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6. Krishnamachary B, Zagzag D, Nagasawa H, Rainey K, Okuyama H, Baek JH, Semenza GL: Hypoxia-inducible factor-1-dependent repression of E-cadherin in von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor-null renal cell carcinoma mediated by TCF3, ZFHX1A, and ZFHX1B. Cancer Res; 2006 Mar 1;66(5):2725-31
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  • [Title] Hypoxia-inducible factor-1-dependent repression of E-cadherin in von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor-null renal cell carcinoma mediated by TCF3, ZFHX1A, and ZFHX1B.
  • A critical event in the pathogenesis of invasive and metastatic cancer is E-cadherin loss of function.
  • Renal clear cell carcinoma (RCC) is characterized by loss of function of the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor (VHL), which negatively regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1).
  • Loss of E-cadherin expression and decreased cell-cell adhesion in VHL-null RCC4 cells were corrected by enforced expression of VHL, a dominant-negative HIF-1alpha mutant, or a short hairpin RNA directed against HIF-1alpha.
  • In human RCC biopsies, expression of E-cadherin and HIF-1alpha was mutually exclusive.
  • The expression of mRNAs encoding TCF3, ZFHX1A, and ZFHX1B, which repress E-cadherin gene transcription, was increased in VHL-null RCC4 cells in a HIF-1-dependent manner.
  • Thus, HIF-1 contributes to the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in VHL-null RCC by indirect repression of E-cadherin.
  • [MeSH-major] Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors / physiology. Cadherins / biosynthesis. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / metabolism. Homeodomain Proteins / physiology. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 / physiology. Kidney Neoplasms / metabolism. Repressor Proteins / physiology. Transcription Factors / physiology. Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy. Cell Adhesion / physiology. Down-Regulation. Epithelial Cells / pathology. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Mesoderm / pathology. RNA, Messenger / biosynthesis. RNA, Messenger / genetics. RNA, Small Interfering / genetics. Transcription, Genetic

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  • (PMID = 16510593.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50-CA103175
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors; 0 / Cadherins; 0 / Homeodomain Proteins; 0 / Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / RNA, Small Interfering; 0 / Repressor Proteins; 0 / TCF3 protein, human; 0 / Transcription Factors; 0 / ZEB1 protein, human; 0 / ZEB2 protein, human; EC 6.3.2.19 / Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein
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7. Dolley-Hitze T, Jouan F, Martin B, Mottier S, Edeline J, Moranne O, Le Pogamp P, Belaud-Rotureau MA, Patard JJ, Rioux-Leclercq N, Vigneau C: Angiotensin-2 receptors (AT1-R and AT2-R), new prognostic factors for renal clear-cell carcinoma? Br J Cancer; 2010 Nov 23;103(11):1698-705
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  • [Title] Angiotensin-2 receptors (AT1-R and AT2-R), new prognostic factors for renal clear-cell carcinoma?
  • BACKGROUND: The growth factor Angiotensin-2 signals through Angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1-R) in a broad range of cell types and tumours and through the type-2 receptor (AT2-R) in a more restricted group of cell types.
  • Although numerous forms of cancer have been shown to overexpress AT1-R, expression of AT1-R and AT2-R by human renal clear-cell carcinoma (RCCC) is not well understood.
  • METHODS: Angiotensin receptor type 1 and AT2-R expressions were quantified on tumour tissues by immunohistochemistry (IHC), western blot and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR).
  • By IHC, AT1-R and AT2-R were expressed to a greater level in high-grade tumours (AT1-R: P<0.001, AT2-R: P<0.001).
  • By multivariate analysis, only AT2-R expression correlated with PFS (HR 1.021, P=0.006) and cancer stage (P<0.001).
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / mortality. Kidney Neoplasms / mortality. Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1 / analysis. Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 2 / analysis
  • [MeSH-minor] Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists / therapeutic use. Blotting, Western. Disease-Free Survival. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Multivariate Analysis. Prognosis. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 21102591.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-1827
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists; 0 / Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1; 0 / Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 2
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2994218
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8. Hallscheidt PJ, Fink C, Haferkamp A, Bock M, Luburic A, Zuna I, Noeldge G, Kauffmann G: Preoperative staging of renal cell carcinoma with inferior vena cava thrombus using multidetector CT and MRI: prospective study with histopathological correlation. J Comput Assist Tomogr; 2005 Jan-Feb;29(1):64-8
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  • [Title] Preoperative staging of renal cell carcinoma with inferior vena cava thrombus using multidetector CT and MRI: prospective study with histopathological correlation.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the accuracy of multidetector computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in staging and estimating renal carcinomas with caval thrombus.
  • The results the tumor thrombus extension and staging results of 2 independent readers were correlated with surgical and histopathological staging.
  • Readers I and II evaluated the uppermost extension of the cranial tumor thrombus by both CT and MRI.
  • CONCLUSION: In cases of a suspected tumor thrombus, MRI and multidetector CT imaging showed similar staging results.
  • Consequently, these staging modalities can be used to assess the extension of the tumor thrombus.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / diagnosis. Iohexol / analogs & derivatives. Kidney Neoplasms / diagnosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neoplastic Cells, Circulating / pathology. Tomography, Spiral Computed. Vena Cava, Inferior / pathology. Venous Thrombosis / diagnosis


9. Nakaigawa N, Yao M, Kondo K, Kishida T, Noguchi K, Kubota Y, Nagashima Y, Kawano N, Inayama Y, Nozawa A: [Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma: a clinicopathological study of 16 cases]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2006 Jan;52(1):1-6
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  • [Title] [Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma: a clinicopathological study of 16 cases].
  • Pathological characteristics, patient outcome, and preoperative examinations of 16 cases (4.1%) of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (RCC) observed among 389 patients with RCC treated at Yokohama City University Hospital and Yokohama City University Medical Center between 1991 and 2004 were analyzed.
  • Pathologically, 14 patients had pure chromophobe RCC, and two patients had chromophobe RCC coexisting with aggressive pathological elements, that is, sarcomatoid change in one patient and collecting duct carcinoma in the other.
  • The average tumor size was 7.1 +/- 4.1 cm.
  • Fourteen cases showing pure chromophobe RCC did not metastases on preoperative examination.
  • The patient with a mixture of chromophobe RCC and sarcomatoid change (pT3aN0M0) died of multiple lung metastases 18 months after nephrectomy.
  • The patient showing a mixture of chromophobe RCC and collecting duct carcinoma demonstrated metastases to the paraaortic lymph nodes at preoperative examination (pT1bN2M0), and died of multiple lung and bone metastases and carcinomatous peritonitis 8 months after nephrectomy.
  • The patients with pure chromophobe RCC had a favorable prognosis, but those with a mixed type including aggressive elements such as sarcomatoid change or collecting duct carcinoma, showed a poor clinical course.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Nephrectomy


10. Nathan P, Chao D, Brock C, Savage P, Harries M, Gore M, Eisen T: The place of VEGF inhibition in the current management of renal cell carcinoma. Br J Cancer; 2006 May 8;94(9):1217-20
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  • [Title] The place of VEGF inhibition in the current management of renal cell carcinoma.
  • Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is overexpressed in around 80% of patients with clear cell carcinoma of the kidney owing to the inactivation of von Hippel Lindau gene activity.
  • A significant body of evidence has accumulated demonstrating that antagonism of VEGF and its downstream pathways is clinically useful in a significant proportion of patients with metastatic clear cell carcinoma of the kidney.
  • Enough data is now available to recommend that patients with metastatic clear cell carcinoma of the kidney should at some point during the course of their disease be offered entry into a clinical trial enabling exposure to a targeted inhibitor of VEGF or its signalling pathways.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / antagonists & inhibitors. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / physiology

