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1. Middeldorf I, Galm O, Osieka R, Jost E, Herman JG, Wilop S: Sequence of administration and methylation of SOCS3 may govern response to gemtuzumab ozogamicin in combination with conventional chemotherapy in patients with refractory or relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Am J Hematol; 2010 Jul;85(7):477-81
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Sequence of administration and methylation of SOCS3 may govern response to gemtuzumab ozogamicin in combination with conventional chemotherapy in patients with refractory or relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).
  • In older patients suffering from acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), aggressive chemotherapy is accompanied with high treatment-related morbidity and mortality.
  • Consequently, a variable response of AML cells to anti-CD33-targeted therapy may be caused by modulation of SOCS3 expression.
  • Twenty-four patients with refractory or relapsed CD33-positive AML received GO as a single agent before or after conventional chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Aminoglycosides / administration & dosage. Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. DNA Methylation. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / drug therapy. Salvage Therapy / methods. Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling Proteins / genetics

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 20575043.001).
  • [ISSN] 1096-8652
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Aminoglycosides; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / SOCS3 protein, human; 0 / Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling Proteins; 0 / gemtuzumab
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2. Foss B, Tronstad KJ, Bruserud Ø: Connexin-based signaling in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Biochim Biophys Acta; 2010 Jan;1798(1):1-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Connexin-based signaling in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).
  • Normal and malignant hematopoiesis are regulated by intercellular communication in the hematopoietic microenvironments, and both soluble mediators as well as direct cell-cell contact play important functional roles.
  • Gap junctions are complex membrane structures that transfer molecules between neighboring cells and thereby alter intracellular signaling and metabolism.
  • Connexins are furthermore involved in cell regulation as single molecules by modulating intracellular pathways and possibly gene transcription.
  • The role of connexins in leukemogenesis and leukemic cell functions are not well characterized.
  • In this review, we describe the known effects of gap junctions and connexins in acute myelogenous leukemia and the diverse potential of connexins in acute myelogenous leukemia chemosensitivity, intracellular signaling and cell death regulation.
  • [MeSH-major] Connexins / metabolism. Leukemia, Myeloid / metabolism. Signal Transduction
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Apoptosis. Cell Communication. Gap Junctions / metabolism. Humans. Models, Biological

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  • (PMID = 19883623.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-3002
  • [Journal-full-title] Biochimica et biophysica acta
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biochim. Biophys. Acta
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Connexins
  • [Number-of-references] 103
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3. Park EK, Jeon JS, Noh HJ, Won JH, Park HS: Complete remission of IgA nephropathy after bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia. NDT Plus; 2008 Dec;1(6):420-422

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Complete remission of IgA nephropathy after bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia.
  • A 32-year-old woman was found to have IgA nephropathy and acute myeloid leukaemia.
  • We herein report a case of complete remission of IgA nephropathy after BMT for acute myeloid leukaemia.

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  • (PMID = 28657023.001).
  • [ISSN] 1753-0784
  • [Journal-full-title] NDT plus
  • [ISO-abbreviation] NDT Plus
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; IgA nephropathy / bone marrow transplantation
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4. Raepple D, von Lintig F, Zemojtel T, Duchniewicz M, Jung A, Lübbert M, Boss GR, Scheele JS: Determination of Ras-GTP and Ras-GDP in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), myeloproliferative syndrome (MPS), juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and malignant lymphoma: assessment of mutational and indirect activation. Ann Hematol; 2009 Apr;88(4):319-24
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  • [Title] Determination of Ras-GTP and Ras-GDP in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), myeloproliferative syndrome (MPS), juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and malignant lymphoma: assessment of mutational and indirect activation.
  • Ras functions as a 'molecular switch' in transduction of signals from the membrane receptors of many growth factors, cytokines, and other second messengers to the cell nucleus.
  • In this work, a non-radioactive assay was used to quantify Ras activity in hematologic malignancies.
  • Ras activation was measured in six different cell lines and 24 patient samples, and sequence analysis of N- and K-ras was performed.
  • The 24 patient samples comprised of seven acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) samples, five acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) samples, four myeloproliferative disease (MPD) samples, four lymphoma samples, four juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) samples, and WBC from a healthy donor.
  • Mutation analysis revealed ras mutations in two of the seven AML samples, one in codon 12 and one in codon 61; ras mutations were also found in two of the four JMML samples, and in one of the four lymphoma samples (codon 12).
  • We found a mean Ras activation of 23.1% in cell lines with known constitutively activating ras mutations, which was significantly different from cell lines with ras wildtype sequence (Ras activation of 4.8%).
  • [MeSH-minor] DNA Mutational Analysis. Guanosine Diphosphate / analysis. Guanosine Triphosphate / analysis. Humans. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute. Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Juvenile. Lymphoma. Mutation. Myeloproliferative Disorders. Oncogenes. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma. Signal Transduction / genetics. Tumor Cells, Cultured


