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1. Latchamsetty KC, Borden LS Jr, Porter CR, Lacrampe M, Vaughan M, Lin E, Conti N, Wright JL, Corman JM: Experience improves staging accuracy of endorectal magnetic resonance imaging in prostate cancer: what is the learning curve? Can J Urol; 2007 Feb;14(1):3429-34
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  • [Title] Experience improves staging accuracy of endorectal magnetic resonance imaging in prostate cancer: what is the learning curve?
  • INTRODUCTION: Accurate clinical staging is critical in guiding treatment for patients with prostate adenocarcinoma.
  • In order to assess the learning curve for endorectal MRI interpretation, we compared two cohorts of patients with high-risk prostate who underwent endorectal MRI at a center with limited prior exposure to this imaging modality.
  • MRI was performed in patients with a high level of suspicion for extracapsular disease based on biopsy Gleason score, prostate specific antigen level, and digital rectal examination or if the Memorial Sloan-Kettering nomogram predicted a greater than 30% likelihood of extracapsular disease.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In our series, endorectal MRI initially did not accurately predict tumor stage in patients with prostatic adenocarcinoma.
  • With further experience, the accuracy of MRI substantially improved and approached the results from centers with significant experience in the interpretation of endorectal prostate MRI.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / diagnosis. Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Clinical Competence. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Neoplasm Staging / standards. Prostatic Neoplasms / diagnosis. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology


2. Krambeck AE, DiMarco DS, Rangel LJ, Bergstralh EJ, Myers RP, Blute ML, Gettman MT: Radical prostatectomy for prostatic adenocarcinoma: a matched comparison of open retropubic and robot-assisted techniques. BJU Int; 2009 Feb;103(4):448-53
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  • [Title] Radical prostatectomy for prostatic adenocarcinoma: a matched comparison of open retropubic and robot-assisted techniques.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: From August 2002 to December 2005 we identified 294 patients undergoing RARP for clinically localized prostate cancer.
  • A comparison RRP group of 588 patients from the same period was matched 2:1 for surgical year, age, preoperative prostate-specific antigen level, clinical stage and biopsy Gleason grade.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / surgery. Intraoperative Complications / etiology. Postoperative Complications / etiology. Prostatectomy / methods. Prostatic Neoplasms / surgery. Robotics

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  • (PMID = 18778350.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-410X
  • [Journal-full-title] BJU international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BJU Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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3. Patil AV, Garson CD, Hossack JA: 3D prostate elastography: algorithm, simulations and experiments. Phys Med Biol; 2007 Jun 21;52(12):3643-63
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  • [Title] 3D prostate elastography: algorithm, simulations and experiments.
  • The estimator is locally initialized by the B-mode tracking stage.
  • Simulations and experiments, conducted at a center frequency of 12 MHz, 40% fractional bandwidth, on a 128 element transducer with 0.2 mm pitch, with elastographic window length of 2 mm and overlap of 90%, demonstrate a 3-6 dB improvement in the elastographic contrast-to-noise ratio over the results obtained using conventional multi-stage stretching based strain estimators.
  • [MeSH-major] Algorithms. Computer Simulation. Imaging, Three-Dimensional. Phantoms, Imaging. Prostate / ultrasonography
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / diagnosis. Elasticity. Humans. Male. Prostatic Neoplasms / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 17664564.001).
  • [ISSN] 0031-9155
  • [Journal-full-title] Physics in medicine and biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Phys Med Biol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
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4. Celikel C, Eren F, Gulluoglu B, Bekiroglu N, Turhal S: Relation of neuroendocrine cells to transforming growth factor-alpha and epidermal growth factor receptor expression in gastric adenocarcinomas: prognostic implications. Pathol Oncol Res; 2007;13(3):215-26
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  • The presence of neuroendocrine (NE) cells in gastric adenocarcinoma (GCa) is well documented, however, their significance is controversial.
  • 101 partial or total gastrectomy specimens from patients operated for conventional gastric adenocarcinoma were included in the study.
  • Among histopathologic variables, the presence of NE cells was significantly related to grade, stage and lymph node status.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / metabolism. Neurosecretory Systems / pathology. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / metabolism. Stomach Neoplasms / metabolism. Transforming Growth Factor alpha / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17922051.001).
  • [ISSN] 1219-4956
  • [Journal-full-title] Pathology oncology research : POR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathol. Oncol. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Chromogranin A; 0 / Gastrins; 0 / Transforming Growth Factor alpha; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor
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5. Sung MT, Eble JN, Cheng L: Invasion of fat justifies assignment of stage pT3a in prostatic adenocarcinoma. Pathology; 2006 Aug;38(4):309-11
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  • [Title] Invasion of fat justifies assignment of stage pT3a in prostatic adenocarcinoma.
  • METHODS: Between 2000 and 2003, 313 consecutive patients underwent radical prostatectomy for clinically localised prostate cancer in the Indiana University Hospital.
  • Other pathological characteristics of prostate cancer were also assessed and clinical data were gathered by a review of patient charts.
  • None of these 313 radical prostatectomy specimens revealed any adipose tissue components within the most peripheral boundary of normal prostatic acini in the prostate.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence of intraprostatic fat and our findings suggest that, at best, the occurrence of fat within the prostate is of extreme rarity.
  • Accordingly, the finding of carcinoma invading adipose tissue in needle biopsies should continue to be considered as extraprostatic extension and stage pT3a assigned.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Adipose Tissue / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16916718.001).
  • [ISSN] 0031-3025
  • [Journal-full-title] Pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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6. Cheng L, Davidson DD, Lin H, Koch MO: Percentage of Gleason pattern 4 and 5 predicts survival after radical prostatectomy. Cancer; 2007 Nov 1;110(9):1967-72
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  • BACKGROUND: Morphologic and clinical heterogeneity within tumor grades is well recognized in prostate cancer.
  • The objective of the current study was to determine whether the combined percentage of Gleason patterns 4 and 5 in radical prostatectomy specimens is an independent predictor of cancer-specific survival in prostate cancer patients.
  • METHODS: The radical prostatectomy specimens were analyzed from 504 consecutive prostate cancer patients who were treated at Indiana University Medical Center between 1990 and 1998.
  • RESULTS: A higher combined percentage of Gleason patterns 4 and 5 was associated with older age, higher preoperative serum prostate-specific antigen level, higher pathologic stage, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension of tumor, higher Gleason score, perineural invasion, and lymph node metastasis.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The combined percentage of Gleason patterns 4 and 5 is a powerful predictor of prostate cancer-specific survival.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Adenocarcinoma / surgery. Prostatectomy. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 17823907.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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7. Basic-Jukic N, Kes P, Bubic-Filipi L, Brunetta B: Treatment of thrombotic microangiopathies with plasma exchange. Hematology; 2007 Feb;12(1):63-7
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  • Four patients developed chronic relapsing TMA, and three of them progressed to end-stage renal disease.
  • A 74-year old male who developed TMA after prostate cancer died from disseminated malignant disease.
  • Development of end-stage renal disease was associated with poor prognosis.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / complications. Adolescent. Adrenal Cortex Hormones / therapeutic use. Adult. Aged. Anaphylaxis / etiology. Catheters, Indwelling / adverse effects. Combined Modality Therapy. Confusion / etiology. Disease Progression. Escherichia coli Infections / complications. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Hemorrhage / etiology. Humans. Kidney Diseases / etiology. Kidney Transplantation. Male. Middle Aged. Plasma. Postoperative Complications / therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / complications. Retrospective Studies. Syndrome. Thrombosis / etiology

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  • (PMID = 17364995.001).
  • [ISSN] 1607-8454
  • [Journal-full-title] Hematology (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hematology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenal Cortex Hormones
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8. Masieri L, Lanciotti M, Nesi G, Lanzi F, Tosi N, Minervini A, Lapini A, Carini M, Serni S: Prognostic role of perineural invasion in 239 consecutive patients with pathologically organ-confined prostate cancer. Urol Int; 2010;85(4):396-400
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prognostic role of perineural invasion in 239 consecutive patients with pathologically organ-confined prostate cancer.
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study was to analyze the role of perineural invasion (PNI) as a predictive parameter of outcome after radical prostatectomy (RRP) in pathologically organ-confined prostate cancer (PCa) and to assess its possible correlation with other well-known prognostic features.
  • PNI was defined as adenocarcinoma within the perineural space adjacent to a nerve.
  • In our series, patients with pathological T2 stages and PNI were found to present a higher pT2 stage and Gleason score, even though our early biochemical-free outcome was not significantly higher than in patients without PNI.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / surgery. Prostate / innervation. Prostate / surgery. Prostatectomy. Prostatic Neoplasms / surgery

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 20516669.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-0399
  • [Journal-full-title] Urologia internationalis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urol. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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9. Balanathan P, Williams ED, Wang H, Pedersen JS, Horvath LG, Achen MG, Stacker SA, Risbridger GP: Elevated level of inhibin-alpha subunit is pro-tumourigenic and pro-metastatic and associated with extracapsular spread in advanced prostate cancer. Br J Cancer; 2009 Jun 2;100(11):1784-93
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  • [Title] Elevated level of inhibin-alpha subunit is pro-tumourigenic and pro-metastatic and associated with extracapsular spread in advanced prostate cancer.
  • The biological function of inhibin-alpha subunit (INH alpha) in prostate cancer (PCa) is currently unclear.
  • This study is the first to demonstrate a pro-tumourigenic and pro-metastatic function for INH alpha associated with androgen-independent stage of metastatic prostate disease.
  • Our results also suggest that INH alpha expression in the primary prostate tumour can be used as a predictive factor for prognosis of PCa.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / metabolism. Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Separation. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Metastasis / genetics. Neoplasm Metastasis / pathology. Neoplasm Staging

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  • (PMID = 19436293.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-1827
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / inhibin-alpha subunit; 57285-09-3 / Inhibins
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2695696
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10. Darb-Esfahani S, Faggad A, Noske A, Weichert W, Buckendahl AC, Müller B, Budczies J, Röske A, Dietel M, Denkert C: Phospho-mTOR and phospho-4EBP1 in endometrial adenocarcinoma: association with stage and grade in vivo and link with response to rapamycin treatment in vitro. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol; 2009 Jul;135(7):933-41
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  • [Title] Phospho-mTOR and phospho-4EBP1 in endometrial adenocarcinoma: association with stage and grade in vivo and link with response to rapamycin treatment in vitro.
  • PURPOSE: Endometrial adenocarcinoma, due to a frequent activation of PI3 K/AKT has been proposed as a candidate neoplasm for the treatment with mTOR inhibitors.
  • CONCLUSISONS: Expression of mTOR and 4EBP1 characterize high-grade, high-stage endometrial adenocarcinomas and might be predictive markers of a response to rapamycin.
  • [MeSH-major] Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing / metabolism. Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Adenocarcinoma / metabolism. Endometrial Neoplasms / drug therapy. Endometrial Neoplasms / metabolism. Phosphoproteins / metabolism. Protein Kinases / metabolism. Sirolimus / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 19107520.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-1335
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cancer research and clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cancer Res. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing; 0 / Antibiotics, Antineoplastic; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / EIF4EBP1 protein, human; 0 / Phosphoproteins; EC 2.7.- / Protein Kinases; EC 2.7.1.1 / MTOR protein, human; EC 2.7.1.1 / TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases; W36ZG6FT64 / Sirolimus
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11. Lawton CA, DeSilvio M, Roach M 3rd, Uhl V, Kirsch R, Seider M, Rotman M, Jones C, Asbell S, Valicenti R, Hahn S, Thomas CR Jr: An update of the phase III trial comparing whole pelvic to prostate only radiotherapy and neoadjuvant to adjuvant total androgen suppression: updated analysis of RTOG 94-13, with emphasis on unexpected hormone/radiation interactions. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2007 Nov 1;69(3):646-55
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  • [Title] An update of the phase III trial comparing whole pelvic to prostate only radiotherapy and neoadjuvant to adjuvant total androgen suppression: updated analysis of RTOG 94-13, with emphasis on unexpected hormone/radiation interactions.
  • PURPOSE: This trial was designed to test the hypothesis that total androgen suppression and whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) followed by a prostate boost improves progression-free survival (PFS) by > or =10% compared with total androgen suppression and prostate only RT (PORT).
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: Patients eligible for the study included those with clinically localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate and an elevated prostate-specific antigen level of <100 ng/mL.
  • Patients were stratified by T stage, prostate-specific antigen level, and Gleason score and were required to have an estimated risk of lymph node involvement of >15%.

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  • (PMID = 17531401.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA096216-05S3; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U56 CA096216; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U56 CA096216-05S3
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase III; Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androgen Antagonists; EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS31871; NLM/ PMC2917177
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12. Yasuda K, Nagakawa O, Akashi T, Fujiuchi Y, Koizumi K, Komiya A, Saiki I, Fuse H: Serum active hepatocyte growth factor (AHGF) in benign prostatic disease and prostate cancer. Prostate; 2009 Mar 1;69(4):346-51
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  • [Title] Serum active hepatocyte growth factor (AHGF) in benign prostatic disease and prostate cancer.
  • We attempted to clarify whether serum levels of active HGF (AHGF) could be used as a marker of prostate cancer.
  • METHODS: Serum levels of AHGF and total HGF (THGF; pro-HGF + AHGF) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 38 patients with benign prostatic disease and 160 patients with prostate cancer.
  • RESULTS: Serum levels of AHGF in patients with untreated prostate cancer (0.37 +/- 0.12 ng/ml) were significantly higher than those in patients with benign prostatic disease (0.28 +/- 0.08 ng/ml) (P = 0.0001).
  • Serum AHGF levels were increased in patients with stage D or D3 compared with stage B.
  • In addition, there were significant differences in serum AHGF levels between patients with well-differentiated and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma.
  • Furthermore, the mean serum AHGF/THGF ratio in patients with stage D3 prostate cancer was significantly higher than that in patients with stage B.
  • CONCLUSIONS: AHGF may be a potential tumor marker for prostate cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / blood. Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Hepatocyte Growth Factor / blood. Prostatic Diseases / blood. Prostatic Neoplasms / blood

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  • [Copyright] 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 19021204.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0045
  • [Journal-full-title] The Prostate
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prostate
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Proteinase Inhibitory Proteins, Secretory; 0 / SPINT1 protein, human; 67256-21-7 / Hepatocyte Growth Factor
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13. Matsuo T, Nakamura K, Takamoto N, Kodama J, Hongo A, Abrzua F, Nasu Y, Kumon H, Hiramatsu Y: Expression of the serine protease hepsin and clinical outcome of human endometrial cancer. Anticancer Res; 2008 Jan-Feb;28(1A):159-64
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  • Hepsin was found to be significantly overexpressed in cancer samples compared to matched various tissues (e.g. prostate, renal, ovarian carcinoma).
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Hepsin expression was examined by immunohistochemisty in 34 cases with normal endometrium as a control, 11 cases with endometrial hyperplasia, and 128 cases with endometrioid adenocarcinoma.
  • High levels of hepsin expression were associated with advanced stage (p<0.001), high grade (p=0.002), depth of myometrial invasion (p<0.001), cervical involvement (p=0.007), lymph node metastasis (p=0.001), lymph vascular space (LVS) involvement (p=0.006), ovarian metastasis (p=0.002), and peritoneal cytology (p=0.03) of endometrial cancer.

