles; 0 / connexin 32; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, ErbB-2
  •  go-up   go-down


95. Fevotte J, Charbotel B, Muller-Beauté P, Martin JL, Hours M, Bergeret A: Case-control study on renal cell cancer and occupational exposure to trichloroethylene. Part I: Exposure assessment. Ann Occup Hyg; 2006 Nov;50(8):765-75
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Case-control study on renal cell cancer and occupational exposure to trichloroethylene. Part I: Exposure assessment.
  • A method for a semi-quantitative retrospective assessment of exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) was implemented for a case-control study conducted in the Arve valley (France), an area with a widely developed screw-cutting industry, where teams of occupational physicians have collected a large quantity of well-documented measurements.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / chemically induced. Kidney Neoplasms / chemically induced. Occupational Exposure / adverse effects. Solvents / toxicity. Trichloroethylene / toxicity
  • [MeSH-minor] Carcinogens / toxicity. Case-Control Studies. Female. France / epidemiology. Humans. Male. Manufactured Materials. Middle Aged. Occupations. Retrospective Studies. Workplace

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Kidney cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Occupational Health.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Trichloroethylene .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16840434.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-4878
  • [Journal-full-title] The Annals of occupational hygiene
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Occup Hyg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carcinogens; 0 / Solvents; 290YE8AR51 / Trichloroethylene
  •  go-up   go-down


96. Wehler TC, Nonn M, Brandt B, Britten CM, Gröne M, Todorova M, Link I, Khan SA, Meyer RG, Huber C, Hartwig UF, Herr W: Targeting the activation-induced antigen CD137 can selectively deplete alloreactive T cells from antileukemic and antitumor donor T-cell lines. Blood; 2007 Jan 1;109(1):365-73
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Targeting the activation-induced antigen CD137 can selectively deplete alloreactive T cells from antileukemic and antitumor donor T-cell lines.
  • In HLA-incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, alloreactive donor T cells recognizing recipient mismatch HLA cause severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD).
  • Strategies allowing the selective depletion of alloreactive T cells as well as the enhancement of graft-versus-malignancy immunity would be beneficial.
  • We generated donor CD8 T-cell lines in vitro using allogeneic recipient cells mismatched at a single HLA class I allele or haplotype as stimulators.
  • Recipient cells were obtained from acute myeloid leukemias, renal-cell carcinomas, and CD40L-induced B lymphoblasts.
  • Resulting alloreactive T cells were activated by incubating day 21 T-cell cultures with HLA-mismatch transfected K562 cells or recipient-derived fibroblasts.
  • Selective allodepletion (SAD) was subsequently performed by a newly developed immunomagnetic depletion approach targeting the tumor necrosis factor receptor molecule CD137 (4-1BB).
  • Compared with other activation-induced antigens, CD137 showed a superior performance based on a consistently low baseline expression and a rapid up-regulation following alloantigen stimulation.
  • In 15 different SAD experiments, the frequency of alloreactive CD8 T cells was reduced to a median of 9.5% compared with undepleted control populations.
  • The allodepleted T-cell subsets maintained significant antitumor and antiviral CD8 responses.
  • In vitro expansion of tumor-reactive T cells followed by CD137-mediated SAD might enhance the antitumor efficacy of T-cell allografts with lower risk of inducing GVHD.
  • [MeSH-minor] B-Lymphocytes / drug effects. CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes / immunology. CD40 Ligand / pharmacology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Cells, Cultured / chemistry. Cells, Cultured / immunology. Cytomegalovirus / immunology. Cytotoxicity Tests, Immunologic. Fibroblasts / immunology. Graft vs Host Disease / prevention & control. HLA Antigens / immunology. Herpesvirus 4, Human / immunology. Histocompatibility. Humans. In Vitro Techniques. Isoantigens / immunology. K562 Cells / immunology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Leukemia, Myeloid / pathology. Lymphocyte Activation. Skin / cytology. Transfection