5. Zhang JH, Zheng YC, Wang YX, Zhang JY, Liu ZG: Enlarged and prominent nucleus may be indicative of tetraploidy: a laboratory study of a rare near-tetraploidy in a child patient with acute myelogenous leukemia AML-M4. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 2010 Jan;32(1):19-21
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  • [Title] Enlarged and prominent nucleus may be indicative of tetraploidy: a laboratory study of a rare near-tetraploidy in a child patient with acute myelogenous leukemia AML-M4.
  • SUMMARY: Near-tetraploidy is a rare cytogenetic abnormality in myelocytic malignancies in children and its significance is unknown.
  • To investigate the pathologic characteristics of a near-tetraploidy in a child with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML-M4), bone marrow smears were prepared for morphologic analysis.
  • Combined with morphologic and immunophenotypic results, the diagnosis was established as acute myelogenous leukemia (AML-M4).
  • Near-tetraploidy is an uncommon cytogenetic finding, and the experience of this case further emphasizes the importance of the laboratory diagnostic methods.
  • [MeSH-major] Cell Nucleus / pathology. Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Acute / diagnosis. Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Acute / genetics. Polyploidy

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  • (PMID = 19816206.001).
  • [ISSN] 1536-3678
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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6. Langer F, Steinmetz O, Marx G, Amirkhosravi A, Eifrig B, Bokemeyer C, Brümmendorf T: Aprotinin-associated hemolytic thrombotic microangiopathy in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and systemic coagulopathy. Am J Hematol; 2007 Dec;82(12):1122-4
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  • [Title] Aprotinin-associated hemolytic thrombotic microangiopathy in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and systemic coagulopathy.
  • [MeSH-major] Blood Coagulation Disorders / complications. Hemostatics / adverse effects. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / complications. Thrombosis / chemically induced


7. Sierra M, Alonso A, Odero MD, Gonzalez MB, Lahortiga I, Pérez JJ, García JL, Gutiérrez NC, Calasanz MJ, San Miguel JF, Hernández JM: Geographic differences in the incidence of cytogenetic abnormalities of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in Spain. Leuk Res; 2006 Aug;30(8):943-8
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  • [Title] Geographic differences in the incidence of cytogenetic abnormalities of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in Spain.
  • The incidence of chromosomal abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) differs according to geographical regions in Spain.
  • We analyse 1,271 consecutive patients diagnosed of AML between 1995 and 2002 in three different regions of Spain: northern, central and southern.
  • By contrast, patients from the south of Spain showed lower incidence of t(8;21) (0%, compared to 1.6% and 3.6% in central and northern areas, respectively, p=0.04).
  • Trisomy 8 showed similar incidence in southern and central areas, while the incidence in the northern area was lower (14% and 10%, respectively, p=0.04).
  • [MeSH-major] Chromosome Aberrations. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11 / genetics. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 15 / genetics. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17 / genetics. Genetics, Population. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / epidemiology. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / genetics

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  • (PMID = 16503352.001).
  • [ISSN] 0145-2126
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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8. Navarro WH, Agovi MA, Logan BR, Ballen K, Bolwell BJ, Frangoul H, Gupta V, Hahn T, Ho VT, Juckett M, Lazarus HM, Litzow MR, Liesveld JL, Moreb JS, Marks DI, McCarthy PL, Pasquini MC, Rizzo JD: Obesity does not preclude safe and effective myeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in adults. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant; 2010 Oct;16(10):1442-50
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Obesity does not preclude safe and effective myeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in adults.
  • We compared outcomes by body mass index (BMI) for adult patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) who underwent autologous (auto, n = 373), related donor (RD, n = 2041), or unrelated donor (URD, n = 1801) allogeneic myeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) using bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) from 1995 to 2004.
  • Multivariable analysis referenced to the normal weight group showed an increased risk of death for underweight patients in the RD group (relative risk [RR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28-2.89; P = .002), but not in the URD group.
  • Overweight and obese patients enjoyed a modest decrease in relapse incidence, although this did not translate into a survival benefit.
  • Small numbers of patients limit the ability to better characterize the adverse outcomes seen in the underweight RD but not the underweight URD allogeneic HCT patients.
  • Obesity alone should not be considered a barrier to HCT.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 20412867.001).
  • [ISSN] 1523-6536
  • [Journal-full-title] Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / U01 HL069294; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U24 CA076518; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / 5U01HL069294; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U24-CA76518
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Myeloablative Agonists
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS210175; NLM/ PMC2933950
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9. Burger JA: CXCR4 in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML): when too much attraction is bad for you. Leuk Res; 2009 Jun;33(6):747-8
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  • [Title] CXCR4 in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML): when too much attraction is bad for you.
  • [MeSH-major] Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / metabolism. Receptors, CXCR4 / metabolism