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  • (PMID = 18383840.001).
  • [ISSN] 0250-7005
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.4.21.- / Serine Endopeptidases; EC 3.4.21.- / hepsin
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14. Sciarra A, Autran Gomez A, Salciccia S, Dattilo C, Ciccariello M, Gentile V, Di Silverio F: Biopsy-derived Gleason artifact and prostate volume: experience using ten samples in larger prostates. Urol Int; 2008;80(2):145-50
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  • [Title] Biopsy-derived Gleason artifact and prostate volume: experience using ten samples in larger prostates.
  • PURPOSE: To verify whether a significant relationship between the risk of Gleason upgrading and the prostate volume remains when the number of biopsies is increased for larger prostate volumes.
  • MATERIALS: A total of 281 biopsy-proven prostate adenocarcinoma cases who underwent radical prostatectomy (RRP) formed the cohort for this study.
  • Change in transrectal ultrasound of the prostate (TRUS) biopsies number based on total gland volume was made simply by increasing the number of biopsies from 6 to 10 when prostate volume was >50 cc.
  • No significant difference in terms of age, serum PSA, prostate volume and pT stage was found between not upgraded and upgraded cases (p > 0.05).
  • As prostate volume categories increase, the number of cancers upgraded at RRP slightly increases in particular from prostate volume 30-39 to 40-49 cc (where only 6 biopsies were performed).
  • CONCLUSIONS: We verified that the relationship between the risk of Gleason upgrading and prostate volume does not become significant simply by increasing the number of laterally directed biopsies from 6 to 10.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Prostate / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology


15. Roobol MJ, Roobol DW, Schröder FH: Is additional testing necessary in men with prostate-specific antigen levels of 1.0 ng/mL or less in a population-based screening setting? (ERSPC, section Rotterdam). Urology; 2005 Feb;65(2):343-6
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  • [Title] Is additional testing necessary in men with prostate-specific antigen levels of 1.0 ng/mL or less in a population-based screening setting? (ERSPC, section Rotterdam).
  • OBJECTIVES: Currently, several prostate cancer rescreening intervals are in use in different countries worldwide, varying from 1 to 4 years.
  • Recently, it has been proposed to determine the rescreening interval relative to the initial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level and possibly to extend the rescreening interval up to 5 years.
  • CONCLUSIONS: A strategy of PSA screening every 8 years for men with a PSA level of 1.0 ng/mL or less will lead to a considerable decrease in the number of screening visits (with the associated costs and stress), with a minimal risk of missing aggressive cancer at a curable stage.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / epidemiology. Early Diagnosis. Mass Screening / methods. Prostatic Neoplasms / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Cohort Studies. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Incidence. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Proteins / blood. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Time Factors. Unnecessary Procedures

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  • (PMID = 15708050.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
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16. Spinola M, Leoni V, Pignatiello C, Conti B, Ravagnani F, Pastorino U, Dragani TA: Functional FGFR4 Gly388Arg polymorphism predicts prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma patients. J Clin Oncol; 2005 Oct 10;23(29):7307-11
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  • [Title] Functional FGFR4 Gly388Arg polymorphism predicts prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma patients.
  • The Gly388Arg polymorphism in the FGFR4 gene was reported to modulate cancer cell migration in vitro and to be associated with breast, colon, and prostate cancer prognostic parameters.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: A case-control study was performed including 274 patients with histologically confirmed lung adenocarcinoma and 401 healthy control subjects from general population. mRNA expression analysis was carried out in healthy lung of cancer patients.
  • RESULTS: Patients with the Arg/Arg or Gly/Arg genotype compared to those with a Gly/Gly genotype had an earlier age at cancer onset (median age, 60.2 v 63.4 years), higher proportion of poor clinical stage disease (hazard ratio [HR], 2.3; 95% CI, 1.4 to 3.9; P = .002), of nodal involvement (HR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.1 to 3.2; P = .027), or of short-term survivors (HR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.3; P = .008).
  • CONCLUSION: This study suggests that FGFR4 Gly388Arg polymorphism may predict prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / genetics. Lung Neoplasms / genetics. Receptor, Fibroblast Growth Factor, Type 4 / genetics

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  • (PMID = 16061909.001).
  • [ISSN] 0732-183X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 2.7.10.1 / FGFR4 protein, human; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Fibroblast Growth Factor, Type 4
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17. Hsu IC, Bae K, Shinohara K, Pouliot J, Purdy J, Ibbott G, Speight J, Vigneault E, Ivker R, Sandler H: Phase II trial of combined high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate: preliminary results of RTOG 0321. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2010 Nov 1;78(3):751-8
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  • [Title] Phase II trial of combined high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate: preliminary results of RTOG 0321.
  • PURPOSE: To estimate the rate of late Grade 3 or greater genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events (AEs) after treatment with external beam radiotherapy and prostate high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy.
  • Patients with locally confined Stage T1c-T3b prostate cancer were eligible for the present study.
  • The pretreatment characteristics of the patients were as follows: Stage T1c-T2c, 91%; Stage T3a-T3b, 9%; prostate-specific antigen level ≤10 ng/mL, 70%; prostate-specific antigen level >10 but ≤20 ng/mL, 30%; and Gleason score 2-6, 10%; Gleason score 7, 72%; and Gleason score 8-10, 18%.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 20207506.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-355X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA32115; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U24 CA081647; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA21661; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10CA37422; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U24 CA81647; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA037422; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA021661; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA032115
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS209285; NLM/ PMC2946454
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18. Samaratunga H, Delahunt B: Ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate: current opinion and controversies. Anal Quant Cytol Histol; 2008 Aug;30(4):237-46
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  • [Title] Ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate: current opinion and controversies.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the morphologic spectrum and clinical significance of ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate (DAP).
  • DAP is found in both the periurethral region and peripheral zone of the prostate and is considered high grade in the modified Gleason grading system.
  • Immunostaining for prostatic-specific antigen and prostate-specific acid phosphatase is present in these tumors, a high percentage of which overexpress alpha-methylacyl-coenzyme A racemase.
  • This usually represents an advanced stage of tumor progression and is not a precursor of invasive carcinoma.
  • CONCLUSION: DAP are neoplasms of prostatic origin, and the terms endometrioid or endometrial adenocarcinoma are best avoided.
  • DAP are aggressive tumors with a shortened average time to progression compared with acinar adenocarcinoma.

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  • (PMID = 18773743.001).
  • [ISSN] 0884-6812
  • [Journal-full-title] Analytical and quantitative cytology and histology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anal. Quant. Cytol. Histol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 36
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19. Inagaki T, Kohjimoto Y, Hagino K, Kuramoto T, Mori T, Kikkawa K, Iba A, Uekado Y, Shinka T: [Preoperative parameters, including percent of positive biopsy cores, in predicting pathological findings after radical prostatectomy]. Nihon Hinyokika Gakkai Zasshi; 2007 Mar;98(3):565-72
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  • OBJECTIVES: We investigated whether preoperative parameters predict pathological stage at radical prostatectomy for patients with clinically localized prostatic cancer.
  • Preoperative parameters include patient age, Body Mass Index, preoperative serum PSA value, biopsy Gleason score, clinical stage, the percent of positive biopsy cores (%PosBx) and the percent of positive biopsy cores on the dominant side (%DomPosBx).
  • RESULTS: Univariate analysis showed preoperative serum PSA value (p< 0.001), biopsy Gleason score (p =0.001), clinical stage (p = 0.026), %PosBx (p= 0.002) and %DomPosBx (p=0.003) were significantly related to the pathological stage.
  • On multivariate analysis, serum PSA value (p< 0.01), biopsy Gleason score (p<0.05) and %DomPosBx (p<0.05) were significant independent predictors of pathological stage.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Prostate / pathology. Prostatectomy. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Biopsy. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Predictive Value of Tests. Prognosis. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Regression Analysis. Seminal Vesicles / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17419367.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-5287
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon Hinyōkika Gakkai zasshi. The japanese journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nippon Hinyokika Gakkai Zasshi
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
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20. Morgenbesser SD, McLaren RP, Richards B, Zhang M, Akmaev VR, Winter SF, Mineva ND, Kaplan-Lefko PJ, Foster BA, Cook BP, Dufault MR, Cao X, Wang CJ, Teicher BA, Klinger KW, Greenberg NM, Madden SL: Identification of genes potentially involved in the acquisition of androgen-independent and metastatic tumor growth in an autochthonous genetically engineered mouse prostate cancer model. Prostate; 2007 Jan 1;67(1):83-106
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Identification of genes potentially involved in the acquisition of androgen-independent and metastatic tumor growth in an autochthonous genetically engineered mouse prostate cancer model.
  • BACKGROUND: A major focus of prostate cancer research has been to identify genes that are deregulated during tumor progression, potentially providing diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets.
  • METHODS: We have employed serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) and microarray hybridization to identify alterations that occur during malignant transformation in the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) model.
  • Cluster analysis of microarray profiles with samples from various stages of the disease demonstrated that androgen-independent (AI) primary tumors are similar to metastases; 180 transcripts have expression patterns suggesting an involvement in the genesis of late-stage tumors, and our data support a role for phospholipase A2 group IIA in the acquisition of their highly aggressive characteristics.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our analyses identified well-characterized genes that were previously known to be involved in prostate cancer, validating our study, and also uncovered transcripts that had not previously been implicated in prostate cancer progression.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / genetics. Androgens / genetics. Disease Models, Animal. Gene Expression Profiling. Genes, Neoplasm / physiology. Genetic Engineering / methods. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis. Prostatic Neoplasms / genetics

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 17013881.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0045
  • [Journal-full-title] The Prostate
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prostate
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA73747; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA84296
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androgens
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21. Marks RA, Lin H, Koch MO, Cheng L: Positive-block ratio in radical prostatectomy specimens is an independent predictor of prostate-specific antigen recurrence. Am J Surg Pathol; 2007 Jun;31(6):877-81
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  • [Title] Positive-block ratio in radical prostatectomy specimens is an independent predictor of prostate-specific antigen recurrence.
  • Tumor volume has been considered an important variable in determining the probability of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence in prostatic adenocarcinoma.
  • The positive block-ratio was significantly associated with Gleason score, pathologic stage, surgical margin status, extraprostatic extension, seminal vesical invasion, lymph node metastasis, perineural invasion, and preoperative serum PSA level (all P<0.001).
  • Using a multivariate Cox regression model, controlling for pathologic stage, Gleason score, lymph node metastasis, and surgical margin status, positive-block ratio was an independent predictor of PSA recurrence (hazard ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-4.83; P=0.03).
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology


22. Kawakami S, Hyochi N, Yonese J, Yano M, Fujii Y, Kageyama Y, Fukui I, Kihara K: Three-dimensional combination of transrectal and transperineal biopsies for efficient detection of stage T1c prostate cancer. Int J Clin Oncol; 2006 Apr;11(2):127-32
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  • [Title] Three-dimensional combination of transrectal and transperineal biopsies for efficient detection of stage T1c prostate cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: Although an increasing number of men present with stage T1c prostate cancer, the optimal biopsy strategy for detecting stage T1c disease still remains to be defined.
  • The aim of this study was to explore an efficient first-time biopsy scheme for detecting stage T1c and T2 prostate cancer.
  • METHODS: A transrectal ultrasound-guided systematic three-dimensional 26-core (3D26) biopsy comprising 12 transrectal and 14 transperineal sampling sites was performed in 321 men with median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of 6.0 ng/ml in the first-time biopsy setting.
  • RESULTS: Prostate cancer was detected in 109 of the 321 men (34%) with a major complication rate of 0.6%.
  • Recursive partitioning revealed that a three-dimensional 14-core (transrectal 8-core plus transperineal 6-core) and a three-dimensional 8-core (transrectal 4-core plus transperineal 4-core) biopsies could detect more than 95% of stage T1c and T2 cancers with a minimum number of cores, respectively.
  • CONCLUSION: We propose a three-dimensional 14-core and a three-dimensional 8-core biopsy as efficient first-time biopsy schemes to detect stage T1c and T2 prostate cancer, respectively.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Biopsy, Needle / methods. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Digital Rectal Examination. Humans. Logistic Models. Male. Neoplasm Staging. Perineum. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Rectum. Ultrasonography


23. Tokuda Y, Carlino LJ, Gopalan A, Tickoo SK, Kaag MG, Guillonneau B, Eastham JA, Scher HI, Scardino PT, Reuter VE, Fine SW: Prostate cancer topography and patterns of lymph node metastasis. Am J Surg Pathol; 2010 Dec;34(12):1862-7
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  • [Title] Prostate cancer topography and patterns of lymph node metastasis.
  • Pelvic lymph node (LN) metastasis is a well-recognized route of prostate cancer spread.
  • LN metastasis is overwhelmingly associated with high-grade, high-stage, and large volume disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 21107093.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-0979
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA092629
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS387518; NLM/ PMC3414911
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24. Hughes L, Waterman FM, Dicker AP: Salvage of suboptimal prostate seed implantation: Reimplantation of underdosed region of prostate base. Brachytherapy; 2005;4(2):163-70
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  • [Title] Salvage of suboptimal prostate seed implantation: Reimplantation of underdosed region of prostate base.
  • PURPOSE: To demonstrate how a suboptimal (125)I prostate implant can be salvaged by reimplantation.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: A (125)I implant was preplanned to deliver 150 Gy to the prostate of a patient with early stage prostate cancer.
  • CONCLUSION: It is feasible to salvage a suboptimal prostate seed implant by reimplanting the underdosed regions under fluoroscopy guidance based on a plan generated from the postimplant CT scan.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / radiotherapy. Brachytherapy / instrumentation. Prostatic Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Prostheses and Implants. Salvage Therapy

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  • (PMID = 15893271.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-4721
  • [Journal-full-title] Brachytherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Brachytherapy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Iodine Radioisotopes
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25. Jonsson E, Sigbjarnarson HP, Tomasson J, Benediktsdottir KR, Tryggvadottir L, Hrafnkelsson J, Olafsdottir EJ, Tulinius H, Jonasson JG: Adenocarcinoma of the prostate in Iceland: a population-based study of stage, Gleason grade, treatment and long-term survival in males diagnosed between 1983 and 1987. Scand J Urol Nephrol; 2006;40(4):265-71
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  • [Title] Adenocarcinoma of the prostate in Iceland: a population-based study of stage, Gleason grade, treatment and long-term survival in males diagnosed between 1983 and 1987.
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate adenocarcinoma of the prostate in a single population with an extended follow-up period.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: Using the Icelandic Cancer Registry, we identified all Icelandic men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1983 and 1987.
  • Disease stage, initial treatment and follow-up information were obtained from hospital records and death certificates.
  • A critical evaluation was made of the accuracy of the death certificates regarding prostate cancer.
  • RESULTS: A total of 414 men were diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the prostate.
  • Of these, 370 were alive at the time of diagnosis and stage could be determined.
  • Four stage groups were defined: focal incidental (n=50); localized (n=164); local advanced (n=32); and metastatic disease (n=124).
  • A total of 334 patients died during the follow-up period, of whom 168 (50%) died of prostate cancer.
  • Prostate cancer-specific survival at 10 and 15 years was 100% and 90.6%, respectively for focal incidental cancer; 73.1% and 60.8% for men with localized disease; 23.4% and 11.7% for local advanced disease; and 6.81% and 5.45% for metastatic disease.
  • A Cox multivariate analysis showed age, stage and Gleason score to be independent predictors of prostate cancer death.
  • Death certificates were judged to be accurate with regard to prostate cancer in nearly all instances (96%).
  • CONCLUSIONS: During an extended follow-up period, half of all patients with prostate cancer died from the disease.
  • However, a higher stage and grade were associated with substantial prostate cancer mortality.
  • Death certificates were accurate as far as prostate cancer was concerned.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / therapy

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  • (PMID = 16916765.001).
  • [ISSN] 0036-5599
  • [Journal-full-title] Scandinavian journal of urology and nephrology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Scand. J. Urol. Nephrol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Sweden
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26. Espinosa M, Cantú D, Herrera N, Lopez CM, De la Garza JG, Maldonado V, Melendez-Zajgla J: Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins in human cervical cancer. BMC Cancer; 2006;6:45
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  • The study included 8 stage I cases; 16 stage II; 17 stageIII; and a control group of 6 samples of normal cervical squamous epithelial tissue.
  • We found no association between survivin expression and age, clinical stage, histology or menopausal state.
  • Nevertheless, we found that adenocarcinoma tumors expressed higher levels of survivin 2B and DeltaEx3 (p = 0.001 and p = 0.04 respectively, by Kruskal-Wallis).
  • A multivariate Cox's partial likelihood-based analysis showed that only FIGO stage was an independent predictor of outcome.
  • We have found that adenocarcinoma presented higher levels of survivin isoforms 2B and DeltaEx3.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / chemistry. Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Cell Line, Tumor. Female. Humans. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. RNA, Messenger / analysis. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 16504151.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2407
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / BIRC5 protein, human; 0 / Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins; 0 / Microtubule-Associated Proteins; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein; 0 / XIAP protein, human
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1403791
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27. Migowski A, Silva GA: Survival and prognostic factors of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Rev Saude Publica; 2010 Apr;44(2):344-52
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  • [Title] Survival and prognostic factors of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer.
  • OBJECTIVE: To assess survival rates and clinical (pretreatment) prognostic factors in patients with clinically localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate.
  • METHODS: Hospital cohort including 258 patients registered in the National Cancer Institute, in the city of Rio de Janeiro, southeastern Brazil, from 1990 to 1999.
  • Five- and ten-year survival functions were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier estimator from the histological diagnosis (initial time of follow-up) to death due to prostate cancer (events).
  • A Gleason score higher than 6, PSA levels higher than 40 ng/mL, B2 stage, and white skin color were independent markers of poor prognosis.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Gleason score, digital rectal examination and PSA levels have great predictive power and must be used in pretreatment risk stratification of patients with localized prostate cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / mortality. Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / mortality. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Biomarkers, Tumor / classification. Brazil / epidemiology. Digital Rectal Examination / standards. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Prostate-Specific Antigen / standards. Survival Rate