  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16931626.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-4971
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD137; 0 / HLA Antigens; 0 / Isoantigens; 147205-72-9 / CD40 Ligand
  •  go-up   go-down


97. Atzpodien J, Kirchner H, Rebmann U, Soder M, Gertenbach U, Siebels M, Roigas J, Raschke R, Salm S, Schwindl B, Müller SC, Hauser S, Leiber C, Huland E, Heinzer H, Siemer S, Metzner B, Heynemann H, Fornara P, Reitz M: Interleukin-2/interferon-alpha2a/13-retinoic acid-based chemoimmunotherapy in advanced renal cell carcinoma: results of a prospectively randomised trial of the German Cooperative Renal Carcinoma Chemoimmunotherapy Group (DGCIN). Br J Cancer; 2006 Aug 21;95(4):463-9
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Interleukin-2/interferon-alpha2a/13-retinoic acid-based chemoimmunotherapy in advanced renal cell carcinoma: results of a prospectively randomised trial of the German Cooperative Renal Carcinoma Chemoimmunotherapy Group (DGCIN).
  • We performed a prospectively randomised clinical trial to compare the efficacy of four subcutaneous interleukin-2-(sc-IL-2) and sc interferon-alpha2a (sc-IFN-alpha2a)-based outpatient regimens in 379 patients with progressive metastatic renal cell carcinoma.
  • Patients with lung metastases, an erythrocyte sedimentation rate < or =70 mm h(-1) and neutrophil counts < or =6000 microl(-1) (group I) were randomised to arm A: sc-IL-2, sc-IFN-alpha2a, peroral 13-cis-retinoic acid (po-13cRA) (n=78), or arm B: arm A plus inhaled-IL-2 (n=65).
  • Given the known therapeutic efficacy of sc-IL-2/sc-INF-alpha2a/po-13cRA-based outpatient chemoimmunotherapies, our results did not establish survival advantages in favour of po-Capecitabine vs iv-5-FU, and in favour of short-term inhaled-IL-2 in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma receiving systemic cytokines.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Interferon-alpha / administration & dosage. Interleukin-2 / administration & dosage. Isotretinoin / administration & dosage. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / adverse effects. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Capecitabine. Deoxycytidine / administration & dosage. Deoxycytidine / analogs & derivatives. Disease Progression. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Fluorouracil / administration & dosage. Germany. Humans. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Male. Middle Aged. Recombinant Proteins. Survival Analysis

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CAPECITABINE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. 13-CIS-RETINOIC ACID .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. FLUOROURACIL .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1998 May;16(5):1820-5 [9586896.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 1996 Jan;155(1):19-25 [7490829.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Cancer Res. 1996 Jul;2(7):1115-22 [9816276.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2005 Jun 20;23(18):4172-8 [15961764.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2000 Feb;82(4):772-6 [10732744.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2000 Aug;18(16):2972-80 [10944130.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2000 Sep;83(5):583-7 [10944596.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 2001 Oct 19;85(8):1130-6 [11710825.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Biother Radiopharm. 2002 Apr;17(2):165-73 [12030110.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2003 Nov 1;21(21):3987-94 [14581421.001]
  • [Cites] Folia Biol (Praha). 2003;49(5):183-90 [14680292.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Oncol. 2004 Apr;15(4):610-2 [15033668.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2004 Apr 1;22(7):1188-94 [14981107.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1987 Apr 9;316(15):889-97 [3493432.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 1990 Jun 23;335(8704):1509-12 [1972442.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 1992 Jul;10(7):1119-23 [1607917.001]
  • [Cites] J Cancer Res Clin Oncol. 1994;120(4):221-8 [8288676.001]
  • [Cites] World J Urol. 1995;13(3):174-7 [7550391.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Cancer. 1998 Aug;78(3):366-9 [9703284.001]
  • (PMID = 16909131.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0920
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Interleukin-2; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 0W860991D6 / Deoxycytidine; 6804DJ8Z9U / Capecitabine; 76543-88-9 / interferon alfa-2a; EH28UP18IF / Isotretinoin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2360667
  •  go-up   go-down