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  • [CommentOn] Leuk Res. 2009 Jun;33(6):764-8 [19042019.001]
  • (PMID = 19091405.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-5835
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA016672
  • [Publication-type] Comment; Editorial
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CXCR4 protein, human; 0 / Receptors, CXCR4
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10. Olsnes AM, Motorin D, Ryningen A, Zaritskey AY, Bruserud Ø: T lymphocyte chemotactic chemokines in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML): local release by native human AML blasts and systemic levels of CXCL10 (IP-10), CCL5 (RANTES) and CCL17 (TARC). Cancer Immunol Immunother; 2006 Jul;55(7):830-40
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] T lymphocyte chemotactic chemokines in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML): local release by native human AML blasts and systemic levels of CXCL10 (IP-10), CCL5 (RANTES) and CCL17 (TARC).
  • T cell targeting immunotherapy is now considered in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), and local recruitment of antileukemic T cells to the AML microcompartment will then be essential.
  • This process is probably influenced by both intravascular as well as extravascular levels of T cell chemotactic chemokines.
  • We observed that native human AML cells usually showed constitutive secretion of the chemotactic chemokines CXCL10 and CCL5, whereas CCL17 was only released for a subset of patients and at relatively low levels.
  • Coculture of AML cells with nonleukemic stromal cells (i.e., fibroblasts, osteoblasts) increased CXCL10 and CCL17 levels whereas CCL5 levels were not altered.
  • Neutralization of CXCL10 and CCL5 inhibited T cell migration in the presence of native human AML cells.
  • Furthermore, serum CCL17 and CXCL10 levels varied between AML patients and were determined by disease status (both chemokines) as well as patient age, chemotherapy and complicating infections (only CCL17).
  • Thus, extravascular as well as intravascular levels of T cell chemotactic chemokines show a considerable variation between patients that may be important for T cell recruitment and the effects of antileukemic T cell reactivity in local AML compartments.
  • [MeSH-major] Chemokines, CC / secretion. Chemokines, CXC / secretion. Chemotaxis, Leukocyte. Leukemia, Myeloid / physiopathology. Neoplasm Proteins / secretion. Neoplastic Stem Cells / secretion
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Burkitt Lymphoma / blood. Burkitt Lymphoma / drug therapy. Burkitt Lymphoma / physiopathology. Cell Communication. Chemokine CCL17. Chemokine CCL5. Chemokine CXCL10. Coculture Techniques. Culture Media, Conditioned / chemistry. Female. Fibroblasts / physiology. Humans. Infection / complications. Infection / physiopathology. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell / blood. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell / drug therapy. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell / physiopathology. Male. Middle Aged. Osteoblasts / secretion. RNA, Messenger / analysis. Stromal Cells / physiology. T-Lymphocytes / immunology. Tumor Cells, Cultured / secretion

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  • (PMID = 16267679.001).
  • [ISSN] 0340-7004
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer immunology, immunotherapy : CII
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Immunol. Immunother.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CCL17 protein, human; 0 / CCL5 protein, human; 0 / CXCL10 protein, human; 0 / Chemokine CCL17; 0 / Chemokine CCL5; 0 / Chemokine CXCL10; 0 / Chemokines, CC; 0 / Chemokines, CXC; 0 / Culture Media, Conditioned; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / RNA, Messenger
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11. Borthakur G, Faderl S, Ravandi F, Padmanabhan S, Stock W, Wu K, Li J, Curt G, Tallman M, Minden M: Clinical, pharmacokinetic (PK), and pharmacodynamic findings from a phase I trial of an Eg5 inhibitor (AZD4877) in patients with refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3580

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clinical, pharmacokinetic (PK), and pharmacodynamic findings from a phase I trial of an Eg5 inhibitor (AZD4877) in patients with refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
  • Eg5 inhibition is thus specific for dividing cells, resulting in monoastral mitotic spindles (monoasters) and apoptotic cell death.
  • Preclinically, hematologic tumor cell lines were generally more sensitive to AZD4877 than those derived from solid tumors.
  • The T<sub>1/2</sub> of AZD4877 ranged from 26 to 42 hr; PK were linear and drug levels non-cumulative.
  • Myelosuppression, the dose limiting toxicity (DLT) in solid tumor studies, was not considered a DLT in this trial.
  • Preliminary results suggest possible clinical activity in AML.

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  • (PMID = 27961757.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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12. Naik SG, Negrin R, Laport G, Miklos D, Shizuru J, Arai S, Blume K, Wong R, Lowsky R, Johnston L: Long-term outcomes of high-dose therapy using busulfan, etoposide, and cyclophosphamide followed by allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for patients with high-risk or advanced stages of myeloid malignancies. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7033

