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1. Alfieri A, Mazzoleni G, Schwarz A, Campello M, Broger M, Vitale M, Vigl EE: Renal cell carcinoma and intradural spinal metastasis with cauda equina infiltration: case report--part II. Spine (Phila Pa 1976); 2005 Jan 15;30(2):260-2
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  • [Title] Renal cell carcinoma and intradural spinal metastasis with cauda equina infiltration: case report--part II.
  • OBJECTIVE: To describe the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment of a papillary renal cell carcinoma that developed an intradural spinal mass with cauda equina infiltration.
  • SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Cancers that metastasize intradurally to the spinal canal are uncommon, accounting for the 6% of all spinal metastases.
  • Those from renal cell carcinoma are especially unusual.
  • Only 3 reports that describe the spread of metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the cauda equina have been published to our knowledge.
  • METHODS: A female patient had undergone nephrectomy for the treatment of the papillary renal cell carcinoma 2 years before, and only 1 localization (at the genital tract) was previously diagnosed.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The majority of cauda equina tumors are primary tumors, and metastases are very rare.
  • To our knowledge, this is the fourth case described of metastasis of renal cell carcinoma at the cauda equina and the first of papillary type.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Cauda Equina / pathology. Dura Mater / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / secondary

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  • (PMID = 15644767.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-1159
  • [Journal-full-title] Spine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Spine
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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2. Leung RS, Biswas SV, Duncan M, Rankin S: Imaging features of von Hippel-Lindau disease. Radiographics; 2008 Jan-Feb;28(1):65-79; quiz 323
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  • [Title] Imaging features of von Hippel-Lindau disease.
  • von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a rare, autosomal dominantly inherited multisystem disorder characterized by development of a variety of benign and malignant tumors.
  • The spectrum of clinical manifestations of the disease is broad and includes retinal and central nervous system hemangioblastomas, endolymphatic sac tumors, renal cysts and tumors, pancreatic cysts and tumors, pheochromocytomas, and epididymal cystadenomas.
  • The most common causes of death in VHL disease patients are renal cell carcinoma and neurologic complications from cerebellar hemangioblastomas.
  • Screening is important because the lesions in VHL disease are treatable; thus, early detection allows use of more conservative therapy and may enhance the patient's length and quality of life.
  • A multidisciplinary team approach is important in screening for VHL disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Diagnostic Imaging / methods. Image Enhancement / methods. Neoplasms / diagnosis. von Hippel-Lindau Disease / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 18203931.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-1323
  • [Journal-full-title] Radiographics : a review publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Radiographics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 28
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3. McHugh K: Renal and adrenal tumours in children. Cancer Imaging; 2007;7:41-51
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  • [Title] Renal and adrenal tumours in children.
  • The differential diagnosis of renal and supra-renal masses firstly depends on the age of the child.
  • Neuroblastoma (NBL) may be seen antenatally or in the newborn period; this tumour has a good prognosis unlike NBL seen in older children (particularly NBL in those aged 2-4 years).
  • Benign renal masses predominate in early infancy but beyond the first year of life Wilms' tumour is the most common renal malignancy, until adolescence when renal cell carcinoma has similar or increased frequency as children get older.
  • Adrenal adenomas and carcinomas also occur in childhood; these tumours are indistinguishable on imaging but criteria for the diagnosis of adrenal carcinoma include size larger than 5 cm, a tendency to invade the inferior vena cava and to metastasise.
  • The most topical dilemmas in the radiological assessment of renal and adrenal tumours are presented.
  • Topics covered include a proposed revision to the staging of NBL, the problems inherent in distinguishing nephrogenic rests from Wilms' tumour and the current recently altered approach regarding small lung nodules in children with Wilms' tumour.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / diagnosis. Diagnostic Imaging / methods. Kidney Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Age of Onset. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / epidemiology. Child. Child, Preschool. Diagnosis, Differential. Ganglioneuroblastoma / diagnosis. Ganglioneuroblastoma / epidemiology. Ganglioneuroblastoma / pathology. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Lung Neoplasms / radiography. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Mass Screening. Neoplasm Staging. Neuroblastoma / diagnosis. Neuroblastoma / epidemiology. Neuroblastoma / pathology. Neuroblastoma / secondary. Neuroblastoma / therapy. Pheochromocytoma / diagnosis. Pheochromocytoma / epidemiology. Positron-Emission Tomography. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Wilms Tumor / diagnosis. Wilms Tumor / epidemiology. Wilms Tumor / pathology. Wilms Tumor / therapy

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  • (PMID = 17339140.001).
  • [ISSN] 1470-7330
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer imaging : the official publication of the International Cancer Imaging Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Imaging
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 19
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1828369
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4. Reckamp KL, Strieter RM, Figlin RA: Chemokines as therapeutic targets in renal cell carcinoma. Expert Rev Anticancer Ther; 2008 Jun;8(6):887-93
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  • [Title] Chemokines as therapeutic targets in renal cell carcinoma.
  • Targeting novel pathways associated with tumor angiogenesis, invasion and immunity, may lead to improvement in patient outcomes for renal cell carcinoma.
  • Chemokines potentiate tumor growth, metastasis, angiogenesis and immune evasion through interactions with stromal cells and neoplastic cells.
  • Further understanding of the mechanisms involved in chemokine-mediated angiogenesis and metastasis may lead to improved therapeutic strategies in this disease.
  • Interactions between chemokine expression and signaling, and the VEGF and hypoxia-inducible factor pathways offer important opportunities to intervene in the process of renal cell carcinoma proliferation, angiogenesis and invasion.
  • Modulation of the CXCR3/CXCR3-ligand or the CXCR4/CXCL12 biologic axis may be potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma.
  • Furthermore, combination treatment with agents targeting chemokine signaling with therapies directed at angiogenesis and tumor immunity may lead to improved outcomes in this disease.

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  • (PMID = 18533798.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-8328
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert review of anticancer therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Rev Anticancer Ther
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL66027; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA087879-09; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA087879-09; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K12 CA01727; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL066027-03; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL066027-03; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA087879; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K12 CA001727-15; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL066027; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA87879; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA001727-15; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K12 CA001727
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Chemokines
  • [Number-of-references] 68
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS199931; NLM/ PMC2884168
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5. Zucchetto A, Dal Maso L, Tavani A, Montella M, Ramazzotti V, Talamini R, Canzonieri V, Garbeglio A, Negri E, Franceschi S, La Vecchia C: History of treated hypertension and diabetes mellitus and risk of renal cell cancer. Ann Oncol; 2007 Mar;18(3):596-600
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  • [Title] History of treated hypertension and diabetes mellitus and risk of renal cell cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: An increased risk of renal cell cancer (RCC) has been reported in subjects with hypertension.
  • Whether this association may vary according to sex, smoking, obesity, or RCC clinical presentation is unclear.
  • Results on the link between diabetes mellitus and RCC are inconclusive.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted an Italian multicenter case-control study, including 767 (494 men, 273 women) incident cases of RCC, under 80 years of age, and 1534 hospital controls, frequency-matched to cases.
  • Multiple logistic regression models, conditioned to center, sex, and age, and adjusted for period of interview, education, smoking, and body mass were used to estimate odds ratios (OR).
  • RESULTS: Compared with subjects never treated, patients with a history of treated hypertension [OR = 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4-2.1] reported an excess risk of RCC.
  • This pattern was confirmed in different strata of sex, education, smoking habits, body mass, tumor histological type, stage, or grade.
  • The attributable risk of RCC for treated hypertension in this population was 16%.
  • CONCLUSION: A possible causal role of hypertension in renal cell carcinogenesis is supported by the consistency of the direct association.


6. Seliger B, Lichtenfels R, Atkins D, Bukur J, Halder T, Kersten M, Harder A, Ackermann A, Malenica B, Brenner W, Zobawa M, Lottspeich F: Identification of fatty acid binding proteins as markers associated with the initiation and/or progression of renal cell carcinoma. Proteomics; 2005 Jul;5(10):2631-40
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Identification of fatty acid binding proteins as markers associated with the initiation and/or progression of renal cell carcinoma.
  • Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) representing the most common neoplasia of the kidney in Western countries is a histologic diverse disease with an often unpredictable course.
  • The prognosis of RCC is worsened with the onset of metastasis, and the therapies currently available are of limited success for the treatment of metastatic RCC.
  • Although gene expression analyses and other methods are promising tools clarifying and standardizing the pathological classification of RCC, novel innovative molecular markers for the diagnosis, prognosis, and for the monitoring of this disease during therapy as well as potential therapeutic targets are urgently needed.
  • Using proteome-based strategies, a number of RCC-associated markers either over-expressed or down-regulated in tumor lesions in comparison to the normal epithelium have been identified which have been implicated in tumorigenesis, but never linked to the initiation and/or progression of RCC.
  • These include members of the fatty acid binding protein family, which have the potential to serve as diagnostic or prognostic markers for the screening of RCC patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / physiopathology. Carrier Proteins / analysis. Kidney Neoplasms / physiopathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Biomarkers, Tumor / isolation & purification. Cell Line, Tumor. DNA Primers. Disease Progression. Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional / methods. Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Kidney. Prognosis. Reference Values. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction. Urothelium / chemistry. Urothelium / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 15892167.001).
  • [ISSN] 1615-9853
  • [Journal-full-title] Proteomics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Proteomics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Carrier Proteins; 0 / DNA Primers; 0 / Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins
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7. Alexanian A, Rufanova VA, Miller B, Flasch A, Roman RJ, Sorokin A: Down-regulation of 20-HETE synthesis and signaling inhibits renal adenocarcinoma cell proliferation and tumor growth. Anticancer Res; 2009 Oct;29(10):3819-24
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  • [Title] Down-regulation of 20-HETE synthesis and signaling inhibits renal adenocarcinoma cell proliferation and tumor growth.
  • BACKGROUND: We examined the ability of inhibitors of the synthesis or actions of 20-HETE, metabolite of arachidonic acid, to inhibit proliferation of human renal carcinoma cell lines.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: 786-O and 769-P cells were exposed to either 10 microM HET0016 (selective inhibitor of 20-HETE synthesis), 10 microM WIT002 (20-HETE antagonist), or vehicle.
  • Subsequently, we assessed the effect of WIT002 on tumor growth in vivo using an ectopic mouse model of clear-cell renal carcinoma.
  • RESULTS: Addition of HET0016 and WIT002 inhibited the proliferation of 786-O and 769-P human renal cell carcinoma lines.
  • HET0016 and WIT002 had little effect on the proliferation of primary cultures of normal human proximal tubule epithelial cells.
  • WIT002 (10 mg/kg, s.c.) administered daily to athymic nude mice implanted subcutaneously with 786-O cells reduced the growth of the tumors by 84 % compared to vehicle (p<0.001).
  • CONCLUSION: 20-HETE is required for proliferation of human renal epithelial cancer.

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  • (PMID = 19846914.001).
  • [ISSN] 1791-7530
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL022563-30; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL 022563; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL 029587; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK041684-19; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL 036279; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK041684-19; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK 41684; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R37 HL036279-23; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / P01 HL029587; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL022563; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL029587-200003; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / P01 HL029587-200003; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK041684; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL022563-30; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL036279-23; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R37 HL036279; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL036279
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Amidines; 0 / Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acids; 0 / N-hydroxy-N'-(4-butyl-2-methylphenyl)formamidine; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand; 27YG812J1I / Arachidonic Acid; 79551-86-3 / 20-hydroxy-5,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid; 9035-51-2 / Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System; EC 1.14.13.30 / CYP4F2 protein, human; EC 1.14.13.30 / CYP4F3 protein, human
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS167901; NLM/ PMC2807614
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8. Poon SA, Gonzalez JR, Benson MC, McKiernan JM: Invasion of renal sinus fat is not an independent predictor of survival in pT3a renal cell carcinoma. BJU Int; 2009 Jun;103(12):1622-5
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  • [Title] Invasion of renal sinus fat is not an independent predictor of survival in pT3a renal cell carcinoma.
  • OBJECTIVE: To clarify the significance of the location of extrarenal tumour extension of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) as in the 2002 Tumour-Nodes-Metastasis classification.
  • Renal cortical tumours with perirenal fat invasion (PFI) or sinus fat invasion (SFI) are consolidated within the pT3a grouping; tumours with SFI are close to the renal veins, lymphatics and the collecting system.
  • This might carry a worse prognosis for disease-specific survival (DSS), but reports are limited and contradictory.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 1244 patients treated with nephrectomy from 1988 to 2007, to identify patients with pT3a renal tumours.
  • CONCLUSION: Patients with renal tumours with SFI are more likely to die from RCC than those with PFI.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / pathology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Kidney Pelvis / pathology


9. Negrier S, Jäger E, Porta C, McDermott D, Moore M, Bellmunt J, Anderson S, Cihon F, Lewis J, Escudier B, Bukowski R: Efficacy and safety of sorafenib in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma with and without prior cytokine therapy, a subanalysis of TARGET. Med Oncol; 2010 Sep;27(3):899-906
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  • [Title] Efficacy and safety of sorafenib in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma with and without prior cytokine therapy, a subanalysis of TARGET.
  • Before the development of targeted therapies, administration of cytokines (e.g., interleukin-2, interferon-alpha) was the primary systemic treatment option for advanced renal cell carcinoma.
  • Sorafenib, an oral targeted, multikinase inhibitor, significantly prolonged progression-free survival and overall survival in the Treatment Approaches in Renal Cancer Global Evaluation Trial (TARGET), a large (N = 903) phase III, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled study of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma resistant to standard therapy.
  • Sorafenib demonstrated a consistent, significant clinical benefit against advanced renal cell carcinoma, with a twofold improvement in progression-free survival and disease control rate, with similar toxicities in patients with or without prior cytokine treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / administration & dosage. Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / adverse effects. Benzenesulfonates / administration & dosage. Benzenesulfonates / adverse effects. Cardiovascular Diseases / chemically induced. Diarrhea / chemically induced. Disease-Free Survival. Double-Blind Method. Female. Hematologic Diseases / chemically induced. Humans. Interferon-alpha / administration & dosage. Interferon-alpha / adverse effects. Interleukin-2 / administration & dosage. Interleukin-2 / adverse effects. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Male. Middle Aged. Niacinamide / analogs & derivatives. Phenylurea Compounds. Progestins / administration & dosage. Progestins / adverse effects. Pyridines / administration & dosage. Pyridines / adverse effects. Treatment Outcome. Vinca Alkaloids / administration & dosage. Vinca Alkaloids / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 19757215.001).
  • [ISSN] 1559-131X
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical oncology (Northwood, London, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase III; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic; 0 / Benzenesulfonates; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Interleukin-2; 0 / Phenylurea Compounds; 0 / Progestins; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Pyridines; 0 / Vinca Alkaloids; 25X51I8RD4 / Niacinamide; 9ZOQ3TZI87 / sorafenib
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10. Autenrieth M, Heidenreich A, Gschwend JE: [Systemic therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma]. Urologe A; 2006 May;45(5):594-9
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  • [Title] [Systemic therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma].
  • Cytokine-based immunotherapy was the only viable option in metastatic, nonresectable renal cell carcinoma (RCC) for many years.
  • In this context, interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) turned out to be the most effective single agents in RCC.
  • Such small molecules like tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, or the mTOR inhibitor CCI-779 may dramatically change the established concepts of systemic RCC treatment.
  • This paper gives an overview of established, current, and evolving concepts of systemic therapy in RCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Drug Delivery Systems / methods. Immunotherapy / methods. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy


11. Tomadoni A, García C, Márquez M, Ayala JC, Prado F: Stauffer's syndrome with jaundice, a paraneoplastic manifestation of renal cell carcinoma: a case report. Arch Esp Urol; 2010 Mar;63(2):154-6
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  • [Title] Stauffer's syndrome with jaundice, a paraneoplastic manifestation of renal cell carcinoma: a case report.
  • OBJECTIVE: To report an infrequent case of Stauffer's Syndrome with jaundice as a paraneoplastic syndrome of a metastatic renal cancer.
  • METHODS: We describe the set up of cholestatic jaundice without neoplastic liver infiltration in a patient with a metastatic renal cell carcinoma, which turned back with surgery and systemic treatment.
  • RESULTS: Proper treatment of baseline disease enables turn back paraneoplastic signs and symptoms of Stauffer's Syndrome.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Reversible cholestatic jaundice without evidence of hepatic disease is an infrequent form of the Stauffer's syndrome.
  • This paraneoplastic syndrome is associated particularly with renal carcinoma but was described in lymphoproliferative diseases, prostate cancer and broncogenic tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / complications. Jaundice, Obstructive / etiology. Kidney Neoplasms / complications. Paraneoplastic Syndromes / etiology

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  • (PMID = 20378939.001).
  • [ISSN] 1576-8260
  • [Journal-full-title] Archivos españoles de urología
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Esp. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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12. Sonpavde G, Hutson TE: Recent advances in the therapy of renal cancer. Expert Opin Biol Ther; 2007 Feb;7(2):233-42
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  • [Title] Recent advances in the therapy of renal cancer.
  • Metastatic clear cell renal cell cancer has traditionally been treated with cytokines (interferon or interleukin-2).
  • Vascular endothelial growth factor, the related receptor and the mTOR signal transduction pathway have particularly been exploited.
  • The future of the therapy of renal cancer appears promising owing to the efficacy of these novel agents.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy


13. Ulamec M, Tomas D, Perić-Balja M, Spajić B, Hes O, Kruslin B: Neuroendocrine breast carcinoma metastatic to renal cell carcinoma and ipsilateral adrenal gland. Pathol Res Pract; 2008;204(11):851-5
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  • [Title] Neuroendocrine breast carcinoma metastatic to renal cell carcinoma and ipsilateral adrenal gland.
  • We report on a 60-year-old woman with neuroendocrine carcinoma of the left breast metastasizing to renal cell carcinoma (RCC) of the left kidney and to adrenal gland.
  • A yellow, well-circumscribed tumor, 11 cm in largest diameter and limited to the kidney, was found.
  • Histopathology revealed RCC with foci of neuroendocrine differentiation.
  • Solid sheets of hyperchromatic epithelioid cells with high mitotic activity were found between typical clear cells of RCC.
  • These cells were CAM5,2 and E-cadherin focally positive, synaptophysin and NSE weakly positive, CK19 moderately positive, and AE1-AE3 and EMA strongly positive.
  • The left adrenal gland contained multiple, separate foci of a tumor composed of neuroendocrine components.
  • Because of the biphasic tumor in the kidney, extensive clinical examination and further analyses were recommended.
  • Tumor in the left breast was revealed.
  • The tumor was histologically and immunohistochemically similar to the neuroendocrine component within RCC.
  • To our knowledge, this is the first case of neuroendocrine breast carcinoma with metastasis to renal cell carcinoma and ipsilateral adrenal gland.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / pathology. Carcinoma, Neuroendocrine / secondary. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / pathology


14. Petrella BL, Lohi J, Brinckerhoff CE: Identification of membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase as a target of hypoxia-inducible factor-2 alpha in von Hippel-Lindau renal cell carcinoma. Oncogene; 2005 Feb 3;24(6):1043-52
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  • [Title] Identification of membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase as a target of hypoxia-inducible factor-2 alpha in von Hippel-Lindau renal cell carcinoma.
  • Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) resulting from the hereditary loss of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene is the leading cause of death in VHL patients due to the deleterious effects of the metastatic tumor(s).
  • The process of tumor invasion and metastasis involves the destruction of the extracellular matrix, which is accomplished primarily by the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family of enzymes.
  • Here, we describe a connection between the loss of VHL tumor suppressor function and the upregulation of membrane type-1 MMP (MT1-MMP) gene expression and protein.
  • Specifically, MT1-MMP is upregulated in VHL-/- RCC cells through an increase in gene transcription, which is mediated by the cooperative effects of the transcription factors, HIF-2 and Sp1.
  • To our knowledge, this is the first report to show direct regulation of MT1-MMP by HIF-2 and to provide a direct link between the loss of VHL tumor suppressor function and an increase in MMP gene and protein expression.