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  • [ErratumIn] Rev Saude Publica. 2010 Jun;44(3):579
  • (PMID = 20339635.001).
  • [ISSN] 1518-8787
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista de saúde pública
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Saude Publica
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
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28. Ehara H, Nakano M, Deguchi T: [What is the best strategy of hormonal therapy in the treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer?]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2006 Jun;52(6):473-7
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  • [Title] [What is the best strategy of hormonal therapy in the treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer?].
  • We retrospectively studied patients with clinical stage C-D1 prostate cancer in Gifu University and affiliated hospitals.
  • This result was remarkable in the patients under 76 years old with clinical stage C.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Prostatectomy. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 16848361.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal
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29. Hung CF, Lee CH, Hung SW, Chiu KY, Cheng CL, Yang CR, Chen CJ, Li JR: Invasive adenocarcinoma of the prostate with urethral tumor. J Chin Med Assoc; 2010 Feb;73(2):101-3
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  • [Title] Invasive adenocarcinoma of the prostate with urethral tumor.
  • Metastases of prostate cancer to the penis and urethra are rare and often represent advanced disease.
  • We describe a case of newly diagnosed prostatic adenocarcinoma with metastases to the corpus spongiosum, cavernosum, and the anterior urethra.
  • His prostate-specific antigen level was 5.02 ng/mL.
  • Digital rectal examination disclosed stony hard tumors at both lobes of the prostate.
  • Transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate revealed adenocarcinoma over both lobes; the Gleason score was 4 + 4 = 8.
  • Cystoscopy showed a penile urethral tumor and biopsy disclosed metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate; the Gleason score was 4 + 4 = 8.
  • Biochemical failure developed after 15 months and rapidly progressed to a hormone-refractory stage.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Urethral Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Humans. Male. Prognosis. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20171591.001).
  • [ISSN] 1728-7731
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the Chinese Medical Association : JCMA
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Chin Med Assoc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China (Republic : 1949- )
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
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30. Lebret T, Coloby P, Descotes JL, Droupy S, Geraud M, Tombal B: Educational tool-kit on diet and exercise: survey of prostate cancer patients about to receive androgen deprivation therapy. Urology; 2010 Dec;76(6):1434-9
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  • [Title] Educational tool-kit on diet and exercise: survey of prostate cancer patients about to receive androgen deprivation therapy.
  • OBJECTIVES: To test a tool-kit designed to improve well-being in patients with prostate cancer.
  • Lifestyle changes might lessen the metabolic, cardiovascular, and osseous side effects of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in prostate cancer patients.
  • However, content should be adapted to patient age and disease stage.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Androgens. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / adverse effects. Diet. Exercise. Hormone Antagonists / adverse effects. Medical Records. Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent / drug therapy. Pamphlets. Patient Education as Topic. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy


31. Lin DW, Porter M, Montgomery B: Treatment and survival outcomes in young men diagnosed with prostate cancer: a Population-based Cohort Study. Cancer; 2009 Jul 1;115(13):2863-71
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  • [Title] Treatment and survival outcomes in young men diagnosed with prostate cancer: a Population-based Cohort Study.
  • BACKGROUND: Outcomes of treatment for young men compared with older men with prostate cancer are poorly defined outside of limited institutional series.
  • In this study, the authors examined the association between age at diagnosis and grade, stage, treatment, and survival outcomes in men who were diagnosed during the era of prostate-specific antigen testing.
  • METHODS: The National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was used to identify men who were diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1988 and 2003.
  • RESULTS: In total, 318,774 men ages 35 years to 74 years were identified who had been diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the prostate between 1988 and 2003.
  • However, among all age groups with high grade and stage, the youngest men (ages 35-44 years) were at the highest risk of all-cause and cancer-specific death.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Age at diagnosis among men with prostate cancer continued to decline.
  • Among men with high grade and locally advanced prostate cancer, the youngest men had a particularly poor prognosis compared with older men.

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  • (PMID = 19466697.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA097186; None / None / / P50 CA097186-10; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA097186-06; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA097186-10
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS233117; NLM/ PMC2948666
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32. Okihara K, Nakanishi H, Nakamura T, Mizutani Y, Kawauchi A, Miki T: Clinical characteristics of prostate cancer in Japanese men in the eras before and after serum prostate-specific antigen testing. Int J Urol; 2005 Jul;12(7):662-7
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  • [Title] Clinical characteristics of prostate cancer in Japanese men in the eras before and after serum prostate-specific antigen testing.
  • BACKGROUND: We retrospectively reviewed a large series of Japanese men with histologically proven prostate cancer to assess the clinical characteristics of the cancer in three different eras of prostate cancer management since prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing started in 1988.
  • METHODS: The medical records of 1125 patients treated between 1975 and 2002 were reviewed with respect to age, chief complaints, clinical stage, tumor grade, treatment options at each stage, and prognosis.
  • RESULTS: Compared with the pre-PSA era, there were significant increases in the proportion of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma with respect to the biopsy tumor grade (24 vs 35%, P<0.01), in the proportion of linically organ-confined disease (21 vs 43%, P<0.001), and in the proportion of patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (13%vs 20%, P<0.01) after PSA testing was introduced.
  • The proportion of patients participating in prostate cancer screening increased from 3% (pre-PSA era) to 11% (PSA era phase 1 and PSA era phase 2, P<0.05).
  • In all clinical stages, there were significant differences between the pre- and post-PSA eras in cause-specific survival rates (5-year: 74 vs 94% in stages A and B, P<0.01; 54 vs 89% in stage C, P<0.001; 32 vs 53% in stage D, P<0.001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Migrations in the age of patients (toward younger patients), the stage of the cancer (towards earlier stages) and the histological findings (toward favorable findings), in addition to changes in treatment options, have contributed to the prolonged survival of Japanese men with prostate cancer after the PSA testing was introduced.
  • [MeSH-major] Prostate-Specific Antigen. Prostatic Neoplasms / complications. Prostatic Neoplasms / diagnosis


33. Tollefson MK, Slezak JM, Leibovich BC, Zincke H, Blute ML: Stratification of patient risk based on prostate-specific antigen doubling time after radical retropubic prostatectomy. Mayo Clin Proc; 2007 Apr;82(4):422-7
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  • [Title] Stratification of patient risk based on prostate-specific antigen doubling time after radical retropubic prostatectomy.
  • OBJECTIVE: To assess the risk of local recurrence, systemic progression, and death from cancer among patients who experience biochemical relapse after radical retropubic prostatectomy and to stratify those patients by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) doubling time (DT).
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: We identified patients who experienced biochemical recurrence (defined as a PSA level < or =0.4 ng/mL) after radical prostatectomy from January 1, 1990, to December 31, 1999, for prostate adenocarcinoma.
  • Patients with a PSA-DT of 10 years or more were less likely to have a higher preoperative PSA level, Gleason score, advanced pathologic stage, and seminal vesicle invasion.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Prostate-specific antigen DT is an independent predictor of clinical disease recurrence and mortality after surgical biochemical failure.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / surgery. Prostate-Specific Antigen / biosynthesis. Prostatectomy. Prostatic Neoplasms / surgery


34. Ludgate CM, Bishop DC, Pai H, Eldridge B, Lim J, Berthelet E, Blood P, Piercy GB, Steinhoff G: Neoadjuvant hormone therapy and external-beam radiation for localized high-risk prostate cancer: the importance of PSA nadir before radiation. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2005 Aug 1;62(5):1309-15
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  • [Title] Neoadjuvant hormone therapy and external-beam radiation for localized high-risk prostate cancer: the importance of PSA nadir before radiation.
  • PURPOSE: To examine the impact of various patient, disease, and treatment characteristics on outcome in patients treated with neoadjuvant hormone therapy (NAHT) and external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for clinically localized, high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma (initial prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level >20, Gleason score 8-10 or Stage > or = T3).
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: A retrospective chart review was conducted on 407 patients treated between 1991 and 2001 with NAHT and EBRT for high-risk prostate cancer.
  • The effect of tumor (PSA level, Gleason score, and T stage) and treatment (NAHT duration, total-hormone duration, preradiation PSA) characteristics on rates of biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS), prostate cancer-specific survival, and overall survival were examined.
  • On multivariate analysis, initial PSA level (p = 0.004), Gleason score (p = 0.005), and preradiation PSA level (p < 0.001) were predictive of bDFS, whereas age, T stage, duration of NAHT, and duration of total hormone therapy were not predictive of outcomes.
  • Gleason score and preradiation PSA level were also predictive of prostate cancer-specific survival rates.
  • CONCLUSION: Improved bDFS in patients with high-risk prostate cancer was associated with lower initial PSA level, lower Gleason score, and lower preradiation PSA level.
  • [MeSH-major] Androgen Antagonists / therapeutic use. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Prostatic Neoplasms / blood. Prostatic Neoplasms / therapy


35. Hardie C, Parker C, Norman A, Eeles R, Horwich A, Huddart R, Dearnaley D: Early outcomes of active surveillance for localized prostate cancer. BJU Int; 2005 May;95(7):956-60
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  • [Title] Early outcomes of active surveillance for localized prostate cancer.
  • OBJECTIVE: To describe the preliminary clinical outcomes of active surveillance (AS), a new strategy aiming to individualize the management of early prostate cancer by selecting only those men with significant cancers for curative therapy, and illustrate the contrast with a policy of watchful waiting (WW).
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty men with early prostate cancer began AS at the authors' institution between 1993 and 2002.
  • Eligibility included histologically confirmed prostatic adenocarcinoma, fitness for radical treatment, clinical stage T1/T2, N0/X, M0/X, a prostate specific antigen (PSA) level of < or = 20 ng/mL, and a Gleason score of < or = 7.
  • During the same period, 32 men with localized prostate cancer (any T stage, N0/X, M0/X, any PSA, Gleason score < or = 7) were managed by WW; hormonal treatment was indicated for symptomatic prostate cancer progression.
  • No patient developed evidence of metastatic disease, none started palliative hormone therapy, and there were no deaths from prostate cancer.
  • Twenty (62%) of the 32 patients on WW remained on observation, eight (25%) received palliative hormonal therapy and four (12%) died, including one from prostate cancer.
  • CONCLUSIONS: AS is feasible in selected men with early prostate cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Clinical Protocols. Disease-Free Survival. Feasibility Studies. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Prostatectomy / methods


36. Theodore SC, Rhim JS, Turner T, Yates C: MiRNA 26a expression in a novel panel of African American prostate cancer cell lines. Ethn Dis; 2010;20(1 Suppl 1):S1-96-100
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  • [Title] MiRNA 26a expression in a novel panel of African American prostate cancer cell lines.
  • INTRODUCTION: African American men have disproportionately high incidence and mortality rates of prostate cancer when compared to other ethnic groups in the United States.
  • Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the miRNA 26a expression profile in novel African American and Caucasian prostate cell lines at each clinical stage of prostate cancer progression.
  • METHODS: The miR-26a expression profile was investigated using novel African American and Caucasian prostate cell lines representing each pathological stage: non-malignant, malignant, and metastatic tumors.
  • RESULTS: Our data showed a 2.25 fold increase for miR-26a in the non-malignant, a 13.3 fold increase in malignant and 2.38 fold increase in metastatic tumors, when comparing African American and Caucasian prostate cell lines of similar clinical stage and pathological grade.
  • African American malignant prostate cancer cell lines showed the most significant fold difference in expression among all cell lines tested.
  • Furthermore, there was a general increase in miR-26a expression toward the more aggressive cell lines in both African American and Caucasian prostate cell lines.
  • CONCLUSION: To date, we are unaware of any studies that compare the miRNA profile at different stages of prostate cancer among two racial groups.
  • Although a gene target for miR-26a has not been identified, our data show a possible role for miRNA regulation of gene expression in prostate cancer progression.
  • Furthermore, this study suggests that miRNAs could possibly contribute to the aggressiveness associated in African American patients with prostate cancer.

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  • (PMID = 20521394.001).
  • [ISSN] 1049-510X
  • [Journal-full-title] Ethnicity & disease
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ethn Dis
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / 2G12RR03059; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U54 CA118623-05; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / G12 RR003059; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U54 CA118623; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U54 CA118948; United States / NIMHD NIH HHS / MD / 3P20MD000195; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / G12 RR003059-22; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA118623-05; United States / NIMHD NIH HHS / MD / P20 MD000195; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / RR003059-22
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / MicroRNAs
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS302881; NLM/ PMC3118047
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37. Lamb DS, Slaney D, Smart R, Nacey JN, Russell G, Scott B, Johnson CA, Adams JD, Moran S, Delahunt B: Prostate cancer: the new evidence base for diagnosis and treatment. Pathology; 2007 Dec;39(6):537-44
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prostate cancer: the new evidence base for diagnosis and treatment.
  • Although prostate cancer (PC) has a significant mortality, there is debate regarding the utility of PC screening.
  • Cancers diagnosed by screening are more likely to be early stage, when most can be cured by a number of different treatment options.
  • 4. Modern histopathological assessment of fine core needle biopsies of the prostate allows for the likely behaviour of cancer present to be accurately predicted.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / diagnosis. Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Evidence-Based Medicine. Pathology / trends. Prostatic Neoplasms / diagnosis. Prostatic Neoplasms / therapy


38. Tollefson M, Magera J, Sebo T, Cohen J, Drauch A, Maier J, Frank I: Raman spectral imaging of prostate cancer: can Raman molecular imaging be used to augment standard histopathology? BJU Int; 2010 Aug;106(4):484-8
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  • [Title] Raman spectral imaging of prostate cancer: can Raman molecular imaging be used to augment standard histopathology?
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether Raman molecular imaging (RMI, which combines digital imaging and analytical spectroscopy to evaluate the biochemical composition of interrogated material) can be used to identify biochemical differences in patients with Gleason 7 prostate cancer who progress to metastatic disease and die from prostate cancer.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: We identified 38 patients who had a radical prostatectomy for Gleason 7 adenocarcinoma of the prostate.
  • Patients were matched for preoperative prostate-specific antigen level, surgical margin status, pathological stage, tumour volume, age at surgery, year of surgery and DNA ploidy.
  • This preliminary work lays the foundation for the further study of RMI for evaluating prostate tissue.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Prostatectomy / methods. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Spectrum Analysis, Raman


39. Dellavedova T, Ponzano R, Racca L, Minuzzi F, Domínguez M: Prostate cancer as incidental finding in transurethral resection. Arch Esp Urol; 2010 Dec;63(10):855-61
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  • [Title] Prostate cancer as incidental finding in transurethral resection.
  • Prostate adenocarcinoma is found in surgical samples without prior diagnosis in 4 to 15% of the patients.
  • We present 7 cases of prostate cancer detected in 100 patients who underwent bipolar transurethral resection (TUR) of the prostate due to regular indications.
  • The aim of this paper is to describe patient's characteristics, postoperative outcome, analyze TURP as a diagnostic tool and evaluate therapeutic options for prostate cancer (PCa).
  • In 7 of them, prostate adenocarcinomas were detected.
  • None of the patients underwent TURP only because of increased prostate-specific antigen (PSA).
  • Prostate cancer detection global rate was 7%, 3 cases were incidental findings (low PSA and low-risk tumors), 3 patients had increased PSA and several previous biopsies with negative results and 1 had low PSA and aggressive tumor (Gleason 4+3).
  • CONCLUSIONS: TURP patients with prostate cancer are a heterogeneous group.
  • TURP can be both diagnostic and therapeutic when facing patients with obstructive symptoms, high PSA and negative prostate biopsies.
  • There are several therapeutic alternatives for TURP patients with cancer, taking into consideration tumor grade and stage, age, life expectancy and will of the patient.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / diagnosis. Prostatic Diseases / surgery. Prostatic Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Humans. Incidental Findings. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Transurethral Resection of Prostate


40. Greenlee JE, Clawson SA, Hill KE, Dechet CB, Carlson NG: Antineuronal autoantibodies in paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration associated with adenocarcinoma of the prostate. J Neurol Sci; 2010 Apr 15;291(1-2):74-8
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  • [Title] Antineuronal autoantibodies in paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration associated with adenocarcinoma of the prostate.
  • Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes are unusual in prostatic cancer, and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration associated with adenocarcinoma of the prostate is rare.
  • Here we report a 68year old man who developed progressive ataxia in the setting of stage D2 adenocarcinoma of the prostate and whose MRI showed cerebellar atrophy.
  • Sera from neurologically normal patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate did not contain this antibody, and the patient's serum did not react with normal prostate or with prostatic adenocarcinomas from other individuals.
  • Prostatic adenocarcinoma may occasionally be accompanied by development of anticerebellar antibodies.
  • Adenocarcinoma of the prostate should be considered as a possible underlying malignancy in older males with unexplained progressive cerebellar degeneration.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / immunology. Autoantibodies / blood. Brain / immunology. Neurons / immunology. Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration / immunology. Prostatic Neoplasms / immunology