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Long-term outcomes of high-dose therapy using busulfan, etoposide, and cyclophosphamide followed by allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for patients with high-risk or advanced stages of myeloid malignancies.
  • : 7033 Patients (pts) with high risk (HR) or advanced myeloid malignancies have limited effective treatment options.
  • These include high-dose therapy followed by allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT).
  • All pts were treated with a uniform preparatory regimen: busulfan 16.0 mg/kg (d-8 to-5), etoposide 60mg/kg (d-4), cyclophosphamide 60mg/kg (d-2), and graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) prophylaxis of cyclosporine and prednisone.
  • Disease status at transplantation was induction failure (IF) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 10), HR AML in 1st complete remission (CR1) n = 11, in CR2 (n = 5), in CR3 (n = 2), relapsed refractory (RR) AML (n = 14), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in second chronic phase (n = 6), blast crisis (n = 2), myelofibrosis (n = 6), myeloproliferative disorders (n = 2), and MDS (n = 38).
  • Non-relapse mortality (NRM) was 29 % (95% CI 20%5-38%) at day 100 and 39% (95% CI 29%-49%) at one yr.
  • Cumulative incidence of acute (grade 3-4) and chronic GVHD was 28% (95% CI 19%-37%) and 38% (95% CI 24%-52%), respectively.
  • There was no statistically significant difference in OS; 31% versus 32% (p = 0.89) or FFP 71% versus 60% (p = 0.29) for recipients of BM versus PBMC with similar results in IF and RR AML.
  • These results confirm that pts with high-risk or advanced myeloid malignancies can achieve long-term survival following myeloablative allogeneic HCT with aggressive conditioning.
  • Relapse and acute GVHD remain significant causes of mortality.

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  • (PMID = 27961395.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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13. Veuillen C, Gravis G, Marcy M, Walz J, Bladou F, Salem N, Brunelle S, Olive D: Alterations of natural killer cells in metastatic prostate cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e16131

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Recently, our group have reported that patients with acute myeloid leukaemia have defective interactions receptor -ligand in NK cells due to a decreasing expression of Natural Cytotoxicity Receptors and it could be used as a evasion mechanism by leukaemia cells.
  • In ADPC and AIPC NK cells, the expression of NKRi and other NKRa did not differ from healthy donors.
  • In LPC NK cells, the expression of NKRi and NKRa did not differ from healthy donors.
  • Is it hormonal therapy or extension of the disease that is responsible of NK cells alterations?

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  • (PMID = 27963371.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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14. Wood WA, Deal AM, Moore DT, Whitley J, Sharf A, Serody JS, Gabriel DA, Shea TC: Usefulness of the hematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index (HCT-CI) in predicting outcomes for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with hematologic malignancies (HM) undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplant (alloSCT). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7034

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Usefulness of the hematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index (HCT-CI) in predicting outcomes for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with hematologic malignancies (HM) undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplant (alloSCT).
  • : 7034 Background: The HCT-CI was developed to help predict overall survival (OS) and non-relapse mortality (NRM) in pts undergoing alloSCT, a procedure with significant toxicity.
  • AYAs with cancer (ages 16-40) have been identified by the NCI as a high-risk group, but it is not known whether the HCT-CI is a useful predictor of outcomes in this relatively healthy population.
  • Diseases included AML (23), CML (14), ALL (14), and other (11).
  • When dichotomized into categories of <80% and >80% of normal, the DLCO/VA adj alone was also significantly associated with OS (p = 0.008), but not with NRM (p = 0.2).
  • The discrepancy between the predictiveness for OS and NRM may reflect pre-treatment or disease status of this population at the time of transplant.

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  • (PMID = 27961408.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. Medeiros BC, Gotlib JR, Coutre SE, Jones C, Khan SA, Rajwanshi R, Rajwanshi R, Zehnder J, Zehnder J: Interim results of protracted low doses of temozolomide in high-risk acute myeloid leukemia. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7052

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Interim results of protracted low doses of temozolomide in high-risk acute myeloid leukemia.
  • : 7052 Background: High treatment-related mortality and low response rates often discourage elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia from receiving treatment.
  • METHODS: Phase II clinical trial of tailored temozolomide therapy to high-risk AML patients according to AGAT methylation promoter status.
  • Patients demonstrating evidence of AGAT promoter methylation were stratified to conventional doses of temozolomide at 200 mg/m2 orally x 7 days.
  • Patients demonstrating lack of AGAT promoter methylation (unmethylated) received protracted doses of temozolomide (100 mg/m2 orally x 14 days) followed by conventional doses of temozolomide.
  • De novo AML was diagnosed in eight patients and five patients had s-AML.
  • Drug-related hematologic toxicities were difficult to distinguish from disease-related cytopenias.
  • Seven patients have died from disease progression, while two patients died of neutropenic sepsis (early deaths).
  • CONCLUSIONS: These preliminary results suggest that temozolomide therapy may be individually tailored to elderly patients with AML according to AGAT promoter status.

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  • (PMID = 27961417.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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16. Armstrong GT, Pan Z, Ness K, Srivastava D, Robison LL: Temporal trends in cause-specific late mortality among five-year survivors of childhood cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10004

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Among 5-yr survivors, the impact of changes in therapy on cause-specific late mortality has not been thoroughly assessed.
  • Cause-specific mortality was categorized as death from recurrence/progression of primary disease, external causes, and non-recurrence/non-external causes (Non-Recur/Ext) (i.e., deaths from health conditions including sequelae of cancer therapy).
  • No significant improvement in late mortality attributable to Non-Recur/Ext causes was seen.
  • Additionally, all-cause mortality was significantly lower in more recent eras for 5-year survivors of ALL, AML, Hodgkin, NHL, and CNS tumors, but not neuroblastoma and Ewing's Sarcoma where an increase in cumulative incidence of late mortality was seen in more recent eras.
  • CONCLUSIONS: All-cause late mortality has improved with more recent eras, attributable to reduced rates of mortality from progression of primary disease (i.e., durable remission).
  • Importantly, however, efforts to reduce the toxicity of more recent therapies have not produced detectable reduction in mortality attributable to other health conditions including sequelae of cancer therapy (non-Recur/Ext causes of death), which would include death from second malignancy, cardiac and pulmonary conditions.
  • Worsening late mortality for 5-year survivors of neuroblastoma and Ewing's sarcoma may be due to improved use of salvage therapies that delay, but do not ultimately prevent death.