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  • (PMID = 15592504.001).
  • [ISSN] 0950-9232
  • [Journal-full-title] Oncogene
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oncogene
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-77267; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA077267; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / AR-26599; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / R01 AR026599; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / R37 AR026599; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / T32 AI007363
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors; 0 / Trans-Activators; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins; 0 / endothelial PAS domain-containing protein 1; EC 3.4.24.- / Matrix Metalloproteinases, Membrane-Associated; EC 3.4.24.- / Metalloendopeptidases; EC 6.3.2.19 / Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases; EC 6.3.2.19 / VHL protein, human; EC 6.3.2.19 / Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS15822; NLM/ PMC1847637
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15. Kanao K, Mizuno R, Kikuchi E, Miyajima A, Nakagawa K, Ohigashi T, Nakashima J, Oya M: Preoperative prognostic nomogram (probability table) for renal cell carcinoma based on TNM classification. J Urol; 2009 Feb;181(2):480-5; discussion 485
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Preoperative prognostic nomogram (probability table) for renal cell carcinoma based on TNM classification.
  • PURPOSE: Recently several prognostic nomograms have been developed to predict the prognosis of malignant diseases, including renal cell carcinoma.
  • However, to our knowledge a preoperative prognostic nomogram that predicts survival in patients with renal cell carcinoma is not available.
  • We developed a preoperative nomogram based on the TNM classification that predicts cause specific survival in patients with renal cell carcinoma.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 545 patients with renal cell carcinoma, including metastatic disease, who underwent radical nephrectomy or nephron sparing surgery at our institution were included in the study.
  • Cases were staged according to the 2002 UICC TNM system, 6th edition.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The preoperative information shown by this nomogram may be important for obtaining informed consent from patients with renal cell carcinoma who have indications for surgery.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / mortality. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology. Nomograms
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Cohort Studies. Confidence Intervals. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Humans. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Nephrectomy / methods. Nephrectomy / mortality. Predictive Value of Tests. Preoperative Care / methods. Probability. Prognosis. Proportional Hazards Models. Retrospective Studies. Risk Assessment. Sensitivity and Specificity. Survival Rate. Treatment Outcome


16. White NM, Bui A, Mejia-Guerrero S, Chao J, Soosaipillai A, Youssef Y, Mankaruos M, Honey RJ, Stewart R, Pace KT, Sugar L, Diamandis EP, Doré J, Yousef GM: Dysregulation of kallikrein-related peptidases in renal cell carcinoma: potential targets of miRNAs. Biol Chem; 2010 Apr;391(4):411-23
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  • [Title] Dysregulation of kallikrein-related peptidases in renal cell carcinoma: potential targets of miRNAs.
  • Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 3% of all adult malignancies and currently no diagnostic marker exists.
  • Kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) have been implicated in numerous cancers including ovarian, prostate, and breast carcinoma.
  • KLKs 5, 6, 10, and 11 have decreased expression in RCC when compared to normal kidney tissue.
  • Our bioinformatic analysis indicated that the KLK 1, 6, and 7 genes have decreased expression in RCC.
  • We experimentally verified these results and found that decreased expression of KLKs 1 and 3 were significantly associated with the clear cell RCC subtype (p<0.001).
  • An analysis of miRNAs differentially expressed in RCC showed that 61 of the 117 miRNAs that were reported to be dysregulated in RCC were predicted to target KLKs.
  • Transfection of miR-224 into HEK-293 cells resulted in decreased KLK1 protein levels.
  • A luciferase assay demonstrated that hsa-let-7f can target KLK10 in the RCC cell line ACHN.
  • Our results, showing differential expression of KLKs in RCC, suggest that KLKs could be novel diagnostic markers for RCC and that their dysregulation could be under miRNA control.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / metabolism. Kallikreins / metabolism. Kidney Neoplasms / metabolism. MicroRNAs / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Chromosome Aberrations. Computational Biology. Evolution, Molecular. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Humans. Phylogeny. Reproducibility of Results

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  • (PMID = 20180642.001).
  • [ISSN] 1437-4315
  • [Journal-full-title] Biological chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biol. Chem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] Canada / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / / 86490
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / MicroRNAs; EC 3.4.21.- / Kallikreins
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17. Komai Y, Fujiwara M, Fujii Y, Mukai H, Yonese J, Kawakami S, Yamamoto S, Migita T, Ishikawa Y, Kurata M, Nakamura T, Fukui I: Adult Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinoma diagnosed by cytogenetics and immunohistochemistry. Clin Cancer Res; 2009 Feb 15;15(4):1170-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Adult Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinoma diagnosed by cytogenetics and immunohistochemistry.
  • PURPOSE: To determine the incidence of Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in adult patients using cytogenetics and immunohistochemstry.
  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Cytogenetic studies were prospectively done using tumor samples from 443 consecutive adult Japanese patients (ages 15-89 years) who underwent nephrectomy for RCC.
  • Clinicopathologic characteristics of Xp11 translocation RCC were examined.
  • RESULTS: Mitotic cells suitable for cytogenetic analysis were obtained in 244 tumor samples (55%); among these, we identified 4 cases (1.6%) of Xp11 translocation RCC.
  • The median age of the 7 patients was 41 years (range, 15-59 years), and 15% of RCC patients (4 of 26) who were younger than ages 45 years had this type of RCC.
  • Of the four Xp11 translocation RCC patients whose karyotypes were determined, two had an ASPL-TFE3 gene fusion.
  • Of these 2, 1 had pulmonary metastasis at presentation, and the other developed liver metastasis 12 months after nephrectomy and died of the disease.
  • Both had nodal involvement but remained disease free for 3 and 5 years, respectively, after surgical resection of lymph node metastases.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report to determine the incidence of Xp11 translocation RCC in adult patients.
  • We found that this disease is relatively common in young adults.
  • [MeSH-major] Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors / analysis. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / genetics. Chromosomes, Human, X. Kidney Neoplasms / genetics. Translocation, Genetic

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  • (PMID = 19228722.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins; 0 / Receptors, Growth Factor; 0 / TFE3 protein, human; EC 2.7.10.1 / MET protein, human; EC 2.7.10.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-met
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18. Ma J, Zhou XJ, Huang WB, Zhou HB, Jiang SJ, Rao Q, Lu ZF, Shi QL: [Clinicopathologic study of renal cell carcinoma with rhabdoid features]. Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi; 2007 Mar;36(3):166-70
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  • [Title] [Clinicopathologic study of renal cell carcinoma with rhabdoid features].
  • OBJECTIVE: To study the clinicopathologic features and biologic behavior of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with rhabdoid features.
  • METHODS: Ten cases of RCC with rhabdoid features collected during the period from 1995 to 2005 were enrolled into the study.
  • Histologically, the rhabdoid foci were characterized by loosely cohesive trabeculae, acini, lobules and clusters of rhabdoid cells in otherwise clear cell RCC (9 cases) or papillary RCC (1 case).
  • The rhabdoid cells were round to polygonal in shape and contained globular eosinophilic inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm, eccentric nuclei, vesicular chromatin pattern and prominent nucleoli.
  • Coagulative tumor necrosis was commonly seen.
  • Immunohistochemical study showed that the rhabdoid cells were diffusely positive for CD10 (10/10), cytokeratin AE1/AE3 (10/10), epithelial membrane antigen (10/10) and vimentin (10/10).
  • The mean Ki-67 labeling index of the rhabdoid component was higher than that of the non-rhabdoid component (P < 0.05).
  • While 6 patients are still alive without recurrence, 2 patients died of the disease 6 and 29 months respectively after the operation.
  • CONCLUSIONS: RCC with rhabdoid elements are mainly observed in clear cell RCC and need to be distinguished from oncocytic renal tumors and malignant rhabdoid tumor of kidney.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Rhabdoid Tumor / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / metabolism. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / pathology. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Keratins / metabolism. Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Mucin-1 / metabolism. Nephrectomy. Neprilysin / metabolism. Vimentin / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17535682.001).
  • [ISSN] 0529-5807
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua bing li xue za zhi = Chinese journal of pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Mucin-1; 0 / Vimentin; 68238-35-7 / Keratins; EC 3.4.24.11 / Neprilysin
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19. Chatzipantelis P, Karvouni E, Fragoulidis GP, Voros D, Pafiti A: Clinicopathologic features of two rare cases of mesenchymal metastatic tumors in the pancreas: review of the literature. Pancreas; 2006 Oct;33(3):301-3
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  • [Title] Clinicopathologic features of two rare cases of mesenchymal metastatic tumors in the pancreas: review of the literature.
  • METHODS: The first case concerns a 26-year-old man with a history of intracranial mesenchymal chondrosarcoma (since the age of 17), 2 left lung operations, and 3 right thigh operations.
  • The second case concerns a 66-year-old woman with a history of uterus leiomyosarcoma (10 years ago) with left axillary and right femoral metastases.
  • RESULTS: In the first case, the pathological examination revealed a tumor measuring 3.8 x 3.5 cm and histologically compatible with mesenchymal chondrosarcoma, developing in a vessel lumen and invading into the pancreatic parenchyma.
  • The incidence of metastatic pancreatic tumors has been reported to be only 1.6% to 3%.
  • Most of these tumors were of epithelial origin, and the most common sites of the primary lesions were the lung, kidney, and gastrointestinal tract.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / pathology. Adult. Aged. Chondrosarcoma / pathology. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Male

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  • (PMID = 17003653.001).
  • [ISSN] 1536-4828
  • [Journal-full-title] Pancreas
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pancreas
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Henske EP: Tuberous sclerosis and the kidney: from mesenchyme to epithelium, and beyond. Pediatr Nephrol; 2005 Jul;20(7):854-7
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  • [Title] Tuberous sclerosis and the kidney: from mesenchyme to epithelium, and beyond.
  • The renal manifestations of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) are remarkably diverse, including polycystic kidney disease, oncocytomas, renal cell carcinomas, and both benign and malignant angiomyolipomas.
  • What is particularly unusual about TSC, setting it apart from virtually all other inherited forms of renal disease, is the abnormalities of both mesenchymal cells (angiomyolipomas) and epithelial cells (cysts, oncocytomas, and carcinomas).
  • Recently, the TSC1/TSC2 protein complex was shown to inhibit the kinase mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin).
  • This places TSC1/TSC2 at center stage in signaling pathways that regulate cell growth.
  • Here, we will address the genetic, cellular and biochemical mechanisms that may contribute to the unusually broad spectrum of renal disease in cells with TSC1 or TSC2 mutations, and consider how the TSC signaling pathways may be linked to other renal diseases such as polycystic kidney disease and renal cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiomyolipoma / etiology. Carcinoma / etiology. Kidney Neoplasms / etiology. Tuberous Sclerosis / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Mutation. Repressor Proteins / genetics. Repressor Proteins / metabolism. Signal Transduction. Tumor Suppressor Proteins / genetics. Tumor Suppressor Proteins / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 15856327.001).
  • [ISSN] 0931-041X
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric nephrology (Berlin, Germany)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr. Nephrol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK 51052
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Repressor Proteins; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins; 0 / tuberous sclerosis complex 1 protein; 4JG2LF96VF / tuberous sclerosis complex 2 protein
  • [Number-of-references] 43
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21. Siemer S, Lahme S, Altziebler S, Machtens S, Strohmaier W, Wechsel HW, Goebell P, Schmeller N, Oberneder R, Stolzenburg JU, Becker H, Lüftenegger W, Tetens V, Van Poppel H: Efficacy and safety of TachoSil as haemostatic treatment versus standard suturing in kidney tumour resection: a randomised prospective study. Eur Urol; 2007 Oct;52(4):1156-63
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  • [Title] Efficacy and safety of TachoSil as haemostatic treatment versus standard suturing in kidney tumour resection: a randomised prospective study.
  • OBJECTIVE: Elective nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has gained general acceptance as an alternative to radical nephrectomy.
  • To achieve haemostasis without risk of local ischaemia and necrosis of kidney parenchyma after standard haemostatic suturing, we investigated TachoSil's efficacy and safety as atraumatic haemostatic treatment after kidney tumour resection.
  • METHODS: A total of 185 patients scheduled for NSS for small, superficial kidney tumours were included in an open, randomised, prospective, multicentre, parallel-group trial.
  • CONCLUSION: TachoSil was superior to standard suturing in obtaining intraoperative control of haemorrhage and was as well tolerated as standard haemostatic treatment during NSS.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Fibrinogen / therapeutic use. Hemostatics / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Surgical Sponges. Thrombin / therapeutic use

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  • [CommentIn] Eur Urol. 2007 Oct;52(4):1162-3 [17467888.001]
  • (PMID = 17467884.001).
  • [ISSN] 0302-2838
  • [Journal-full-title] European urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase III; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drug Combinations; 0 / Hemoglobins; 0 / Hemostatics; 0 / TachoSil; 9001-32-5 / Fibrinogen; EC 3.4.21.5 / Thrombin
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22. Yoo C, Song C, Hong JH, Kim CS, Ahn H: Prognostic significance of perinephric fat infiltration and tumor size in renal cell carcinoma. J Urol; 2008 Aug;180(2):486-91; discussion 491
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  • [Title] Prognostic significance of perinephric fat infiltration and tumor size in renal cell carcinoma.
  • PURPOSES: It is controversial that perinephric fat infiltration has an impact on survival in patients with renal cell carcinoma.
  • Therefore, we evaluated the influence of perinephric fat infiltration and tumor size on patient survival.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 783 and 77 patients with pT1-2 (cN0M0) and pT3a (cN0M0) renal cell carcinoma, respectively.
  • Sporadic unilocular noncystic renal cell carcinoma was included.
  • Univariate and multivariate analyses of prognostic factors, including perinephric fat infiltration, on cancer specific and disease-free survival were performed.
  • RESULTS: Patients with pT1-2 and pT3a tumors had a 5-year cancer specific survival rate of 96.1% and 84.9%, and a 5-year disease-free survival rate of 93.4% and 74.7%, respectively (each p <0.01).
  • Age, tumor size and Fuhrman nuclear grade were independent prognostic factors for cancer specific and disease-free survival, whereas perinephric fat infiltration was significant only for disease-free survival.
  • However, perinephric fat infiltration had a significant effect on cancer specific survival in patients with pT3a tumors more than 7 cm (p = 0.001).
  • In contrast, patients with pT3a tumors 7 cm or less had cancer specific and disease-free survival similar to that of patients with pT2 tumors.
  • Recurrence of pT3a tumors greater than 7 cm was observed in 44% of patients but in only 14.6% of those with pT3a tumors 7 cm or less (p = 0.029).
  • In contrast to the recurrence of tumors 7 cm or less, recurrence of pT3a tumors more than 7 cm usually developed at multiple sites with a large tumor burden and it progressed rapidly.
  • Consequently 85% of patients with recurrence of pT3a tumors larger than 7 cm died of renal cell carcinoma compared with 33% of those with recurrence of pT3a tumors 7 cm or less (p = 0.001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: In pT3a renal cell carcinoma tumor size was the strongest prognostic factor of disease-free and cancer specific survival.
  • Perinephric fat infiltration was an independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival but not for cancer specific survival due to the less aggressive behavior of small (7 cm or less) pT3a tumors after recurrence.
  • Tumor size and perinephric fat infiltration should be included in T3a renal cell carcinoma staging.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / pathology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / mortality. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Tumor Burden