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  • (PMID = 16508632.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-0920
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; 2S9ZZM9Q9V / Bevacizumab
  • [Number-of-references] 31
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2361396
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11. Roskoski R Jr: Sunitinib: a VEGF and PDGF receptor protein kinase and angiogenesis inhibitor. Biochem Biophys Res Commun; 2007 May 4;356(2):323-8
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  • [Title] Sunitinib: a VEGF and PDGF receptor protein kinase and angiogenesis inhibitor.
  • Sunitinib (SU-11248, Sutent) inhibits at least eight receptor protein-tyrosine kinases including vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1-3 (VEGFR1-VEGFR3), platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGFRalpha and PDGFRbeta), stem cell factor receptor (Kit), Flt-3, and colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R).
  • PDGFRbeta, which is found in pericytes that surround capillary endothelial cells, plays a pivotal role in stabilizing the vascular endothelium.
  • Renal cell cancers that have metastasized, or spread from the primary tumor, exhibit extensive vascularity, and sunitinib is approved for the treatment of these neoplasms.
  • Activating Kit mutations occur in about 85% of gastrointestinal stromal tumors and activating PDGFRalpha mutations occur in about 5% of these tumors.
  • Sunitinib is approved for the treatment of those tumors that are resistant to imatinib (STI-571, Gleevec), another Kit and PDGFRalpha protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitor.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antibodies, Monoclonal / pharmacology. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Bevacizumab. Biological Availability. Humans. Mice. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / pharmacokinetics. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / pharmacology. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 17367763.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-291X
  • [Journal-full-title] Biochemical and biophysical research communications
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / Indoles; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Pyrroles; 0 / VEGFA protein, human; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; 0 / sunitinib; 2S9ZZM9Q9V / Bevacizumab; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptors, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor
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12. Su X, Zhang L, Jin L, Ye J, Guan Z, Chen R, Guo T: Immunotherapy with cytokine-induced killer cells in metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Cancer Biother Radiopharm; 2010 Aug;25(4):465-70
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  • [Title] Immunotherapy with cytokine-induced killer cells in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.
  • Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells have shown antitumor activity against several tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo.
  • This study reports on the large-scale expansion of CIK cells and also present preliminary results from a pilot clinical trial.
  • Sixteen (16) patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC), all of whom had metastases after radical nephrectomy and adjuvant therapy using interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) and/or interleukin-2 (IL-2), were treated with CIK cells.
  • CIK cells were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and incubated in the presence of IFN-gamma followed by OKT3 and IL-2.
  • Treatment schedule consisted of two to three cycles of CIK cell infusions at an interval of 3 weeks.
  • A total of 46 infusions were administered to 16 metastatic RCC (mRCC) patients.
  • The median number of transferred cells per treatment was 6.7 x 10(9) (range, 2.5-12.3).
  • At a 60:1 effector-target cell ratio, CIK cells killed 51.4% and 32.1% of two human kidney tumor cell lines (293 and SK-RC-42), respectively.
  • After CIK cell infusion, the percentage of CD3(+), CD8(+), CD3(+)CD56(+), and NKG2D(+) cells and the intracellular products of two type 1 cytokines (IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor alpha) significantly increased in the patients' PBMCs.
  • Three (3) patients had complete response, 1 patient had partial response, and 6 patients had stable disease.
  • These results showed that adoptive CIK cell immunotherapy is a safe and effective treatment, which may have essential benefits for the improvement of the immunologic function in mRCC patients and play an important role in the treatment of mRCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / therapy. Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells / immunology. Cytokines / pharmacology. Immunotherapy. Kidney Neoplasms / therapy. Liver Neoplasms / therapy. Lung Neoplasms / therapy


13. Hui GC, Tuncali K, Tatli S, Morrison PR, Silverman SG: Comparison of percutaneous and surgical approaches to renal tumor ablation: metaanalysis of effectiveness and complication rates. J Vasc Interv Radiol; 2008 Sep;19(9):1311-20
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  • [Title] Comparison of percutaneous and surgical approaches to renal tumor ablation: metaanalysis of effectiveness and complication rates.
  • PURPOSE: To determine the effectiveness and complication rates of ablation of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) performed with a percutaneous approach versus a surgical approach.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: A search performed on PubMed identified series of renal tumor ablations.
  • Keywords searched included "radiofrequency" (RF), "cryoablation", "cryosurgery", "cryotherapy", "ablation", "renal", "kidney", and "RCC".
  • Effectiveness was defined by the proportion of tumors without residual enhancement after one treatment session (ie, primary effectiveness) or after repeated treatments (ie, secondary effectiveness).
  • Differences were considered significant if the 95% CIs did not overlap.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Based on a metaanalysis, when ablating renal tumors, a percutaneous approach was safer than an open or laparoscopic approach and was equally effective.
  • However, more than one procedure was needed to treat the tumor completely.
  • [MeSH-major] Catheter Ablation / statistics & numerical data. Cryosurgery / statistics & numerical data. Kidney Neoplasms / epidemiology. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Postoperative Complications / epidemiology. Risk Assessment / methods


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4. Song C, Jun SY, Hong JH, Ahn H: Transforming growth factor-beta downregulates interleukin-2-induced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 in human renal cell carcinoma. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol; 2007 Jul;133(7):487-92
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Transforming growth factor-beta downregulates interleukin-2-induced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 in human renal cell carcinoma.
  • PURPOSE: We investigated signal transducer and activator of transcription-5 (STAT5) activation status in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and the role of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) in the process.
  • METHODS: Twenty normal and RCC tissues were obtained from radical nephrectomy specimens for the assessment of expressions of phosphorylated STAT5 (p-STAT5) and TGF-beta1 (Western blot) and for localization and assessment of their relationship (immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence stains).
  • By using four RCC cell lines and four primary cultured cells, the effect of TGF-beta1 and/or interleukin-2 (IL-2) on the expressions of p-STAT5 were analyzed.
  • RESULTS: In RCC samples, expression of p-STAT5 was significantly reduced while expression of TGF-beta was enhanced compared with normal kidney tissues (P < 0.001 and P = 0.003, respectively).
  • P-STAT5 was observed almost exclusively in the nuclei of normal kidney tissues while TGF-beta was identified in the cytoplasm of cells of both tissues reflecting the Western results.
  • In both RCC cell lines and cells from primary cultures, treatment with TGF-beta or antibody did not significantly alter STAT5 activation.
  • CONCLUSIONS: STAT5 activation is suppressed in RCC compared with normal renal parenchyma.
  • It may be attributed to the RCC-derived TGF-beta which also interferes with IL-2-induced STAT5 pathway activation.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / metabolism. Interleukin-2 / pharmacology. Kidney Neoplasms / metabolism. STAT5 Transcription Factor / metabolism. Transforming Growth Factor beta / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 17279417.001).
  • [ISSN] 0171-5216
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cancer research and clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cancer Res. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interleukin-2; 0 / STAT5 Transcription Factor; 0 / Transforming Growth Factor beta
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15. Xu ZF, Xu HX, Xie XY, Liu GJ, Zheng YL, Lu MD: Renal cell carcinoma and renal angiomyolipoma: differential diagnosis with real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasonography. J Ultrasound Med; 2010 May;29(5):709-17
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  • [Title] Renal cell carcinoma and renal angiomyolipoma: differential diagnosis with real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasonography.
  • OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) in differentiating renal cell carcinoma (RCC) from renal angiomyolipoma (RAML).
  • METHODS: One hundred nineteen patients with 126 renal lesions (33 RAMLs and 93 RCCs) who had undergone CEUS were retrospectively studied.
  • The tumor echogenicity, enhancement patterns, and degree of enhancement at different phases were evaluated.
  • RESULTS: On CEUS, the features of wash-out from hyperenhancement or isoenhancement to hypoenhancement over time (observed in 3.0% of RAMLs and 71.0% of RCCs; P < .001), heterogeneous enhancement (observed in 12.1% of RAMLs and 74.2% of RCCs; P < .001), and an enhanced perilesional rim (observed in 3.0% of RAMLs and 79.6% of RCCs; P < .001) achieved significant difference between RCCs and RAMLs.
  • Early wash-out and heterogeneous enhancement or peritumoral rim enhancement yielded the highest diagnostic capability in differentiating RCC from RAML.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The CEUS features of early wash-out, heterogeneous enhancement, and an enhanced peritumoral rim highly suggest RCC, whereas homogeneous enhancement and prolonged enhancement are characteristic manifestations of RAML.
  • Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography is valuable in differentiating RCC from RAML.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiomyolipoma / ultrasonography. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / ultrasonography. Kidney Neoplasms / ultrasonography. Phospholipids. Sulfur Hexafluoride. Ultrasonography / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Computer Systems. Contrast Media. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Reproducibility of Results. Sensitivity and Specificity

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  • (PMID = 20427782.001).
  • [ISSN] 1550-9613
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of ultrasound in medicine : official journal of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Ultrasound Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Contrast Media; 0 / Phospholipids; 0 / contrast agent BR1; WS7LR3I1D6 / Sulfur Hexafluoride
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16. Hsieh CL, Peng CC, Cheng YM, Lin LY, Ker YB, Chang CH, Chen KC, Peng RY: Quercetin and ferulic acid aggravate renal carcinoma in long-term diabetic victims. J Agric Food Chem; 2010 Aug 25;58(16):9273-80
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  • [Title] Quercetin and ferulic acid aggravate renal carcinoma in long-term diabetic victims.
  • It is hypothesized that phytoantioxidants (PAO) are beneficial only to the early-stage diabetes mellitus (DM) and will become ineffective once renopathy occurs.
  • The incidence of cataract (50%), injured glomerules, and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) was very common, among which the most severely affected involved the quercetin- and the FA-treated groups.
  • However, for quercetin, this can be attributted to (i) the prooxidant effect, (ii) the insulin-secretagogue bioactivity, and (iii) the competitive and noncompetitive inhibition on the O-methyltransferase to enhance the estradiol-induced tumorigenesis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Coumaric Acids / adverse effects. Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental / complications. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology. Quercetin / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 20669956.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-5118
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of agricultural and food chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Agric. Food Chem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Coumaric Acids; 5W494URQ81 / Streptozocin; 9IKM0I5T1E / Quercetin; AVM951ZWST / ferulic acid
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17. Srinivas S, Guardino AE: A lower dose of thalidomide is better than a high dose in metastatic renal cell carcinoma. BJU Int; 2005 Sep;96(4):536-9
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  • [Title] A lower dose of thalidomide is better than a high dose in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.
  • OBJECTIVE: To conduct a dose-finding trial using a single low dose and dose escalation of a higher dose of thalidomide in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and to evaluate the antineoplastic effectiveness of thalidomide as an anti-angiogenic agent on RCC.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: The 14 patients enrolled in the study had progressive measurable metastatic RCC and consented to participate.
  • RESULTS: Stable disease was achieved in six patients and was seen in both the low-dose and high-dose thalidomide groups.
  • The low-dose thalidomide regimen was better tolerated and patients survived longer than those on the high-dose regimen (16 vs 6 months, P = 0.04) CONCLUSION: The use of low-dose thalidomide in patients with metastatic RCC was well tolerated and they survived for longer than those on the high-dose regimen.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / administration & dosage. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Thalidomide / administration & dosage