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  • (PMID = 27962548.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Chaubey R, Sazawal S, Mahapatra M, Saxena R: Low frequency of RAS and absence of FLT3-ITD gene mutations in patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes in India: AIIMS experience. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22231

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : e22231 Background: Chromosomal abnormalities and molecular detection has potential importance for diagnosis and prognosis of MDS, although the mechanisms underlying the development of MDS and their progressive evolution to AML are still largely unknown.
  • Since, no studies have been reported from India on the prevalence of N-RAS, K- RAS point mutation in codon 12 and FLT3-ITD mutations in patients with MDS, we undertook this study.
  • PCR-RFLP and nested PCR-RFLP were used for the detection of point mutation in codon 12 of N-RAS and K-RAS.
  • One out of 53 patients (2%) was found positive for N-RAS and four patients were positive for K-RAS (8%) mutation.
  • The presence of N-RAS codon 12 mutation was associated with the poor survival.
  • FLT3-ITD mutation was not observed in any of our cases, which is in contrast to 3% reported from the West.

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  • (PMID = 27964108.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. Sierra J, Harms R, Mo M, Vogel CL: Evaluation of reported bone pain in patients (pts) receiving chemotherapy in pegfilgrastim clinical trials. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):9621

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Some authors have suggested that pegfilgrastim-induced bone pain is unpredictable and refractory to analgesics (Kirshner 2007), though that impression may not be uniformly accepted.
  • The incidence of bone pain was determined by treatment (pegfilgrastim, filgrastim, or placebo), chemotherapy (taxane-containing or not), cycle, severity, age, and body surface area (BSA).
  • In studies comparing pegfilgrastim (n=74) and filgrastim (n==7) in pts with AML and NHL, 52% were female, and the mean (SD) age was 50 (15.1) years.

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  • (PMID = 27963898.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Sekeres M, Kantarjian H, Fenaux P, Becker P, Boruchov A, Guerci-Bresler A, Hu K, Franklin J, Berger D: Subcutaneous or intravenous administration of romiplostim in thrombocytopenic patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7009

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Five pts experienced serious AEs, and there were 2 cases of disease progression to AML: one pt in the QWSC cohort who received romiplostim for 4 weeks and one in the Q2WSC cohort who received romiplostim for 20 weeks.
  • For pts who completed 8 weeks treatment, 15/23 (65%) achieved a plt response, defined by IWG 2006 criteria, and 14/23 (61%) did not require a plt transfusion during this period.

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  • (PMID = 27961381.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Kamper P, Bendix K, Hamilton-Dutoit S, Honoré B, d'Amore F: Tumor-infiltrating CD163-positive macrophages, clinicopathological parameters, and prognosis in classical Hodgkin lymphoma. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8528

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 8528 Background: Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) is characterized by a minority of neoplastic cells surrounded by a heterogeneous background of non-neoplastic cells.
  • CD163 expression was assessed immunohistochemically and the degree of intratumoral LAM infiltration was scored semi-quantitatively.
  • All pts were homogeneously treated with either chemo-radiotherapy (localised disease) or ABVD chemotherapy (advanced disease).
  • The histological subtypes were: nodular sclerosis (NS)-type I, 167 cases (59 %); NS-type II, 71 (25%); mixed cellularity (MC), 44 (15 %); lymphocyte-rich, lymphocyte-depleted and cHL-NOS, each one case.
  • Of 253 pts with assessable International Prognostic Score (IPS), 204 had a low-risk (≤ 2) and 49 a high risk (>2) profile.
  • Furthermore, a high expression of CD163 strongly correlated to stage IV disease (p=0.035), presence of B-symptoms (p=0.008), lymphocytopenia (p=0.003), hypersedimentation (p=0.009).
  • CONCLUSIONS: In cHL, a high number of intratumoral CD163+ monocytes/macrophages correlates with adverse outcome and with clinical parameters reflecting underlying aggressive disease biology.