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  • (PMID = 18550101.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-3792
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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23. Margulis V, Wood CG: The role of lymph node dissection in renal cell carcinoma: the pendulum swings back. Cancer J; 2008 Sep-Oct;14(5):308-14
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  • [Title] The role of lymph node dissection in renal cell carcinoma: the pendulum swings back.
  • The incidence of regional lymph node metastases in patients with renal cell carcinoma ranges from 13% to over 30%, and portends a poor prognosis in both locally advanced and metastatic settings.
  • Patients with small, organ confined tumors are at low risk for regional lymph node metastases and lymph node dissection can be omitted in these patients.
  • Patients with locally advanced primary tumors but no clinical evidence of lymphadenopathy can be selectively targeted for aggressive lymph node dissection as an adjunct to radical nephrectomy, based on their individual risk of harboring micrometastatic lymph node disease.
  • Although early identification of micrometastatic nodal disease in this group of patients has not conclusively been shown to improve survival, accurate pathologic nodal staging allows for early implementation of adjuvant systemic therapies in these high-risk patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Lymph Node Excision

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  • (PMID = 18836335.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-9117
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer journal (Sudbury, Mass.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. Flörcken A, Denecke T, Kretzschmar A, Gollasch H, Reich G, Westermann J: Long-lasting remission of pulmonary metastases of renal cell cancer under IFN-beta therapy in a patient with multiple sclerosis. Onkologie; 2006 Sep;29(8-9):382-4
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  • [Title] Long-lasting remission of pulmonary metastases of renal cell cancer under IFN-beta therapy in a patient with multiple sclerosis.
  • BACKGROUND: Immunomodulary therapy based on interferon (IFN)-a has been shown to be effective in a subset of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • IFN-Beta has occasionally been reported to induce remissions in RCC, but is well established in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS).
  • There is an ongoing debate whether hyperactivation of the immune system may convey protection against the development of cancer in MS patients.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: A 54-year-old female MS patient underwent tumor nephrectomy for RCC in 1994.
  • CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the longest remission under IFN-Beta treatment ever reported in an RCC patient.
  • We conclude that IFN-Beta should be particularly considered as a therapeutic option in the rare occasion of metastatic RCC in patients with MS.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / prevention & control. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Interferon-beta / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Lung Neoplasms / prevention & control. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Multiple Sclerosis / drug therapy


25. Bravi F, Bosetti C, Scotti L, Talamini R, Montella M, Ramazzotti V, Negri E, Franceschi S, La Vecchia C: Food groups and renal cell carcinoma: a case-control study from Italy. Int J Cancer; 2007 Feb 1;120(3):681-5
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  • [Title] Food groups and renal cell carcinoma: a case-control study from Italy.
  • Although nutrition and diet have been related to renal cell carcinoma (RCC), the role of specific foods or nutrients on this cancer is still controversial.
  • We evaluated the relation between a wide range of foods and the risk of RCC in an Italian case-control study including 767 patients (494 men and 273 women) younger than 79 years with incident, histologically confirmed RCC, and 1,534 controls (988 men and 546 women) admitted to the same hospitals as cases for a wide spectrum of acute, non-neoplastic conditions, not related to long term diet modifications.
  • A validated and reproducible food frequency questionnaire, including 78 foods and beverages, plus a separate section on alcohol drinking, was used to assess patients' dietary habits 2 years before diagnosis or hospital admission.
  • Poultry (OR = 0.74), processed meat (OR = 0.64) and vegetables (OR = 0.65) were inversely associated with RCC risk.
  • No relation was found for coffee and tea, soups, eggs, red meat, fish, cheese, pulses, potatoes, fruits, desserts and sugars.
  • The results of this study provide further indications on dietary correlates of RCC, and in particular indicate that a diet rich in refined cereals and poor in vegetables may have an unfavorable role on RCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / physiopathology. Energy Intake / physiology. Food. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Alcohol Drinking. Body Mass Index. Case-Control Studies. Diet. Educational Status. Female. Humans. Italy. Male. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Odds Ratio. Risk Factors. Smoking

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  • [CommentIn] Int J Cancer. 2007 Nov 1;121(9):2116-7 [17640056.001]
  • (PMID = 17058282.001).
  • [ISSN] 0020-7136
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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26. Smaldone MC, Cannon GM Jr, Hrebinko RL: Resection of recurrent inferior vena cava tumor after radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma. Urology; 2006 May;67(5):1084.e5-7
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  • [Title] Resection of recurrent inferior vena cava tumor after radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma.
  • Management of recurrent tumor in the inferior vena cava (IVC) after radical nephrectomy is surgically challenging.
  • We report 3 cases of recurrent renal cell carcinoma within the IVC managed by three different surgical techniques.
  • One patient was treated with tumor thrombus removal and primary cavotomy closure.
  • Although technically difficult, repeat resection of IVC tumor recurrence after nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma is an acceptable method of treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Vascular Neoplasms / surgery. Vena Cava, Inferior

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  • (PMID = 16698379.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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27. Van Gool AR, Verkerk R, Fekkes D, Sleijfer S, Bannink M, Kruit WH, van der Holt B, Scharpé S, Eggermont AM, Stoter G, Hengeveld MW: Plasma activity of prolyl endopeptidase in relation to psychopathology during immunotherapy with IFN-alpha in patients with renal cell carcinoma. J Interferon Cytokine Res; 2008 May;28(5):283-6
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  • [Title] Plasma activity of prolyl endopeptidase in relation to psychopathology during immunotherapy with IFN-alpha in patients with renal cell carcinoma.
  • In 24 patients (16 men, 8 women, median age 60.5 years, range 47-72 years) with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), psychiatric assessment and blood sampling were performed before and at 4 and 8 weeks and at 6 months after initiation of treatment with IFN-alpha.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / psychology. Immunotherapy. Interferon-alpha / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / psychology. Serine Endopeptidases / blood

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  • (PMID = 18547158.001).
  • [ISSN] 1079-9907
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of interferon & cytokine research : the official journal of the International Society for Interferon and Cytokine Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Interferon Cytokine Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interferon-alpha; EC 3.4.21.- / Serine Endopeptidases; EC 3.4.21.26 / prolyl oligopeptidase
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28. Yao XD, Ye DW, Zhang SL, Dai B, Zhang HL, Shen YJ, Zhu Y, Zhu YP, Shi GH, Ma CG, Xiao WJ, Qin XJ, Lin GW: [Experiences of open transperitoneal radical nephrectomy for large renal masses]. Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi; 2010 Apr 27;90(16):1117-9
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  • [Title] [Experiences of open transperitoneal radical nephrectomy for large renal masses].
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of technical improvements of transperitoneal radical nephrectomy on the patients with large renal cell carcinoma.
  • METHODS: From May 2002 until May 2009, 45 patients with large (> 12 cm) renal cell carcinoma underwent transperitoneal radical nephrectomy.
  • The modified operative methods included exposing the operative field via a liver retractor and initially ligating renal artery to block the blood supply of kidney and tumor.
  • The method of tumor-free tissue dissociation was applied.
  • RESULTS: The tumor diameter was from 12.2 cm to 28.3 cm with a mean of 14.5 cm.
  • The pathological diagnoses were all of renal cell carcinoma.
  • The pathological stage included T(2)N(0 approximately 1)M(0 approximately 1)(n = 13), T(3)N(0 approximately 1)M(0 approximately 1)(n = 23), T(4)N(0 approximately 1)M(0 approximately 1)(n = 9).
  • After a follow-up period of 3 - 63 months, 3 cases of tumor recurrence were found in primary renal clutch.
  • CONCLUSION: Improved radical nephrectomy is feasible for large renal cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Abdominal Cavity / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Nephrectomy / methods

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  • (PMID = 20646430.001).
  • [ISSN] 0376-2491
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua yi xue za zhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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29. Habib SL, Simone S, Barnes JJ, Abboud HE: Tuberin haploinsufficiency is associated with the loss of OGG1 in rat kidney tumors. Mol Cancer; 2008 Jan 24;7:10
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  • [Title] Tuberin haploinsufficiency is associated with the loss of OGG1 in rat kidney tumors.
  • BACKGROUND: Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is caused by defects in one of two tumor suppressor genes, TSC-1 or TSC-2.
  • TSC-2 gene encodes tuberin, a protein involved in the pathogenesis of kidney tumors.
  • Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the TSC2 locus has been detected in TSC-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and in RCC in the Eker rat.
  • Tuberin downregulates the DNA repair enzyme 8-oxoguanine DNA-glycosylase (OGG1) with important functional consequences, compromising the ability of cells to repair damaged DNA resulting in the accumulation of the mutagenic oxidized DNA, 8-oxo-dG.
  • Loss of function mutations of OGG1 also occurs in human kidney clear cell carcinoma and may contribute to tumorgenesis.
  • We investigated the distribution of protein expression and the activity of OGG1 and 8-oxo-dG and correlated it with the expression of tuberin in kidneys of wild type and Eker rats and tumor from Eker rat.
  • RESULTS: Tuberin expression, OGG1 protein expression and activity were higher in kidney cortex than in medulla or papilla in both wild type and Eker rats.
  • In kidney tumors from Eker rats, the loss of the second TSC2 allele is associated with loss of OGG1 expression.
  • Immunostaining of kidney tissue shows localization of tuberin and OGG1 mainly in the cortex.
  • CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that OGG1 localizes with tuberin preferentially in kidney cortex.
  • In addition, the predominant expression of OGG1 in the cortex and its decreased expression and activity in the Eker rat may account for the predominant cortical localization of renal cell carcinoma.

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  • (PMID = 18218111.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-4598
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cancer
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / P50 DK061597; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R37 DK33665
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins; 4JG2LF96VF / tuberous sclerosis complex 2 protein; 88847-89-6 / 8-oxo-7-hydrodeoxyguanosine; EC 3.2.2.- / DNA Glycosylases; EC 3.2.2.- / OGG1 protein, rat; G9481N71RO / Deoxyguanosine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2265742
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30. Seliger B, Fedorushchenko A, Brenner W, Ackermann A, Atkins D, Hanash S, Lichtenfels R: Ubiquitin COOH-terminal hydrolase 1: a biomarker of renal cell carcinoma associated with enhanced tumor cell proliferation and migration. Clin Cancer Res; 2007 Jan 1;13(1):27-37
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  • [Title] Ubiquitin COOH-terminal hydrolase 1: a biomarker of renal cell carcinoma associated with enhanced tumor cell proliferation and migration.
  • PURPOSE: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 2% to 3% of all malignancies.
  • It represents one of the most radiation- and chemotherapy-resistant tumors and surgical resections are only effective in organ-defined disease.
  • However, RCC is an immunogenic tumor with response rates to immunotherapies between 10% and 20% of the treated patients.
  • Due to the currently inefficient therapies and the low 5-year survival rates of RCC patients, novel diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic markers are urgently needed for this disease.
  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Proteome-based approaches were used to identify (a) differentially expressed proteins in RCC compared with normal kidney epithelium and (b) proteins that are able to induce an antibody response in RCC patients.
  • RESULTS: The ubiquitin COOH-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) was found to be differentially expressed in both RCC lesions and RCC cell lines and immunoreactive using patients' sera.
  • UCHL1 expression was often down-regulated in primary RCC when compared with normal kidney epithelium but dependent on the RCC subtype, the von Hippel-Lindau phenotype, and the tumor grading.
  • Moreover, the frequency and the level of UCHL1 expression were higher in metastases when compared with primary RCC lesions.
  • Gain-of-function transfectants exhibited a significant higher proliferation and migration rate than UCHL1-negative RCC cells.
  • CONCLUSIONS: UCHL1 expression seems to be associated with the metastatic phenotype of RCC and therefore might serve as potential biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of RCC patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Ubiquitin Thiolesterase / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Movement. Cell Proliferation. Humans. Kidney / metabolism. Neoplasm Metastasis. Phenotype. Protein Structure, Tertiary. Proteomics / methods

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  • (PMID = 17200335.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; EC 3.1.2.15 / UCHL1 protein, human; EC 3.1.2.15 / Ubiquitin Thiolesterase
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31. Rey Rey J, León Ramírez D, López García S, Fernández Vázquez P, Benavente Delgado J, Ojea Calvo A: [Pathological prognostic indicators in renal cell carcinoma]. Actas Urol Esp; 2010 Jan;34(1):71-7
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  • [Title] [Pathological prognostic indicators in renal cell carcinoma].
  • [Transliterated title] Indicadores pronósticos anatomopatológicos del cáncer de riñón.
  • OBJECTIVE: To analyze histological factors not routinely assessed as potential prognostic factors in renal cell carcinoma, such as tumor necrosis, microscopic vascular invasion, and sinus fat invasion.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective, analytical study was conducted of surgical specimens from 139 patients with localized renal cell carcinoma who underwent nephrectomy from 1993 to 2005.
  • Tumor necrosis, microscopic vascular invasion, and sinus fat invasion were analyzed and compared to the classical factors: TNM classification, Fuhrman grade, and tumor size.
  • For statistical analysis, variables analyzed were categorized as pT1, 2 vs pT3, 4; Fuhrman grade 1, 2 vs 3, 4; tumor size < 7 cm vs >or= 7cm; tumor necrosis vs no tumor necrosis; microvascular invasion of sinus fat vs no invasion.
  • Cancer-specific survival probability and disease-free survival were calculated.
  • Dependent variables were used to analyze cancer-specific survival rates.
  • Disease-free survival was estimated using a Cox regression model and Kaplan-Meier curves.
  • RESULTS: In the univariate analysis, all variables analyzed had a significant influence on death for renal cell carcinoma.
  • The variables significantly influencing disease-free survival, estimated by the Cox method, were the pT stage (p = 0.038) and Fuhrman grade (p = 0.048).
  • CONCLUSIONS: In patients with clinically localized renal cell carcinoma undergoing nephrectomy, pT stage and Fuhrman grade are the most important prognostic factors for survival and disease-free survival.
  • Tumor necrosis, microscopic vascular invasion, and sinus fat invasion are prognostic factors for death from renal carcinoma which are associated to TNM classification, Fuhrman grade, and tumor size.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 20223135.001).
  • [ISSN] 1699-7980
  • [Journal-full-title] Actas urologicas españolas
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Actas Urol Esp
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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32. Hamamoto S, Okamura T, Mizuno K, Kamisawa H, Mogami T, Kohri K: Renal oncocytoma with bilateral synchronous renal cell carcinoma in a patient undergoing long-term hemodialysis. Int J Urol; 2008 Jan;15(1):87-9
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  • [Title] Renal oncocytoma with bilateral synchronous renal cell carcinoma in a patient undergoing long-term hemodialysis.
  • We report a case of bilateral synchronous renal cell carcinoma and renal oncocytoma in a 56-year-old male who had been treated with hemodialysis for 32 years.
  • Because anemia gradually worsened, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were carried out and revealed bilateral renal tumors within acquired cystic disease of the kidney.
  • Bilateral nephrectomy was carried out, and the patient was diagnosed with multiple renal cell carcinomas and a single renal oncocytoma.
  • To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of renal oncocytoma with synchronous renal cell carcinoma in a patient undergoing long-term hemodialysis.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoma, Oxyphilic / etiology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / etiology. Kidney Neoplasms / etiology. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / etiology. Renal Dialysis / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Kidney Failure, Chronic / complications. Kidney Failure, Chronic / therapy. Male. Middle Aged


33. Pino Rivero V, González Palomino A, Pantoja Hernández CG, Trinidad Ruiz G, Pardo Romero G, Montero García C, Rejas Ugena E, Blasco Huelva A: [Statistical study regarding anemia in patients admitted with epistaxis. Importance of its control and the associated risk factors]. Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp; 2005 Aug-Sep;56(7):305-8
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  • [Title] [Statistical study regarding anemia in patients admitted with epistaxis. Importance of its control and the associated risk factors].
  • [Transliterated title] Estudio estadistico sobre anemia en pacientes ingresados por epistaxis. Importancia de su control y de los factores de riesgo asociados.
  • OBJECTIVE: To emphasize the importance of hemodinamic control and risk factors in the patients hospitalized due to epistaxis.
  • About 39% of the anemizing epistaxis needed a transfusion, generally red cell concentrates.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Every admitted epistaxis needs a good hemodinamic study and control of the patient and the treatment of the base pathology associated.