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  • (PMID = 16104906.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-4096
  • [Journal-full-title] BJU international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BJU Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 4Z8R6ORS6L / Thalidomide
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18. Funao K, Matsuyama M, Naganuma T, Kawahito Y, Sano H, Nakatani T, Yoshimura R: The cysteinylLT1 receptor in human renal cell carcinoma. Mol Med Rep; 2008 Mar-Apr;1(2):185-9
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  • [Title] The cysteinylLT1 receptor in human renal cell carcinoma.
  • We investigated LTD4 receptor (cysteinylLT1 receptor, CysLT1R) expression in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), as well as the effect of the CysLT1R antagonist on cell proliferation in the RCC cell line.
  • CysLT1R expression was detected by immunohistochemistry and examined in RCC patients and normal kidney (NK) tissues.
  • The effect of the CysLT1R antagonist on RCC cell growth was examined by MTT assay.
  • Initially, only slight CysLT1R expression was detected in NK tissues, and marked CysLT1R expression in RCC tissues.
  • CysLT1R expression was higher in high-grade than in low-grade cancer.
  • Furthermore, the CysLT1R antagonist caused marked inhibition of RCC cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner through early apoptosis.
  • To conclude, CysLT1R was induced in RCC and the results suggest that the CysLT1R antagonist may mediate the potent anti-proliferative effects of RCC cells.
  • Thus, CysLT1R may become a new target therapy in the treatment of RCC.

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  • (PMID = 21479395.001).
  • [ISSN] 1791-2997
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular medicine reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol Med Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
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19. Rafique M: Nephrectomy: indications, complications and mortality in 154 consecutive patients. J Pak Med Assoc; 2007 Jun;57(6):308-11
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  • OBJECTIVE: To gain information about the indications for and complications of conventional nephrectomy as practiced in a teaching hospital of Pakistan.
  • The indications for nephrectomy were divided into benign and malignant conditions.
  • RESULTS: Out of 154 nephrectomies, 118 (76.6%) were performed for benign condition and 36 (23%) for malignant etiology.
  • 53.3%) of the patients had kidneys removed due to renal stone.
  • Other conditions in this group included chronic pyelonephritis (20%), neglected ureteropelvic junction obstruction (16%), renal tuberculosis (7.6%) and iatrogenic (2.5%).
  • Thirty-six (23%) patients had nephrectomy for malignant conditions i.e. renal cell carcinoma.
  • Malignant tumors were more common in males while benign conditions necessitating nephrectomy were predominant in female patients.
  • Patients with benign conditions were much younger (mean age 32 years) than patients in malignant group (mean age 52.8 years).
  • Nephrectomy for malignant disease had a higher rate of complications (13.8%) than for benign conditions (7.6%).
  • Two patients, one in each group, died post-operatively and the overall 30-day mortality was 1.29% CONCLUSION: The mean age of the patients undergoing nephrectomy for benign and malignant conditions was lower than reported from western countries.
  • Renal stone related etiology was the major indication for nephrectomy.
  • Malignant renal tumours affected patients at a remarkably younger age and clear cell renal carcinoma was the predominant histological variety.
  • Nephrectomy for malignant conditions had a higher rate of complications than for benign conditions while there was no difference in the overall mortality.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Diseases / surgery. Nephrectomy / adverse effects. Nephrectomy / mortality

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  • (PMID = 17629234.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-9982
  • [Journal-full-title] JPMA. The Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Pak Med Assoc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Pakistan
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20. Zhao F, Qu Y, Tang B, Mao M, Mu D: [Telomerase reverse transcriptase expression and cell apoptosis during hypoxia ischemia brain damage in neonatal rats]. Zhongguo Xiu Fu Chong Jian Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2010 May;24(5):588-93
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  • [Title] [Telomerase reverse transcriptase expression and cell apoptosis during hypoxia ischemia brain damage in neonatal rats].
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and cell apoptosis in neonatal rats with hypoxia ischemia brain damage (HIBD).
  • The right common carotid artery (CCA) was exposed and permanently ligated with a 7-0 silk suture through a midline cervical incision.
  • The apoptosis cells were detected with TUNEL staining method.
  • The TUNEL staining showed that the positive cells in hippocampus and cortical areas were increased at 4 hours after HI injury, significantly increased at 24-48 hours and maintained a high level at 72 hours.
  • However, there was few positive cells in the sham-operation group.
  • CONCLUSION: TERT could be induced by HI in neonatal rats, and might have a protective role in regulating the cell apoptosis in the neonatal HIBD.

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  • (PMID = 20540267.001).
  • [ISSN] 1002-1892
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhongguo xiu fu chong jian wai ke za zhi = Zhongguo xiufu chongjian waike zazhi = Chinese journal of reparative and reconstructive surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhongguo Xiu Fu Chong Jian Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 2.7.7.49 / Telomerase
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21. Renaud J, Yartsev S, Dar AR, Van Dyk J: Successful treatment of primary renal lymphoma using image guided helical tomotherapy. Can J Urol; 2009 Jun;16(3):4639-47
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  • [Title] Successful treatment of primary renal lymphoma using image guided helical tomotherapy.
  • PURPOSE: To describe a clinical pilot case of renal lymphoma successfully treated using helical tomotherapy, and to evaluate alternative hypofractionated treatment schedules and their potential applicability to future cases of renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: An 82-year-old female patient with a large right perinephric mass encircling the lower pole of the right kidney was treated on the Hi-ART unit (TomoTherapy Inc.
  • Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were outlined on every MVCT study.
  • Six alternative treatment schedules were investigated: 48 Gy in 4 and 3 fractions, and 60 Gy in 30, 5, 4 and 3 fractions, as possible clinical scenarios for RCC.
  • Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and tumor control probability (TCP) values were estimated for each scenario in the study.
  • NTCP and TCP estimates have shown that hypofractionated treatment schedules provide a much higher probability of local control, but the risk of tissue complication rises simultaneously.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Caution should be observed in high dose hypofractionated radiotherapy in right sided, whole kidney carcinoma due to increased risk of liver complication.
  • The accelerated treatment may however be justified by the significantly higher TCP rates for left sided kidney cases.
  • Further investigation of small renal tumors is needed to evaluate control rates, vasculopathy, and residual normal function.
  • [MeSH-major] Kidney Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Lymphoma / radiotherapy. Tomography, Spiral Computed

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  • (PMID = 19497170.001).
  • [ISSN] 1195-9479
  • [Journal-full-title] The Canadian journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Can J Urol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Canada
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22. Nishizawa M, Hirayama F, Matsuyama N, Tada K, Kaneko H, Watanabe M, Miura Y, Tsudo M: [Transfusion-related acute lung injury with anti-leukocyte antibodies identified both in patient's serum and in red cell concentrate]. Rinsho Ketsueki; 2009 Jan;50(1):16-22
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  • [Title] [Transfusion-related acute lung injury with anti-leukocyte antibodies identified both in patient's serum and in red cell concentrate].
  • We report a fatal case of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) with anti-leukocyte antibodies detected both in the patient's serum and in the causative red cell concentrate (RC-M.A.P).