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  • (PMID = 27960903.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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21. Rao AV, Valk P, Metzeler KH, Acharya C, Rizzieri DA, Delwel R, Bohlander SH, Buske C, Potti A, Lowenberg B: Age-specific differences in oncogenic pathway deregulation and chemosensitivity in patients with acute myeloid leukemia: Strategies to maximize response to induction chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7013

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Age-specific differences in oncogenic pathway deregulation and chemosensitivity in patients with acute myeloid leukemia: Strategies to maximize response to induction chemotherapy.
  • : 7013 Background: Despite all the advances made in understanding the poor prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the elderly, the underlying biology at a molecular signaling pathway level has yet to be defined.
  • METHODS: Clinically annotated, microarray data from 425 patients with newly diagnosed AML from two publicly available datasets GSE1159 and GSE12417 were analyzed.
  • Standard Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated using the two-sided log-rank test and individual differences in the probability of oncogenic pathway deregulation between young vs. elderly were analyzed via the non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test and a one-sided p-value ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant.
  • RESULTS: Elderly AML patients had worse OS (median 8.8 months vs. 24.1 months in younger patients; p = 0.001) and EFS (median 7.1 months vs. 15.3 months in younger patients; p < 0.0001).
  • Older patients were also less sensitive to anthracycline compared to younger AML patients, p < 0.0001.
  • Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of younger AML patients revealed two clusters and clinically better survival for cluster 1 compared to cluster 2 (high Ras, Src, TNF pathway activation) and the latter were in turn less sensitive to adriamycin.
  • However, in elderly patients those in cluster 2 also had high Ras, Src, TNF but this did not translate into differences in survival or chemotherapy sensitivity.
  • CONCLUSIONS: AML arising in the elderly represents a distinct biologic entity characterized by unique patterns of deregulated signaling pathways that contributes to poor survival and resistance to adriamycin.

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  • (PMID = 27961386.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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22. Pigazzi M, Manara E, Baron E, Beghin A, Basso G: The inducible cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate early repressor (ICER) enhances drug sensitivity in acute myeloid leukemia. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22045

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The inducible cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate early repressor (ICER) enhances drug sensitivity in acute myeloid leukemia.
  • CREB was previously demonstrated to be overexpressed in acute leukemia, whereas ICER was found rapidly degradated being unable to control gene transcription.
  • ICER exogenous expression was demonstrated to repress CREB targets preventing leukemia progression.
  • We hypothesized that ICER restoration deserves a special consideration for playing a role in CREB oncogenic feature and in modeling leukemic cell phenotype.
  • We monitored transcription and translation of a series of genes involved in different pathways by quantitative gene expression and western blot analysis.
  • We investigate ICER's role in cell death after treatment with chemotherapic drugs.
  • RESULTS: We revealed that ICER was able to control gene expression in leukemia, principally of genes involved in cell death and survival.
  • Cell cycle analyses revealed a block in G2 phase, a lowered cell proliferation and clonogenic potential with respect to HL60 treated at the same conditions.

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  • (PMID = 27963227.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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23. Marcucci G, Maharry K, Whitman SP, Paschka P, Baldus CD, Langer C, Mrózek K, Kolitz JE, Larson RA, Bloomfield CD, Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB): Improving the molecular risk classification for younger (&lt;60 years) de novo cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN AML) patients (pts). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7002

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Improving the molecular risk classification for younger (<60 years) de novo cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN AML) patients (pts).
  • : 7002 Background: CN AML pts are currently stratified into Low-risk [FLT3-ITD negative (neg)/NPM1 mutated (mut)] and High-risk [FLT3-ITD positive (pos) or NPM1 wild type (wt)] groups (FLT3-ITD/NPM1-only classification).
  • Here, we assess if adding CEBPA and WT1 mutation and ERG expression testing improves the currently used CN AML molecular risk classification.
  • METHODS: FLT3, NPM1, CEBPA and WT1 mutations and ERG and BAALC expression were tested at diagnosis in 143 CN AML adults enrolled on CALGB treatment protocols 9621 and 19808.
  • RESULTS: CALGB Group I (n=56) v Group II (n=87) had more complete remissions (CRs) (P=.005; 96% v 79%), and longer disease-free (DFS; P<.0001; 5 year (y) 69% v 21%) and overall (OS; P<.0001; 5 y 70% v 31%) survival [median follow-up for pts alive 6 y].
  • In contrast, for the same cohort of pts grouped by the FLT3-ITD/NPM1-only classification, CRs were 94% v 82% and 5 y DFS 59% v 32% and OS 67% v 36% in the Low- v High-risk groups.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Prognostic classification of younger de novo CN AML pts is improved by adding CEBPA and WT1 mutation and ERG expression testing.

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  • (PMID = 27961374.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. Laille E, Ward R, Nasser A, Stoltz M, Cogle C, Gore S, Skikne BS, Garcia-Manero G: The pharmacokinetics of azacitidine following subcutaneous treatment in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) or acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7087

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The pharmacokinetics of azacitidine following subcutaneous treatment in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) or acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).
  • : 7087 Background: 5-azacitidine (AZA), through its effects on DNA metabolism, gene expression, and cell differentiation, has proven beneficial in treatment of MDS and AML and AZA therapy significantly increases survival in higher-risk MDS and AML compared to conventional care.
  • Few studies have evaluated the pharmacokinetics (PK) of AZA and the renal elimination of AZA has not been previously published to our knowledge.
  • METHODS: Adult patients with MDS or AML and ECOG status 0-2 were treated with 7 consecutive daily SC doses of 75 mg/m<sup>2</sup> AZA during their first treatment cycle.