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  • (PMID = 16240920.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6519
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta otorrinolaringológica española
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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34. Ishizaki H, Yano H, Tsuneoka M, Ogasawara S, Akiba J, Nishida N, Kojiro S, Fukahori S, Moriya F, Matsuoka K, Kojiro M: Overexpression of the myc target gene Mina53 in advanced renal cell carcinoma. Pathol Int; 2007 Oct;57(10):672-80
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  • [Title] Overexpression of the myc target gene Mina53 in advanced renal cell carcinoma.
  • The myc target gene Mina53 was reported to be overexpressed in esophageal cancer with a poor prognosis.
  • The purpose of the present study was to examined Mina53 expression and its relationship to clinicopathological parameters in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • Mina53 and Ki-67 expression was examined on immunohistochemistry for 64 surgically resected RCC and non-cancerous tissue.
  • In addition, the relationship between Mina53 expression and clinicopathological prognostic factors of RCC such as age, stage, microvenous invasion (MVI), histological subtype, Ki-67 labeling index (LI), and prognosis, was examined.
  • Mina53 was expressed in the nuclei of tumor cells and tubular nuclei of normal renal tissue.
  • The expression level of Mina53 was significantly higher in patients with poor prognostic factors (stage IV, MVI-positive, and sarcomatoid RCC, and high Ki-67 LI).
  • The prognosis of high Mina53-expressing tumors was significantly poorer than that of non-Mina53-high tumors (P < 0.0001).
  • In conclusion, Mina53 is overexpressed in RCC tissue from patients with poor prognostic factors, suggesting that Mina53 overexpression is one of the factors for poor prognosis in RCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / genetics. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Kidney Neoplasms / genetics. Nuclear Proteins / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Biomarkers, Tumor / genetics. Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Nucleus / metabolism. Female. Humans. Immunoenzyme Techniques. Japan / epidemiology. Ki-67 Antigen / metabolism. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Staging. Nephrectomy. Prognosis. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 17803656.001).
  • [ISSN] 1320-5463
  • [Journal-full-title] Pathology international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathol. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Ki-67 Antigen; 0 / MINA protein, human; 0 / Nuclear Proteins
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35. Benincasa E, Conti A, Bossone G, Gallà DA, Gianciotta A, Zuccaro SM, Madaio R: A case of complete clinical response with sorafenib in a patient with thyroid gland metastases from renal cell carcinoma 17 years from diagnosis. Tumori; 2009 May-Jun;95(3):403
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  • [Title] A case of complete clinical response with sorafenib in a patient with thyroid gland metastases from renal cell carcinoma 17 years from diagnosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Benzenesulfonates / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Pyridines / therapeutic use. Thyroid Neoplasms / drug therapy. Thyroid Neoplasms / secondary

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  • (PMID = 19688987.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-8916
  • [Journal-full-title] Tumori
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tumori
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Letter
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzenesulfonates; 0 / Phenylurea Compounds; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Pyridines; 25X51I8RD4 / Niacinamide; 9ZOQ3TZI87 / sorafenib
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36. Song Y, He ZS, Li NC, Li M, Zhou LQ, Na YQ: [Outcome of surgical management of renal cell carcinoma with renal vein or inferior vena cava tumor thrombus]. Zhonghua Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2006 May 15;44(10):678-80
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  • [Title] [Outcome of surgical management of renal cell carcinoma with renal vein or inferior vena cava tumor thrombus].
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prognosis of surgical treatment for renal cell carcinoma with renal vein or inferior vena cava tumor thrombus.
  • METHODS: Between August 1994 and July 2004, 33 patients with renal cell carcinoma with renal vein or inferior vena cava tumor thrombus underwent radical nephrectomy and thrombectomy.
  • Level of tumor thrombus was renal vein in 15 patients, infrahepatic (level I) in 9, intrahepatic (level II) in 5, suprahepatic (level III) in 1, and right atrial extension (level IV) in 3.
  • The mean survival time of patients with renal vein involvement [(49.9 +/- 9.8) months] versus level I [(16.7 +/- 1.9) months] was significantly different (P < 0.05).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Radical nephrectomy plus thrombectomy is a valuable method for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma with renal vein or inferior vena cava involvement.
  • Patients with renal vein tumor thrombus appear to have better survival compared to patients with inferior vena cava tumor thrombus.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Embolectomy / methods. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Neoplastic Cells, Circulating. Nephrectomy / methods. Renal Veins / surgery. Vena Cava, Inferior / surgery

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  • (PMID = 16784678.001).
  • [ISSN] 0529-5815
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua wai ke za zhi [Chinese journal of surgery]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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37. Saidi RF, Remine SG: Isolated gastric metastasis from renal cell carcinoma 10 years after radical nephrectomy. J Gastroenterol Hepatol; 2007 Jan;22(1):143-4
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  • [Title] Isolated gastric metastasis from renal cell carcinoma 10 years after radical nephrectomy.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Stomach Neoplasms / secondary

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  • (PMID = 17201902.001).
  • [ISSN] 0815-9319
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Letter
  • [Publication-country] Australia
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38. Goregaonkar R, Shet T, Ramadwar M, Chinoy R: Critical role of fine needle aspiration cytology and immunocytochemistry in preoperative diagnosis of pediatric renal tumors. Acta Cytol; 2007 Sep-Oct;51(5):721-9
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  • [Title] Critical role of fine needle aspiration cytology and immunocytochemistry in preoperative diagnosis of pediatric renal tumors.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate accuracy and role of immunocytochemistry (ICC) in cytologic diagnosis of pediatric renal tumors.
  • STUDY DESIGN: Fine needle aspirates from 75 cases of pediatric renal tumors were studied.
  • Smears were screened without the knowledge of final histologic diagnosis.
  • Subsequently, clinical details, final histology and diagnosis rendered by the original cytologist were noted to judge accuracy of diagnosis by a sensitized cytologist.
  • Five neuroblastomas that entered close differentials for Wilms tumor were also evaluated.
  • RESULTS: Of 58 Wilms tumors, 5 were misdiagnosed; 3 renal rhabdoid tumors and 1 clear cell sarcoma were missed on cytology.
  • Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas presenting as renal masses were accurately diagnosed on cytology, but primitive neuroectodermal tumors (n = 3) and renal cell carcinomas (n = 2) were not accurately diagnosed.
  • Accuracy rate improved from 65% to 92% on review by a cytologist aware of cytologic features of pediatric renal tumors.
  • CONCLUSION: A good accuracy rate of diagnosis of pediatric renal tumors can be achieved by priming pathologists to typical features of tumors.
  • Immunocytochemistry plays a supportive role in cases with atypical morphology or unusual presentations.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / diagnosis. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Preoperative Care
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Azure Stains. Biopsy, Fine-Needle. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Cell Nucleus / pathology. Child. Child, Preschool. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Infant. Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive, Peripheral / diagnosis. Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive, Peripheral / pathology. Rhabdoid Tumor / diagnosis. Rhabdoid Tumor / pathology. Wilms Tumor / diagnosis. Wilms Tumor / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17910341.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-5547
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta cytologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Cytol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Azure Stains
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39. Sinha S, Dutta S, Datta K, Ghosh AK, Mukhopadhyay D: Von Hippel-Lindau gene product modulates TIS11B expression in renal cell carcinoma: impact on vascular endothelial growth factor expression in hypoxia. J Biol Chem; 2009 Nov 20;284(47):32610-8
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  • [Title] Von Hippel-Lindau gene product modulates TIS11B expression in renal cell carcinoma: impact on vascular endothelial growth factor expression in hypoxia.
  • TIS11B has been shown to regulate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA stability in adrenocorticotropic hormone-stimulated primary adrenocortical cells.
  • TIS11B has also been documented as a negative regulator of VEGF during development, but nothing has yet been reported in the context of human cancers.
  • The Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor protein regulates VEGF gene expression at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in normoxia.
  • Here, we report a unique regulatory function of VHL in VEGF expression in hypoxia that is mediated through modulation of TIS11B protein levels in renal cancer cells.
  • In normoxia, we detected increased expression of the microRNA hsa-miR-29b in the VHL-overexpressing renal cancer cell line 786-O.
  • In contrast, in hypoxia, increased TIS11B expression paralleled an increased TIS11B mRNA stability in VHL-overexpressing 786-O cells.
  • This VHL-mediated TIS11B up-regulation in hypoxia may be important for TIS11B-regulated gene expression: we observed a down-regulation of VEGF mRNA in hypoxia in VHL-overexpressing cells compared with parental 786-O cells, and this effect was reversible by silencing TIS11B expression.

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  • (PMID = 19801654.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-351X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of biological chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Biol. Chem.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA078383; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R29 CA078383; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA78383
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Butyrate Response Factor 1; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; 0 / ZFP36L1 protein, human; EC 6.3.2.19 / VHL protein, human; EC 6.3.2.19 / Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein; S88TT14065 / Oxygen
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2781675
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40. Kobayashi N, Suzuki K, Murakami H, Kagawa E, Aoki I, Nagashima Y: Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma with sarcomatoid transformation in a dog. J Vet Diagn Invest; 2010 Nov;22(6):983-7
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  • [Title] Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma with sarcomatoid transformation in a dog.
  • An abdominal ultrasonographic examination revealed a left renal tumor measuring 8 cm in diameter, and a nephrectomy was performed.
  • The resected kidney contained a cavitated tumor with a white solid region.
  • Histologically, this tumor was composed of large polygonal cells with abundant and cloudy cytoplasm and focal sarcomatoid change.
  • The neoplastic epithelial cells were reactive with colloidal iron staining; Dolichos biflorus agglutinin, peanut agglutinin, and Ulex europaeus agglutinin I lectins; and cluster of differentiation 10 and c-KIT antigens but not for periodic acid-Schiff or vimentin stain.
  • Neoplastic sarcomatoid cells stained positive for vimentin.
  • Because these histopathologic features are identical to those of human chromophobe renal cell carcinoma, the present case was diagnosed as canine chromophobe renal cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / veterinary. Dog Diseases / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 21088189.001).
  • [ISSN] 1040-6387
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of veterinary diagnostic investigation : official publication of the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Vet. Diagn. Invest.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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41. Banerjee D, Chadalavada RS, Bourdon V, Korkola JE, Motzer RJ, Chaganti RS: Transcriptional program associated with IFN-alpha response of renal cell carcinoma. J Interferon Cytokine Res; 2006 Mar;26(3):156-70
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  • [Title] Transcriptional program associated with IFN-alpha response of renal cell carcinoma.
  • Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is refractory to therapy; however, 10%-20% of patients respond favorably with interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) treatment.
  • To understand the molecular basis of response to IFN-alpha therapy, we performed global gene expression analysis of sensitive and resistant RCC cell lines in the absence and in the presence of IFN-alpha, using high-density oligonucleotide arrays to detect differentially expressed genes.
  • In the absence of IFN-alpha, no significant differences in gene expression were observed between six sensitive and six resistant cell lines.
  • Gene expression analysis following a time course of IFN-alpha2b treatment in one sensitive (SK-RC-17) and one resistant (SK-RC-12) cell line revealed that 484 and 354 transcripts, respectively, were modulated.
  • A considerable number of these transcripts were similarly modulated between the two cell types that included several known targets of IFN signaling associated with antiviral and immunomodulatory activity.
  • A further analysis of gene expression pattern in response to IFN revealed that several transcripts associated with proapoptotic function were upregulated in the sensitive cells.
  • In the resistant cells, transcripts associated with cell survival and proliferation were induced, and key apoptotic molecules were suppressed.
  • This study suggests that the IFN-alpha response of individual RCC tumors is determined by the expression pattern of genes in the apoptosis vs. survival and proliferation pathways rather than by alterations in expression of one or more individual genes.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / immunology. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic / drug effects. Immunologic Factors / pharmacology. Interferon-alpha / pharmacology. Liver Neoplasms / immunology. Transcription, Genetic / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Culture Techniques. Cell Death / drug effects. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Cell Survival / drug effects. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Gene Expression Profiling. Humans. Kinetics. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction. Up-Regulation

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  • (PMID = 16542138.001).
  • [ISSN] 1079-9907
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of interferon & cytokine research : the official journal of the International Society for Interferon and Cytokine Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Interferon Cytokine Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunologic Factors; 0 / Interferon-alpha
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42. Moudouni SM, Tligui M, Doublet JD, Haab F, Gattegno B, Thibault P: Nephron-sparing surgery for de novo renal cell carcinoma in allograft kidneys. Transplantation; 2005 Sep 27;80(6):865-7
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  • [Title] Nephron-sparing surgery for de novo renal cell carcinoma in allograft kidneys.
  • Renal cell carcinomas account for 4.6% of post-transplant cancers, 10% of which occur in allograft kidneys.
  • We report three such cases among kidney grafts that were performed or followed from 1970 to 2004.
  • In all patients, we performed a partial allograft nephrectomy after consideration of the tumor size, location, and absence of metastases and local extension.
  • Renal function has remained stable, and there has been no sign of graft rejection, tumor recurrence or metastases.
  • The lateral, peripherally located tumor allowed excision without renal hilar dissection or entry into the collecting system.
  • In agreement with data emerging from the literature, the present cases confirm that even in the setting of long-standing immunosuppression, de novo RCC of the kidney graft warrants a minimally invasive approach to spare patients graft loss and return to hemodialysis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Kidney Transplantation. Nephrons

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  • (PMID = 16210977.001).
  • [ISSN] 0041-1337
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplantation
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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43. Flaherty KT, Fuchs CS, Colditz GA, Stampfer MJ, Speizer FE, Willett WC, Curhan GC: A prospective study of body mass index, hypertension, and smoking and the risk of renal cell carcinoma (United States). Cancer Causes Control; 2005 Nov;16(9):1099-106
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  • [Title] A prospective study of body mass index, hypertension, and smoking and the risk of renal cell carcinoma (United States).
  • OBJECTIVE: We prospectively investigated the independent association of hypertension, thiazide use, body mass index, weight change, and smoking with the risk of renal cell carcinoma among men and women using biennial mailed questionnaires.
  • RESULTS: During 24 years of follow-up for women and 12 years for men, 155 and 110 incident cases of renal cell carcinoma were confirmed, respectively.
  • After adjusting for age, updated BMI and smoking, an updated diagnosis of hypertension was associated with renal cell carcinoma (RCC); the relative risk (RR) was 1.9 (95% CI 1.4-2.7) for women and 1.8 (95% CI 1.2-2.7) for men.
  • Based on limited data regarding the use of thiazide diuretics, we did not observe a risk associated with their use, independent of the diagnosis of hypertension.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Diagnosis of hypertension, higher BMI, and increasing pack-years of smoking appear to independently increase the risk of renal cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Body Mass Index. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / epidemiology. Hypertension / epidemiology. Smoking / epidemiology

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  • (PMID = 16184476.001).
  • [ISSN] 0957-5243
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer causes & control : CCC
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Causes Control
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA40356; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA55075; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA87969; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK52866
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Sodium Chloride Symporter Inhibitors
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44. Ohno Y, Izumi M, Tachibana M, Kawamura T, Yoshioka K, Aoyagi T, Ohori M, Namiki K, Sakamoto N, Nakagami Y, Hatano T, Akimoto S, Nishimura T: Characterization and gene expression analysis of novel matched primary and metastatic renal cell carcinoma cell lines. Oncol Rep; 2008 Sep;20(3):501-9
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  • [Title] Characterization and gene expression analysis of novel matched primary and metastatic renal cell carcinoma cell lines.
  • Despite recent advances in molecular biology that have clarified the mechanisms involved in the metastasis of several types of cancer, the molecular mechanism underlying the metastasis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remains unclear.
  • Two RCC cell lines were successfully established from the surgical specimens of a matched primary tumor and adrenal metastasis from the same RCC patient, and were designated as TMK-1P and TMK-1M, respectively.
  • DNA microarray analysis showed a large differential expression of genes related to cell adhesion and the extracellular matrix molecules of which hexabrachion (tenascin-C), epidermal growth factor receptor, cadherin-6, and beta1-catenin were down-regulated, and the 67 kDa laminin receptor 1 and transforming growth factor-beta-induced 68 kDa protein (betaig-h3) were up-regulated in TMK-1M.
  • Real-time RT-PCR analysis confirmed this differential gene expression between the two cell lines.
  • The RCC cell lines may be useful in studying tumor invasion and screening markers for metastasis.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / genetics. Biomarkers, Tumor / genetics. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / genetics. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Kidney Neoplasms / genetics. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. Gene Expression Profiling. Humans. Karyotyping. Male. Middle Aged. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis. RNA, Messenger / genetics. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. RNA, Neoplasm / genetics. RNA, Neoplasm / metabolism. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction


45. Pepper K, Jaowattana U, Starsiak MD, Halkar R, Hornaman K, Wang W, Dayamani P, Tangpricha V: Renal cell carcinoma presenting with paraneoplastic hypercalcemic coma: a case report and review of the literature. J Gen Intern Med; 2007 Jul;22(7):1042-6
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  • [Title] Renal cell carcinoma presenting with paraneoplastic hypercalcemic coma: a case report and review of the literature.
  • We report a case of a 62-year-old woman with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) presenting with a hypercalcemia-induced coma.
  • Initial imaging was negative, but PET scan identified a mass in the upper pole of the left kidney.
  • Our patient underwent partial nephrectomy, and the mass was identified as RCC on final pathology.
  • This case report describes a patient with RCC with the unusual presentation of hypercalcemic coma.
  • We review the differential diagnosis of malignant hypercalcemia and the evaluation of hypercalcemia occurring with RCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / complications. Coma / etiology. Hypercalcemia / etiology. Kidney Neoplasms / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Interleukin-6 / blood. Middle Aged. Parathyroid Hormone / blood. Receptor, Parathyroid Hormone, Type 1 / blood

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  • (PMID = 17443359.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-1497
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of general internal medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Gen Intern Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interleukin-6; 0 / PTH1R protein, human; 0 / Parathyroid Hormone; 0 / Receptor, Parathyroid Hormone, Type 1
  • [Number-of-references] 48
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2219737
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46. Onishi T, Franco OE, Shibahara T, Arima K, Sugimura Y: Papillary adenocarcinoma of the renal pelvis and ureter producing carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigen 19-9 and carbohydrate antigen 125. Int J Urol; 2005 Feb;12(2):214-6
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  • [Title] Papillary adenocarcinoma of the renal pelvis and ureter producing carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigen 19-9 and carbohydrate antigen 125.
  • We report a case of advanced renal pelvis and ureter adenocarcinoma producing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) and carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125).
  • A 72-year-old woman was diagnosed with right renal pelvic and ureter tumor with para-aortic lymph node swelling.
  • Biopsy of the ureteral mass revealed papillary adenocarcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma, Papillary / immunology. Antigens, Neoplasm / metabolism. Kidney Neoplasms / immunology. Ureteral Neoplasms / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Female. Humans. Kidney Pelvis / pathology

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  • (PMID = 15733120.001).
  • [ISSN] 0919-8172
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of urology : official journal of the Japanese Urological Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm
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47. Bukowski RM: Tyrosine kinase inhibitors in advanced renal cell carcinoma: the evolving treatment paradigm. Clin Genitourin Cancer; 2009 Jan;7(1):9-10
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  • [Title] Tyrosine kinase inhibitors in advanced renal cell carcinoma: the evolving treatment paradigm.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors

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  • [CommentOn] Clin Genitourin Cancer. 2009 Jan;7(1):20-3 [19213663.001]
  • [CommentOn] Clin Genitourin Cancer. 2009 Jan;7(1):11-9 [19213662.001]
  • (PMID = 19213661.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-7673
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical genitourinary cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Genitourin Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comment; Editorial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Benzenesulfonates; 0 / Indoles; 0 / Phenylurea Compounds; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Pyridines; 0 / Pyrroles; 0 / sunitinib; 25X51I8RD4 / Niacinamide; 9ZOQ3TZI87 / sorafenib; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
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48. Park H, Byun SS, Kim HH, Lee SB, Kwon TG, Jeon SH, Kang SH, Seo SI, Oh TH, Jeon YS, Lee W, Hwang TK, Rha KH, Seo IY, Kwon DD, Kim YJ, Choi Y, Park SK: Comparison of laparoscopic and open partial nephrectomies in t1a renal cell carcinoma: a korean multicenter experience. Korean J Urol; 2010 Jul;51(7):467-71
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  • [Title] Comparison of laparoscopic and open partial nephrectomies in t1a renal cell carcinoma: a korean multicenter experience.
  • PURPOSE: We analyzed a series of patients who had undergone laparoscopic partial nephrectomies (LPNs) and open partial nephrectomies (OPNs) to compare outcomes of the two procedures in patients with pathologic T1a renal cell carcinomas (RCCs).
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: From January 1998 to May 2009, 417 LPNs and 345 OPNs were performed on patients with small renal tumors in 15 institutions in Korea.
  • Of the patients, 273 and 279 patients, respectively, were confirmed to have pT1a RCC.
  • Although the tumor location was more exophytic (51% vs. 44%, p=0.047) and smaller (2.1 cm vs. 2.3 cm, p=0.026) in the LPN cohort, the OPN cohort demonstrated shorter ischemia times (23.4 min vs. 33.3 min, p<0.001).
  • The LPN may be an acceptable surgical option in patients with small RCC in Korea.