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  • (PMID = 19225224.001).
  • [ISSN] 0485-1439
  • [Journal-full-title] [Rinshō ketsueki] The Japanese journal of clinical hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rinsho Ketsueki
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Autoantibodies; 0 / HLA Antigens
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23. Nogueira M, Kim HL: Molecular markers for predicting prognosis of renal cell carcinoma. Urol Oncol; 2008 Mar-Apr;26(2):113-24
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  • [Title] Molecular markers for predicting prognosis of renal cell carcinoma.
  • Metastatic or recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) carries a poor prognosis and long term survival is rare.
  • However, many small RCCs that are incidentally discovered have an indolent course even without treatment.
  • The variability in clinical outcome is a reflection of the underlying tumor biology.
  • Currently, clinical variables such as tumor stage and histologic grade are widely accepted surrogates for tumor-specific cellular and molecular processes.
  • We review expression array studies evaluating molecular signatures for predicting prognosis in patients with RCC and describe specific prognostic markers that have been validated in at least 50 cases of RCC.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / diagnosis. Kidney Neoplasms / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 18312928.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-1439
  • [Journal-full-title] Urologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Urol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 184
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24. Sáenz López P, Vázquez Alonso F, Romero JM, Carretero R, Tallada Buñuel M, Ruiz Cabello F, Cózar Olmo JM: [Polymorphisms in inflammatory response genes in metastatic renal cancer]. Actas Urol Esp; 2009 May;33(5):474-81
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  • [Title] [Polymorphisms in inflammatory response genes in metastatic renal cancer].
  • [Transliterated title] Polimorfimos en genes de respuesta inflamatoria en cáncer renal metastásico.
  • Inflammation has been implicated as an etiological factor in different human cancers.
  • Allelic variations in the genes implicated in inflammation are candidates as genetic determinants or markers of renal carcinoma risk.
  • The present stud investigates whether polymorphisms of the genes that give rise to increases in the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines are associated with an increased risk of renal carcinoma.
  • To this effect, a number of case-control studies were designed to assess the correlation between renal carcinoma and polymorphisms IL10-1082 A/G (rs 1800896), IL10-592 A/C (rs 1800872), IL10-819 C/T (rs 1800871), IL10-1082 A/G, IL4-590 C/T (rs 2243250), TNF-A-308 A/G (rs 1800629), RANTES-403 G/A (rs 2107538), IL1-A-889 C/T (rs 1800587), MCP-1 2518 G/A (rs 1024611), CTLA-4/+49 A/G (rs 231775) and CTLA-4 CT60 A/G (rs 3087243) in 127 renal carcinoma patients and in 176 healthy subjects.
  • The results obtained in relation to cytokine polymorphism IL-10-1082 A/G indicate that AG heterozygosity status is the principal risk factor in relation to locally advanced or metastatic tumor stage and renal carcinoma.
  • In the case of the molecule CTLA4, the results obtained in renal cancer reveal an association between the polymorphisms of the CTLA-4 gene and an increased risk of developing renal cell carcinoma.
  • A high genotypic frequency of polymorphisms CTLA4/CT60-AA and CTLA4/A49G-AA is observed in patients with renal cell carcinoma versus the controls.
  • An association has been established between polymorphism CTLA4/CT60 and tumor grade in patients with renal cell carcinoma.
  • Logistic regression analysis has confirmed these data, demonstrating a high frequency of the AA genotype in patients with high-grade tumors.
  • The results obtained support the hypothesis that different genetic factors implicated in the regulation of adaptive immune responses, stromal cell composition and local cytokine production levels may be crucial elements in the modification of the clinicopathological parameters of renal carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / genetics. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / immunology. Kidney Neoplasms / genetics. Kidney Neoplasms / immunology. Polymorphism, Genetic
  • [MeSH-minor] Case-Control Studies. Chemokines / genetics. Cytokines / genetics. Humans. Inflammation / genetics. Interleukin-10 / genetics. Neoplasm Metastasis / genetics

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  • (PMID = 19658300.001).
  • [ISSN] 0210-4806
  • [Journal-full-title] Actas urologicas españolas
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Actas Urol Esp
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Chemokines; 0 / Cytokines; 130068-27-8 / Interleukin-10
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25. Zada G, Ditty B, McNatt SA, McComb JG, Krieger MD: Surgical treatment of rathke cleft cysts in children. Neurosurgery; 2009 Jun;64(6):1132-7; author reply 1037-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVE: Rathke cleft cysts (RCCs) are cystic epithelial lesions in the sellar and suprasellar regions that are often discovered incidentally.
  • Our aim was to review our experience with pediatric patients treated surgically for RCCs.
  • METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted of all patients treated surgically for RCCs at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles between 1999 and 2007 after approval by the institutional review board.
  • Clinical notes, operative reports, radiological studies, and pathology reports were reviewed.
  • RESULTS: Ten patients undergoing surgical treatment of an RCC were identified, making up 20% of the 51 patients with RCCs followed clinically over the same time period.
  • Patients requiring surgery presented with the following clinical symptoms: headache (8 patients, 80%), endocrine insufficiency (6 patients, 60%), meningitis followed by visual loss (1 patient, 10%), and incidental finding (1 patient, 10%).
  • Four patients had strictly sellar lesions, 4 patients had suprasellar extension of an RCC, and 2 patients had primarily suprasellar RCCs.
  • CONCLUSION: RCCs are an infrequent cause of symptoms in pediatric patients.
  • Fenestration and aspiration of the cyst are usually sufficient to achieve total resolution of symptoms and signs caused by RCCs.
  • Patient selection remains of paramount importance when considering surgery for pediatric patients with RCCs.
  • [MeSH-major] Central Nervous System Cysts / surgery. Craniotomy / methods. Microsurgery / methods

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  • (PMID = 19487893.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4040
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurgery
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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26. Ficarra V, Novara G, Iafrate M, Cappellaro L, Bratti E, Zattoni F, Artibani W: Proposal for reclassification of the TNM staging system in patients with locally advanced (pT3-4) renal cell carcinoma according to the cancer-related outcome. Eur Urol; 2007 Mar;51(3):722-9; discussion 729-31
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  • [Title] Proposal for reclassification of the TNM staging system in patients with locally advanced (pT3-4) renal cell carcinoma according to the cancer-related outcome.
  • OBJECTIVES: The optimal stratification of locally advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is controversial, with the prognostic relevance of ipsilateral adrenal gland invasion and cranial extension of vena cava thrombosis being the most debatable issues.
  • We evaluated the prognosis of patients with locally advanced RCC and identified a new model to stratify their outcome.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed the data of 227 patients who had undergone partial or radical nephrectomy for pT3-4 RCC at two academic centers between 1986 and 2002.
  • RESULTS: At a median follow-up of 29 mo, we censored 108 (47.6%) cancer-related deaths.
  • On univariate analysis, the 2002 T stage was not statistically significant.
  • According to cancer-related outcome, we identified three subgroups of patients with different prognoses: pT3a(n): tumors with perirenal fat invasion or renal vein thrombosis or thrombosis within the vena cava below the diaphragm; pT3b(n): tumors with renal vein thrombosis or thrombosis within the vena cava below the diaphragm and concomitant perirenal fat invasion; pT4(n): adrenal gland or Gerota fascia invasion or thrombosis within the vena cava above the diaphragm.
  • The new reclassification was an independent predictive variable on multivariate analysis, as well as the pathologic lymph node stage.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The 2002 version of TNM of locally advanced RCC did not stratify patient outcome.
  • The present study suggests the possibility of reclassifying pT3-4 RCC into three categories capable of predicting cancer-specific survival, regardless of all other prognostic factors.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / classification. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / classification. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology


27. Transperitoneal laparoscopic right radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma and end-stage renal disease: a case report. Cases J; 2009 Nov 18;2:200
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  • [Title] Transperitoneal laparoscopic right radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma and end-stage renal disease: a case report.
  • Nephron-sparing surgery (partial nephrectomy) results are similar to those of radical nephrectomy for small (<4 cm) renal tumors.
  • However, in patients with end-stage renal disease, radical nephrectomy emerges as a more efficient treatment for localized renal cell cancer.
  • The objective of the present study was to present a case of a patient under hemodialysis who was submitted to LRN for a small renal mass and discuss the current issues concerning this approach.
  • It appears that radical nephrectomy should be the standard treatment in dialysis patients even for small tumors.
  • The laparoscopic technique is associated with acceptable cancer-specific survival and recurrence rate along with shorter hospital stay, less postoperative pain and earlier return to normal activities.

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  • [Cites] J Urol. 2000 Feb;163(2):437-41 [10647649.001]
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  • (PMID = 20062705.001).
  • [ISSN] 1757-1626
  • [Journal-full-title] Cases journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cases J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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28. Fujibayashi S, Neo M, Nakamura T: Palliative dual iliac screw fixation for lumbosacral metastasis. Technical note. J Neurosurg Spine; 2007 Jul;7(1):99-102
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  • The authors describe their surgical technique for secure iliac screw placement and the clinical results obtained in five patients with metastatic spinal disease.
  • All patients in this study underwent palliative operations with dual iliac screw fixation between April 1999 and October 2002, and the clinical and radiological findings were assessed.
  • The metastases were from renal cell carcinomas in two patients, lung cancer in two, and a paraganglioma in one patient.