41. Saad M, Abdel-Rahim M, Abol-Enein H, Ghoneim MA: Concomitant pathology in the prostate in cystoprostatectomy specimens: a prospective study and review. BJU Int; 2008 Dec;102(11):1544-50
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  • [Title] Concomitant pathology in the prostate in cystoprostatectomy specimens: a prospective study and review.
  • OBJECTIVES: To investigate possible associated pathology in the prostate removed from patients with invasive bladder cancer and determine if there is a justification for prostate-sparing cystectomy.
  • The prostate was step sectioned at 2-3 mm intervals and any associated pathology determined; patient and tumour characteristics were correlated with prostatic pathology.
  • The results were compared with those published previously, and the potential functional advantages of prostate sparing are reviewed and discussed.
  • RESULTS: Prostatic adenocarcinoma was detected in 90 of the 425 (21.2%) patients.
  • There was no significant correlation between preoperative prostate-specific antigen level and the presence of adenocarcinoma, Gleason score or prostatic tumour stage.
  • CONCLUSION: We think that the potential oncological risks of prostate-sparing cystectomy outweigh any small and possible functional benefits; accordingly, the prostate should not be retained.
  • [MeSH-major] Cystectomy / methods. Prostate / pathology. Prostatectomy / methods. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 18565169.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-410X
  • [Journal-full-title] BJU international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BJU Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 65
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42. Helpap B, Egevad L: [Clinical insignificance of prostate cancer: are there morphological findings?]. Urologe A; 2009 Feb;48(2):170-4
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  • [Title] [Clinical insignificance of prostate cancer: are there morphological findings?].
  • OBJECTIVE: Overdiagnosis and overtreatment of microfocal nonpalpable and early-stage prostatic adenocarcinoma are currently a topic of strong discussion.
  • We tried to find morphological findings of such insignificant carcinomas of the prostate.
  • STUDY DESIGN: More than 1,000 consecutive core needle biopsy specimens of prostate carcinoma taken during 1 year (2007) were graded according to the modified Gleason scoring system.
  • The results were correlated to serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and tumor extent in the cores.
  • CONCLUSION: With a very restricted parameter of a microfocal adenocarcinoma of the prostate with a Gleason score <7a, tumor infiltration of <or=1 mm in only one core needle biopsy, and PSA of <or=10 ng/ml, clinical insignificance may be possible, and in agreement with the patient, active surveillance is feasible.
  • [MeSH-major] Biopsy, Needle / methods. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Prostatic Neoplasms / blood. Prostatic Neoplasms / diagnosis


43. Bantis A, Gonidi M, Athanassiades P, Tsolos Ch, Liossi A, Aggelonidou E, Athanassiadou AM, Petrakakou E, Athanassiadou P: Prognostic value of DNA analysis of prostate adenocarcinoma: correlation to clinicopathologic predictors. J Exp Clin Cancer Res; 2005 Jun;24(2):273-8
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  • [Title] Prognostic value of DNA analysis of prostate adenocarcinoma: correlation to clinicopathologic predictors.
  • The ability to accurately predict tumor behavior and patient survival is a problem in managing patients with prostate cancer.
  • DNA ploidy provides important information for the evaluation of the prognosis of prostate cancer.
  • The aim of this study was to investigate the DNA ploidy in imprints from prostate adenocarcinomas in a group of 70 patients in relation to Gleason score, tumor differentiation, stage and PSA serum levels.
  • A statistically significant difference was found between DNA aneuploidy and increased pretreatment PSA serum levels (>4 ng/ml) (p<0.001), as well as between ploidy pattern and stage of the disease (p<0.001).
  • Our results conclude that DNA ploidy status appears to be an additional marker in the field of prognosis of prostatic adenocarcinoma and could provide useful information on the potential behavior of prostate cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / diagnosis. Adenocarcinoma / genetics. DNA / metabolism. Prostatic Neoplasms / diagnosis. Prostatic Neoplasms / genetics

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  • (PMID = 16110761.001).
  • [ISSN] 0392-9078
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of experimental & clinical cancer research : CR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Exp. Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 9007-49-2 / DNA
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44. Chen C, Chen LQ, Chen LD, Yang GL, Li Y: Evaluation of tumor markers biochip C12 system in the diagnosis of gastric cancer and the strategies for improvement: analysis of 100 cases. Hepatogastroenterology; 2008 May-Jun;55(84):991-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODOLOGY: Sera from 100 gastric carcinoma patients were screened for 12 tumor markers including carcinoembryonic antigen, alpha-fetoprotein, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, carbohydrate antigen 242, cancer antigen 15-3, cancer antigen 125, prostate specific antigen, free-PSA, neuron-specific enolase, human chorionic gonagotropin-beta, human growth hormone, and ferritin, using the C12 biochip system.
  • The differences in diagnostic rates between stage I (7.8%) and stage IV (50%) reached statistical significance (chi-square test, Chi2=7.20, p<0.01).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The C12 biochip system has some value in the diagnosis of advanced stage gastric cancer, but less sensitive in early gastric cancer.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / diagnosis. Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous / diagnosis. Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous / pathology. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Carcinoma / diagnosis. Carcinoma / pathology. Carcinoma, Signet Ring Cell / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Signet Ring Cell / pathology. Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Predictive Value of Tests. Prognosis. Young Adult


45. Kim SY, Song SY, Kim MS, Lee JY, Lee HM, Choi HY, Yoo NJ, Lee SH: Immunohistochemical analysis of Fas and FLIP in prostate cancers. APMIS; 2009 Jan;117(1):28-33
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  • [Title] Immunohistochemical analysis of Fas and FLIP in prostate cancers.
  • Expression of Fas has been reported in prostate tissues several times, but the data were not consistent.
  • Expression of FLICE-like inhibitory protein (FLIP), an inhibitor of Fas-mediated apoptosis, has not been studied by immunohistochemistry in prostate tissues.
  • The aim of this study is to explore whether alterations of Fas and FLIP expression occur in prostate cancer tissues.
  • We analyzed the expression of Fas and FLIP in 107 prostate adenocarcinoma tissues by immunohistochemistry using a tissue microarray approach.
  • Prostate intraepithelial neoplasm also showed a strong Fas immunoreactivity.
  • The decreased expression of Fas was not associated with pathologic characteristics, including FLIP expression, size of the cancers, age, Gleason score and stage.
  • The decreased expression of Fas in a large fraction of prostate cancers compared with their normal cells suggested that loss of Fas expression might play a role in tumorigenesis in some prostate cancers possibly by inhibiting apoptosis mediated by Fas.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / metabolism. Antigens, CD95 / metabolism. CASP8 and FADD-Like Apoptosis Regulating Protein / metabolism. Prostate / metabolism. Prostatic Neoplasms / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19161534.001).
  • [ISSN] 1600-0463
  • [Journal-full-title] APMIS : acta pathologica, microbiologica, et immunologica Scandinavica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] APMIS
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD95; 0 / CASP8 and FADD-Like Apoptosis Regulating Protein
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46. van Niekerk CG, van der Laak JA, Börger ME, Huisman HJ, Witjes JA, Barentsz JO, Hulsbergen-van de Kaa CA: Computerized whole slide quantification shows increased microvascular density in pT2 prostate cancer as compared to normal prostate tissue. Prostate; 2009 Jan 1;69(1):62-9
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  • [Title] Computerized whole slide quantification shows increased microvascular density in pT2 prostate cancer as compared to normal prostate tissue.
  • BACKGROUND: Contrast enhanced imaging enables powerful, non-invasive diagnostics, important for detection and staging of early prostate cancer.
  • The uptake of contrast agent is increased in prostate cancer as compared to normal prostate tissue.
  • Aim of this study was to investigate whether microvascularity is increased in prostate confined cancer (pT2).
  • METHODS: Radical prostatectomy specimens of 26 patients were selected for organ confined peripheral zone tumors which were restricted to one side of the prostate.
  • Specimens were scanned using a computer controlled microscope and scanning stage and vessels were recognized automatically.
  • Pseudocolor mappings were produced showing number of vascular profiles (MVD), vascular area (MVA) and perimeter (MVP) in an overview of the entire prostate transection.
  • Mean, coefficient of variation and 75th percentile of these parameters were calculated automatically in manually indicated areas, consisting of the entire tumor area and the corresponding normal area in the contra lateral side of the prostate.
  • RESULTS: The mappings clearly indicate areas of increased vascularity in prostate transections.
  • In contrast, the heterogeneity in tumor vasculature was significantly decreased as compared to normal prostate (P < 0.001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Characteristics of microvasculature deviated significantly in pT2 prostate tumor as compared to normal tissue.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / blood supply. Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Microvessels / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / blood supply. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antigens, CD31 / metabolism. Humans. Image Processing, Computer-Assisted / methods. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Microscopy / methods. Middle Aged. Neovascularization, Pathologic / pathology. Prostate / blood supply. Prostate / cytology. Prostatectomy

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 18780292.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0045
  • [Journal-full-title] The Prostate
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prostate
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD31
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47. Suzuki R, Jujo Y, Koshiba K, Hoshiai O, Endo T, Aihara M, Nakajo H, Ohori M: [Histopathologic changes due to combination of androgen deprivation and transurethral microwave thermotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2009 Feb;55(2):79-85
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  • [Title] [Histopathologic changes due to combination of androgen deprivation and transurethral microwave thermotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer].
  • Fifty patients with localized prostate cancer, clinical stage T1-T2N0M0 were studied.
  • The therapy started with androgen deprivation therapy for 3 months to reduce the volume of prostate about 35%.
  • Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) was performed in radical fashion at least 3 months after TUMT to confirm the treatment effect.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / therapy. Transurethral Resection of Prostate

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  • (PMID = 19301612.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androgen Antagonists
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48. Lessard L, Bégin LR, Gleave ME, Mes-Masson AM, Saad F: Nuclear localisation of nuclear factor-kappaB transcription factors in prostate cancer: an immunohistochemical study. Br J Cancer; 2005 Oct 31;93(9):1019-23
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  • [Title] Nuclear localisation of nuclear factor-kappaB transcription factors in prostate cancer: an immunohistochemical study.
  • Several reports suggest that the canonical nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway is constitutively activated in a subset of prostate cancer cells.
  • However, except for RelA (p65), little is known about the status of NF-kappaB transcription factors in prostate cancer tissues.
  • The subcellular localisation of NF-kappaB factors was tested against relevant clinical parameters (preoperative prostate-specific antigen, pathological stage, and postoperative Gleason grade).
  • The nuclear localisation of both canonical and noncanonical NF-kappaB subunits in prostate cancer cells suggests for the first time that different NF-kappaB pathways and dimers may be activated in the progression of the disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / metabolism. Cell Nucleus / metabolism. NF-kappa B / metabolism. Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia / metabolism. Prostatic Neoplasms / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] DNA-Binding Proteins / metabolism. Dimerization. Disease Progression. Humans. Immunoenzyme Techniques. Male. NF-kappa B p50 Subunit / metabolism. NF-kappa B p52 Subunit / metabolism. Nuclear Proteins / metabolism. Prostate-Specific Antigen / metabolism. Subcellular Fractions. Tissue Array Analysis. Transcription Factor RelA / metabolism. Transcription Factor RelB / metabolism. Transcription Factors

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  • (PMID = 16205698.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0920
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / HIVEN86A protein, human; 0 / NF-kappa B; 0 / NF-kappa B p50 Subunit; 0 / NF-kappa B p52 Subunit; 0 / Nuclear Proteins; 0 / RELA protein, human; 0 / RELB protein, human; 0 / Transcription Factor RelA; 0 / Transcription Factors; 147337-75-5 / Transcription Factor RelB; EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2361687
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49. Gurel B, Iwata T, Koh CM, Jenkins RB, Lan F, Van Dang C, Hicks JL, Morgan J, Cornish TC, Sutcliffe S, Isaacs WB, Luo J, De Marzo AM: Nuclear MYC protein overexpression is an early alteration in human prostate carcinogenesis. Mod Pathol; 2008 Sep;21(9):1156-67
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  • [Title] Nuclear MYC protein overexpression is an early alteration in human prostate carcinogenesis.
  • A region on chromosome 8q24 encompassing the MYC locus is amplified in prostate cancer, but this occurs mostly in advanced disease suggesting that MYC alterations occur late in prostate cancer.
  • In contrast, MYC mRNA is elevated in most prostate cancers, even those of relatively low stage and grade (eg Gleason score 6) suggesting that MYC plays a role in initiation.
  • Thus, it is critical to determine whether MYC protein is elevated in human prostate cancer, and if so, at what stage of the disease this elevation occurs.
  • We utilized a new anti-MYC antibody coupled with genetically defined control experiments to localize MYC protein within human tissue microarrays consisting of normal, atrophy, PIN, primary adenocarcinoma, and metastatic adenocarcinoma.
  • These results provide evidence that upregulation of nuclear MYC protein expression is a highly prevalent and early change in prostate cancer and suggest that increased nuclear MYC may be a critical oncogenic event driving human prostate cancer initiation and progression.

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  • (PMID = 18567993.001).
  • [ISSN] 1530-0285
  • [Journal-full-title] Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mod. Pathol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA006973; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA058236; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA058236-11; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50CA58236
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / MYC protein, human; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc; 0 / RNA, Messenger
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS285485; NLM/ PMC3170853
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50. Oken MM, Marcus PM, Hu P, Beck TM, Hocking W, Kvale PA, Cordes J, Riley TL, Winslow SD, Peace S, Levin DL, Prorok PC, Gohagan JK, PLCO Project Team: Baseline chest radiograph for lung cancer detection in the randomized Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. J Natl Cancer Inst; 2005 Dec 21;97(24):1832-9
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  • [Title] Baseline chest radiograph for lung cancer detection in the randomized Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial.
  • BACKGROUND: The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial was initiated in 1992 to examine cause-specific mortality reduction from screening for these four cancers in men and women.
  • Among these cancers, 44% (95% CI = 35% to 52%) were stage I non-small-cell lung cancer.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In the baseline screen, nearly half the cancers were stage I.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / radiography. Aged. Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / radiography. Colorectal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Confounding Factors (Epidemiology). Female. Humans. Incidence. Male. Mass Screening. Middle Aged. Minority Groups / statistics & numerical data. Neoplasm Staging. Ovarian Neoplasms / diagnosis. Prevalence. Prostatic Neoplasms / diagnosis. Smoking / adverse effects. Smoking / epidemiology. United States / epidemiology


51. Ahmed H, Cappello F, Rodolico V, Vasta GR: Evidence of heavy methylation in the galectin 3 promoter in early stages of prostate adenocarcinoma: development and validation of a methylated marker for early diagnosis of prostate cancer. Transl Oncol; 2009 Aug 18;2(3):146-56
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  • [Title] Evidence of heavy methylation in the galectin 3 promoter in early stages of prostate adenocarcinoma: development and validation of a methylated marker for early diagnosis of prostate cancer.
  • Galectins, soluble intracellular and extracellular beta-galactoside-binding proteins, are known to be involved in the progression and metastasis of various cancers, including prostate adenocarcinoma, but the detailed mechanism of their biological roles remains elusive.
  • In the prostate cancer cell lines PC-3 and DU-145, galectin 3 (gal3) is present at normal levels, whereas in LNCaP, its expression is silenced.
  • On immunohistochemical analysis of normal and tumor prostate tissues, gal3 was found expressed both in nucleus and cytoplasm of benign prostatic hyperplasia, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and stage I.
  • On methylation analysis, the gal3 promoter in stage II prostate adenocarcinoma (PCa) was found heavily methylated, whereas in stages III and IV, it was only lightly methylated.
  • However, in stage I PCa, both heavy and light methylations were observed in the gal3 promoter.

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  • (PMID = 19701499.001).
  • [ISSN] 1936-5233
  • [Journal-full-title] Translational oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transl Oncol
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM070589
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2730137
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52. Liang JT, Lai HS, Lee PH, Chang KJ: Laparoscopic pelvic autonomic nerve-preserving surgery for sigmoid colon cancer. Ann Surg Oncol; 2008 Jun;15(6):1609-16
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  • The genitourinary function was evaluated on the basis of validated questionnaires including International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), and Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI).
  • RESULTS: A total of 112 patients (tumor, node, metastasis system stage I, n = 8; stage II, n = 54; stage III, n = 50; male, n = 58; female, n = 54; age [mean +/- standard deviation], 55.8 +/- 6.4 years) with good baseline genitourinary function were operated on with the intent of total preservation of pelvic autonomic nerves and curative resection of sigmoid colon cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / surgery. Autonomic Pathways / surgery. Colectomy. Sigmoid Neoplasms / surgery. Trauma, Nervous System / prevention & control

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  • (PMID = 18365285.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-4681
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2373867
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53. El Touny LH, Banerjee PP: Akt GSK-3 pathway as a target in genistein-induced inhibition of TRAMP prostate cancer progression toward a poorly differentiated phenotype. Carcinogenesis; 2007 Aug;28(8):1710-7
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  • [Title] Akt GSK-3 pathway as a target in genistein-induced inhibition of TRAMP prostate cancer progression toward a poorly differentiated phenotype.
  • Anti-proliferative properties of genistein in prostate and other cancers have been studied extensively.
  • In this study, we have demonstrated that the incorporation of genistein in the diet of transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate model (TRAMP/FVB) mice resulted in a reduction in prostate size and the incidence of poorly differentiated (PD) cancer ensuing in an accumulation of prostates at the prostatic intra-epithelial neoplasia (PIN) stage.
  • TRAMP/FVB prostate cancer progression and the onset of PD cancer were characterized by the activation of acutely transforming retrovirus AKT8 in rodent T cell lymphoma (Akt), phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta (GSK-3beta), post-transcriptional up-regulation of cyclin D1 and repression of cadherin-1 via snail-1 up-regulation.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Cell Differentiation / genetics. Dietary Supplements. Genistein / administration & dosage. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 / physiology. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt / physiology. Signal Transduction / drug effects


54. Hampton L, Kawachi M: Robot-assisted laparoscopic ipsilateral ureteroureterostomy for injury of an ectopic duplicated ureter following robotic prostatectomy. J Robot Surg; 2008 Dec;2(4):253-5
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  • Prostate pathology showed adenocarcinoma of the prostate, Gleason 3 + 4 = 7 with negative margins pathologic stage T2c.Robot-assisted laparoscopic ipsilateral ureteroureterostomy is safe and effective for the treatment of ureteral injury in a duplicated system.