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  • (PMID = 20664779.001).
  • [ISSN] 2005-6745
  • [Journal-full-title] Korean journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Korean J Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2907495
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Glomerular filtration rate / Kidney neoplasms / Nephrectomy / Outcomes assessment
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49. Volmar KE, Cummings TJ, Wang WH, Creager AJ, Tyler DS, Xie HB: Clear cell hidradenoma: a mimic of metastatic clear cell tumors. Arch Pathol Lab Med; 2005 May;129(5):e113-6
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  • [Title] Clear cell hidradenoma: a mimic of metastatic clear cell tumors.
  • Clear cell hidradenoma is a benign skin appendage tumor that may mimic conventional-type renal cell carcinoma.
  • Histologically, clear cell hidradenoma contains small ductular lumens, focal apocrine and squamoid change, and a less prominent vascular pattern than renal cell carcinoma.
  • Furthermore, immunohistochemical studies can aid in distinguishing the 2 tumors.
  • Detailed clinical history, physical findings, and ancillary studies are essential for correct diagnosis and categorization of these tumors.
  • We report the rare case of a patient with renal cell carcinoma who underwent excision of an axillary clear cell hidradenoma, which was clinically suggestive of cutaneous metastatic disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoma, Sweat Gland / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / diagnosis. Kidney Neoplasms / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / diagnosis. Sweat Gland Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Axilla. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Diagnosis, Differential. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Lymph Nodes / pathology. Lymph Nodes / surgery. Male. Middle Aged. Mitotic Index. Neoplasm Metastasis / diagnosis. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15859654.001).
  • [ISSN] 1543-2165
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of pathology & laboratory medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
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50. Jeong SJ, Kim KT, Chung MS, Hong SK, Byun SS, Lee SE: The prognostic value of the width of the surgical margin in the enucleoresection of small renal cell carcinoma: an intermediate-term follow-up. Urology; 2010 Sep;76(3):587-92
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  • [Title] The prognostic value of the width of the surgical margin in the enucleoresection of small renal cell carcinoma: an intermediate-term follow-up.
  • OBJECTIVES: To assess the prognostic value of the width of a healthy surgical margin in the enucleoresection of small renal cell carcinoma, in which 68% of cases had a margin width of 3.0 mm or less.
  • METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 98 consecutive enucleoresections regarding the width of healthy margin and tumor recurrence in 96 patients followed up for more than 3 years after surgery.
  • RESULTS: The mean tumor size was 2.8 cm (range, 1.0-6.1).
  • Only 1 patient developed tumor recurrence during follow-up, excluding a patient with von Hippel Lindau disease.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The width of the surgical margin was not associated with the oncological prognosis in our enucleoresection series of small renal cell carcinoma, in which the width of the margin was 3.0 mm or less in more than two-thirds of the cases.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20346491.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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51. Wells GM, Schroth W, Brauch H, Ross EA: Bilateral renal-cell carcinoma associated with an acquired VHL mutation and long-term trichloroethylene exposure. Clin Nephrol; 2009 Jun;71(6):708-13
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  • [Title] Bilateral renal-cell carcinoma associated with an acquired VHL mutation and long-term trichloroethylene exposure.
  • BACKGROUND/AIMS: The genetic basis for clear-cell renal carcinomas has been established in familial and many sporadic forms.
  • METHODS: PCR amplification and sequencing of VHL exons 1 - 3 were performed on peripheral blood and tumor tissue.
  • RESULTS: The tumor alone had a previously undescribed mutation in exon 1 of the VHL gene: deletion of a cytidine residue at position 291 relative to the first ATG start codon of the wild-type sequence.
  • There is loss of suppressor function when substrates such as hypoxia-inducible factor have impaired degradation: they accumulate and ultimately cause uncontrolled cell turnover.
  • This association of a proposed occupational cause and occurrence of renal-cell carcinoma emphasizes the availability and use of VHL sequencing for both studying the pathophysiology of malignant transformation and potentially playing a clinical role in genetic counseling or risk assessment.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / genetics. Kidney Neoplasms / genetics. Mutation. Occupational Exposure / adverse effects. Solvents / adverse effects. Trichloroethylene / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Kidney / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Nephrectomy. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein / genetics

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  • (PMID = 19473641.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-0430
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical nephrology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Nephrol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Solvents; 290YE8AR51 / Trichloroethylene; EC 6.3.2.19 / VHL protein, human; EC 6.3.2.19 / Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein
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52. Thompson RH, Kwon ED: Significance of B7-H1 overexpression in kidney cancer. Clin Genitourin Cancer; 2006 Dec;5(3):206-11
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  • [Title] Significance of B7-H1 overexpression in kidney cancer.
  • B7-H1 is a cell surface glycoprotein belonging to the B7 family of costimulatory molecules.
  • Constitutive protein expression is restricted to a fraction of macrophage-lineage cells, although B7-H1 can be induced on activated T lymphocytes.
  • In addition, some human tumor cells can acquire the ability to aberrantly express B7-H1.
  • In vitro studies demonstrate that B7-H1, expressed by tumor cells or activated lymphocytes, impairs T-cell function and survival and enhances apoptosis of activated tumor-specific T cells.
  • Consistent with this, in vivo monoclonal antibody blockade of B7-H1 has been shown to potentiate antitumor responses in several murine cancer models.
  • Thus, tumor-associated B7-H1 has recently garnered much attention as a potential inhibitor of host antitumor immunity.
  • We describe herein the published investigations looking at the role of B7-H1 in renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • Clinical observations demonstrate that B7-H1 is aberrantly expressed in primary and metastatic RCC.
  • All patients had clear-cell RCC, and pathologic evaluation was performed by a single urologic pathologist.
  • Their results demonstrated that B7-H1, expressed by tumor cells or lymphocytes, is associated with aggressive pathologic features, including TNM stage, nuclear grade, tumor size, and coagulative necrosis.
  • With a median clinical follow-up of 11 years, patients with tumor B7-H1 were at significant risk of disease progression, cancer-specific death, and overall mortality even after multivariate analyses.
  • Five-year cancer-specific survival rates were 42% and 83% for patients with and without tumor B7-H1, respectively.
  • The basis for these associations could relate to the recognized ability of B7-H1 to inhibit antitumor T-cell-mediated immunity.
  • Based on the current literature, B7-H1 is an independent predictor of prognosis in RCC and represents a promising target for immune manipulation in this refractory tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD / metabolism. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / diagnosis. Kidney Neoplasms / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 17239274.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-7673
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical genitourinary cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Genitourin Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD; 0 / Antigens, CD274; 0 / CD274 protein, human
  • [Number-of-references] 39
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53. Ficarra V, Guillè F, Schips L, de la Taille A, Prayer Galetti T, Tostain J, Cindolo L, Novara G, Zigeuner R, Bratti E, Li G, Altieri V, Abbou CC, Zanolla L, Artibani W, Patard JJ: Proposal for revision of the TNM classification system for renal cell carcinoma. Cancer; 2005 Nov 15;104(10):2116-23
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  • [Title] Proposal for revision of the TNM classification system for renal cell carcinoma.
  • BACKGROUND: The current study defined an optimal tumor size breakpoint to stratify localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC) into groups with significantly different cancer-related outcomes and proposed a revision of the TNM classification system.
  • METHODS: The authors analyzed the data from 1138 patients who had undergone partial or radical nephrectomy for localized RCC at 7 European urologic centers.
  • The scatterplot of tumor size versus expected risk of death per patient suggested that an interval of 5-6 cm was appropriate.
  • A total of 720 (63.3%) and 418 (36.7%) patients had tumors measuring < or = 5.5-cm and tumors measuring > 5.5-cm, respectively.
  • Significant cancer-specific survival differences between the two groups of patients were reported in the series by all the centers participating in the study.
  • On univariate analysis, the other variables found to be associated with cancer-specific survival were the patient's age, symptomatic tumor presentation, and the Fuhrman nuclear grade.
  • On multivariate analysis, the pathologic stage of the primary tumor defined according to the 5.5-cm breakpoint was found to be an independent predictor of cancer-specific survival, as well as age, mode of presentation, and nuclear grade.
  • 1) patients with < or = 5.5-cm incidentally detected RCC;.
  • 2) patients with < or = 5.5-cm symptomatic RCC; and 3) patients with > 5.5-cm RCC.
  • This cancer-related outcome stratification was valid regardless of the patient's age.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The 5.5-cm breakpoint was found to be the optimal tumor size breakpoint with which to stratify patients with organ-confined RCC.
  • The study supported the upgrade of the TNM classification system according to this breakpoint.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / classification. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / classification. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2005 American Cancer Society
  • (PMID = 16208703.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] United States
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54. Otgün I, Arda IS, Haberal N, Güney H, Hiçsönmez A: Renal cell carcinoma: case report and literature review. J Pediatr Surg; 2005 May;40(5):e13-6
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  • [Title] Renal cell carcinoma: case report and literature review.
  • Renal cell carcinoma arising from epithelial cells of the renal tubule is a highly aggressive and malignant tumor in all ages.
  • Tumor is presented with characteristic findings of flank pain, gross hematuria, and palpable mass.
  • Although one half of the patients have metastasis at the time of diagnosis, most cases are currently being incidentally detected using improved imaging techniques.
  • Tumor stage and complete surgical resection have been reported as the most meaningful prognostic factors for the outcome.
  • The incidence of metastatic disease is same as in adults.
  • Cure is the most likely consequence in localized and completely resected tumors.
  • Here, we present an 8-year-old boy with renal cell carcinoma demonstrating only hematuria without any pathological physical examination findings.
  • The mass was described by abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography in the left kidney.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 15937800.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-5037
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 30
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55. Roy S, Chu A, Trojanowski JQ, Zhang PJ: D2-40, a novel monoclonal antibody against the M2A antigen as a marker to distinguish hemangioblastomas from renal cell carcinomas. Acta Neuropathol; 2005 May;109(5):497-502
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  • [Title] D2-40, a novel monoclonal antibody against the M2A antigen as a marker to distinguish hemangioblastomas from renal cell carcinomas.
  • Hemangioblastomas (HB) are characterized by the presence of vacuolated tumor cells resembling the tumor cells seen in clear cell renal cell carcinomas (CRCC).
  • The issue is further complicated by the possibility of both HB and metastatic CRCC in brains of patients with Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) disease.
  • The vacuolated tumor cells in all HB were stained positively with D2-40.
  • Nineteen of 23 (83%) HB showed strong, membranous staining in the vacuolated tumor cells, and 4 of 23 (17%) showed weaker staining.
  • No expression was seen in CRCC, either primary in the kidney (0/20), or metastatic CRCC in the brain (0/8).
  • Three of the patients with HB also had VHL disease, and no difference was seen in D2-40 staining of HB in patients with or without VHL disease.
  • Two of these three VHL disease patients had both primary CRCC and HB resected at our institution.
  • In these two patients, strong D2-40 expression was seen in the HB, but no expression was seen in the CRCC, underlying the utility of this marker in distinguishing HB from CRCC in patients with VHL disease in addition to sporadic cases.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal. Antigens, Neoplasm / immunology. Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / metabolism. Hemangioblastoma / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry / methods. Inhibins / metabolism. Male. Middle Aged. Staining and Labeling / methods. von Hippel-Lindau Disease / diagnosis. von Hippel-Lindau Disease / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 15864611.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6322
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta neuropathologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Neuropathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antigens, Neoplasm; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / oncofetal antigens; 57285-09-3 / Inhibins
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56. Kawata N, Nagane Y, Yamaguchi K, Ichinose T, Hirakata H, Takahashi S: How do symptoms have an impact on the prognosis of renal cell carcinoma? Int J Urol; 2008 Apr;15(4):299-303
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  • [Title] How do symptoms have an impact on the prognosis of renal cell carcinoma?
  • AIM: Symptomatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is well known to have a characteristic behavior.
  • We therefore evaluated the impact of systemic symptoms on the prognosis of RCC.
  • METHODS: Patard's criteria were used to classify symptoms before operation into three groups defined as: S1 (incidental tumor), S2 (localized symptoms) and S3 (systemic symptoms).
  • Selected clinicopathological factors including gender, maximum tumor diameter, clinical stage, hemoglobin, C-reactive protein (CRP) and immunosuppressive acidic protein, nuclear grade and venous invasion were measured preoperatively in 252 patients.
  • To determine impacts of them on the prognosis of RCC, we compared quantitative results using Cox multivariate analysis.
  • RESULTS: The cancer-specific five-year survival rates were 93.1%, 71.0%, and 20.2% for S1 (144 patients), S2 (80 patients) and S3 (28 patients), respectively (P < 0.0001).
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / diagnosis. Kidney Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Biomarkers, Tumor / blood. C-Reactive Protein / metabolism. Female. Hemoglobins / metabolism. Humans. Kidney / pathology. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Proteins / blood. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 18380815.001).
  • [ISSN] 1442-2042
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of urology : official journal of the Japanese Urological Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Hemoglobins; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / immunosuppressive acidic protein; 9007-41-4 / C-Reactive Protein
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57. Crépel M, Jeldres C, Perrotte P, Capitanio U, Isbarn H, Shariat SF, Liberman D, Sun M, Lughezzani G, Arjane P, Widmer H, Graefen M, Montorsi F, Patard JJ, Karakiewicz PI: Nephron-sparing surgery is equally effective to radical nephrectomy for T1BN0M0 renal cell carcinoma: a population-based assessment. Urology; 2010 Feb;75(2):271-5
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  • [Title] Nephron-sparing surgery is equally effective to radical nephrectomy for T1BN0M0 renal cell carcinoma: a population-based assessment.
  • OBJECTIVES: To test the effect of nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) vs radical nephrectomy (RN) on cancer-specific mortality (CSM) in patients with T1bN0M0 renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in a population-based cohort.
  • To date, only few series from tertiary care centers supported the use of NSS for T1bN0M0 (range 4-7 cm) RCC.
  • METHODS: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database allowed us to identify 275 NSS (5.3%) and 4866 RN (94.7%) patients treated for T1bN0M0 RCC between 1988 and 2004.
  • Analyses matched for age, year of surgery, tumor size, and Fuhrman grade addressed the effect of nephrectomy type (NSS vs RN) on CSM.
  • RESULTS: Five years after surgery, the surviving proportions of NSS and RN patients matched for age, tumor size, and year of surgery were respectively 91.4 and 95.3% and 90.1 and 93.8% in the cohort, where additional matching for Fuhrman grade was performed.
  • Neither of the matched analyses resulted in statistically significant CSM difference (P = .1 and .4) between NSS and RN.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our study represents the largest and the only population-based analysis of cancer control efficacy of NSS vs RN in T1bN0M0 RCC.
  • It indicates that NSS does provide equivalent cancer control relative to RN.
  • In consequence, based on cancer control equivalence, NSS should be given equal consideration to RN in patients with T1bN0M0 lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Nephrectomy / methods

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  • [Copyright] Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • [CommentIn] Urology. 2010 Feb;75(2):275-6; author reply 276 [20152477.001]
  • (PMID = 19962740.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-9995
  • [Journal-full-title] Urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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58. Dillman RO, Wiemann MC, Tai DF, Depriest CB, Soori G, Stark JJ, Mahdavi K, Church CK: Phase II trial of subcutaneous interferon followed by intravenous hybrid bolus/continuous infusion interleukin-2 in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma: final results of Cancer Biotherapy Research Group 95-09. Cancer Biother Radiopharm; 2006 Apr;21(2):130-7
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  • [Title] Phase II trial of subcutaneous interferon followed by intravenous hybrid bolus/continuous infusion interleukin-2 in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma: final results of Cancer Biotherapy Research Group 95-09.
  • OBJECTIVE: We conducted a phase II trial in metastatic renal cell cancer of outpatient subcutaneous (s.c.) interferon-alpha2b (IFN), followed by an inpatient hybrid schedule of bolus and continuous interleukin-2 (IL- 2).
  • Sites of disease included 26 lung, 13 lymph node, 9 bone, 8 liver, 4 kidney, and 4 adrenal locations.
  • RESULTS: There was 1 complete and 3 partial responses, for a response rate of 11% (3% to 27%; 95% confidence interval [CI]); 40% had stable disease.
  • The most frequent grade 3 or 4 toxicities were 11% fatigue, 9% renal insufficiency, and 7% hypotension.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy