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  • (PMID = 17633497.001).
  • [ISSN] 1547-5654
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery. Spine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Neurosurg Spine
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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29. Liang S, Gong F, Zhao X, Wang X, Shen G, Xu Y, Yang H, Ruan X, Wei Y: Prokaryotic expression, purification of a new tumor-relative protein FAM92A1-289 and its characterization in renal cell carcinoma. Cancer Lett; 2009 Apr 8;276(1):81-7
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  • [Title] Prokaryotic expression, purification of a new tumor-relative protein FAM92A1-289 and its characterization in renal cell carcinoma.
  • In order to study the characterization of a new tumor-relative FAM92A1-289 protein, we first constructed plasmid FAM92A1-pQE30 for fusion expression in Escherichia coli.
  • Furthermore, the expression and cell localization of FAM92A1-289 by immunohistochemistry using our self-prepared polyclonal antibody showed it was expressed in cytoplasm of renal carcinoma.
  • FAM92A1-289 mRNA was expressed in 2 of 10 kidney tissues and in 6 of 12 primary renal tumors.
  • FAM92A1-289 can promote cell growth in vitro and in vivo by colony formation and mouse xenograft assay.
  • Our present data indicated FAM92A1-289 is a new tumor-related gene with oncogenic potentials to probably play roles in renal carcinogenesis.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / genetics. Gene Expression. Kidney Neoplasms / genetics. Proteins / genetics. Proteins / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19059705.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-7980
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / FAM92A1 protein, human; 0 / Proteins; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Recombinant Fusion Proteins
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30. Kabutan K, Taniguchi M: [Anesthetic management of radical nephrectomy using cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with vena caval or atrial extension of renal cell carcinoma]. Masui; 2005 Aug;54(8):881-3
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  • [Title] [Anesthetic management of radical nephrectomy using cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with vena caval or atrial extension of renal cell carcinoma].
  • We experienced three cases of anesthesia for radical nephrectomy using cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with vena caval or atrial extension of renal cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Cardiopulmonary Bypass. Heart Neoplasms / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Nephrectomy / methods. Vascular Neoplasms / pathology. Venae Cavae
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Fatal Outcome. Heart Atria. Humans. Intraoperative Complications / prevention & control. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16104541.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-4892
  • [Journal-full-title] Masui. The Japanese journal of anesthesiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Masui
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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81. Hasegawa Y, Mita K, Matsubara A, Ohdan H: Multidisciplinary treatment including sorafenib stabilized the bone metastases of renal cell carcinoma in an immunosuppressed renal transplant recipient. Int J Clin Oncol; 2009 Oct;14(5):465-7
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  • [Title] Multidisciplinary treatment including sorafenib stabilized the bone metastases of renal cell carcinoma in an immunosuppressed renal transplant recipient.
  • We report a case of metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the native kidney of a renal transplant recipient.
  • The patient was a 57-year-old man in whom a tumor in the native kidney and bone metastasis were found incidentally on imaging, 10 years after cadaveric renal transplantation.
  • Subsequent administration of zoledronic acid and sorafenib stabilized the disease for 18 months after nephrectomy.
  • This is the first reported case of sorafenib administration to a renal transplant recipient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bone Neoplasms / drug therapy. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Kidney Neoplasms / therapy. Kidney Transplantation

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  • (PMID = 19856059.001).
  • [ISSN] 1437-7772
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of clinical oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Benzenesulfonates; 0 / Bone Density Conservation Agents; 0 / Diphosphonates; 0 / Imidazoles; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Interferon-alpha; 0 / Phenylurea Compounds; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Pyridines; 25X51I8RD4 / Niacinamide; 6XC1PAD3KF / zoledronic acid; 9ZOQ3TZI87 / sorafenib
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82. Ogiso S, Maeno A, Nagahama K, Nakamura K, Okuno H: [Small intestinal metastases from renal cell carcinoma: a case report and literature review]. Hinyokika Kiyo; 2005 Jan;51(1):13-6
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  • [Title] [Small intestinal metastases from renal cell carcinoma: a case report and literature review].
  • We report a case of small intestinal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in a 57-year-old female.
  • The patient had undergone partial nephrectomy for a right RCC (pT1aN0M0) in June 1997.
  • We removed the mass surgically, and the histological features confirmed the diagnosis as metastatic RCC.
  • Metastasis of RCC in the small bowel is a rare entity clinically.
  • To our knowledge, this is only the 20th case of small intestinal metastasis from RCC reported in the Japanese and English literature.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Ileal Neoplasms / secondary. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 15732334.001).
  • [ISSN] 0018-1994
  • [Journal-full-title] Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hinyokika Kiyo
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Number-of-references] 21
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83. Berger A, Brandina R, Atalla MA, Herati AS, Kamoi K, Aron M, Haber GP, Stein RJ, Desai MM, Kavoussi LR, Gill IS: Laparoscopic radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma: oncological outcomes at 10 years or more. J Urol; 2009 Nov;182(5):2172-6
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  • [Title] Laparoscopic radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma: oncological outcomes at 10 years or more.
  • PURPOSE: We present oncological outcomes at a followup of 10 years or greater after laparoscopic radical nephrectomy for cancer.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between February 1994 and March 1999 a total of 73 laparoscopic radical nephrectomies were performed by 2 surgeons for pathologically confirmed renal cell carcinoma.
  • Mean tumor size on computerized tomography was 5 cm (range 1.7 to 13).
  • Pathological stage was pT1a in 41% of cases, pT1b in 30%, pT2 in 15%, pT3a in 10%, pT3b in 3% and pT4 in 1%.
  • High grade tumors (Fuhrman 3 or greater) were present in 18 cases (28%).
  • Actual 10-year overall, cancer specific and recurrence-free survival rates were 65%, 92% and 86%, respectively.
  • Overall, cancer specific and recurrence-free survival rates at 12 years were 35%, 78% and 77%, respectively.
  • At a mean of 67 months 10 patients (14%) had metastatic disease, of whom 8 (11%) died.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Long-term oncological outcomes after laparoscopic radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma are excellent and appear comparable to those of open surgery.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Laparoscopy. Nephrectomy / methods

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  • [CommentIn] J Urol. 2009 Nov;182(5):2176 [19758630.001]
  • (PMID = 19758651.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-3792
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of urology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Urol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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84. Chen YJ, Liao HF, Tsai TH, Wang SY, Shiao MS: Caffeic acid phenethyl ester preferentially sensitizes CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma to ionizing radiation without affecting bone marrow radioresponse. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2005 Nov 15;63(4):1252-61
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  • [Title] Caffeic acid phenethyl ester preferentially sensitizes CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma to ionizing radiation without affecting bone marrow radioresponse.
  • METHODS AND MATERIALS: The effects of CAPE on GSH level, GSH metabolism enzyme activities, NF-kappaB activity, and radiosensitivity in mouse CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells were determined.
  • BALB/c mouse with CT26 cells implantation was used as a syngeneic in vivo model for evaluation of treatment and toxicity end points.
  • RESULTS: CAPE entered CT26 cells rapidly and depleted intracellular GSH in CT26 cells, but not in bone marrow cells.
  • Pretreatment with nontoxic doses of CAPE significantly enhanced cell killing by ionizing radiation (IR) with sensitizer enhancement ratios up to 2.2.
  • Pretreatment of CT26 cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine reversed the GSH depletion activity and partially blocked the radiosensitizing effect of CAPE.
  • CAPE treatment in CT26 cells increased glutathione peroxidase, decreased glutathione reductase, and did not affect glutathione S-transferase or gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity.
  • In vivo study revealed that pretreatment with CAPE before IR resulted in greater inhibition of tumor growth and prolongation of survival in comparison with IR alone.
  • Pretreatment with CAPE neither affected body weights nor produced hepatic, renal, or hematopoietic toxicity.
  • CONCLUSIONS: CAPE sensitizes CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma to IR, which may be via depleting GSH and inhibiting NF-kappaB activity, without toxicity to bone marrow, liver, and kidney.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / radiotherapy. Bone Marrow / radiation effects. Caffeic Acids / pharmacology. Colorectal Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Phenylethyl Alcohol / analogs & derivatives. Radiation-Sensitizing Agents / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Cycle / drug effects. DNA Repair / drug effects. Drug Evaluation, Preclinical / methods. Glutathione / metabolism. Glutathione Peroxidase / metabolism. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. NF-kappa B / metabolism. gamma-Glutamyltransferase / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 16253780.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Caffeic Acids; 0 / NF-kappa B; 0 / Radiation-Sensitizing Agents; EC 1.11.1.9 / Glutathione Peroxidase; EC 2.3.2.2 / gamma-Glutamyltransferase; G960R9S5SK / caffeic acid phenethyl ester; GAN16C9B8O / Glutathione; ML9LGA7468 / Phenylethyl Alcohol
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85. Ingold B, Wild PJ, Nocito A, Amin MB, Storz M, Heppner FL, Moch H: Renal cell carcinoma marker reliably discriminates central nervous system haemangioblastoma from brain metastases of renal cell carcinoma. Histopathology; 2008 May;52(6):674-81
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  • [Title] Renal cell carcinoma marker reliably discriminates central nervous system haemangioblastoma from brain metastases of renal cell carcinoma.
  • AIMS: The distinction between central nervous system (CNS) metastases of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and CNS haemangioblastoma still poses a challenge to the pathologist.
  • Since both entities occur in von Hippel-Lindau disease, this aggravates the issue.
  • The antibody renal cell carcinoma marker (RCC-ma) has been suggested to identify primary RCCs specifically, but its value for diagnosing metastases of RCC is controversial.
  • The aim was to assess two distinct clones of the RCC-ma for their potential to: (i) identify primary RCCs and (ii) differentiate between CNS metastases of clear cell RCC and CNS haemangioblastomas.
  • METHODS AND RESULTS: Using tissue microarrays, 77% (n = 363; PN-15) and 66% (n = 355; 66.4C2) of clear cell RCCs, and 93% (PN-15) and 74% (66.4C2) of papillary RCCs (n = 46) were immunopositive for RCC-ma, whereas none of the investigated chromophobe RCCs (n = 22) or any of the oncocytomas (n = 15) showed immunoreactivity.
  • Importantly, 50.9% of CNS metastases of clear cell RCCs (n = 55) exhibited RCC-ma expression, whereas all CNS haemangioblastomas (71) were negative.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Both RCC-ma clones, despite some variation in their sensitivity to detect clear cell and papillary RCCs, are of value in differentiating subtypes of primary RCC and are excellent markers for discriminating clear cell lesions in the brain.
  • [MeSH-major] Antibodies, Monoclonal. Brain Neoplasms / diagnosis. Brain Neoplasms / secondary. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / secondary. Hemangioblastoma / diagnosis. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers, Tumor / metabolism. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / pathology. Humans. Neprilysin / immunology. Tissue Array Analysis