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  • (PMID = 27637796.001).
  • [ISSN] 1863-2483
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of robotic surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Robot Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Laparoscopy / Robotic / Ureteral duplication / Ureteral injury / Ureteroureterostomy
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55. Matousková M: [Prostate cancer]. Klin Onkol; 2008;21(5):280-7
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  • [Title] [Prostate cancer].
  • [Transliterated title] Karcinom prostaty.
  • Malignant prostate tumors rank with its incidence among the most frequent tumors in man in Czech Republic.
  • Adenocarcinoma of the prostate due to its unusual behavior occupy especial position among solid tumors.
  • After the introduction of PSA in the diagnostic methods we can gradually see shift of the new cases of prostate cancer to the localised stage.
  • Movement to less localized stage diminishes the chance of recovery, but even the metastatic adenocarcinoma can be stabilised at least for some time.

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  • (PMID = 19202959.001).
  • [ISSN] 0862-495X
  • [Journal-full-title] Klinická onkologie : casopis Ceské a Slovenské onkologické spolecnosti
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Klin Onkol
  • [Language] cze
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Czech Republic
  • [Number-of-references] 12
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56. Schlomm T, Iwers L, Kirstein P, Jessen B, Köllermann J, Minner S, Passow-Drolet A, Mirlacher M, Milde-Langosch K, Graefen M, Haese A, Steuber T, Simon R, Huland H, Sauter G, Erbersdobler A: Clinical significance of p53 alterations in surgically treated prostate cancers. Mod Pathol; 2008 Nov;21(11):1371-8
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  • [Title] Clinical significance of p53 alterations in surgically treated prostate cancers.
  • Despite the high number of previous studies, the role of p53 alterations in prostate cancer is not clearly defined.
  • To address the role of p53 alterations in prostate cancer biology, a total of 2514 cancers treated by radical prostatectomy were successfully analyzed by immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray format.
  • These data suggest a high sensitivity of our immunohistochemistry approach and confirm the overall low frequency of p53 alterations in clinically localized prostate cancer.
  • A positive p53 immunostaining was strongly associated with presence of exon 5-8 mutations (P<0.0001), advanced pT-stage (P<0.0001), high Gleason grade (P<0.0001), positive surgical margins (P=0.03) and early biochemical tumor recurrence (P<0.0001).
  • A higher rate of positive p53 immunostaining was detected in late-stage diseases including metastatic prostate cancer (P=0.0152) and hormone-refractory tumors (P=0.0003).
  • In summary, the results of this study show that p53 mutations characterize a small biologically aggressive subgroup of prostate cancers with a high risk of progression after prostatectomy.
  • The rate of p53 alterations increases with prostate cancer progression.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / metabolism. Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Prostatic Neoplasms / metabolism. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 18552821.001).
  • [ISSN] 1530-0285
  • [Journal-full-title] Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mod. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
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57. Bolla M, Van Tienhoven G, Warde P, Dubois JB, Mirimanoff RO, Storme G, Bernier J, Kuten A, Sternberg C, Billiet I, Torecilla JL, Pfeffer R, Cutajar CL, Van der Kwast T, Collette L: External irradiation with or without long-term androgen suppression for prostate cancer with high metastatic risk: 10-year results of an EORTC randomised study. Lancet Oncol; 2010 Nov;11(11):1066-73
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  • [Title] External irradiation with or without long-term androgen suppression for prostate cancer with high metastatic risk: 10-year results of an EORTC randomised study.
  • BACKGROUND: We did a randomised phase 3 trial assessing the benefit of addition of long-term androgen suppression with a luteinising-hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist to external irradiation in patients with prostate cancer with high metastatic risk.
  • METHODS: For this open-label randomised trial, eligible patients were younger than 80 years and had newly diagnosed histologically proven T1-2 prostatic adenocarcinoma with WHO histological grade 3 or T3-4 prostatic adenocarcinoma of any histological grade, and a WHO performance status of 0-2.
  • Treatment allocation was open label and used a minimisation algorithm with institution, clinical stage of the disease, results of pelvic-lymph-node dissection, and irradiation fields extension as minimisation factors.
  • Patients were irradiated externally, once a day, 5 days a week, for 7 weeks to a total dose of 50 Gy to the whole pelvis, with an additional 20 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles.
  • 10-year overall survival was 39·8% (95% CI 31·9-47·5) in patients receiving radiotherapy alone and 58·1% (49·2-66·0) in those allocated combined treatment (HR 0·60, 95% CI 0·45-0·80, p=0·0004), and 10-year prostate-cancer mortality was 30·4% (95% CI 23·2-37·5) and 10·3% (5·1-15·4), respectively (HR 0·38, 95% CI 0·24-0·60, p<0·0001).
  • INTERPRETATION: In patients with prostate cancer with high metastatic risk, immediate androgen suppression with an LHRH agonist given during and for 3 years after external irradiation improves 10-year disease-free and overall survival without increasing late cardiovascular toxicity.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Adenocarcinoma / radiotherapy. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / radiotherapy


58. Kanno H, Umemoto S, Izumi K, Hasumi H, Osada Y, Ohta J, Mikata K, Tuchiya F: [Prostate cancer development after transurethral resection of the prostate--histopathological studies of radical prostatectomy specimens]. Nihon Hinyokika Gakkai Zasshi; 2006 May;97(4):649-59
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  • [Title] [Prostate cancer development after transurethral resection of the prostate--histopathological studies of radical prostatectomy specimens].
  • PURPOSE: We investigated prostate cancer (ca.) development after transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP).
  • Of them, 23 pts. (5.3%) had incidental carcinoma (Stage A), which developed into clinically significant ca. after 1 to 5 years in 5 (22% of Stage A, 1.2% of TURP).
  • In 13 (3.2%) of 407 Non-Stage A pts. (who had no ca. initially), prostate ca. developed after 1 to 7 yrs.
  • A total of 21 pts. (including 3 Stage A pts. diagnosed before 1994) underwent radical prostatectomy.
  • Stage A pts. received regular needle biopsy of prostate (Pbx).
  • Non-Stage A pts. were followed by yearly PSA measurement and digital rectal examination (DRE).
  • RESULTS: Clinically significant ca. developed in 8 Stage A pts. (all A2) after 1 to 14 yrs.
  • Long term (5 or 10 years) MAB therapy changed moderately-differentiated adenocarcinoma (AC) to poorly-differentiated AC in 2 pts. during follow-up.
  • Thirteen Non-Stage A pts. showed aggressive ca. (6 moderately-differentiated AC, 6 poorly-differentiated AC, and 1 ductal carcinoma which showed metastasis later), most of which invaded widely in peripheral zone (PZ).
  • Interval between TURP and diagnosis was short in pts. who had cancer of high Gleason Score (GS) or large prostate.
  • CONCLUSIONS: As significant cancer developed in 22% of Stage A pts. (1.2% of TURP) in long term follow-up, regular Pbx (to get TZ tissue) is mandatory regardless of PSA value or DRE.
  • Aggressive cancer developed in 3.2% of Non-Stage A pts. (3.0% of TURP). Pts. with high PSA or abnormal DRE after TURP must receive needle biopsy actively.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Prostate / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Transurethral Resection of Prostate
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Postoperative Period. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Prostatectomy. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 16768146.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-5287
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon Hinyōkika Gakkai zasshi. The japanese journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nippon Hinyokika Gakkai Zasshi
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
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59. Rabien A, Fritzsche FR, Jung M, Tölle A, Diamandis EP, Miller K, Jung K, Kristiansen G, Stephan C: KLK15 is a prognostic marker for progression-free survival in patients with radical prostatectomy. Int J Cancer; 2010 Nov 15;127(10):2386-94
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  • In search of biomarkers for prostate cancer, we evaluated the expression of the human kallikrein-related peptidase KLK15 in samples of prostatic adenocarcinomas from radical prostatectomies.
  • Immunohistochemical expression of the KLK15 protein in 193 samples of prostatic adenocarcinoma was analysed in relation to clinicopathological parameters of the patients and disease progression.
  • Expression of KLK15 correlated with the pathological tumour stage and Gleason score of the cases, both at mRNA and at protein level.
  • Univariate Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a significant association of dichotomised KLK15 levels with disease progression defined by prostate-specific antigen relapse (p = 0.001).
  • Multivariate analysis according to the Cox proportional hazards regression model identified dichotomised KLK15 expression, corrected for the patient parameters age, preoperative prostate-specific antigen level, pathological tumour stage, Gleason score and surgical margin status, as an independent prognostic factor for poor outcome (inclusion model, hazard ratio 1.802, 95% confidence interval 1.037-3.132, p = 0.037).
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / metabolism. Biomarkers, Tumor / biosynthesis. Kallikreins / biosynthesis. Prostatic Neoplasms / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 20473923.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0215
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / RNA, Messenger; EC 3.4.21.- / KLK15 protein, human; EC 3.4.21.- / Kallikreins
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60. Johnke RM, Edwards JM, Evans MJ, Nangami GN, Bakken NT, Kilburn JM, Lee TK, Allison RR, Karlsson UL, Arastu HH: Circulating cytokine levels in prostate cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy: influence of neoadjuvant total androgen suppression. In Vivo; 2009 Sep-Oct;23(5):827-33
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  • [Title] Circulating cytokine levels in prostate cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy: influence of neoadjuvant total androgen suppression.
  • BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate the immunological impact of combining neoadjuvant total androgen suppression (TAS) with radiotherapy (xRT) in the treatment of prostate cancer by monitoring blood cytokine levels.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Participants were stage I-II prostate cancer patients receiving xRT alone (n=18) or TAS+xRT (n=19) under the procedures outlined in RTOG protocols #94-08 and #94-13.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / blood. Androgen Antagonists / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / administration & dosage. Cytokines / blood. Prostatic Neoplasms / blood


61. Ma S, Guan XY, Beh PS, Wong KY, Chan YP, Yuen HF, Vielkind J, Chan KW: The significance of LMO2 expression in the progression of prostate cancer. J Pathol; 2007 Feb;211(3):278-85
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  • [Title] The significance of LMO2 expression in the progression of prostate cancer.
  • This study has investigated LMO2 expression in human prostatic tissue specimens, prostate cancer cell lines, and xenografts; and has assessed the possible role and mechanism of LMO2 in prostate carcinogenesis.
  • Immunohistochemical analysis on a tissue microarray consisting of 91 human prostate specimens, including normal, prostatic hyperplasia, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and invasive carcinoma, revealed that overexpression of LMO2 was significantly associated with advanced tumour stage, as measured by Gleason score (p = 0.012), as well as with the development of distant metastasis (p = 0.018).
  • These data were supported by quantitative real-time PCR experiments, where LMO2 mRNA levels were found to be significantly higher in prostate tumour specimen than in normal epithelium (p = 0.037).
  • The expression of LMO2 in cell lines and xenografts representing androgen-dependent (AD) and androgen-independent (AI) prostate cancer stages was further studied.
  • Consistent with the in vivo data, LMO2 mRNA and protein were found to be overexpressed in the more aggressive AI cells (PC3, DU145, and AI CWR22 xenografts) compared with less aggressive AD cells (LNCaP and AD CWR22 xenografts).
  • Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence to support the hypothesis that LMO2 may play an important role in prostate cancer progression, possibly via repression of E-cadherin expression.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. DNA-Binding Proteins / genetics. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Metalloproteins / genetics. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2006 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
  • (PMID = 17167821.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3417
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / LIM Domain Proteins; 0 / LMO2 protein, human; 0 / Metalloproteins; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins; 0 / RNA, Messenger
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62. Yoon GS, Wang W, Osunkoya AO, Lane Z, Partin AW, Epstein JI: Residual tumor potentially left behind after local ablation therapy in prostate adenocarcinoma. J Urol; 2008 Jun;179(6):2203-6; discussion 2206
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  • [Title] Residual tumor potentially left behind after local ablation therapy in prostate adenocarcinoma.
  • PURPOSE: We examined contralateral prostate cancer potentially left behind by focal therapy.
  • Clinical stage was T1c in 85 and T2a in 15 cases with the palpable lesion on the positive biopsy side.

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  • (PMID = 18423736.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-3792
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA006973; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA058236; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 58236
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS374261; NLM/ PMC3353270
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63. Shah JN, Wuu CS, Katz AE, Laguna JL, Benson MC, Ennis RD: Improved biochemical control and clinical disease-free survival with intraoperative versus preoperative preplanning for transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy. Cancer J; 2006 Jul-Aug;12(4):289-97
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  • [Title] Improved biochemical control and clinical disease-free survival with intraoperative versus preoperative preplanning for transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy.
  • PURPOSE: We hypothesized that intraoperative preplanning for transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy may yield better prostate cancer control than preoperative preplanning.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed the data of 135 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer treated from 1996 to 2001 with transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy+/-preimplantation hormonal therapy: 42 received preoperative preplanning (group 1), and 93 underwent intraoperative preplanning (group 2).
  • Biochemical status was assessed using two failure definitions: American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) (three consecutive rises in prostate-specific antigen level) and Houston (prostate-specific antigen level>or=current nadir+2 ng/mL).
  • Preplanning method (preoperative versus intraoperative) remained predictive of disease control outcomes in multivariate analyses with the covariates of pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, clinical stage, and case sequence number (proxy for brachytherapist experience and "stage migration").
  • Dosimetric prostate coverage was superior for group 2.
  • The mean percentage of the prescription dose delivered to 90% of the prostate volume (%D90) was 75% for group 1 versus 90% for group 2.
  • DISCUSSION: Intraoperative preplanning yielded superior disease control outcomes in this analysis, likely due at least in part to improved dosimetric prostate coverage with this method.
  • Although not mandatory for obtaining high prostate brachytherapy efficacy, intraoperative preplanning nevertheless may offer an excellent means of improving dosimetric prostate coverage and therefore disease control outcomes.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / radiotherapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / radiotherapy


64. Kuban DA, Levy LB, Potters L, Beyer DC, Blasko JC, Moran BJ, Ciezki JP, Zietman AL, Zelefsky MJ, Pisansky TM, Elshaikh M, Horwitz EM: Comparison of biochemical failure definitions for permanent prostate brachytherapy. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2006 Aug 1;65(5):1487-93
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  • [Title] Comparison of biochemical failure definitions for permanent prostate brachytherapy.
  • PURPOSE: To assess prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure definitions for patients with Stage T1-T2 prostate cancer treated by permanent prostate brachytherapy.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: A total of 2,693 patients treated with radioisotopic implant as solitary treatment for T1-T2 prostatic adenocarcinoma were studied.
  • CONCLUSIONS: For patients treated by permanent radioisotopic implant for prostate cancer, the definition nadir + 2 ng/mL provides the best surrogate for failure throughout the entire follow-up period, similar to patients treated by external beam radiotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / blood. Adenocarcinoma / radiotherapy. Brachytherapy / methods. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Prostatic Neoplasms / blood. Prostatic Neoplasms / radiotherapy

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  • (PMID = 16750326.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
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65. van Vugt HA, Bangma CH, Roobol MJ: Should prostate-specific antigen screening be offered to asymptomatic men? Expert Rev Anticancer Ther; 2010 Jul;10(7):1043-53
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  • [Title] Should prostate-specific antigen screening be offered to asymptomatic men?
  • The benefits of population-based prostate cancer screening are the detection of clinically important prostate cancers at an early, still curable, stage and the subsequent reduction of prostate cancer-specific mortality.
  • However, a prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based prostate cancer screening program is currently insufficient to warrant its introduction as a public health policy.
  • The main reasons are insufficient knowledge regarding the optimal screening strategy and overdiagnosis and overtreatment of indolent prostate cancers that are unlikely to lead to complaints or death.
  • In some countries, guidelines have been developed on screening for prostate cancer, but the diversity of recommendations illustrates the limited knowledge on the optimal strategy.
  • Although a mortality reduction can be achieved by early detection of prostate cancer, patients and physicians must be aware of the current side effects of screening.
  • Algorithms that advise screening at a young age (<55 years), with screening intervals of less than 4 years and low PSA thresholds (<3 ng/ml) for prostate biopsy seem premature and are not supported by evidence.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / diagnosis. Mass Screening. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Prostatic Neoplasms / diagnosis