59. Kanda S, Miyata Y, Kanetake H: Current status and perspective of antiangiogenic therapy for cancer: urinary cancer. Int J Clin Oncol; 2006 Apr;11(2):90-107
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  • [Title] Current status and perspective of antiangiogenic therapy for cancer: urinary cancer.
  • Angiogenesis is considered a prerequisite for solid tumor growth.
  • Antiangiogenic therapy reduces tumor size and extends host survival in a number of preclinical animal models.
  • However, in humans antiangiogenic therapy is a poor promoter of tumor regression and has shown minimal effect on patient survival.
  • In urinary cancers, such as renal cell cancer, prostate cancer, and bladder cancer, advanced refractory disease is a good candidate for antiangiogenic therapy because of its resistance to ordinary chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy.
  • Unique characteristics of molecular mechanisms underlie the induction of angiogenesis in urinary cancers.
  • In this review, we summarize these unique mechanisms and review the results of clinical trials of antiangiogenic therapy for these cancers, discussing prospects and problems relating to antiangiogenic therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Neovascularization, Pathologic / prevention & control. Urogenital Neoplasms / blood supply. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / antagonists & inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Lymphangiogenesis / drug effects. Male. Neoplasm Metastasis / prevention & control

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  • (PMID = 16622744.001).
  • [ISSN] 1341-9625
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
  • [Number-of-references] 268
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60. Jeldres C, Bensalah K, Capitanio U, Zini L, Perrotte P, Suardi N, Tostain J, Valeri A, Descotes JL, Rambeaud JJ, de La Taille A, Salomon L, Abbou C, Patard JJ, Karakiewicz PI: Baseline renal function, ischaemia time and blood loss predict the rate of renal failure after partial nephrectomy. BJU Int; 2009 Jun;103(12):1632-5
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  • [Title] Baseline renal function, ischaemia time and blood loss predict the rate of renal failure after partial nephrectomy.
  • OBJECTIVE: To identify independent predictors of renal failure after partial nephrectomy (PN) in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data were available for 166 patients with pathological T1-3 N0M0 RCC treated with PN.
  • Renal failure after PN was defined as a decrease in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of >25% (RIFLE criteria).
  • The GFR before and after PN was estimated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study group equation.
  • Candidate predictor variables were age, gender, PN indication (absolute vs relative), preoperative GFR, tumour size, perioperative blood loss, surgery duration and clamping time.
  • It is possible that selective referral to experienced surgeons who can perform PN within short surgical and clamping times, and with minimal blood loss, could minimize the rate of renal failure, especially in patients with an underlying renal function impairment.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Glomerular Filtration Rate / physiology. Kidney / physiopathology. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Nephrectomy / adverse effects. Renal Insufficiency / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Blood Loss, Surgical. Female. Humans. Ischemia / complications. Kidney Function Tests. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Regression Analysis. Risk Factors. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19545272.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-410X
  • [Journal-full-title] BJU international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BJU Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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61. Kim J, Jonasch E, Alexander A, Short JD, Cai S, Wen S, Tsavachidou D, Tamboli P, Czerniak BA, Do KA, Wu KJ, Marlow LA, Wood CG, Copland JA, Walker CL: Cytoplasmic sequestration of p27 via AKT phosphorylation in renal cell carcinoma. Clin Cancer Res; 2009 Jan 1;15(1):81-90
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  • [Title] Cytoplasmic sequestration of p27 via AKT phosphorylation in renal cell carcinoma.
  • PURPOSE: p27 localization and expression has prognostic and predictive value in cancer.
  • Little is known regarding expression patterns of p27 in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) or how p27 participates in disease progression or response to therapy.
  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: RCC-derived cell lines, primary tumors, and normal renal epithelial cells were analyzed for p27 expression, phosphorylation (T157 of the NLS), and subcellular localization.
  • RCC-derived cell lines were treated with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors and effects on p27 localization were assessed.
  • RESULTS: p27 was elevated in tumors compared with matched controls, and cytoplasmic mislocalization of p27 was associated with increasing tumor grade.
  • In RCC cell lines, activated PI3K/AKT signaling was accompanied by mislocalization of p27.
  • AKT activation and phosphorylation of p27 was associated with resistance to apoptosis, and small interfering RNA knockdown of p27 or relocalization to the nucleus increased apoptosis in RCC cells.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In RCC, p27 is phosphorylated at T157 of the NLS, with increasing tumor grade associated with cytoplasmic p27.
  • Clinical testing of these findings may provide a rational approach for use of mTOR and PI3K/AKT pathway inhibitors in patients with RCC.

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  • (PMID = 19118035.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / P30 ES007784-13; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA063613-13; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA104505-05; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / HD046282-05; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / R01 HD046282; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA104505-05; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / R01 HD046282-05; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA104505; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA063613; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / ES007784-13; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA063613-13; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / P30 ES007784; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA63613
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen; 0 / RNA, Small Interfering; 0 / p27 antigen; EC 2.7.- / Protein Kinases; EC 2.7.1.- / Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; EC 2.7.1.1 / MTOR protein, human; EC 2.7.1.1 / TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases; EC 2.7.11.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS118521; NLM/ PMC3030253
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62. Iesalnieks I, Woenckhaus M, Glockzin G, Schlitt HJ, Agha A: [Renal cell carcinoma metastases to the thyroid gland -- report of 3 cases and review of the literature]. Zentralbl Chir; 2006 Jun;131(3):235-9
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  • [Title] [Renal cell carcinoma metastases to the thyroid gland -- report of 3 cases and review of the literature].
  • [Transliterated title] Schilddrüsenmetastasen eines Nierenzellkarzinoms -- drei Fallvorstellungen und Ubersicht der Literatur.
  • The clear cell carcinoma of the kidney (RCC) is the most common primary tumor site.
  • Late recurrence is a notable feature of renal carcinoma.
  • We describe 3 cases of surgically treated thyroid metastases of RCC, and review the literature.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Thyroid Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Nephrectomy. Postoperative Complications / diagnosis. Postoperative Complications / pathology. Postoperative Complications / surgery. Reoperation. Thyroid Gland / pathology. Thyroidectomy


63. Vanderbrink BA, Rastinehad A, Caplin D, Ost MC, Lobko I, Lee BR: Successful conservative management of colorenal fistula after percutaneous cryoablation of renal-cell carcinoma. J Endourol; 2007 Jul;21(7):726-9
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  • [Title] Successful conservative management of colorenal fistula after percutaneous cryoablation of renal-cell carcinoma.
  • BACKGROUND: Cryoablation is an increasingly utilized treatment for renal-cell carcinoma.
  • We describe the first reported case of colorenal fistula resulting from percutaneous renal cryoablation.
  • CASE REPORT: A 63-year-old man with hematuria was found to have an enhancing renal mass that was treated with percutaneous CT-guided cryoablation.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to previously reported animal and clinical studies, our case report demonstrates that it is possible to incur serious harm to the renal collecting system as a result of percutaneous renal cryoablation.

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  • (PMID = 17705759.001).
  • [ISSN] 0892-7790
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of endourology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Endourol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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64. Audenet F, Rouprêt M, Méjean A: [Renal cell carcinoma and antiangiogenic agents: ongoing controversies are seeking answers for improvement of therapeutic management]. Prog Urol; 2009 Oct;19(9):596-605
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  • [Title] [Renal cell carcinoma and antiangiogenic agents: ongoing controversies are seeking answers for improvement of therapeutic management].
  • [Transliterated title] Cancer du rein et thérapies ciblées : controverses sur les prises en charge thérapeutiques.
  • The recent development of agents targeting VHL-related growth factors as therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma has generated a revolution in the management of these patients, with a clear improvement of survival.
  • Notably, the role for radical nephrectomy in metastatic cases, the interest of adjuvant treatment in high-risk recurrence cases, the place for neoadjuvant treatment in locally advanced renal cell carcinoma, the choice of the best agent at first-line treatment, the various therapeutic options and their consequences on the quality of life and the potential contribution of dynamic imaging to assess antiangiogenic treatment's efficiency.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 19800548.001).
  • [ISSN] 1166-7087
  • [Journal-full-title] Progrès en urologie : journal de l'Association française d'urologie et de la Société française d'urologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prog. Urol.
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal
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65. Maluf FC, Fernandes Gdos S, Kann AG, Aguilar-Ponce JL, de la Garza J, Buzaid AC: Exploring the role of novel agents in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. Cancer Treat Rev; 2008 Dec;34(8):750-60
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  • [Title] Exploring the role of novel agents in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma.
  • Renal cell carcinoma represents nearly 3% of all cancers, predominantly affecting individuals >or=50 years of age, and until recently, few treatments options were available for metastatic disease.
  • The 5-year median survival for these patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma has been estimated at <10%.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / administration & dosage. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Drug Delivery Systems. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy

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  • (PMID = 18801619.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-1967
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer treatment reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Treat. Rev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Benzenesulfonates; 0 / Indoles; 0 / Phenylurea Compounds; 0 / Pyridines; 0 / Pyrroles; 0 / sunitinib; 25X51I8RD4 / Niacinamide; 2S9ZZM9Q9V / Bevacizumab; 624KN6GM2T / temsirolimus; 9ZOQ3TZI87 / sorafenib; W36ZG6FT64 / Sirolimus
  • [Number-of-references] 57
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66. Merseburger AS, Kuczyk MA: [Value of targeted therapies for renal cell cancer]. Urologe A; 2008 Oct;47(10):1303-10
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  • [Title] [Value of targeted therapies for renal cell cancer].
  • [Transliterated title] Der Stellenwert der Targeted-Therapie beim Nierenzellkarzinom.
  • Therapeutic approaches based solely on cytokine are meanwhile no longer recommended without restrictions as the primary therapy for metastatic renal cancer due to the reduced clinical response and the promising available data regarding molecular therapy.
  • Several randomized controlled studies have been performed since the introduction of the so-called targeted therapies for metastatic renal cancer.
  • Experimental investigations for a better understanding of signaling pathways will preferably allow preselecting patients for an individualized therapy in metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC).
  • The aim of the present paper is to address and to critically discuss the clinical data that are currently available regarding"targeted" therapeutics during the treatment of metastatic RCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Drug Delivery Systems. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Benzenesulfonates / administration & dosage. Bevacizumab. Disease Progression. Drug Resistance, Multiple. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Humans. Indoles / administration & dosage. Neoplasm Staging. Niacinamide / analogs & derivatives. Phenylurea Compounds. Pyridines / administration & dosage. Pyrroles / administration & dosage. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Sirolimus / administration & dosage. Sirolimus / analogs & derivatives. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 18587556.001).
  • [ISSN] 0340-2592
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Urologe. Ausg. A
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urologe A
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzenesulfonates; 0 / Indoles; 0 / Phenylurea Compounds; 0 / Pyridines; 0 / Pyrroles; 25X51I8RD4 / Niacinamide; 2S9ZZM9Q9V / Bevacizumab; 624KN6GM2T / temsirolimus; 9ZOQ3TZI87 / sorafenib; V99T50803M / sunitinib; W36ZG6FT64 / Sirolimus
  • [Number-of-references] 35
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67. Shao ZQ, Zheng SB, Xiao YJ, Tan WL, Chen T, Qi H, Jiang YD, Yu ZC, Zhang HJ: [Expressions of hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha and vascular endothelial growth factor in human renal cell carcinoma]. Di Yi Jun Yi Da Xue Xue Bao; 2005 Aug;25(8):1034-6
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  • [Title] [Expressions of hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha and vascular endothelial growth factor in human renal cell carcinoma].
  • OBJECTIVE: To explore the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and their relationship.
  • METHODS: The expression of HIF-1alphaand VEGF was examined in 42 patients with renal cell carcinoma by SABC methods of immunohistochemistry.
  • RESULTS: The positivity rate of HIF-1alpha was 57.1% in the RCC tissues, and there was no expression in the tissue adjacent to the tumor and normal tissues.
  • The positivity rate of VEGF was 61.9% in the tumor tissues, with significant difference from the control tissues (P<0.05).
  • The expression levels of HIF-1alpha and VEGF were significantly higher in metastatic RCC than in non-metastatic RCC (P<0.01) tissues, and there was a significant correlation between HIF-1alpha and VEGF expressions (Kappa=0.41, P<0.01).
  • CONCLUSIONS: HIF-1alpha is highly expressed in renal cell carcinoma tissues in close correlation with VEGF.
  • HIF-1alpha and VEGF may serve as important indicators to evaluate the biological behaviors of RCC such as metastasis and prognosis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / metabolism. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit / biosynthesis. Kidney Neoplasms / metabolism. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / biosynthesis

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  • (PMID = 16109571.001).
  • [ISSN] 1000-2588
  • [Journal-full-title] Di 1 jun yi da xue xue bao = Academic journal of the first medical college of PLA
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Di Yi Jun Yi Da Xue Xue Bao
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
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68. Bai H, Zheng SB, Wu J, Liu DZ: [Correlation of serum calcium level with tumor size and stage of renal cell carcinoma]. Di Yi Jun Yi Da Xue Xue Bao; 2005 Nov;25(11):1435-7
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  • [Title] [Correlation of serum calcium level with tumor size and stage of renal cell carcinoma].
  • OBJECTIVE: To analyze the correlation between serum calcium level and tumor size/ stage in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • METHODS: Totally 173 RCC cases were divided into 3 groups according to their serum calcium level, namely low, normal and high level groups.
  • SPSS10.0 software was used for statistical analysis of the tumor sizes/stages and their association with serum calcium level in the 3 groups.
  • RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Kruskal-Wallis H test revealed no significant difference in the tumor size between the 3 groups (X(2)=4.768, df=2, P=0.092), but Spearman correlation analysis suggested inverse correlation between serum calcium and tumor size (r=-0.166, P=0.029).
  • Kruskal-Wallis H test also failed to suggest significant difference in the tumor stage between the 3 groups (X(2)=4.277, df=2, P=0.118), but serum calcium was found to be inversely correlated with the tumor stage (r=-0.157, P=0.039 by Spearman correlation analysis).
  • [MeSH-major] Calcium / blood. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / blood. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / blood. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16305975.001).
  • [ISSN] 1000-2588
  • [Journal-full-title] Di 1 jun yi da xue xue bao = Academic journal of the first medical college of PLA
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Di Yi Jun Yi Da Xue Xue Bao
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] SY7Q814VUP / Calcium
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69. Khan T, Chakrabarty A, Baborie A: Renal cell carcinoma in allograft kidney--a case report with unusual findings at autopsy. Int J Urol; 2007 Jul;14(7):652-4
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  • [Title] Renal cell carcinoma in allograft kidney--a case report with unusual findings at autopsy.
  • A 30-year old male who had a non-related cadaveric renal transplant at the age of 12 years, presented with generalised CNS symptoms and meningeal enhancement on CT scan of the brain, 18 years after the transplantation.
  • Autopsy revealed renal cell carcinoma in the transplanted kidney and metastatic tumour in a variety of organs including the brain.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Kidney Transplantation

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  • (PMID = 17645613.001).
  • [ISSN] 0919-8172
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of urology : official journal of the Japanese Urological Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
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70. Antonelli A, Cozzoli A, Nicolai M, Zani D, Zanotelli T, Perucchini L, Cunico SC, Simeone C: Nephron-sparing surgery versus radical nephrectomy in the treatment of intracapsular renal cell carcinoma up to 7cm. Eur Urol; 2008 Apr;53(4):803-9
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  • [Title] Nephron-sparing surgery versus radical nephrectomy in the treatment of intracapsular renal cell carcinoma up to 7cm.
  • OBJECTIVE: To compare the oncologic outcomes of nephron-sparing surgery versus radical nephrectomy in intracapsular renal cell carcinoma (RCC) up to 7 cm by reviewing surgical experience retrospectively.
  • METHODS: Data from 1290 consecutive patients who had surgery for RCC have been stored in a dedicated database since 1983.
  • We selected and reviewed those related to disease-free patients who had been treated for unilateral pT1a/pT1b pN0/Nx M0 carcinomas up to 7 cm and later followed for a minimum of 12 mo.
  • RESULTS: A total of 642 patients with mean follow-up of 72.9 mo were selected; 313 had been treated for tumours <4 cm in diameter (176 nephron-sparing surgery, 137 nephrectomy), whereas 329 had been treated for tumours measuring > or =4 cm (52 nephron-sparing surgery, 277 nephrectomy).
  • The comparison between tumours <4 cm or > or =4 cm in diameter showed worse progression and disease-free survival rates for the latter, but the type of surgery (nephron-sparing or radical) seemed to have no significant impact.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Conservative management can be cautiously suggested for RCC up to 7 cm because the worsening of prognosis as diameter increases shows no statistical differences for either nephron-sparing or radical surgery.
  • The agreement of our results with those of similar studies available in the literature may suggest designing a prospective study to compare conservative and more radical surgery in the management of RCC up to 7 cm.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Nephrectomy / methods