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  • (PMID = 18393979.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2559
  • [Journal-full-title] Histopathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Histopathology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; EC 3.4.24.11 / Neprilysin
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86. Pahernik S, Cudovic D, Roos F, Melchior SW, Thüroff JW: Bilateral synchronous sporadic renal cell carcinoma: surgical management, oncological and functional outcomes. BJU Int; 2007 Jul;100(1):26-9
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  • [Title] Bilateral synchronous sporadic renal cell carcinoma: surgical management, oncological and functional outcomes.
  • OBJECTIVE: To analyse the functional and oncological outcomes of surgical treatment of bilateral synchronous sporadic renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between 1969 and 2006, 57 patients with bilateral synchronous sporadic RCC were identified from our kidney database.
  • The mean (range) follow-up was 4.8 (0.1-23.8) years; 28 patients (49%) had radical nephrectomy (RN) and contralateral nephron-sparing surgery (NSS), and 22 (39%) had bilateral NSS.
  • The oncological outcome and long-term renal function were analysed.
  • RESULTS: After excluding four patients (7%) with bilateral benign renal tumours, six (11%) with metastatic bilateral RCC and three (5%) who had bilateral RN, the cancer-specific outcome was analysed.
  • For 44 patients with bilateral RCC who had surgery with intent to cure and avoid dialysis, 13 (30%) had stage pT1a, 10 (23%) pT1b, nine (17%) pT2 and 12 (27%) pT3 disease.
  • At 5 and 10 years, the cancer-specific survival rates were 86% and 75%, and the local recurrence-free survival rates were 87% and 80%.
  • The median serum creatinine level at the latest follow-up was 1.18 mg/dL in patients after bilateral NSS and 1.40 mg/dL after unilateral NSS and contralateral RN (P < 0.05).
  • CONCLUSIONS: These long-term data support the concept that NSS, whenever possible bilateral, is the treatment of choice for bilateral synchronous sporadic RCC.
  • NSS provides adequate local tumour control and cancer-specific survival.
  • Preservation of renal function is more efficient with bilateral NSS than with unilateral NSS and contralateral RN.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / surgery. Nephrectomy / methods

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  • (PMID = 17552949.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-4096
  • [Journal-full-title] BJU international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BJU Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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87. Feun L, You M, Wu CJ, Kuo MT, Wangpaichitr M, Spector S, Savaraj N: Arginine deprivation as a targeted therapy for cancer. Curr Pharm Des; 2008;14(11):1049-57
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  • [Title] Arginine deprivation as a targeted therapy for cancer.
  • Certain cancers may be auxotrophic for a particular amino acid, and amino acid deprivation is one method to treat these tumors.
  • Arginine deprivation is a novel approach to target tumors which lack argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) expression.
  • Tumors which usually do not express ASS include melanoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, some mesotheliomas and some renal cell cancers.
  • Citrulline can be recycled back to arginine in normal cells which express ASS, whereas ASS(-) tumor cells cannot.
  • A pegylated form of ADI (ADI-PEG20) has been formulated and has shown in vitro and in vivo activity against melanoma and hepatocellular carcinoma.
  • ADI-PEG20 induces apoptosis in melanoma cell lines.
  • However, arginine deprivation can also induce ASS expression in certain melanoma cell lines which can lead to in vitro drug resistance.
  • Phase I and II clinical trials with ADI-PEG20 have been conducted in patients with melanoma and hepatocellular carcinoma, and antitumor activity has been demonstrated in both cancers.

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  • (PMID = 18473854.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-4286
  • [Journal-full-title] Current pharmaceutical design
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Pharm. Des.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA109578-02; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01CA109578; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA109578-03; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA109578; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA109578-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA109578-02; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA109578-01; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA109578-03
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 30IQX730WE / Polyethylene Glycols; 94ZLA3W45F / Arginine; EC 3.- / Hydrolases; EC 3.5.3.6 / ADI PEG20; EC 6.3.4.5 / Argininosuccinate Synthase
  • [Number-of-references] 75
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS287629; NLM/ PMC3096551
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88. Zanelli M, Cortecchia S, Righi E, Caprara L, De Lillo M, Costa F, Galanti G, Bondi A: Epithelioid angiomyolipoma of the kidney: case report. Pathologica; 2008 Jun;100(3):202-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Epithelioid angiomyolipoma of the kidney: case report.
  • Renal angiomyolipoma is a benign tumour histologically characterized by a mixture of adipose tissue, smooth muscle cells and thick walled blood vessels.
  • Long-believed to be a benign hamartoma, angiomyolipoma is now considered to arise from perivascular epithelioid cells.
  • Epithelioid angiomyolipoma is a rare type of angiomyolipoma, composed partially or completely of epithelioid cells, with a potentially aggressive behaviour.
  • Histologically it can mimic renal cell carcinoma.
  • Positivity for HMB45, Melan A, CD68 and CD117 are useful for diagnosis.
  • Herein, we report the clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical features of a renal tumour composed of large epithelioid mononucleated or multinucleated cells with abundant acidophilic cytoplasm and prominent nucleoli.
  • Despite the morphologic resemblance of this tumour to renal cell carcinoma, its phenotype (HMB45, Melan A and CD68 positivity and keratin negativity) parallels the phenotypic profile of angiomyolipoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiomyolipoma / pathology. Kidney Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 18841830.001).
  • [ISSN] 0031-2983
  • [Journal-full-title] Pathologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathologica
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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89. Cánovas D, Martínez JM, Viguera M, Ribera G: [Association of renal carcinoma with neuromyotonia and involvement of inferior motor neuron]. Neurologia; 2007 Jul-Aug;22(6):399-400
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  • [Title] [Association of renal carcinoma with neuromyotonia and involvement of inferior motor neuron].
  • [Transliterated title] Asociación de carcinoma renal con neuromiotonía y afectación de neurona motora inferior.
  • It has been considered a paraneoplastic syndrome in patients with neoplasms of the immune system, mainly lymphomas.
  • We report a rare case, given the presence of two uncommon paraneoplastic manifestations such as neuromyotonia and reversible paraneoplastic lower motor neuronopathy secondary to clear cell renal carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / complications. Isaacs Syndrome / etiology. Kidney Neoplasms / complications. Motor Neuron Disease / etiology. Paraneoplastic Syndromes / etiology

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  • (PMID = 17610170.001).
  • [ISSN] 0213-4853
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurología (Barcelona, Spain)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurologia
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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90. Kölbel T, Rostock T, Larena-Avellaneda A, Treede H, Franzen O, Debus ES: An externalized transseptal guidewire technique to facilitate guidewire stabilization and stent-graft passage in the aortic arch. J Endovasc Ther; 2010 Dec;17(6):744-9
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  • TECHNIQUE: The technique of a transseptal through-and-through guidewire is demonstrated in a patient with a ruptured thoracic aneurysm with severe tortuosity of the aorta and a right-sided, severely angulated aortic arch.
  • The transseptal through-and-through guidewire stabilization technique allowed successful passage and deployment of a thoracic stent-graft after debranching of the right common carotid and subclavian arteries.
  • CONCLUSION: An externalized transseptal guidewire can facilitate endograft passage in tortuous aortic anatomies and optimize control in most severely angulated aortic arches.