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  • (PMID = 27961481.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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25. Blum WG, Klisovic R, Liu S, Kefauver C, Grever MR, Schaaf L, Chan K, Byrd JC, Villalona-Calero M, Marcucci G: Efficacy of a novel schedule of decitabine in previously untreated AML, age 60 or older. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7010

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Efficacy of a novel schedule of decitabine in previously untreated AML, age 60 or older.
  • : 7010 Background: We established an optimal daily dose of decitabine in AML at 20mg/m<sup>2</sup>/day based on re-expression of epigenetically silenced genes, with promising clinical activity seen in poor risk older patients (pts) (Blum, J Clin Oncol. 2007).
  • METHODS: We designed a phase II study of decitabine for untreated AML pts of age≥60 who were not candidates for intensive chemotherapy (or who refused it).
  • Pts with persistent AML at the end of a cycle received a repeat of the 10 day course, but responding pts received maintenance with abbreviated courses of 3-5 days depending on degree and duration of neutropenia.
  • 15 pts had either secondary or t-AML.
  • 31/33 pts had at least 2 poor-risk factors of age ≥70, antecedent hematologic disorder, unfavorable karyotype, or ECOG 2, and 28/33 had HCT-CI scores of ≥2.
  • CR occurred in all subsets of disease and cytogenetic risk groups.
  • Median OS has not been reached; median f/u of 19 surviving pts is 8 months.
  • Though non-hematologic toxicities were infrequent, infection and/or febrile neutropenia were common (in 24/33 pts).

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  • (PMID = 27961371.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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26. Schiller GJ, O'Brien SM, Vey N, Pigneux A, DeAngelo DJ, Karp JE, Hudak D, Kell J, Stuart RK, Giles FJ: Comorbidity description using the hematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index (HCT-CI) in elderly de novo poor-risk AML patients (pts) treated with laromustine. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7050

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Comorbidity description using the hematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index (HCT-CI) in elderly de novo poor-risk AML patients (pts) treated with laromustine.
  • : 7050 Background: Treatment of older pts with AML is often complicated by comorbidities and pts with comorbidities are often underrepresented in clinical trials.
  • The HCT-CI, which was developed in pts receiving allogeneic SCT, has been applied to pts receiving induction therapy for AML in an effort to assist in therapeutic and investigational decisions (Kantarjian 2006; Etienne 2007; Giles 2007).
  • HCT-CI scores have been shown to be predictive of early death and survival in pts ≥ 60 years receiving induction therapy for AML, with early death rates of 3%, 11%, and 29% for pts with HCT-CI scores of 0, 1-2, and ≥ 3, respectively (Giles 2007).
  • METHODS: 140 pts age ≥ 60 with poor risk de novo AML from two phase II studies were scored for comorbidity by HCT-CI.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The majority (81%) of these older poor risk AML pts treated with laromustine had a HCT-CI score ≥ 3, confirming the poor risk nature of this patient group.
  • The induction death rate for pts treated with laromustine and with HCT-CI score ≥ 3 was lower than that reported for a group of pts with HCT-CI score ≥ 3 treated with standard induction chemotherapy (14% vs 29%; Giles 2007).

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  • (PMID = 27961414.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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27. Raza A, Galili N, Borthakur G, Carter TH, Claxton DF, Erba HP, DeAngelo DJ, Berger MS, Schimmer A: A safety and schedule seeking trial of Bcl-2 inhibitor obatoclax in previously untreated older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3579

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A safety and schedule seeking trial of Bcl-2 inhibitor obatoclax in previously untreated older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
  • : 3579 Background: Obatoclax (Ob) is a small-molecule inhibitor of all Bcl-2 prosurvival proteins.
  • In a previous study a 70 year old patient with untreated AML had a cytogenetic CR 8 days after receiving 20 mg/m<sup>2</sup> of Ob over 24 hrs.
  • This study evaluated the single-agent response rate in older patients with previously untreated AML.
  • Eligibility criteria included age ≥ 70, untreated AML (1 prior Rx allowed in Safety phase), ECOG PS ≤2, adequate renal and hepatic function.
  • Efficacy data after C2 show that 3 patients in the 20 mg 3-hr infusion cohort in the Safety phase and 1 at the same dose & schedule in the Schedule Seeking phase had ≥50% decrease in BM blasts after C2, which was not seen in the 60 mg 24-hr infusion cohort.
  • CONCLUSIONS: MTD for Ob as a 3-hr infusion administered in older patients with AML on 3 consecutive days is 20 mg/day, and both this regimen and 60 mg as a 24-hr infusion x 3 days were well tolerated.
  • Evidence of biological activity was seen with the 3-hr infusion schedule but not with the 24-hr infusion schedule, suggesting that efficacy may be improved with the 3-hr infusion schedule and may be related to PK differences.