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  • [CommentIn] Eur Urol. 2008 Apr;53(4):691-3 [18060683.001]
  • (PMID = 18036730.001).
  • [ISSN] 0302-2838
  • [Journal-full-title] European urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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71. Szabó KG, Szentkereszty Z, Tóth LA, Damjanovich L, Sápy P: [Distal pancreas resection for metastasis of clear cell renal cancer]. Magy Seb; 2010 Aug;63(4):161-3
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  • [Title] [Distal pancreas resection for metastasis of clear cell renal cancer].
  • BACKGROUND: Distant spread from renal cell carcinoma is commonly found in the liver and lung.
  • Metastatic involvement of any other gastro-intestinal organ (duodenum, other kidney, adrenal gland) is unexpected.
  • However, clear cell renal carcinoma is known to cause pancreatic metastasis.
  • METHODS: The authors present the case of a successfully operated 82- year-old man, who was operated for a metastatic tumor in his pancreas.
  • 8 years prior to his current hospitalization, a left sided nephrectomy was performed for renal cell carcinoma.
  • The CT scan revealed a tumor localised in the tail of the pancreas.
  • Histology revealed clear cell renal carcinoma metastasis.
  • CONCLUSIONS: pancreatic tumors are mostly primaries.
  • Renal cell carcinoma generally gives hepatic and pulmonary metastases.
  • However, clear cell renal carcinoma is known to give pancreatic metastasis, too.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Pancreatectomy / methods. Pancreatic Neoplasms / secondary. Pancreatic Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 20724240.001).
  • [ISSN] 0025-0295
  • [Journal-full-title] Magyar sebészet
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Magy Seb
  • [Language] hun
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Hungary
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72. Dall'Oglio MF, Antunes AA, Sarkis AS, Crippa A, Leite KR, Lucon AM, Srougi M: Microvascular tumour invasion in renal cell carcinoma: the most important prognostic factor. BJU Int; 2007 Sep;100(3):552-5
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  • [Title] Microvascular tumour invasion in renal cell carcinoma: the most important prognostic factor.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the role of microvascular invasion (MVI) in the primary lesion for predicting tumour behaviour in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC), as reliable clinical prognostic factors would be very valuable.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: MVI was assessed in 230 patients with clinically localized RCC (stages T1-4NxM0) who had a radical nephrectomy and/or nephron-sparing surgery.
  • The impact of MVI on disease progression and its correlation with clinical and histopathological factors was analysed, including whether patients were symptomatic or not at presentation, Fuhrman nuclear grade, tumour size, pathological stage and lymph node metastasis.
  • Regression analyses and survival curves were used to determine if MVI was associated with the prognosis of RCC.
  • RESULTS: There was MVI in 59 patients (26%); of these, 46% developed disease recurrence.
  • Among the 171 patients with no MVI, only 11 (6%) had tumour recurrence.
  • MVI was associated with tumour diameter, nuclear grade, pathological stage, lymph node metastasis and the presence of sarcomatous elements in the tumour.
  • Multivariate analysis showed that MVI was an independent predictor of disease recurrence and the most important factor related to death.
  • CONCLUSION: MVI is an independent predictor of prognosis in patients with RCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Vascular Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Child. Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Male. Microcirculation / pathology. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness / pathology. Neoplasm Staging. Nephrectomy / methods. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 17555475.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-4096
  • [Journal-full-title] BJU international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BJU Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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73. Dal Maso L, Zucchetto A, Tavani A, Montella M, Ramazzotti V, Talamini R, Canzonieri V, Garbeglio A, Negri E, Tonini A, La Vecchia C, Franceschi S: Renal cell cancer and body size at different ages: an Italian multicenter case-control study. Am J Epidemiol; 2007 Sep 1;166(5):582-91
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  • [Title] Renal cell cancer and body size at different ages: an Italian multicenter case-control study.
  • An increased risk of renal cell cancer (RCC) has been reported in overweight persons.
  • The authors aimed to clarify which anthropometric measures are associated with risk of RCC and whether risk may vary according to selected variables.
  • Between 1992 and 2004, they carried out an Italian multicenter case-control study including 767 (494 men, 273 women) incident cases of RCC and 1,534 hospital controls, frequency-matched to cases.
  • To estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals, they used conditional logistic regression matched on study center, sex, and age and adjusted for period of interview, years of education, smoking habits, and family history of kidney cancer.
  • Using body-size measurements taken 1 year prior to diagnosis/interview, the authors found an odds ratio of 1.3 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.0, 1.7) among obese persons (body mass index (BMI; weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) > or =30) versus normal-weight persons (BMI <25) and an odds ratio of 1.5 (95% CI: 1.1, 2.0) among persons in the highest tertile of waist-to-hip ratio.
  • RCC risks among overweight and obese persons were apparently higher in never smokers, persons with the clear-cell histologic type, and persons with a Fuhrman nuclear grade of G3-G4.
  • [MeSH-major] Body Size. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / epidemiology. Kidney Neoplasms / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Age Factors. Aged. Body Mass Index. Case-Control Studies. Female. Humans. Incidence. Italy / epidemiology. Logistic Models. Male. Middle Aged. Risk Factors. Surveys and Questionnaires

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  • (PMID = 17591592.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-9262
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of epidemiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Epidemiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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74. Master VA, Gottschalk AR, Kane C, Carroll PR: Management of isolated renal fossa recurrence following radical nephrectomy. J Urol; 2005 Aug;174(2):473-7; discussion 477
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  • [Title] Management of isolated renal fossa recurrence following radical nephrectomy.
  • PURPOSE: Local recurrence of renal cell carcinoma in the renal fossa without distant metastatic disease is an infrequent occurrence.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: The University of California, San Francisco Urologic Oncology database and the University of California, San Francisco Radiation Oncology database were queried for all patients with locally recurrent renal fossa recurrence.
  • Only patients with recurrence of renal cell carcinoma in the renal fossa were included.
  • Only 1 patient was symptomatic preoperatively, while in 13 disease had been detected on routine computerized tomography followup.
  • Mean size of the recurrent tumor was 6.35 cm (range 2 to 17).
  • 9 patients died of progressive, metastatic disease after a mean of 17 months (range 1 to 56) and 5 are alive with a mean survival of 66 months (range 14 to 86).
  • The time to recurrence after nephrectomy approached statistical significance (p =0.06) when comparing the patients who were alive vs those who died of disease.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Selected patients with isolated local recurrence in the renal fossa may have favorable and durable outcomes following surgical resection and possibly adjuvant intraoperative radiation therapy for isolated renal fossa recurrence following radical nephrectomy.
  • Development of novel and effective systemic therapy is needed in high risk patients with renal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Nephrectomy

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  • (PMID = 16006867.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-5347
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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75. Eto M, Harada M, Tatsugami K, Harano M, Koga H, Matsuzaki G, Naito S: Anti-tumour activity of heat-shock protein 60-recognizing CD4+ T cells against syngeneic murine renal cell carcinoma. BJU Int; 2005 Feb;95(3):421-4
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  • [Title] Anti-tumour activity of heat-shock protein 60-recognizing CD4+ T cells against syngeneic murine renal cell carcinoma.
  • OBJECTIVES: To determine whether heat-shock protein (HSP) 60-recognizing CD4(+) T cells show antitumour activity against renal carcinoma (RENCA) cells, as HSP is highly expressed by tumour cells and induced in cells by various stresses, including transformation.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: RENCA, a renal cortical adenocarcinoma cell line of BALB/c origin, was used.
  • Expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, class II and HSP-60 on RENCA tumour cells was analysed by flow cytometry.
  • BASL1.1, an autoreactive T-helper type 1 type CD4(+) T cell clone established by us, and that recognises HSP-60, was also used for a tumour-neutralising assay.
  • RESULTS: The RENCA cells were negative for MHC class II, but expressed intracellular HSP-60.
  • In the tumour-neutralising assay, BASL1.1 cells significantly suppressed the in vivo growth of RENCA cells.
  • Three of five mice rejected RENCA cells when co-inoculated with BASL1.1 cells.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that HSP-60-recognizing CD4(+) T cells have the potential to eliminate renal cell carcinoma in vivo and that the eliciting of an anti-self T cell response at the tumour site can lead to regression of renal cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes / immunology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / therapy. Chaperonin 60 / immunology. Kidney Neoplasms / therapy


76. Weinzierl AO, Lemmel C, Schoor O, Müller M, Krüger T, Wernet D, Hennenlotter J, Stenzl A, Klingel K, Rammensee HG, Stevanovic S: Distorted relation between mRNA copy number and corresponding major histocompatibility complex ligand density on the cell surface. Mol Cell Proteomics; 2007 Jan;6(1):102-13
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  • [Title] Distorted relation between mRNA copy number and corresponding major histocompatibility complex ligand density on the cell surface.
  • The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presents peptides derived from degraded cellular proteins to T-cells and is thus crucial for triggering specific immune responses against viral infections or cancer.
  • Up to now, there has been no evidence for a correlation between levels of mRNA (the "transcriptome") and the density of MHC-peptide complexes (the "MHC ligandome") on cells.
  • Because such dependences are of intrinsic importance for the detailed understanding of translation efficiency and protein turnover and thus for systems biology in general and for tumor immunotherapy in practical application, we quantitatively analyzed the levels of mRNA and corresponding MHC ligand densities in samples of renal cell carcinomas and their autologous normal kidney tissues.
  • In comparing more than 270 pairs of gene expression and corresponding peptide presentation ratios, we demonstrate that there is no clear correlation (r = 0.32) between mRNA levels and corresponding MHC peptide levels in renal cell carcinoma.
  • A significant number of peptides presented predominantly on tumor or normal tissue showed no or only minor changes in mRNA expression levels.
  • Thus we conclude that a majority of epitopes from tumor-associated antigens will not be found in approaches based mainly on mRNA expression studies as mRNA expression reflects a distorted picture of the situation on the cell surface as visible for T-cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Gene Dosage. Kidney / cytology. Kidney / pathology. Major Histocompatibility Complex / immunology. RNA, Messenger / genetics

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  • (PMID = 17074750.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-9476
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cell Proteomics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / HLA Antigens; 0 / Ligands; 0 / Peptides; 0 / RNA, Messenger
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77. Irvine J, Aho T, Davidson P, Searle M: Rhabdomyolysis following laparoscopic radical nephrectomy: a case to heighten awareness. Nephrology (Carlton); 2006 Aug;11(4):282-4
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  • Rhabdomyolysis, myoglobinuria and acute renal failure are rare complication of surgery.
  • The authors describe the case of a 70-year-old man with renal cell carcinoma who underwent a laparoscopic right radical nephrectomy in the lateral decubitus position.
  • His postoperative course was complicated by acute renal failure due to rhabdomyolysis.
  • Heightened awareness, early recognition and treatment of this condition are important, particularly as laparoscopic nephrectomy is becoming a common procedure for living donor transplantation.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Humans. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Male

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  • (PMID = 16889565.001).
  • [ISSN] 1320-5358
  • [Journal-full-title] Nephrology (Carlton, Vic.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nephrology (Carlton)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
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78. Wu D, Ji S, Wu Y, Ju Y, Zhao Y: Design, synthesis, and antitumor activity of bile acid-polyamine-nucleoside conjugates. Bioorg Med Chem Lett; 2007 Jun 1;17(11):2983-6
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  • A series of bile acid-polyamine amides conjugated with 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) as potential antitumor prodrugs in the form of phosphoramidates were synthesized in good yields and their antitumor activities were assayed against two human cancer cells in vitro: cervix cancer HeLa cells and renal cancer 7860 cells.
  • [MeSH-minor] Amides / chemistry. Cell Line, Tumor. Drug Delivery Systems. Drug Design. HeLa Cells. Humans. Nucleosides / chemistry. Phosphoric Acids / chemistry

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  • (PMID = 17416522.001).
  • [ISSN] 0960-894X
  • [Journal-full-title] Bioorganic & medicinal chemistry letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Amides; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Bile Acids and Salts; 0 / Nucleosides; 0 / Phosphoric Acids; 0 / Polyamines; 0 / Prodrugs; 4B9XT59T7S / Zidovudine; 9Q189608GB / phosphoramidic acid
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79. Machens A, Dralle H: Outcome after thyroid surgery for metastasis from renal cell cancer. Surgery; 2010 Jan;147(1):65-71
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  • [Title] Outcome after thyroid surgery for metastasis from renal cell cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: Owing to their rarity, the prognostic ramifications of thyroid metastases from renal cell cancer are unclear.
  • METHODS: This retrospective analysis comprised 17 patients who underwent thyroid surgery (15 total thyroidectomies, 2 lobectomies) for renal cell cancer metastases.
  • Powerful effects on cause-specific mortality after thyroid operation for renal cell cancer metastases were seen for extrathyroidal growth (means of 15 vs 69 months; P=.004) and recurrent laryngeal nerve invasion (means of 10 vs 56 months; P=.002).
  • CONCLUSION: Extrathyroidal metastatic growth reflects an aggressive tumor biology, which may extend to other renal cell cancer metastases outside the neck.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Thyroid Neoplasms / secondary. Thyroid Neoplasms / surgery


80. Gong Y, Du C, Josephson DY, Wilson TG, Nelson R: Four-arm robotic partial nephrectomy for complex renal cell carcinoma. World J Urol; 2010 Feb;28(1):111-5
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  • [Title] Four-arm robotic partial nephrectomy for complex renal cell carcinoma.
  • Complex renal tumors add an additional challenge to a minimally invasive approach to nephron-sparing surgery (NSS).
  • We represented our technique and results of robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN) for hilar, endophytic, and multiple renal tumors.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between May 2006 and March 2008, 29 patients with complex renal tumors underwent RPN, including hilar (n = 14), endophytic (n = 12) and multiple tumors (n = 3).The hilar vessels were clamped with laparoscopic bulldog with warm ischemia.
  • The mean diameter of tumors was 3.0 cm (range 2.0-4.0).
  • Histopathology confirmed clear-cell carcinoma (n = 21), chromophobe cell carcinoma (n = 4), hybrid oncocytic tumor (n = 2), oncocytoma (n = 1), and cystic renal cell carcinoma (n = 1).
  • At the 3-23 months (mean of 15 mo) follow-up, no patients experienced a significant change of glomerular filtration rate compared to preoperative levels and there was no evidence of tumor recurrence.
  • RPN is a preferred approach for complex renal tumors when NSS is indicated.
  • For complex and technical challenging renal tumors, robotic assistance may provide patients the benefit of minimally invasive surgery.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Nephrectomy / instrumentation. Nephrectomy / methods. Robotics / instrumentation

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  • (PMID = 19499225.001).
  • [ISSN] 1433-8726
  • [Journal-full-title] World journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] World J Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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81. Choi JY, Kim BS, Kim TH, Yoo ES, Kwon TG: Correlation between Radiologic and Pathologic Tumor Size in Localized Renal Cell Carcinoma. Korean J Urol; 2010 Mar;51(3):161-4
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  • [Title] Correlation between Radiologic and Pathologic Tumor Size in Localized Renal Cell Carcinoma.
  • PURPOSE: To evaluate the accuracy of radiologic tumor size for making decisions regarding nephron-sparing surgery of localized renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), we compared tumor size measured by a preoperative radiologic modality with that measured in the pathologic specimen.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between January 2003 and December 2007, a total of 186 patients with pT1 or pT2 RCC underwent radical or partial nephrectomy at our institute.
  • Radiologic size was defined as the largest diameter on computed tomography (CT), and pathologic size was defined as the largest diameter of the surgical specimen of the tumor.
  • We retrospectively analyzed the difference between radiologic and pathologic tumor size.
  • RESULTS: The radiologic and pathologic tumor sizes did not significantly differ (4.98+/-2.82 cm vs. 4.55+/-2.70 cm, respectively, p=0.152).
  • In the subgroup analysis, the size difference was statistically significant only for tumor sizes of less than 6 cm.
  • The size difference was largest in tumors of 3 to 4 cm, for which mean the radiologic size was 0.63+/-1.19 cm larger than the mean pathologic size (p=0.002).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The tumor size of RCCs in preoperative CT seems to correlate well with pathologic tumor size.
  • However, CT imaging may overestimate the size of a tumor in the small mass group (less than 6 cm).