66. Armatys SA, Koch MO, Bihrle R, Gardner TA, Cheng L: Is it necessary to separate clinical stage T1c from T2 prostate adenocarcinoma? BJU Int; 2005 Oct;96(6):777-80
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  • [Title] Is it necessary to separate clinical stage T1c from T2 prostate adenocarcinoma?
  • OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that prostate cancer patients with clinical stage cT1c and cT2 have similar outcomes and clinicopathological features, and should be grouped together.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: From a series of men with prostate cancer who had a radical retropubic prostatectomy (RP), we assessed those with cT1c (223) and cT2 (65) adenocarcinoma.
  • RESULTS: Patients with cT2 tumours were more likely to have a higher Gleason score (P = 0.04) and final pathological stage (P = 0.05) than those with cT1c tumours.
  • There was no significant difference in age (P = 0.92), preoperative PSA level (P = 0.17), prostate weight (P = 0.34), tumour volume (P = 0.16), surgical margin status (P = 0.86), multifocality (P = 0.92), the presence of perineural invasion (P = 0.09), or high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (P = 0.99) between patients with clinical stage cT1c and those with cT2 tumours.
  • There was no difference in PSA recurrence between patients with clinical stage T1c and those with cT2 tumours (P = 0.27).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Patients with clinical stage cT2 tumours have a higher Gleason score and advanced pathological stage than tumours detected because of a high serum PSA level (cT1c).
  • These results suggest that clinical stage cT1c tumours should be separated from clinical stage cT2 disease, but the PSA recurrence rate for both tumour stages is similar, indicating a need for further evaluation and refinement of the current clinical staging system.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Neoplasm Staging / methods. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood

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  • (PMID = 16153198.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-4096
  • [Journal-full-title] BJU international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BJU Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
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67. Mumenthaler SM, Yu H, Tze S, Cederbaum SD, Pegg AE, Seligson DB, Grody WW: Expression of arginase II in prostate cancer. Int J Oncol; 2008 Feb;32(2):357-65
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  • [Title] Expression of arginase II in prostate cancer.
  • Previous reports have shown elevated arginase activity in prostate cancer patients.
  • This study was designed to compare expression levels of arginase II (AII) in various human prostate cancer cell lines and tissues.
  • Expression levels of AII and other enzymes involved in arginine metabolism were examined in androgen-dependent (LNCaP, LAPC-4) and androgen-independent (PC3, DU145, CL-1, CL-2) prostate cancer cell lines by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis.
  • In addition, polyamine levels were measured within the prostate cancer cell lines by HPLC.
  • The tissue microarray data revealed that the highest AII expression was seen in BPH, followed by PIN and normal samples, with the lowest expression levels observed in prostate cancer tissues.
  • Based on these results, arginase II expression may play a role in prostate cancer progression.
  • More specifically, the elevated AII expression seen in androgen-dependent and in more differentiated prostate cancers suggests that AII could be a potentially useful marker of early stage prostate adenocarcinoma.

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  • (PMID = 18202758.001).
  • [ISSN] 1019-6439
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 16042; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 92131
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androgens; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Polyamines; 0 / Receptors, Androgen; 94ZLA3W45F / Arginine; EC 2.6.1.13 / Ornithine-Oxo-Acid Transaminase; EC 3.5.3.1 / Arginase; EC 3.5.3.1 / arginase II, human
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68. Schostak M, Miller K, Krause H, Schrader M, Kempkensteffen C, Kollermann J: Kinetic fluorescence reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction for alpha-methylacyl CoA racemase distinguishes prostate cancer from benign lesions. Cancer Detect Prev; 2006;30(5):449-54
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  • [Title] Kinetic fluorescence reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction for alpha-methylacyl CoA racemase distinguishes prostate cancer from benign lesions.
  • BACKGROUND: High-throughput gene expression profiling has recently shown that the mRNA for alpha-methylacyl CoA racemase (AMACR or P504S) is overexpressed in prostate carcinomas (PCa).
  • Several immunohistochemical studies have reported the usefulness of anti-AMACR/P504S for detecting prostate cancer over the full range of prostate specimens encountered in surgical pathology.
  • RESULTS: Normalized AMACR transcript levels showed an average 3.75-fold increase in 57 prostate carcinomas cases when compared to 55 cases of BPH (p<0.0001).
  • AMACR expression levels among PCa cases were not statistically associated with the tumor and lymph node stage, the grading, the surgical margins, the Gleason score or progression.
  • Since the latter clearly predominate in the laboratory routine, PCR-based detection of AMACR has the potential to gain widespread acceptance as a suitable future tool for monitoring prostate cancer patients.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / diagnosis. Adenocarcinoma / enzymology. Adenocarcinoma / secondary. Fluorescence. Humans. Kinetics. Male. Prostatectomy. RNA, Messenger / genetics. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. RNA, Neoplasm / genetics. RNA, Neoplasm / metabolism. ROC Curve. Sensitivity and Specificity

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  • (PMID = 17067752.001).
  • [ISSN] 0361-090X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer detection and prevention
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Detect. Prev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / RNA, Neoplasm; EC 5.1.- / Racemases and Epimerases; EC 5.1.99.4 / alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase
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69. Zelefsky MJ, Reuter VE, Fuks Z, Scardino P, Shippy A: Influence of local tumor control on distant metastases and cancer related mortality after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer. J Urol; 2008 Apr;179(4):1368-73; discussion 1373
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  • [Title] Influence of local tumor control on distant metastases and cancer related mortality after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer.
  • PURPOSE: We report local control outcomes, as assessed by posttreatment biopsies in patients who underwent 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Posttreatment prostate biopsies were performed in 339 patients who underwent 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer.
  • The histological outcome of prostate biopsy was classified as positive-prostatic adenocarcinoma without typical radiation induced changes or negative-no evidence of carcinoma or severe treatment effect.
  • Patients with negative and severe treatment effect biopsies had similar 10-year prostate specific antigen relapse-free survival outcomes that were markedly different from outcomes in those with positive treatment biopsies.
  • Multivariate analysis indicated that the strongest predictor of biochemical failure was posttreatment biopsy status (positive vs severe treatment effect or negative p <0.001), followed by pretreatment prostate specific antigen (p = 0.05) and clinical T stage (p = 0.09).
  • Similarly multivariate analysis revealed that a positive posttreatment biopsy was one of the strongest predictors of distant metastasis and prostate cancer death in this cohort of patients.
  • CONCLUSIONS: As assessed by posttreatment prostate biopsies, local control is improved with higher radiation doses.
  • We also noted that local tumor control was associated with a decrease in distant metastases and prostate cancer mortality, further highlighting the importance of achieving optimal tumor control in patients with clinically localized disease.

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  • (PMID = 18289585.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-3792
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA092629-07; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA092629; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA092629-07
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS53642; NLM/ PMC2646887
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70. Pinkstaff DM, Igel TC, Petrou SP, Broderick GA, Wehle MJ, Young PR: Systematic transperineal ultrasound-guided template biopsy of the prostate: three-year experience. Urology; 2005 Apr;65(4):735-9
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  • [Title] Systematic transperineal ultrasound-guided template biopsy of the prostate: three-year experience.
  • OBJECTIVES: To review the technique of transperineal saturation prostate biopsy and to update our results on patients at high risk of prostate cancer.
  • METHODS: A total of 210 men who met the study inclusion criteria underwent systematic transperineal ultrasound-guided template biopsy of the prostate.
  • All patients had previously undergone at least one set of transrectal prostate biopsies and 170 (81%) had undergone two or more.
  • The mean number of prostate cores obtained before the template biopsy was 17.4.
  • A mean of 21.2 cores (range 12 to 41) were obtained at the template biopsy, depending on prostate size.
  • The study inclusion criteria included prostate-specific antigen level of 10 ng/mL or greater, prostate-specific antigen velocity of 0.75 ng/mL per year or greater, or the presence of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and/or atypical small cell acinar proliferation on the previous biopsy.
  • RESULTS: Adenocarcinoma was detected in 78 men (37%).
  • Thirty patients underwent radical prostatectomy, and 27 (90%) had pathologic Stage pT2 disease as the final pathologic stage.
  • CONCLUSIONS: A systematic transperineal template biopsy provides uniform sampling of the entire prostate.
  • This technique appears to enhance the identification of transition zone cancers not detected by previous transrectal prostate biopsy in patients at high risk of prostate adenocarcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Adenocarcinoma / ultrasonography. Biopsy, Needle / methods. Prostate / pathology. Prostate / ultrasonography. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / ultrasonography


71. Venkitaraman R, Norman A, Woode-Amissah R, Dearnaley D, Horwich A, Huddart R, Parker C: Prostate-specific antigen velocity in untreated, localized prostate cancer. BJU Int; 2008 Jan;101(2):161-4
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  • [Title] Prostate-specific antigen velocity in untreated, localized prostate cancer.
  • OBJECTIVE: To report the results of a prospective study of active surveillance of untreated prostate cancer, with a focus on baseline predictors of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) velocity, as PSA velocity before treatment is an important predictor of prostate cancer mortality, and patients on active surveillance are monitored for several years to estimate the PSA velocity and thus select patients for radical treatment.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: A prospective study of active surveillance for localized prostate cancer opened at the Royal Marsden Hospital in 2002.
  • Eligible patients had clinical stage T1/T2a, N0/Nx, M0/Mx adenocarcinoma of the prostate with a serum PSA level of < 15 ng/mL, a Gleason score of < or = 7 with primary grade < or = 3, and less than half the biopsy cores positive.
  • On multivariate analysis, PSA density (i.e. serum PSA level/prostate volume) was the only significant determinant of PSA velocity (P < 0.001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: PSA density, which is readily available at the time of diagnosis, is an independent determinant of PSA velocity in untreated, localized prostate cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Prostate / pathology. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology


72. Kälkner KM, Wahlgren T, Ryberg M, Cohn-Cedermark G, Castellanos E, Zimmerman R, Nilsson J, Lundell M, Fowler J, Levitt S, Hellström M, Nilsson S: Clinical outcome in patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy and high dose-rate iridium 192 brachytherapy boost: a 6-year follow-up. Acta Oncol; 2007;46(7):909-17
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  • [Title] Clinical outcome in patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy and high dose-rate iridium 192 brachytherapy boost: a 6-year follow-up.
  • To report the long-term results for treatment of localized carcinoma of the prostate using high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D EBRT) and neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy (TAB).
  • From 1998 through 1999, 154 patients with localized prostate cancer were entered in the trial.
  • Among the 80 patients who presented with clinical stage T3 tumours, 55 (68%) were relapse-free.
  • Urinary tract toxicity, most likely can be explained by the fact that during the first years of this treatment, no effort was made to localize the urethra, which was assumed to be in the middle of the prostate.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / radiotherapy. Brachytherapy / methods. Iridium Radioisotopes / therapeutic use. Prostatic Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Radiotherapy, Conformal / methods

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  • (PMID = 17917823.001).
  • [ISSN] 0284-186X
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Norway
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Iridium Radioisotopes
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73. Abu-Rustum NR, Zhou Q, Gomez JD, Alektiar KM, Hensley ML, Soslow RA, Levine DA, Chi DS, Barakat RR, Iasonos A: A nomogram for predicting overall survival of women with endometrial cancer following primary therapy: toward improving individualized cancer care. Gynecol Oncol; 2010 Mar;116(3):399-403
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  • OBJECTIVES: Traditionally we have relied mainly on final FIGO stage to estimate overall oncologic outcome in endometrial cancer patients.
  • Stage included: IA (501), IB (590), IC (141), IIA (36), IIB (75), IIIA (116), IIIB (6), IIIC (135), IVA (7), and IVB (128).
  • Histology included: adenocarcinoma (1376), carcinosarcoma (100), clear cell (62), and serous (197).
  • This nomogram incorporates other individualized patient variables beyond FIGO stage to more accurately predict outcome.

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  • (PMID = 20022094.001).
  • [ISSN] 1095-6859
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA008748
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS523399; NLM/ PMC3870336
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74. Cho-Vega JH, Tsavachidis S, Do KA, Nakagawa J, Medeiros LJ, McDonnell TJ: Dicarbonyl/L-xylulose reductase: a potential biomarker identified by laser-capture microdissection-micro serial analysis of gene expression of human prostate adenocarcinoma. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 2007 Dec;16(12):2615-22
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  • [Title] Dicarbonyl/L-xylulose reductase: a potential biomarker identified by laser-capture microdissection-micro serial analysis of gene expression of human prostate adenocarcinoma.
  • To identify genes involved in prostate carcinogenesis, we used laser-capture microdissection-micro serial analysis of gene expression to construct libraries of paired cancer and normal cells from human tissue samples.
  • After computational comparison of the two libraries, we identified dicarbonyl/l-xylulose reductase (DCXR), an enzyme that catalyzes alpha-dicarbonyl and l-xylulose, as being significantly up-regulated in prostate cancer cells.
  • The specificity of DCXR up-regulation for prostate cancer tissues was confirmed by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR, virtual Northern blot, and Western blot analyses.
  • Furthermore, DCXR expression at the protein level was assessed using fresh-frozen tissues and a tissue microarray consisting of 46 cases of organ-confined early-stage prostate cancer and 29 cases of chemohormonally treated prostate cancer.
  • In most normal prostate epithelial cells, DCXR was expressed at low levels and was localized predominantly in the cytoplasmic membrane.
  • In contrast, in virtually all grades of early-stage prostate cancer and in all chemohormonally treated cases, DCXR was strikingly overexpressed and was localized predominantly in the cytoplasm and nucleus.
  • Based on these findings, we suggest that DCXR overexpression has the potential to be an additional useful biomarker for prostate cancer.

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  • (PMID = 18086765.001).
  • [ISSN] 1055-9965
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA016672; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-16672
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; EC 1.1.- / Sugar Alcohol Dehydrogenases; EC 1.1.1.10 / L-xylulose reductase
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75. Cho NY, Kim JH, Moon KC, Kang GH: Genomic hypomethylation and CpG island hypermethylation in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasm. Virchows Arch; 2009 Jan;454(1):17-23
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  • Both types of aberrant methylation are frequently found in human prostate adenocarcinoma (PCa).
  • We analyzed the methylation status at 12 CpG island loci and at two repetitive DNA elements (LINE-1 and SAT2) from normal prostate (n = 20), PIN (n = 25), and PCa (n = 35) tissues using MethyLight assay or combined bisulfite restriction analysis.
  • The methylation levels in LINE-1 and SAT2 decreased with progression of lesion types from normal prostate to PIN to PCa (P < 0.05), whereas promoter CpG island loci displayed increased methylation.
  • The number of methylated genes was closely associated with TNM stage, Gleason sum, and preoperative serum PSA levels (P = 0.020, 0.073, 0.033, respectively).
  • These results suggest that genomic hypomethylation and CpG island hypermethylation, common among PCas, are early events in prostate carcinogenesis and may be implicated in the development of PIN.
  • [MeSH-minor] Acetyltransferases / genetics. Adenocarcinoma / blood. Adenocarcinoma / genetics. Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Aged. Case-Control Studies. DNA, Neoplasm / genetics. Disease Progression. Humans. Long Interspersed Nucleotide Elements / genetics. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood

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  • (PMID = 19048291.001).
  • [ISSN] 0945-6317
  • [Journal-full-title] Virchows Archiv : an international journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Virchows Arch.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Neoplasm; EC 2.3.1.- / Acetyltransferases; EC 2.3.1.57 / diamine N-acetyltransferase; EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
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76. Berruti A, Mosca A, Porpiglia F, Bollito E, Tucci M, Vana F, Cracco C, Torta M, Russo L, Cappia S, Saini A, Angeli A, Papotti M, Scarpa RM, Dogliotti L: Chromogranin A expression in patients with hormone naïve prostate cancer predicts the development of hormone refractory disease. J Urol; 2007 Sep;178(3 Pt 1):838-43; quiz 1129
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  • [Title] Chromogranin A expression in patients with hormone naïve prostate cancer predicts the development of hormone refractory disease.
  • PURPOSE: We assessed chromogranin A as a tissue biomarker in prostate needle biopsies or as a plasma biomarker, a risk factor for hormone refractory prostate cancer.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 211 patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer treated with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogues constituted the study cohort.
  • RESULTS: Chromogranin A expression in less than 30% or in 30% or more tumor cells was significantly associated with a shorter time to hormone refractory disease on univariate analysis (HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.3-3.1 and HR 6.0, 95% CI 2.7-12.9), or on multivariate analysis after adjusting for Gleason score, serum prostate specific antigen and disease stage (HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.0-2.8 and HR 3.9, 95% CI 1.7-9.0), respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Chromogranin A expression in prostate cancer biopsies is an independent predictive factor of hormone refractory disease in patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer on early androgen deprivation therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / metabolism. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Chromogranin A / analysis. Prostatic Neoplasms / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17631319.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-5347
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Androgen Antagonists; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Chromogranin A; 33515-09-2 / Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone
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77. Lapointe J, Kim YH, Miller MA, Li C, Kaygusuz G, van de Rijn M, Huntsman DG, Brooks JD, Pollack JR: A variant TMPRSS2 isoform and ERG fusion product in prostate cancer with implications for molecular diagnosis. Mod Pathol; 2007 Apr;20(4):467-73
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  • [Title] A variant TMPRSS2 isoform and ERG fusion product in prostate cancer with implications for molecular diagnosis.
  • Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among men in the United States.
  • Recently, fusion of TMPRSS2 with ETS family oncogenic transcription factors has been identified as a common molecular alteration in prostate cancer, where most often the rearrangement places ERG under the androgen-regulated transcriptional control of TMPRSS2.
  • Here, we carried out rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) on a prostate cancer specimen carrying an atypical aberration discovered by array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH), suggesting an alternative fusion partner of ERG.
  • The sequences derive from an apparent second TMPRSS2 isoform, which we found also expressed in some prostate tumors, suggesting similar androgen-regulated control.
  • In a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based survey of 63 prostate tumor specimens (54 primary and nine lymph node metastases), 44 (70%) cases expressed either the known or novel variant TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, 28 (44%) expressed both, 10 (16%) expressed only the known, and notably six (10%) expressed only the variant isoform fusion.
  • In this specimen set, the presence of a TMPRSS2-ERG fusion showed no statistical association with tumor stage, Gleason grade or recurrence-free survival.
  • Nonetheless, the discovery of a novel variant TMPRSS2 isoform-ERG fusion adds to the characterization of ETS-family rearrangements in prostate cancer, and has important implications for the accurate molecular diagnosis of TMPRSS2-ETS fusions.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / metabolism. Oncogene Proteins, Fusion / metabolism. Prostatic Neoplasms / metabolism. Serine Endopeptidases / metabolism

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  • [CommentIn] Mod Pathol. 2008 Aug;21(8):1056; author reply 1056-7 [18654591.001]
  • (PMID = 17334351.001).
  • [ISSN] 0893-3952
  • [Journal-full-title] Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mod. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] GENBANK/ EF194202
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA111782
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Oncogene Proteins, Fusion; 0 / Protein Isoforms; 0 / TMPRSS2-ERG fusion protein, human; EC 3.4.21.- / Serine Endopeptidases; EC 3.4.21.- / TMPRSS2 protein, human
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78. Magheli A, Rais-Bahrami S, Peck HJ, Walsh PC, Epstein JI, Trock BJ, Gonzalgo ML: Importance of tumor location in patients with high preoperative prostate specific antigen levels (greater than 20 ng/ml) treated with radical prostatectomy. J Urol; 2007 Oct;178(4 Pt 1):1311-5
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  • [Title] Importance of tumor location in patients with high preoperative prostate specific antigen levels (greater than 20 ng/ml) treated with radical prostatectomy.
  • PURPOSE: We investigated the effect of tumor location (anterior vs posterior) on pathological characteristics and biochemical-free survival in patients with a preoperative prostate specific antigen level of greater than 20 ng/ml undergoing radical prostatectomy since transition zone tumors are known to present with higher prostate specific antigen levels.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively studied the records of 265 patients treated with radical prostatectomy between 1984 and 2005 who had preoperative prostate specific antigen levels greater than 20 ng/ml.
  • Differences in clinicopathological characteristics and prostate specific antigen recurrence rates were examined.
  • RESULTS: Of 265 patients with a preoperative prostate specific antigen level of greater than 20 ng/ml who underwent radical prostatectomy 50 (19%) had anterior tumors and 215 (81%) had posterior tumors.
  • Patients with anterior tumors had lower clinical stage and less seminal vesicle involvement than patients with posterior tumors (p = 0.006 and <0.001, respectively).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Radical prostatectomy is a feasible treatment option in patients with a preoperative prostate specific antigen level of greater than 20 ng/ml.
  • Further studies are warranted to identify patients with high preoperative prostate specific antigen levels most likely to have recurrence.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / surgery. Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. Prostate / pathology. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Prostatectomy. Prostatic Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 17698095.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-5347
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
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79. Russo G, Anzivino E, Fioriti D, Mischitelli M, Bellizzi A, Giordano A, Autran-Gomez A, Di Monaco F, Di Silverio F, Sale P, Di Prospero L, Pietropaolo V: p53 gene mutational rate, Gleason score, and BK virus infection in prostate adenocarcinoma: Is there a correlation? J Med Virol; 2008 Dec;80(12):2100-7
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  • [Title] p53 gene mutational rate, Gleason score, and BK virus infection in prostate adenocarcinoma: Is there a correlation?
  • Prostate cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer deaths in Western countries.
  • Viral infections could play a role in prostate carcinogenesis.
  • In this study, BKV sequences in urine, blood, fresh, and paraffin-embedded prostate cancer samples from 26 patients were searched using Q-PCR analysis.
  • Results showed that BKV-DNA was found in urine (54%), plasma (31%), and in fresh prostate cancer specimens (85%).
  • The analysis of p53 gene evidenced several mutations in high Gleason patients, according to tumor advanced stage.
  • This study suggests that BKV acts as cofactor in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / virology. BK Virus / isolation & purification. Genes, p53 / genetics. Polyomavirus Infections / complications. Prostatic Neoplasms / virology. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / analysis. Tumor Virus Infections / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Antigens, Viral, Tumor / analysis. Blood / virology. Cell Nucleus / chemistry. Cytoplasm / chemistry. Humans. Male. Prostate / chemistry. Prostate / virology. Severity of Illness Index. Urine / virology

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  • (PMID = 19040285.001).
  • [ISSN] 1096-9071
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of medical virology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Med. Virol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, Viral, Tumor; 0 / TP53 protein, human; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
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80. Martin JM, Rosewall T, Bayley A, Bristow R, Chung P, Crook J, Gospodarowicz M, McLean M, Ménard C, Milosevic M, Warde P, Catton C: Phase II trial of hypofractionated image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate adenocarcinoma. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2007 Nov 15;69(4):1084-9
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  • [Title] Phase II trial of hypofractionated image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate adenocarcinoma.
  • PURPOSE: To assess in a prospective trial the feasibility and late toxicity of hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: Eligible patients had clinical stage T1c-2cNXM0 disease.
  • The cohort had a median prostate-specific antigen value of 7.06 ng/mL.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / radiotherapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Biopsy. Dose Fractionation. Feasibility Studies. Humans. Male. Prospective Studies. Prostate / pathology. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Salvage Therapy / methods

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  • (PMID = 17606331.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
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81. Hattab EM, Koch MO, Eble JN, Lin H, Cheng L: Tertiary Gleason pattern 5 is a powerful predictor of biochemical relapse in patients with Gleason score 7 prostatic adenocarcinoma. J Urol; 2006 May;175(5):1695-9; discussion 1699
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  • [Title] Tertiary Gleason pattern 5 is a powerful predictor of biochemical relapse in patients with Gleason score 7 prostatic adenocarcinoma.
  • PURPOSE: In radical prostatectomy specimens Gleason score 7 is among the most commonly assigned scores for prostate carcinoma accounting for 30% to 50% of cases.
  • Gleason score 7 is different from other more differentiated prostate carcinomas (tumors of Gleason scores 5 and 6) with a significantly worse outcome and higher rate of recurrence.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 504 patients underwent radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer and 228 of the patients (45%) had a Gleason score of 7.
  • RESULTS: Among 228 patients with Gleason score 7 prostatic adenocarcinoma, 91 (40%) had a primary Gleason pattern 4 and 137 (60%) had primary Gleason pattern 3.
  • Patients of the former group were more likely to have a higher pathological stage (p = 0.003), more likely to have PSA recurrence (p = 0.02) and more likely to have a tertiary Gleason pattern 5 (p <0.0001).
  • In the Cox regression model controlling for tumor stage and surgical margin status, the primary Gleason pattern was not an independent predictor of PSA recurrence (p = 0.80), whereas the presence of tertiary Gleason pattern 5 was a significant predictor of PSA recurrence (hazard ratio 2.10, 95% CI 1.24-3.55, p = 0.006).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with Gleason score 7, primary Gleason grade 4 indicates a likelihood of higher tumor stage and higher probability of PSA recurrence than does primary pattern 3.
  • Regardless of whether the primary Gleason pattern is 3 or 4, a tertiary Gleason pattern 5 is the strongest predictor of a worse outcome in patients with Gleason grade 7 prostatic adenocarcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / blood. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / epidemiology. Prognosis. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Prostatectomy

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  • (PMID = 16600733.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-5347
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
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82. Sridhar SS, Hotte SJ, Chin JL, Hudes GR, Gregg R, Trachtenberg J, Wang L, Tran-Thanh D, Pham NA, Tsao MS, Hedley D, Dancey JE, Moore MJ: A multicenter phase II clinical trial of lapatinib (GW572016) in hormonally untreated advanced prostate cancer. Am J Clin Oncol; 2010 Dec;33(6):609-13
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  • [Title] A multicenter phase II clinical trial of lapatinib (GW572016) in hormonally untreated advanced prostate cancer.
  • Since EGFR and HER2 overexpression has also been seen in prostate cancer and appears to correlate with a worse clinical outcome, Lapatinib may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in prostate cancer.
  • This Phase II multicenter clinical trial is the first to evaluate Lapatinib in early stage, hormonally untreated recurrent or metastatic prostate cancer.
  • The primary end point was prostate specific antigen (PSA) response.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Lapatinib was well tolerated but like other EGFR- and HER2-targeted agents in advanced HRPC failed to show significant antitumor activity even in this very early stage hormonally untreated population.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / drug therapy. Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Quinazolines / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Administration Schedule. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Maximum Tolerated Dose. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Risk Assessment. Single-Blind Method. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome


83. Huffman DM, Grizzle WE, Bamman MM, Kim JS, Eltoum IA, Elgavish A, Nagy TR: SIRT1 is significantly elevated in mouse and human prostate cancer. Cancer Res; 2007 Jul 15;67(14):6612-8
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  • [Title] SIRT1 is significantly elevated in mouse and human prostate cancer.
  • First, a transgenic mouse model of prostate cancer (transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate; TRAMP) was used to determine the role of energy balance on SIRT1 expression and the effect of cancer stage on SIRT1 and hypermethylated in cancer-1 (HIC-1).
  • Second, immunohistochemistry was done on human prostate tumors to determine if SIRT1 was differentially expressed in tumor cells versus uninvolved cells.
  • Results show that SIRT1 is not increased in the dorsolateral prostate (DLP) of calorie-restricted mice during carcinogenesis.
  • Furthermore, immunostaining of human prostate tumors showed that cancer cells had greater SIRT1 expression than uninvolved cells.
  • However, SIRT1 expression was increased in mice with poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas and in human prostate cancer cells.
  • Because SIRT1 may function as a tumor promoter, these results suggest that SIRT1 should be considered as a potential therapeutic target for prostate cancer.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Differentiation. Cell Line, Tumor. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Mice, Transgenic. Prostate / metabolism. Sirtuin 1

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  • [ErratumIn] Cancer Res. 2007 Sep 1;67(17):8423
  • (PMID = 17638871.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 101058; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 47888; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / P30 DK 56336
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.5.1.- / SIRT1 protein, human; EC 3.5.1.- / Sirt1 protein, mouse; EC 3.5.1.- / Sirtuin 1; EC 3.5.1.- / Sirtuins
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84. Ives EP, Burke MA, Edmonds PR, Gomella LG, Halpern EJ: Quantitative computed tomography perfusion of prostate cancer: correlation with whole-mount pathology. Clin Prostate Cancer; 2005 Sep;4(2):109-12
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  • [Title] Quantitative computed tomography perfusion of prostate cancer: correlation with whole-mount pathology.
  • PURPOSE: Microvessel density within the prostate is associated with presence of cancer, disease stage, and disease-specific survival.
  • We evaluated multidetector computed tomography (CT) to estimate prostate perfusion and localize prostate cancer.
  • Repeated dynamic scans through the prostate were obtained at 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 seconds following initiation of contrast injection.
  • RESULTS: Conventional adenocarcinoma (Gleason score, 6-10) was present in all subjects, including one who also demonstrated a mucinous variant of prostate cancer.
  • A positive correlation between local estimates of CT perfusion and percent of prostate volume occupied by tumor in each sextant was found for half of the subjects (Pearson correlation coefficient, 0.3-0.95; mean, 0.48) but statistically significant correlation (P < 0.05; Pearson coefficient, 0.9-0.95) was present in only the 2 subjects with the highest Gleason scores (8 and 10) and the highest tumor volume (> or = 50% in > or = 1 sextant region).
  • CONCLUSION: Visible enhancement of prostate cancer during dynamic CT is present in a minority of subjects.
  • Correlation between quantitative CT perfusion and tumor location is statistically significant only in subjects with localized high-volume, poorly differentiated prostate cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / radiography. Prostatic Neoplasms / radiography. Tomography, X-Ray Computed
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Biopsy. Contrast Media. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prostate / pathology. Triiodobenzoic Acids

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  • (PMID = 16197611.001).
  • [ISSN] 1540-0352
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical prostate cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Prostate Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Contrast Media; 0 / Triiodobenzoic Acids; 87771-40-2 / ioversol
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85. Raina K, Rajamanickam S, Deep G, Singh M, Agarwal R, Agarwal C: Chemopreventive effects of oral gallic acid feeding on tumor growth and progression in TRAMP mice. Mol Cancer Ther; 2008 May;7(5):1258-67
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  • Our recent studies have identified gallic acid as one of the major constituents of grape seed extract showing strong in vitro anticancer efficacy against human prostate cancer cells.
  • Herein, for the first time, we established the in vivo chemopreventive efficacy of gallic acid against prostate cancer by evaluating its activity against prostate tumor growth and progression in transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model.
  • Immunohistochemical analysis of prostate tissue showed a decrease in proliferative index by 36% to 41% (P < 0.05) in 0.3% to 1% gallic acid-fed groups, with an increase in the apoptotic cells by 3-fold (P < 0.05).
  • Together, for the first time, we identified that oral gallic acid feeding inhibits prostate cancer growth and progression to advanced-stage adenocarcinoma in TRAMP mice via a strong suppression of cell cycle progression and cell proliferation and an increase in apoptosis.