98. Skinnider BF, Amin MB: An immunohistochemical approach to the differential diagnosis of renal tumors. Semin Diagn Pathol; 2005 Feb;22(1):51-68
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] An immunohistochemical approach to the differential diagnosis of renal tumors.
  • Renal neoplasms comprise several distinct clinicopathologic entities with potential prognostic and the rapeutic differences.
  • Although careful morphologic examination using sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin will allow for the correct diagnosis in the majority of cases, there is sufficient overlap between several entities such that ancillary techniques may be necessary to arrive at the correct diagnosis.
  • In routine diagnostic surgical pathology practice of renal tumors, immunohistochemistry is the foremost ancillary technique.
  • Using an approach based on common histologic patterns (tumors with clear cytoplasm, granular cytoplasm, tubulopapillary architecture, spindle cell morphology, small round-cell morphology, and infiltrating poorly differentiated carcinoma), we will discuss the utility of immunohistochemistry in the differential diagnosis of renal neoplasms.
  • In recent years, needle biopsies from renal masses are being increasingly performed.
  • In these small biopsies, the entire range of cytoarchitectural features that are generally necessary to make a diagnosis may not be fully appreciated.
  • Immunohistochemistry may be helpful in this setting to narrow the differential diagnosis or to arrive at a definitive diagnosis.
  • Finally, the use of immunohistochemistry for the confirmation of metastatic renal cell carcinoma presenting at distant sites will be discussed.
  • Panels of immunohistochemical stains are proposed for different settings, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC) marker, CD10, and vimentin to suggest renal origin of a metastatic tumor, and markers to aid in subclassification of RCC, including parvalbumin and c-kit for chromophobe RCC, and cytokeratin 7 and alpha-methyl-acyl-CoA racemase for papillary RCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma / diagnosis. Immunohistochemistry. Kidney Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenoma, Oxyphilic / diagnosis. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / diagnosis. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Neoplasm Metastasis. Translocation, Genetic

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16512599.001).
  • [ISSN] 0740-2570
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in diagnostic pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin Diagn Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
  • [Number-of-references] 82
  •  go-up   go-down


99. Grivas AA, Trafalis DT, Athanassiou AE: Implication of bevacizumab in fatal arterial thromboembolic incidents. J BUON; 2009 Jan-Mar;14(1):115-7
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial factor (VEGF), is approved for the treatment of metastatic colon cancer, but it has also shown efficacy in first line therapy of non-squamous-cell non-smallcell lung cancer, breast cancer and clear-cell renal cancer.
  • We describe and discuss two cases of cancer patients who developed fatal arterial thromboembolic episodes after administration of bevacizumab.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Angiogenesis Inhibitors / adverse effects. Antibodies, Monoclonal / adverse effects. Lung Neoplasms / drug therapy. Maxillary Neoplasms / drug therapy. Sarcoma / drug therapy. Thromboembolism / chemically induced

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Lung Cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Soft Tissue Sarcoma.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19365880.001).
  • [ISSN] 1107-0625
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of B.U.ON. : official journal of the Balkan Union of Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J BUON
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Anticoagulants; 2S9ZZM9Q9V / Bevacizumab
  •  go-up   go-down


100. Matsuzaki K, Yasunaga Y, Fukuda S, Oka T: Seminal vesicle metastasis of renal cell carcinoma. Urology; 2009 Nov;74(5):1017-8
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Seminal vesicle metastasis of renal cell carcinoma.
  • We present an unusual magnetic resonance imaging finding of a 70-year-old man with the seminal vesicle tumor.
  • The patient underwent radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma 4 years ago.
  • Transrectal needle biopsy disclosed a clear cell carcinoma, which was compatible with the original renal cell cancer.
  • Pathohistologic examination confirmed a metastatic renal cell carcinoma of the seminal vesicle.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Genital Neoplasms, Male / secondary. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Seminal Vesicles

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Renal cell carcinoma.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Kidney Cancer.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 19589576.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down






Advertisement