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  • (PMID = 20414390.001).
  • [ISSN] 2005-6745
  • [Journal-full-title] Korean journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Korean J Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2855455
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Nephrectomy / Radiology / Renal cell carcinoma
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82. Dancey J: mTOR signaling and drug development in cancer. Nat Rev Clin Oncol; 2010 Apr;7(4):209-19
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  • [Title] mTOR signaling and drug development in cancer.
  • Activation of mTOR in response to growth, nutrient and energy signals leads to an increase in protein synthesis, which is required for tumor development.
  • This feature makes mTOR an attractive target for cancer therapy.
  • First-generation mTOR inhibitors are sirolimus derivatives (rapalogs), which have been evaluated extensively in cancer patients.
  • Everolimus and temsirolimus are already approved for the treatment of renal-cell carcinoma.
  • Temsirolimus is also approved for the treatment of mantle-cell lymphoma.
  • These drugs, in addition to ridaforolimus (formerly deforolimus) and sirolimus, are currently being evaluated in clinical trials of various cancers.
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers, Tumor. Drug Design. Humans. Phosphorylation. Sirolimus / analogs & derivatives. Sirolimus / pharmacology. Sirolimus / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 20234352.001).
  • [ISSN] 1759-4782
  • [Journal-full-title] Nature reviews. Clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nat Rev Clin Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; EC 2.7.1.1 / MTOR protein, human; EC 2.7.1.1 / TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases; W36ZG6FT64 / Sirolimus
  • [Number-of-references] 110
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83. Decastro GJ, McKiernan JM: Epidemiology, clinical staging, and presentation of renal cell carcinoma. Urol Clin North Am; 2008 Nov;35(4):581-92; vi
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  • [Title] Epidemiology, clinical staging, and presentation of renal cell carcinoma.
  • The increasing incidence of renal cell carcinoma over the past 2 decades can be partly explained by the expanding use of abdominal imaging.
  • As a result, the most incident renal cancers today are small, localized, and asymptomatic.
  • However, the well-documented rise in all stages of RCC calls into question the nature of these asymptomatic lesions.
  • The expected "screening effect" of detecting RCC when it is small and localized, with subsequent decreases in disease-specific mortality, has not been observed.
  • Disease-specific mortality is actually rising, especially in African American patients.
  • Effective interventions aimed at reducing obesity, hypertension, and smoking may help in reducing the incidence of RCC in the future.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / epidemiology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / epidemiology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 18992612.001).
  • [ISSN] 0094-0143
  • [Journal-full-title] The Urologic clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urol. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 77
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84. Adamo R, Greaney PJ Jr, Witkiewicz A, Kennedy EP, Yeo CJ: Renal cell carcinoma metastatic to the duodenum: treatment by classic pancreaticoduodenectomy and review of the literature. J Gastrointest Surg; 2008 Aug;12(8):1465-8
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  • [Title] Renal cell carcinoma metastatic to the duodenum: treatment by classic pancreaticoduodenectomy and review of the literature.
  • Renal cell cancer (RCC) most commonly metastasizes to the lungs, bones, liver, renal fossa, and brain, although metastases can occur elsewhere.
  • RCC metastatic to the duodenum is especially rare, with only a small number of cases reported in the literature.
  • Herein, we describe a case of an 86-year-old woman with a history of RCC treated by radical nephrectomy 13 years previously.
  • Preoperative imaging and intra-operative assessment showed no evidence of other disease.
  • Pathology confirmed metastatic RCC without lymph node involvement.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Duodenal Neoplasms / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Pancreaticoduodenectomy / methods

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  • (PMID = 18066632.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-4626
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of gastrointestinal surgery : official journal of the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Gastrointest. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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85. Abe T, Hayashi T, Nakayama J, Kishikawa H, Sekii K, Yoshioka T, Itatani H, Kojima Y, Takahara S: [A case of synchronous double primary cancers of prostate, and bladder in a hemodialysis patient: a case report]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2005 Oct;51(10):689-93
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  • [Title] [A case of synchronous double primary cancers of prostate, and bladder in a hemodialysis patient: a case report].
  • A 60-year-old male, who had been maintained on hemodialysis for 4 years, visited our hospital to receive living renal transplantation.
  • Cystoscopy revealed papillary tumors on the right lateral bladder wall.
  • Transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TUR-Bt) was performed and histopathological examination showed transitional cell carcinoma, G2, pTa.
  • The histologic diagnosis of the transrectal needle prostate biopsy specimen was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma.
  • A case of synchronous double primary cancers, comprised of adenocarcinoma of the prostate and transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary blader in a hemodialysis patient has never been previously reported in the Japanese literature.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Transitional Cell / diagnosis. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary. Prostatic Neoplasms / diagnosis. Renal Dialysis. Urinary Bladder Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Kidney Failure, Chronic / therapy. Male. Middle Aged


86. Taguchi E, Nishigami K, Kamio T, Honda T, Nakao K: Free-floating thrombus in the right common carotid artery. J Cardiol; 2009 Oct;54(2):304-6
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  • [Title] Free-floating thrombus in the right common carotid artery.
  • We report the case with type A acute aortic dissection that vascular echo disclosed a free-floating thrombus in the right common carotid artery.
  • [MeSH-major] Carotid Artery Thrombosis / diagnosis. Carotid Artery, Common
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Aged. Aneurysm, Dissecting / complications. Aneurysm, Dissecting / diagnosis. Aorta. Aortic Aneurysm / complications. Aortic Aneurysm / diagnosis. Autopsy. Cerebral Infarction / diagnosis. Cerebral Infarction / etiology. Diagnostic Imaging. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans

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  • (PMID = 19782270.001).
  • [ISSN] 1876-4738
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Cardiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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87. Altinoz MA, Santaguida C, Guiot MC, Del Maestro RF: Spinal hemangioblastoma containing metastatic renal cell carcinoma in von Hippel-Lindau disease. Case report and review of the literature. J Neurosurg Spine; 2005 Dec;3(6):495-500
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  • [Title] Spinal hemangioblastoma containing metastatic renal cell carcinoma in von Hippel-Lindau disease. Case report and review of the literature.
  • The authors describe the case of a patient with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease in which a spinal hemangioblastoma contained metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • The literature on tumor-to-tumor metastasis associated with VHL disease of the central nervous system (CNS) is reviewed.
  • Midthoracic back pain developed in this 43-year-old man with a left-sided radicular component 2 years after he underwent resection of a left RCC.
  • Radiological findings demonstrated a T6-7 intradural intramedullary lesion.
  • Light and electron microscopic examination showed features of hemangioblastoma, which contained metastatic foci of RCC.
  • A review of the literature revealed that RCC-to-CNS hemangioblastoma is the second most common donor-recipient tumor association among the tumor-to-tumor metastases.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Hemangioblastoma / pathology. Hemangioblastoma / secondary. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Spinal Cord Neoplasms / secondary
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Back Pain / etiology. Humans. Laminectomy. Male. Thoracic Vertebrae. Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein / genetics. von Hippel-Lindau Disease

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  • (PMID = 16381215.001).
  • [ISSN] 1547-5654
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery. Spine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Neurosurg Spine
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 6.3.2.19 / VHL protein, human; EC 6.3.2.19 / Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein
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88. Meyners T, Heisterkamp C, Kueter JD, Veninga T, Stalpers LJ, Schild SE, Rades D: Prognostic factors for outcomes after whole-brain irradiation of brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors: a retrospective analysis. BMC Cancer; 2010;10:582
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  • [Title] Prognostic factors for outcomes after whole-brain irradiation of brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors: a retrospective analysis.
  • BACKGROUND: This study investigated potential prognostic factors in patients treated with whole-brain irradiation (WBI) alone for brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors such as malignant melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and colorectal cancer.
  • METHODS: Data from 220 patients were retrospectively analyzed for overall survival and local control.
  • Nine potential prognostic factors were evaluated: tumor type, WBI schedule, age, gender, Karnofsky performance score, number of brain metastases, extracerebral metastases, interval from diagnosis of cancer to WBI, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class.
  • Local control rates at 6 and 12 months were 37% and 15%, respectively.
  • In the multivariate analyses, KPS ≥70 (p < 0.001), only 1-3 brain metastases (p < 0.001), and RPA class 1 (p < 0.001) were associated with improved local control.
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / radiotherapy. Colorectal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Female. Humans. Karnofsky Performance Status. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Metastasis. Radiotherapy / methods. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 20977700.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2407
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2988027
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89. Michaelson JS, Chen LL, Silverstein MJ, Mihm MC Jr, Sober AJ, Tanabe KK, Smith BL, Younger J: How cancer at the primary site and in the lymph nodes contributes to the risk of cancer death. Cancer; 2009 Nov 1;115(21):5095-107
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  • [Title] How cancer at the primary site and in the lymph nodes contributes to the risk of cancer death.
  • BACKGROUND: : It has long been appreciated that tumor size, lymph node status, and patient survival are related qualities, although how to isolate their interactions has not been obvious, nor has it been obvious how to integrate tumor size and lymph node status into predictions of the risk of death for individual patients.
  • METHODS: : The authors describe a mathematical method, the binary-biological model of cancer metastasis, based on the spread of cancer cells, in which the equations capture the relations between tumor size, lymph node status, and cancer lethality.
  • RESULTS: : For melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and breast carcinoma, the relation between tumor size and the risk of cancer death was captured by the SizeOnly equation.
  • For melanoma and breast carcinoma, the relation between tumor size and the presence of cancer in the lymph nodes was captured by using the NodalSizeOnly equation.
  • For lymph node-negative melanoma and breast carcinoma, the relation between tumor size and risk of death was captured by the PrimarySizeOnly equation.
  • For breast carcinoma, the model indicated that each positive lymph node contributed approximately 6% extra risk of death, whereas each millimeter of greatest primary tumor dimension contributed approximately 1% risk of death.
  • CONCLUSIONS: : Both tumor size and the number of positive lymph nodes made independent contributions to the risk of cancer death, as estimated by using the Size+Nodes method.
  • Cancer 2009. (c) 2009 American Cancer Society.
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Lymphatic Metastasis / pathology. Mathematics. Models, Biological. Neoplasm Metastasis. Risk Factors. Tumor Burden

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  • (PMID = 19670458.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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90. Hallscheidt P, Wagener N, Gholipour F, Aghabozorgi N, Dreyhaupt J, Hohenfellner M, Haferkamp A, Pfitzenmaier J: Multislice computed tomography in planning nephron-sparing surgery in a prospective study with 76 patients: comparison of radiological and histopathological findings in the infiltration of renal structures. J Comput Assist Tomogr; 2006 Nov-Dec;30(6):869-74
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  • [Title] Multislice computed tomography in planning nephron-sparing surgery in a prospective study with 76 patients: comparison of radiological and histopathological findings in the infiltration of renal structures.
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of this prospective study is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector-row computed tomography (CT) compared to histopathologic findings in tumor staging of renal cell carcinoma, with the focus on tumor stage, vein and artery infiltration, and infiltration of the renal pelvis.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a prospective study, a total of 76 consecutive patients with suspected renal cell carcinoma were preoperatively assessed for tumor staging using multidetector-row CT.
  • RESULTS: A total of 56 renal cell carcinomas were proven on histopathology.
  • Readers 1 and 2 reached a sensitivity of 1.0 and 1.0 and a specificity of 0.41 and 0.42 for arterial infiltration, a sensitivity of 1.0 and 0.86 and a specificity of 0.58 and 0.5 for venous infiltration, and a sensitivity of 0.75 and 1.0 and a specificity of 0.5 and 0.44 for infiltration of the renal pelvis.
  • The lowest specificity was reached in excluding infiltration of the renal pelvis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / radiography. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / radiography. Nephrectomy / methods. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • [ErratumIn] J Comput Assist Tomogr. 2007 Jan-Feb;31(1):164
  • (PMID = 17082687.001).
  • [ISSN] 0363-8715
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of computer assisted tomography
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Comput Assist Tomogr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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91. Misić M, Vidas Z, Skegro D, Kocman B, Jelić-Puskarić B, Kardum-Skelin I: Fine needle aspiration cytology of adrenocortical carcinoma--case report. Coll Antropol; 2010 Jun;34(2):665-9
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  • [Title] Fine needle aspiration cytology of adrenocortical carcinoma--case report.
  • Ultrasonography (US) revealed a solitary tumor mass, eight cm in size, of the right adrenal gland.
  • Laboratory tests showed it to be a hormonally active, androgen secreting tumor (elevated testosterone level), which was consistent with the clinical picture of the disease.
  • After histopathological analysis tumor was signed out as adrenocortical carcinoma, a low risk carcinoma according to Weiss' classification.
  • One year later on regular follow up, US revealed a suspicious growth measuring 65 x 43 mm in the projection of the lower pole of the right kidney.
  • The finding was verified by computerized tomography and the patient was reoperated on.
  • 8 months after the second operation and after 6 chemotherapy cycles according to EAP protocol, control CT showed enlarged para-aortic lymph nodes and a node along the upper pole of the right kidney.
  • Cytologic opinion was recidive of primary malignant disease.
  • ACC is a rare malignant epithelial tumor of adrenal cortical cells, with high malignant potential.
  • Morphologically (histopathology and cytology), differential diagnosis includes adenoma on the one hand, and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on the other hand.
  • A combined evaluation of clinical features, size or weight, microscopic appearance, immunohistochemical and molecular genetic data is necessary to ensure a correct diagnosis.
  • The purpose of this case report is to present clinical and cytomorphologic features of our case of adrenocortical carcinoma which is very rare in cytology practice.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms / pathology. Carcinoma / pathology

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  • (PMID = 20698150.001).
  • [ISSN] 0350-6134
  • [Journal-full-title] Collegium antropologicum
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Coll Antropol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Croatia
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92. Robb VA, Karbowniczek M, Klein-Szanto AJ, Henske EP: Activation of the mTOR signaling pathway in renal clear cell carcinoma. J Urol; 2007 Jan;177(1):346-52
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Activation of the mTOR signaling pathway in renal clear cell carcinoma.
  • PURPOSE: We determined the frequency of mTOR/p70S6 kinase signaling pathway activation in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Phospho-S6 (Ser235/236) and phospho-mTOR (Ser2448) staining was performed on renal tumor tissue microarrays containing 29 clear cell renal cell carcinomas.
  • Mutational analysis of Rheb and RhebL1 was performed on DNA from phospho-mTOR/phospho-S6 positive clear cell renal cell carcinoma.
  • The 3 clear cell renal cell carcinoma derived cell lines A498, 786-O and Caki1 were also assessed for mTOR activation and the effect of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin (Biomol) on proliferation.
  • RESULTS: Moderate or strong phospho-S6 immunoreactivity was found in 17 of 29 clear cell carcinomas (59%), of which 14 were also moderately/strongly positive for phospho-mTOR (Ser2448).
  • We hypothesized that this activation of the mTOR signaling pathway in clear cell renal cell carcinoma could reflect mutational activation of Rheb or RhebL1, which are Ras family members that directly activate mTOR.
  • Two of 3 renal clear cell carcinoma derived cell lines also showed inappropriate S6 hyperphosphorylation.
  • Treatment of all 3 cell lines with rapamycin significantly decreased S6 phosphorylation and proliferation.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The mTOR/p70S6 kinase signaling pathway is activated in most clear cell renal cell carcinomas.
  • Moreover, the growth of renal clear cell carcinoma derived cell lines is inhibited by rapamycin.
  • This is especially significant in light of new agents such as CCI-779, an ester of rapamycin and inhibitor of mTOR, which has shown promise in the treatment of renal carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / chemistry. Kidney Neoplasms / chemistry. Protein Kinases / analysis. Protein Kinases / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Immunohistochemistry. TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases. Tumor Cells, Cultured


93. Parker AS: Re: The epidemiology of renal cell carcinoma. J Urol; 2007 May;177(5):1953; author reply 1953-4
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  • [Title] Re: The epidemiology of renal cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / epidemiology. Kidney Neoplasms / epidemiology

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  • [CommentOn] J Urol. 2006 Dec;176(6 Pt 1):2353-8 [17085101.001]
  • (PMID = 17437854.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-5347
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comment; Letter
  • [Publication-country] United States
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94. Budía Alba A, Gómez Pérez L, Bango V, Ruiz-Cerdá JI, Sempere A, Queipo JA, Jiménez Cruz JF: [Prognostic factors for disease progression in patients with renal cell carcinoma]. Actas Urol Esp; 2007 Sep;31(8):831-44
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Prognostic factors for disease progression in patients with renal cell carcinoma].
  • [Transliterated title] Análisis de los factores pronósticos de progresión tumoral en el adenocarcinoma renal.
  • INTRODUCTION: More than 40% of patients with renal cell carcinoma present with disease progression after surgery.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: The authors studied 252 patients with renal cell carcinoma who underwent radical nephrectomy.
  • Several morphologic parameters of the tumors were considered.
  • DNA content was analyzed by flow cytometry and tumor size was determined from the surgical specimen.
  • A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to identify significant independent prognostic factors for disease progression.
  • Of the 224 patients, 95 (42.4%) were aneuploid tumors, 106 (47.2%) were organ-confined renal cell carcinoma and 87 (39.74%) presented disease progression.
  • At 5 and 10 years of followup, disease free survival was found to be 66.31% and 62.23%, respectively.
  • Univariate analysis revealed that DNA ploidy, Furhman grade and stage (TNM) had a statistically significant predictive value for disease progression.
  • Survival univariate analysis found a worse probability of survival for aneuploid tumors, grade III-IV tumors, non organ-confined tumors and conventional and undiferentiated tumors.
  • Using multivariate survival analyses, Furhman grade, stage (TNM) and DNA ploidy were the only independent prognostic factors.
  • So, the probability of death for aneuploid tumor was 1.7 times higher than for diploid tumors.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Stage, DNA content and Furhman grade were the only significant independent predictors of disease progression.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / mortality. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / mortality. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Disease Progression. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Nephrectomy. Prognosis. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 18020207.001).
  • [ISSN] 0210-4806
  • [Journal-full-title] Actas urologicas españolas
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Actas Urol Esp
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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95. Kochhar R, Brown RK, Wong CO, Dunnick NR, Frey KA, Manoharan P: Role of FDG PET/CT in imaging of renal lesions. J Med Imaging Radiat Oncol; 2010 Aug;54(4):347-57
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  • [Title] Role of FDG PET/CT in imaging of renal lesions.
  • Focal incidental renal lesions are commonly encountered on positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging.
  • However, the interpretation of renal lesions can be problematic if the imaging criteria of simple cysts are not met.
  • Limited literature exists on the characterisation of renal masses with metabolic imaging.
  • The purpose of this article is to focus on the imaging features of benign and malignant renal masses with PET/CT.
  • The lesions discussed include renal cyst, angiomyolipoma, oncocytoma, renal cell carcinoma, renal metastases and other infiltrating neoplastic processes affecting the kidney.
  • Both the anatomical and metabolic features which characterise these benign and malignant entities are described.
  • We emphasise the importance of viewing the CT component to identify the typical morphological features and discuss how to best use hybrid imaging for management of renal lesions.
  • Metabolic imaging has a promising role in the imaging of renal lesions and can help prevent unnecessary biopsies and ensure optimal management of suspicious lesions.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / diagnosis. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18. Kidney Neoplasms / diagnosis. Positron-Emission Tomography / methods. Radiopharmaceuticals. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenoma, Oxyphilic / diagnosis. Angiomyolipoma / diagnosis. Cysts / diagnosis. Humans. Incidental Findings. Kidney / radiography. Kidney / radionuclide imaging. Kidney Diseases / diagnosis. Leukemia / diagnosis. Lymphoma / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 20718915.001).
  • [ISSN] 1754-9485
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of medical imaging and radiation oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Med Imaging Radiat Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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96. Miyata Y, Iwata T, Ohba K, Kanda S, Nishikido M, Kanetake H: Expression of matrix metalloproteinase-7 on cancer cells and tissue endothelial cells in renal cell carcinoma: prognostic implications and clinical significance for invasion and metastasis. Clin Cancer Res; 2006 Dec 1;12(23):6998-7003
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