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  • [CommentIn] J Endovasc Ther. 2010 Dec;17(6):750 [21142484.001]
  • (PMID = 21142483.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-1550
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of endovascular therapy : an official journal of the International Society of Endovascular Specialists
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Endovasc. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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91. Maeda K, Yasaka M, Wakugawa Y, Ogata T, Okada Y: [A case of brain infarction and thoracic aortic dissection without chest nor back pain diagnosed by carotid duplex ultrasonography]. Rinsho Shinkeigaku; 2009 Feb-Mar;49(2-3):104-8
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  • [Title] [A case of brain infarction and thoracic aortic dissection without chest nor back pain diagnosed by carotid duplex ultrasonography].
  • Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed multiple acute brain infarction of the right middle cerebral artery territory.
  • Carotid duplex ultrasonography demonstrated a subintimal dissection with a false channel of the right common carotid artery (CCA) and the right internal carotid artery (ICA).
  • Cervical CT scan showed a dissection with a false channel of the right CCA.
  • Thus our patient showed thoracic aortic dissection with extension of the dissection toward the right internal carotid artery.
  • So we emphasize the necessity of carotid duplex ultrasonography examination before intravenous administration of rt-PA in the treatment of the cerebral infarction, regardless of having chest pain, back pain, neck pain or not.
  • [MeSH-major] Aneurysm, Dissecting / diagnosis. Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic / diagnosis. Carotid Arteries / ultrasonography. Cerebral Infarction / diagnosis. Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex

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  • (PMID = 19348175.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-918X
  • [Journal-full-title] Rinshō shinkeigaku = Clinical neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rinsho Shinkeigaku
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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92. Haas NB, Uzzo RG: Tyrosine kinase inhibitors and anti-angiogenic therapies in kidney cancer. Curr Treat Options Oncol; 2007 Jun;8(3):211-26
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  • [Title] Tyrosine kinase inhibitors and anti-angiogenic therapies in kidney cancer.
  • Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a heterogeneous disease as reflected in its presentation and clinical course, pathological subtypes, nuclear grades and molecular biology.
  • Emerging data indicate that renal tumors express a variety of molecular tumor markers and unique patterns of gene expression.
  • Clinically the disease behaves quite heterogeneously, with courses ranging from indolent to highly aggressive.
  • Surgical monotherapy or as part of a multimodal approach remains the standard of care for most cases of RCC.
  • Radical or partial nephrectomy is associated with a 5-year cancer specific survival (CSS) of 85-97% for pT1 tumors.
  • Unfortunately, 20% of patients have either locally advanced or node positive (N+) RCC while another 22% have metastatic RCC (mRCC) at presentation.
  • Unlike the outcomes in early localized disease, survival rates for N+ patients are poor and patients with mRCC are rarely cured despite aggressive multimodal therapy.
  • Recent advances in our understanding of the molecular origins and pathways of RCC have led to the development of more effective targeted therapies.
  • Here we review the molecular pathways that define the pertinent therapeutic targets in RCC and the clinical data for these new and promising agents.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / drug therapy. Kidney Neoplasms / drug therapy. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors

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  • (PMID = 17712534.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-2729
  • [Journal-full-title] Current treatment options in oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Treat Options Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; EC 2.7.10.1 / Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
  • [Number-of-references] 68
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93. Wethkamp N, Ramp U, Geddert H, Schulz WA, Florl AR, Suschek CV, Hassan M, Gabbert HE, Mahotka C: Expression of death-associated protein kinase during tumour progression of human renal cell carcinomas: hypermethylation-independent mechanisms of inactivation. Eur J Cancer; 2006 Jan;42(2):264-74
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  • [Title] Expression of death-associated protein kinase during tumour progression of human renal cell carcinomas: hypermethylation-independent mechanisms of inactivation.
  • Death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) is a pro-apoptotic Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent serine/threonine kinase that is widely expressed in tissues but kept silent in growing cells.
  • Downregulation of DAPK transcription by CpG methylation has been demonstrated in a variety of tumours, providing a selective growth advantage during tumour progression.
  • As the in vivo expression of DAPK in human renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) has not previously been analysed, 72 RCCs were investigated using semi-quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).
  • We found that almost 92% (66/72) of all primary RCCs express DAPK mRNA and results obtained from methylation-specific PCR analyses suggest that aberrant CpG methylation of the DAPK promoter is absent even in DAPK non-expressing tumours.
  • Comparison of early/intermediate with advanced tumour stages of clear cell RCCs showed that no significant changes in the expression levels of DAPK were evident.
  • Chromophilic/papillary RCCs display no significantly different expression patterns of DAPK compared with stage-adjusted clear cell RCCs.
  • Furthermore, on analysing the DAPK enzyme activity in RCC cell lines with DAPK mRNA and protein expression, only 1 out of 11 cell lines showed basal DAPK activity in kinase activity assays, suggesting that DAPK, although expressed in RCC, remains largely inactive.
  • Our study demonstrates the in vivo expression of DAPK in RCCs and reveals that, in contrast to other tumour types, RCCs may not downregulate DAPK mRNA expression during tumour progression.
  • Despite persistent DAPK transcription and translation, however, the markedly reduced DAPK enzyme activity in our RCC cell lines suggested a post-translational inactivation of DAPK in RCCs.
  • [MeSH-major] Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases / metabolism. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / metabolism. Kidney Neoplasms / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins. Cell Line, Tumor. DNA Methylation. Death-Associated Protein Kinases. Disease Progression. Humans. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. RNA, Neoplasm / metabolism. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction / methods. Tumor Cells, Cultured

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  • (PMID = 16386893.001).
  • [ISSN] 0959-8049
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / RNA, Neoplasm; EC 2.7.11.1 / Death-Associated Protein Kinases; EC 2.7.11.17 / Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases
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94. Liu H, Brannon AR, Reddy AR, Alexe G, Seiler MW, Arreola A, Oza JH, Yao M, Juan D, Liou LS, Ganesan S, Levine AJ, Rathmell WK, Bhanot GV: Identifying mRNA targets of microRNA dysregulated in cancer: with application to clear cell Renal Cell Carcinoma. BMC Syst Biol; 2010;4:51
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  • [Title] Identifying mRNA targets of microRNA dysregulated in cancer: with application to clear cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.
  • RESULTS: We describe a simple method to identify direct mRNA targets of microRNA dysregulated in cancers from expression level measurements in patient matched tumor/normal samples.
  • The word "direct" is used here in a strict sense to: a) represent mRNA which have an exact seed sequence match to the microRNA in their 3'UTR, b) the seed sequence match is strictly conserved across mouse, human, rat and dog genomes, c) the mRNA and microRNA expression levels can distinguish tumor from normal with high significance and d) the microRNA/mRNA expression levels are strongly and significantly anti-correlated in tumor and/or normal samples.
  • We apply and validate the method using clear cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (ccRCC) and matched normal kidney samples, limiting our analysis to mRNA targets which undergo degradation of the mRNA transcript because of a perfect seed sequence match.
  • Dysregulated microRNA and mRNA are first identified by comparing their expression levels in tumor vs normal samples.
  • These are further pruned by requiring a strong anti-correlation signature in tumor and/or normal samples.
  • The method revealed many new regulations in ccRCC.
  • For instance, loss of miR-149, miR-200c and mir-141 causes gain of function of oncogenes (KCNMA1, LOX), VEGFA and SEMA6A respectively and increased levels of miR-142-3p, miR-185, mir-34a, miR-224, miR-21 cause loss of function of tumor suppressors LRRC2, PTPN13, SFRP1, ERBB4, and (SLC12A1, TCF21) respectively.
  • Several identified microRNA/mRNA pairs were validated on an independent set of matched ccRCC/normal samples.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We describe a simple and reliable method to identify direct gene targets of microRNA in any cancer.
  • The constraints we impose (strong dysregulation signature for microRNA and mRNA levels between tumor/normal samples, evolutionary conservation of seed sequence and strong anti-correlation of expression levels) remove spurious matches and identify a subset of robust, tissue specific, functional mRNA targets of dysregulated microRNA.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / metabolism. Gene Expression Profiling. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Kidney Neoplasms / metabolism. RNA, Messenger / metabolism


95. Dahele M, Skinner M, Schultz B, Cardoso M, Bell C, Ung YC: Adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric cancer: A dosimetric comparison of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, tomotherapy and conventional intensity modulated radiotherapy treatment plans. Med Dosim; 2010;35(2):115-21
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  • [Title] Adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric cancer: A dosimetric comparison of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, tomotherapy and conventional intensity modulated radiotherapy treatment plans.
  • Some patients with gastric cancer benefit from post-operative chemo-radiotherapy, but adequately irradiating the planning target volume (PTV) whilst avoiding organs at risk (OAR) can be difficult.
  • We evaluate 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT), conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (TT).
  • The volume of left/right kidney receiving at least 20Gy (V20) was 57/51% and 51/60% for 2 and 5F-CRT, and 28/14% for TT and 27/19% for IMRT.
  • Using conventional metrics, conventional IMRT can achieve comparable PTV coverage and OAR sparing to TT, but at the expense of PTV dose heterogeneity.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / radiotherapy. Radiotherapy Planning, Computer-Assisted. Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated. Stomach Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Radiometry. Radiotherapy Dosage. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Burden