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  • (PMID = 18445658.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-7163
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular cancer therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cancer Ther.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA091883; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA91883
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 632XD903SP / Gallic Acid
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86. Andrén O, Fall K, Franzén L, Andersson SO, Johansson JE, Rubin MA: How well does the Gleason score predict prostate cancer death? A 20-year followup of a population based cohort in Sweden. J Urol; 2006 Apr;175(4):1337-40
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] How well does the Gleason score predict prostate cancer death? A 20-year followup of a population based cohort in Sweden.
  • PURPOSE: Adenocarcinoma of the prostate is the most common cancer among men in Western countries.
  • Although the prognostic heterogeneity of prostate cancer is enormous, clinically insignificant aggressive prostate cancers cannot be reliably distinguished.
  • Therefore, identifying prognostic factors is increasingly important, notably among men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer, because many of them may not require aggressive treatment.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed a population based cohort of 253 men with early stage (T1a-b, Nx, M0) initially untreated prostate cancer diagnosed between 1977 and 1991, before PSA screening was available.
  • RESULTS: Higher Gleason grade, higher nuclear grade and larger tumor volume were independent predictors of death in prostate cancer with monotonous and statistically significant trends (p <0.05).
  • In contrast, the level of Ki-67 - strongly correlated to Gleason score - was not an independent predictor of prostate cancer death.
  • Given a Gleason score of 7 or greater, the probability of dying of prostate cancer was 29%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although a high Gleason score is a determinant of prostate cancer death, its PPV is relatively low.
  • Thus, further efforts in finding other or complementary indicators of prostate cancer outcome are needed.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / mortality. Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / mortality. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology


87. Bujons Tur A, Montlleó González M, Pascual García X, Rosales Bordes A, Caparrós Sariol J, Villavicencio Mavrich H: [Radical prostatectomy in patients with history of transurethral resection of the prostate]. Arch Esp Urol; 2006 Jun;59(5):473-8
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  • [Title] [Radical prostatectomy in patients with history of transurethral resection of the prostate].
  • [Transliterated title] Prostatectomía radical en pacientes con antecedentes de RTU próstata.
  • OBJECTIVES: To perform a retrospective evaluation of surgical complications and morbidity in patients undergoing radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) as elective treatment for organ-confined prostate cancer in our center with previous transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP).
  • We analyze the morbidity and mortality of the RRP, its functional outcomes, and the accordance between clinical and pathological stage.
  • Clinical stage: 16 T1a, 18T1b, 20T1c, 3T2a, 2T2b.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / surgery. Prostatectomy. Prostatic Neoplasms / surgery. Transurethral Resection of Prostate

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  • (PMID = 16903548.001).
  • [ISSN] 0004-0614
  • [Journal-full-title] Archivos españoles de urología
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Esp. Urol.
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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88. Mahmoudieh A, Tremblay C, Beaulieu L, Lachance B, Harel F, Lessard E, Pouliot J, Vigneault E: Anatomy-based inverse planning dose optimization in HDR prostate implant: a toxicity study. Radiother Oncol; 2005 Jun;75(3):318-24
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  • [Title] Anatomy-based inverse planning dose optimization in HDR prostate implant: a toxicity study.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between September 1999 and October 2002, 44 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer (PSA>/=10 ng/ml, and/or Gleason score>/=7, and/or Stage T2c or higher) were treated with 40-45 Gy external pelvic field followed by 2--3 fraction of inverse-planned HDR implant boost (6--9.5 Gy /fraction).
  • Questionnaires were used to collect prostate related measures of quality of life, and international prostate symptom score (IPSS) before and after treatment.
  • Dose-volume histograms for prostate, urethra, bladder, penis bulb and rectum were analyzed.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Inverse-planned HDR brachytherapy is a viable option to deliver higher dose to the prostate as a boost without increasing GU or rectal complication.
  • Further HDR dose escalation to the prostate is feasible.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / radiotherapy. Brachytherapy / methods. Prostatic Neoplasms / radiotherapy

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  • (PMID = 16086913.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-8140
  • [Journal-full-title] Radiotherapy and oncology : journal of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiother Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
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89. van As NJ, de Souza NM, Riches SF, Morgan VA, Sohaib SA, Dearnaley DP, Parker CC: A study of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in men with untreated localised prostate cancer on active surveillance. Eur Urol; 2009 Dec;56(6):981-7
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  • [Title] A study of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in men with untreated localised prostate cancer on active surveillance.
  • BACKGROUND: Markers that predict the behaviour of localised prostate cancer are needed to identify patients that require treatment.
  • Patients had clinical stage T1/T2a N0/Nx M0/Mx adenocarcinoma of the prostate, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level<15 ng/ml, Gleason score≤7, primary Gleason grade≤3, and positive biopsy cores (pbc)≤50%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In patients with low-risk, localised disease, tumour ADC on DW-MRI may be a useful marker of prostate cancer progression and may help to identify patients who stand to benefit from radical treatment.


90. White WM, Sadetsky N, Waters WB, Carroll PR, Litwin MS: Quality of life in men with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate: an exploratory analysis using data from the CaPSURE database. J Urol; 2008 Dec;180(6):2409-13; discussion 2414
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  • [Title] Quality of life in men with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate: an exploratory analysis using data from the CaPSURE database.
  • PURPOSE: We present longitudinal quality of life outcomes in a national observational cohort of men with locally advanced prostate adenocarcinoma.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: The CaPSURE registry was used to evaluate quality of life in men with clinical T3 or T4 prostate adenocarcinoma who underwent primary treatment and had a minimum followup of 2 years.
  • Records were reviewed for treatment, patient age, T stage, prostate specific antigen at diagnosis, body mass index, and initial and posttreatment quality of life using the SF-36 and UCLA-PCI questionnaires, which can each be scored from 0 to 100 with higher scores indicating better outcomes.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Treatment for locally advanced prostate adenocarcinoma is associated with a significant burden in patients, notably decrements in urinary and sexual function.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / therapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / therapy. Quality of Life. Registries

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  • (PMID = 18930270.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-3792
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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91. Kurokawa T: [A case of giant prostate carcinoma difficult to diagnose because of absence of urinary difficulty]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2009 Dec;55(12):769-71
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  • [Title] [A case of giant prostate carcinoma difficult to diagnose because of absence of urinary difficulty].
  • The computed tomography revealed a giant pelvic mass with a high value of prostate specific antigen.
  • A transrectal prostatic biopsy was performed and the histopathological diagnosis was poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of prostate.
  • The clinical stage was D2 with multiple lung metastases but no bone metastasis.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / diagnosis. Prostatic Neoplasms / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 20048563.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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92. Yu HH, Song DY, Tsai YY, Thompson T, Frassica DA, DeWeese TL: Perineural invasion affects biochemical recurrence-free survival in patients with prostate cancer treated with definitive external beam radiotherapy. Urology; 2007 Jul;70(1):111-6
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  • [Title] Perineural invasion affects biochemical recurrence-free survival in patients with prostate cancer treated with definitive external beam radiotherapy.
  • OBJECTIVES: To assess the prognostic effect of perineural invasion (PNI) for patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer.
  • METHODS: We evaluated 657 consecutive patients who had undergone external beam radiotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer.
  • The clinical/treatment parameters used for analysis included PNI, clinical stage, biopsy Gleason score, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen, radiation dose, and androgen deprivation.
  • The primary endpoint was biochemical recurrence defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-American Society for Therapeutic Radiology Oncology Phoenix consensus; the secondary endpoint was prostate cancer death.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The results of our study have shown that the presence of PNI is an independent risk factor associated with an increased risk of biochemical recurrence in patients with prostate cancer undergoing external beam radiotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Adenocarcinoma / radiotherapy. Nervous System Neoplasms / pathology. Prostate / innervation. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Disease-Free Survival. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood

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  • (PMID = 17656219.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
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93. Heebøll S, Borre M, Ottosen PD, Andersen CL, Mansilla F, Dyrskjøt L, Orntoft TF, Tørring N: SMARCC1 expression is upregulated in prostate cancer and positively correlated with tumour recurrence and dedifferentiation. Histol Histopathol; 2008 09;23(9):1069-76
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  • [Title] SMARCC1 expression is upregulated in prostate cancer and positively correlated with tumour recurrence and dedifferentiation.
  • BACKGROUND: The identification of new prognostic markers in prostate cancer (PC) is essential to improve patient treatment and management.
  • MATERIALS: Expression of SMARCC1 immunostaining was analysed on a tissue microarray containing specimens from 327 patients with prostate cancer and clinical follow-up information.
  • Furthermore, 30 specimens from patients with benign prostate hyperplasia were included as controls as well as 30 specimens of benign prostate tissue from PC patients.
  • SMARCC1 expression was also positively correlated to Gleason score (p<0.05), clinical T stage (p<0.01) and time to recurrence (p<0.001).
  • Conclusions. Our present results demonstrate an increased expression of SMARCC1 protein in prostate cancer and reveal a positive correlation with tumour dedifferentiation, progression, metastasis and time to recurrence.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / metabolism. Prostatic Neoplasms / metabolism. Transcription Factors / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. COS Cells. Cell Dedifferentiation. Cell Nucleus / metabolism. Cell Nucleus / pathology. Cercopithecus aethiops. Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Direct. Humans. Immunoenzyme Techniques. Lymph Nodes / metabolism. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Odds Ratio. Prostate / metabolism. Prostate / pathology. Prostatic Hyperplasia / metabolism. Prostatic Hyperplasia / pathology. Tissue Array Analysis. Up-Regulation

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  • (PMID = 18581278.001).
  • [ISSN] 1699-5848
  • [Journal-full-title] Histology and histopathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Histol. Histopathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / SMARCC1 protein, human; 0 / Transcription Factors
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94. Zhigang Z, Wenlu S: External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) suppressed prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) mRNA expression in clinically localized prostate cancer. Prostate; 2007 May 1;67(6):653-60
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  • [Title] External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) suppressed prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) mRNA expression in clinically localized prostate cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a recently identified glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell surface protein belonging to the Thy-1/Ly-6 family of cell surface antigens, is overexpressed in human prostate cancer (PCa).
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between January 1999 and June 2005, 87 men with clinically localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate received only EBRT with a total dose of 65-70 Gy for 6.5-7 weeks.
  • PSCA in situ hybridization (ISH) was performed on the cancerous pretreatment biopsy or transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) tissue and post-treatment biopsy tissue of all 87 men, respectively.
  • This decline in PSCA mRNA labeling was directly proportional to higher pretreatment serum PSA level, higher tumor grade (Gleason score), and higher clinical T stage.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / radiotherapy. Antigens, Neoplasm / genetics. Biomarkers, Tumor / genetics. Membrane Glycoproteins / genetics. Neoplasm Proteins / genetics. Prostatic Neoplasms / radiotherapy. RNA, Messenger / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Biopsy. Cell Count. Disease Progression. GPI-Linked Proteins. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic / drug effects. Humans. In Situ Hybridization. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Transurethral Resection of Prostate

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 17342746.001).
  • [ISSN] 0270-4137
  • [Journal-full-title] The Prostate
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prostate
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / GPI-Linked Proteins; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / PSCA protein, human; 0 / RNA, Messenger; EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
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95. Jhavar S, Bartlett J, Kovacs G, Corbishley C, Dearnaley D, Eeles R, Khoo V, Huddart R, Horwich A, Thompson A, Norman A, Brewer D, Cooper CS, Parker C: Biopsy tissue microarray study of Ki-67 expression in untreated, localized prostate cancer managed by active surveillance. Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis; 2009;12(2):143-7
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  • [Title] Biopsy tissue microarray study of Ki-67 expression in untreated, localized prostate cancer managed by active surveillance.
  • Active surveillance provides a unique opportunity to study biomarkers of prostate cancer behaviour, although only small volumes of tumor tissue are typically available.
  • We have evaluated a technique for constructing tissue microarrays (TMAs) from needle biopsies for assessing immunohistochemical markers in localized prostate cancer managed by active surveillance.
  • TMAs were constructed from diagnostic prostate biopsies for 60 patients with localized prostatic adenocarcinoma in a prospective cohort study of active surveillance.
  • Radical treatment was recommended for a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) velocity greater than 1 ng ml(-1) per year or adverse histology in repeat biopsies, defined as Gleason score > or =4+3 or >50% of cores involved.
  • On univariate analysis, PSA density (P=0.001), Gleason score (P=0.001), clinical T stage (P=0.01), Ki-67 LI (P=0.02) and initial PSA (P=0.04) were associated with time to radical treatment.
  • TMAs constructed from prostate needle biopsies can be used to assess immunohistochemical markers in localized prostate cancer managed by active surveillance.
  • Ki-67 LI merits further study as a possible biomarker of early prostate cancer behaviour.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / metabolism. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Ki-67 Antigen / biosynthesis. Prostatic Neoplasms / metabolism. Tissue Array Analysis / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Biopsy, Needle. Cohort Studies. Disease Progression. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Membrane Proteins / biosynthesis. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Prognosis. Prostate-Specific Antigen. Prostatectomy. Racemases and Epimerases / biosynthesis

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  • (PMID = 18762814.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-5608
  • [Journal-full-title] Prostate cancer and prostatic diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Cancer Research UK / / 10588; United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / G0501019; United Kingdom / Cancer Research UK / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / CKAP4 protein, human; 0 / Ki-67 Antigen; 0 / Membrane Proteins; EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen; EC 5.1.- / Racemases and Epimerases; EC 5.1.99.4 / alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase
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96. Losa CA, Fernando AB, Lázaro VA, Berlanga FF, Frago PS, López MA, Sanz MJ, Martínez PG, Sanz LA: [Current value of seminal vesicle biopsy in patients with prostate cancer and influence of radical prostatectomy in patients with seminal vesicle invasion]. Arch Esp Urol; 2006 Dec;59(10):977-88
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  • [Title] [Current value of seminal vesicle biopsy in patients with prostate cancer and influence of radical prostatectomy in patients with seminal vesicle invasion].
  • [Transliterated title] Valor actual de la biopsia de vesículas seminales en pacientes con cancer de próstata e influencia de la prostatectomía radical en pacientes con infiltarción seminal.
  • OBJECTIVES: To evaluate if radical prostatectomy may positively influence cancer-specific survival (CSS), hormone-resistance-free time, metastasis-free time, and quality of life(QoL) of patients with prostate adenocarcinoma and seminal vesicle invasion, and also to update our thoughts about seminal vesicle biopsy.
  • Primary grade and Gleason Score were independent predictors for CSS in the Cox regression test; clinical stage was independent predictor for time to hormone resistance.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Radical prostatectomy as monotherapy does not show a statistically significant influence on followup time, CSS, time to hormone resistance, metastasis free time or QoL in patients with prostate cancer and seminal vesicle invasion associated with other bad prognostic factors (unfavourable Gleason and PSA).
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Adenocarcinoma / surgery. Prostatectomy. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / surgery. Seminal Vesicles / pathology


97. Sankin A, Tareen B, Lepor H: Side-specific factors associated with extracapsular extension and seminal vesicular invasion in men undergoing open radical retropubic prostatectomy. Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis; 2009;12(2):204-8
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  • This study provides further insights into those preoperative parameters that predict side-specific risk of pathological stage in men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP).
  • The transrectal ultrasound-guided tissue biopsy cores obtained from the right and left sides of the prostate were collected in separate jars and examined independently according to the side of origin in 1250 men with clinically localized prostate cancer who underwent RP.
  • Using a univariate analysis, age, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), prostate volume, clinical stage, Gleason score, number of positive biopsies, percent positive biopsy cores, percent volume of prostate cancer in cores and perineural invasion were all significant predictors of both ECE and SVI.
  • Age, serum PSA, Gleason score and prostate volume were independent predictors of side-specific SVI.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Adenocarcinoma / surgery. Neoplasm Staging / methods. Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology. Prostatic Neoplasms / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Age Factors. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prostate-Specific Antigen / blood. Prostatectomy. Risk Factors. Seminal Vesicles / pathology

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  • (PMID = 19238170.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-5608
  • [Journal-full-title] Prostate cancer and prostatic diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.4.21.77 / Prostate-Specific Antigen
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98. Zhu AX, Wallner KE, Frivold GP, Ferry D, Jutzy KR, Foster GP: Prostate brachytherapy seed migration to the right coronary artery associated with an acute myocardial infarction. Brachytherapy; 2006 Oct-Dec;5(4):262-5
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  • [Title] Prostate brachytherapy seed migration to the right coronary artery associated with an acute myocardial infarction.
  • PURPOSE: We report a case of prostate brachytherapy seed migration to the right coronary artery (RCA) associated with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI).
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: A 69-year-old male was diagnosed with Prostate Adenocarcinoma Stage II (T(1c)N0M0) in October 2003.
  • He underwent percutaneous transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy with the implantation of 94 loose iodine (125I) seeds under transrectal ultrasound guidance on 15 December, 2003.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / radiotherapy. Brachytherapy / adverse effects. Coronary Vessels. Myocardial Infarction / etiology. Prostatic Neoplasms / radiotherapy

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  • (PMID = 17118321.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-4721
  • [Journal-full-title] Brachytherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Brachytherapy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Iodine Radioisotopes
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99. Kannan V, Sathiyanarayanan VK, Sagde S, Anand V, Almel S, Kapadia A, Srinivas V: Three dimensional conformal radiation therapy in prostate adenocarcinoma: survival and rectal toxicity. J Cancer Res Ther; 2005 Jan-Mar;1(1):34-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Three dimensional conformal radiation therapy in prostate adenocarcinoma: survival and rectal toxicity.
  • The 3D-CRT clinical treatment in our hospital was started in September 1998 and till December 2002, 51 patients with M(0) stage prostate carcinoma were treated.
  • Our experience suggests that a dose of 72 Gy by 3D-CRT can be safely delivered to the prostate and gastrointestinal tolerance during treatment and follow-up period was excellent.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / radiotherapy. Prostatic Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Rectum / radiation effects

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Prostate Cancer.
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
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  • (PMID = 17998623.001).
  • [ISSN] 1998-4138
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cancer research and therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Cancer Res Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
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100. Sharkey J, Cantor A, Solc Z, Huff W, Chovnick SD, Behar RJ, Perez R, Otheguy J, Rabinowitz R: 103Pd brachytherapy versus radical prostatectomy in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer: a 12-year experience from a single group practice. Brachytherapy; 2005;4(1):34-44
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] 103Pd brachytherapy versus radical prostatectomy in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer: a 12-year experience from a single group practice.
  • PURPOSE: In an effort to shed light on the continuing debate over the best treatment options for patients with localized prostate cancer, we present a retrospective review of patients from a single group community urology practice.
  • These patients, with T1 or T2 adenocarcinoma of the prostate, were treated from 1992 to 2004 with either brachytherapy or radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRPP); 81% were aged over 65 years.
  • Patients were classified into risk groups based on initial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and Gleason score.
  • Brachytherapy and prostatectomy should be offered without bias to all men with stage T1 and T2 organ-confined prostate cancer.






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