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  • [Copyright] 2010 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 19931023.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-4022
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical dosimetry : official journal of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Dosim
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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96. Imanaka M, Iida K, Takahashi K, Tsuji K, Nishizawa H, Fukuoka H, Takeno R, Takahashi Y, Okimura Y, Kaji H, Chihara K: The N131S mutation in the von Hippel-Lindau gene in a Japanese family with pheochromocytoma and hemangioblastomas. Endocr J; 2006 Dec;53(6):819-27
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  • von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease (VHLD) is a hereditary autosomal dominant syndrome that causes various benign and malignant tumors.
  • VHLD is caused by mutations in the VHL tumor suppressor gene.
  • Here, we report a mutation in the VHL gene in a Japanese family with VHLD type 2A, characterized by pheochromocytoma (PHE), and hemangioblastomas (HAB) in both the retina and thoracic spinal cord but without renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • Previous patients with the N131K or N131T mutation in pVHL developed VHLD type 2B with RCC or VHLD type 1 without PHE, respectively.
  • We also identified somatic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at chromosome 3p25-26 in the adrenal tumor of the patient.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / genetics. Cerebellar Neoplasms / genetics. Hemangioblastoma / genetics. Mutation. Pheochromocytoma / genetics. Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein / genetics

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  • (PMID = 17001110.001).
  • [ISSN] 0918-8959
  • [Journal-full-title] Endocrine journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Endocr. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 6.3.2.19 / Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein
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97. Ko YH, Choi H, Kang SG, Park HS, Lee JG, Kim JJ, Kang SH, Cheon J: Efficacy of laparoscopic renal cryoablation as an alternative treatment for small renal mass in patients with poor operability: experience from the Korean single center. J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A; 2010 May;20(4):339-45
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  • [Title] Efficacy of laparoscopic renal cryoablation as an alternative treatment for small renal mass in patients with poor operability: experience from the Korean single center.
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of laparoscopic renal cryoablation (LRC) for the treatment of incidentally found small renal masses in patients with poor operability, from our initial experience in Korea.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: From June 2005 to April 2009, surgical and oncologic outcomes were evaluated from a database of 45 renal tumors in 39 patients who underwent LRC due to a high American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) physical status score (i.e., over 3) or old age (i.e., over 70 years old).
  • RESULTS: Mean (range) age was 63.3 years (range, 43-81), and mean tumor size was 2.5 cm (range 0.7-3.9).
  • Among 45 treated lesions, 23 (51.1%) were exophytic tumors, 17 (37.8%) were endophytic tumors, and the other 5 (11.1%) were mesophytic tumors.
  • None of the patients developed major complications, including adjacent organ injury, collecting system injury, open surgical conversion, or conversion to nephrectomy.
  • Pathologic examination revealed that 60% (27/45) of lesions were renal-cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • During a mean follow-up duration of 23.5 months (range, 6-53), radiologic evidence of tumor recurrence was found in 1 patient (3.7% for RCC).
  • Serum creatinine remains stable, with no statistical difference, compared to preoperative levels, in both whole patients and patients with solitary kidney.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In this series, LRC for small renal tumors showed favorable oncologic and surgical outcomes, including maintenance of renal function, without adverse effects in selected patients with poor operability.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Cryosurgery. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery. Laparoscopy. Nephrectomy / methods

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  • (PMID = 20438310.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-9034
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of laparoendoscopic & advanced surgical techniques. Part A
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3157334
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98. Hallscheidt P, Besharati S, Noeldge G, Haferkamp A, Lopez R, Kauffmann GW: [Preoperative and palliative embolization of renal cell carcinomas: follow-up of 49 patients]. Rofo; 2006 Apr;178(4):391-9
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  • [Title] [Preoperative and palliative embolization of renal cell carcinomas: follow-up of 49 patients].
  • PURPOSE: To evaluate the influence of preoperative and palliative embolization of renal cell carcinomas on survival, intra- and post-operative procedures, and symptom control for palliative and preoperative indications.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: 56 patients who underwent renal cell carcinoma embolization from 1981 to 1999 were included in this retrospective study.
  • 42 patients underwent preoperative embolization at different tumor stages (pT1: 1 patient, pT2: 6, pT3 a: 4, pT3 b: 19, pT3 c: 2, pT4: 5).
  • Indications for preoperative embolization were bleeding of the renal tumor in 6 cases -- non-recurrent bleeding reported, flank pain in 4 patients -- 3 of 4 patients had no further symptoms, recurrent tumor embolization in 1 patient, and 2 patients who wanted to be treated without symptoms.
  • CONCLUSION: Palliative embolization of renal cell carcinomas is a safe therapeutic method to treat advanced renal cell carcinomas allowing control of symptoms such as hematuria and flank pain in more than 90 % of our cases.
  • Preoperative embolization yields a patient survival time comparable to that of patients at earlier tumor stages and is dependent on the metastases.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / blood supply. Kidney Neoplasms / blood supply. Neoadjuvant Therapy. Palliative Care

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  • (PMID = 16612730.001).
  • [ISSN] 1438-9029
  • [Journal-full-title] RöFo : Fortschritte auf dem Gebiete der Röntgenstrahlen und der Nuklearmedizin
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rofo
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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99. Stern JM, Gupta A, Raman JD, Cost N, Lucas S, Lotan Y, Raj GV, Cadeddu JA: Radiofrequency ablation of small renal cortical tumours in healthy adults: renal function preservation and intermediate oncological outcome. BJU Int; 2009 Sep;104(6):786-9
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  • [Title] Radiofrequency ablation of small renal cortical tumours in healthy adults: renal function preservation and intermediate oncological outcome.
  • OBJECTIVES: To present the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and oncological outcomes in a series of patients with cT1a renal cortical tumours treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA), a non-ischaemic minimally invasive ablative method, as nephron-sparing surgery gives excellent oncological outcomes and preserves renal function.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Healthy (American Society of Anesthesiologists, ASA, I and II) patients with cT1a renal masses were identified, and clinical and radiographic data were reviewed to assess indications, complications, radiological evidence of disease recurrence, and renal function.
  • Radiological recurrence was defined as any new enhancement (>10 Hounsfield units) after absence of enhancement on initial 6-week computed tomography.
  • Preoperative needle biopsy was diagnostic in 89% of patients, including 75% diagnostic of renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • At a median (range) follow-up of 34 (1.0-80) months the renal preservation rate was 97%.
  • One patient had a nephrectomy for biopsy-confirmed recurrence of RCC at 55 months; a second had a nephrectomy at 24 months for suspected radiographic recurrence, but had no evidence of disease on final pathology.
  • A fifth (20%) of the patients had chronic kidney disease at the time of diagnosis.
  • Intermediate results suggest excellent oncological outcomes and preservation of renal function.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Renal Cell / surgery. Glomerular Filtration Rate / physiology. Kidney / physiology. Kidney Neoplasms / surgery

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  • (PMID = 19426196.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-410X
  • [Journal-full-title] BJU international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BJU Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 1.8.1.4 / Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase
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100. Schouten LJ, van Dijk BA, Oosterwijk E, van Engeland M, Hulsbergen-van de Kaa CA, Kiemeney LA, Goldbohm RA, Kester A, de Vogel S, Schalken JA, van den Brandt PA: Alcohol consumption and mutations or promoter hypermethylation of the von Hippel-Lindau gene in renal cell carcinoma. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 2008 Dec;17(12):3543-50
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  • [Title] Alcohol consumption and mutations or promoter hypermethylation of the von Hippel-Lindau gene in renal cell carcinoma.
  • Alcohol consumption has been associated with a decreased risk for renal cell cancer in several studies.
  • We investigated whether alcohol is associated with (epi)genetic changes of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene in renal cell cancer.
  • The Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS) on Diet and Cancer started in 1986 (n = 120,852) and uses the case-cohort method.
  • After 11.3 years of follow-up, 314 renal cell cancer cases and 4,511 subcohort members were available for analysis.
  • DNA was isolated from paraffin-embedded tumor tissue from 235 cases.
  • In multivariate analysis, hazard ratios of renal cell cancer for cohort members who consumed up to 5, 15, 30, and > or = 30 g of alcohol per day were 0.72, 0.64, 0.81, and 0.69, respectively, compared with nondrinkers [95% confidence interval (95% CI) for the > or = 30 category, 0.44-1.07; P for trend, 0.17].
  • Alcohol intake from beer, wine, and liquor was associated with decreased risks for renal cell cancer, although not statistically significant.
  • Hazard ratios were not different for clear-cell renal cell cancer with and without VHL mutations, except for alcohol from beer, which was associated with an increased risk for clear-cell renal cell cancer without VHL mutations (hazard ratio for > or = 5 g of alcohol from beer compared with nondrinkers, 2.74; 95% CI, 1.35-5.57).
  • Alcohol was associated with a decreased risk for clear-cell renal cell cancer without VHL gene promoter methylation (hazard ratio for >15 g compared with nondrinkers, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.34-0.99).
  • In this study, a not statistically significant inverse association was observed between alcohol and renal cell cancer.
  • [MeSH-major] Alcohol Drinking / genetics. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / genetics. Kidney Neoplasms / genetics. Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Case-Control Studies. CpG Islands. DNA Methylation. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Mutation. Proportional Hazards Models. Prospective Studies. Risk Factors. Surveys and Questionnaires

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  • (PMID = 19064569.001).
  • [ISSN] 1055-9965
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 6.3.2.19 / Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein
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