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  • (PMID = 27961704.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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28. Bloomfield CD: Importance of genetic heterogeneity in curing adult acute leukemia (AL). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):s1

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Importance of genetic heterogeneity in curing adult acute leukemia (AL).
  • Publication of the French-American-British classification 34 years ago resulted in acceptance that morphology and cytochemistry separated AL into two different diseases, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), that required separate treatment.
  • During the next 15-20 years the importance of cytogenetics in dissecting ALL and AML into entities requiring different therapies became widely accepted, resulting in 2001 in their first incorporation into the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of AL.
  • The most striking example of increased curability of AL is acute promyelocytic leukemia, in which targeted therapy combined with chemotherapy has increased survival from a 2-week median to an 80% cure rate.
  • Recognition of increased sensitivity of a genetic subtype of AML to high-dose cytarabine (HiDAC) has increased the cure rate of core-binding factor (CBF) AML from <10%-25% to 55%-60%.
  • Recent discovery of the adverse impact of KIT mutations in CBF AML may allow the addition of tyrosine kinase inhibitors to HiDAC to substantially further increase cure.
  • Among adult de novo AML 40%-45% are cytogenetically normal (CN); the striking molecular heterogeneity of CN-AML is now being recognized and promises to allow individualized approaches that improve substantially upon the current cure rate of 40%.
  • New approaches to studying the leukemia genome and epigenome should improve our understanding of AL heterogeneity, identify new therapeutic targets, and allow the cure of most patients.

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  • (PMID = 27962366.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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29. Queudeville M, Eckhoff SM, Debatin K, Meyer LH: Correlatoin of apoptosis signaling in primary pediatric BCP-ALL xenograft cells with the kinetics of engraftment in vivo in a NOD/SCID model and patient outcome. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10043

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 10043 Background: We previously identified the importance of intact apoptosis signaling for treatment response in pediatric ALL and AML by analyzing two key apoptogenic events, caspase-3 activation and cytochrome c release.
  • Using a NOD/SCID mouse model for pediatric BCP-ALL we found that short time from transplant to overt leukemia in the recipient mice (short time to leukemia, TTLshort) determines poor patient outcome.
  • METHODS: In this study we investigated the importance of deficient apoptosis signaling for leukemia engraftment in this model.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our finding in the NOD/SCID/huALL model matches our results in pediatric ALL and AML to conclude that the functional integrity of a downstream apoptotic checkpoint is an important feature regulating leukemia biology.
  • Thus, deficient apoptosis signaling appears to determine rapid engraftment of leukemia cells in the NOD/SCID model in vivo and consequently poor patient outcome.

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  • (PMID = 27962469.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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30. Steensma D, Kantarjian H, Wijermans P: Clinical experience with different dosing schedules of decitabine in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7011

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Data from each clinical trial supporting overall improvement, duration of improvement, time to AML or death, progression-free survival (PFS), and transfusion independence was assessed.
  • RESULTS: Patients had IPSS classification scores of intermediate-2 or high-risk (D-0007, 70%; EORTC-06011, 93%; ID03-0180, 66%; DACO-020, 46%) and de novo MDS (D-0007, 87%; EORTC-06011, 88%; ID03-0180, 70%; DACO-020, 89%).
  • Comparable overall improvement (complete response [CR] + partial response [PR] + hematologic improvement [HI]), time to AML or death, and PFS was observed across all trials (Table).

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  • (PMID = 27961372.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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31. Duhoux F, Libouton J, Bahloula K, Ameye G, Poirel HA: Identification by FISH of 4 novel partner loci of PRDM16 in myeloid malignancies. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):11037

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Identification by FISH of 4 novel partner loci of PRDM16 in myeloid malignancies.
  • : 11037 Background: PRDM16 is a gene located on 1p36.32 that encodes for a zinc finger transcription factor and contains an N-terminal PR domain.
  • It has been shown to be involved in the reciprocal translocation t(1;3)(p36;q21) and more rarely the t(1;21)(p36;q22) which both occur in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemias (AML).
  • These translocations result in the overexpression of a truncated version of the PRDM16 protein that lacks the PR domain.
  • This overexpression might play an important role in the pathogenesis of MDS and AML in blocking myeloid differentiation.
  • METHODS: We studied 35 myeloid malignancies, 12 lymphoid malignancies and 3 undifferentiated acute leukemias with 1p36 abnormalities by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) contig containing 50 BAC probes on 1p36.
  • RESULTS: In addition to the known t(1;3)(p36;q21) (11 cases) and t(1;21)(p36;q22) (1 case) involving RPN1 andAML1/RUNX1 respectively in myeloid malignancies, we specifically found PRDM16 to be rearranged in 4 additional translocations : a t(1;12)(p36;p13) in an AML-M4, a t(1;7)(p36;p12) in a MDS, an add(1)(p36) in an AML-M2 and a t(1;2)(p36;p12) in a relapsed AML-M4.
  • We identified the respective candidate partner loci : TEL/ETV6, IKZF1, CDH4 and a non-coding unknown sequence.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In our series of 50 cases of hematological malignancies with 1p36 abnormalities, PRDM16 was involved in about 45% of myeloid malignancies, and was never involved in lymphoid malignancies.
  • PRDM16 is supposed to have similar oncogenic properties as MDS1/EVI-1(3q26), another gene encoding for a zinc finger protein and acting as a transcriptional regulatory factor with 2 isoforms.
  • Interestingly, the shortest isoform of MDS/EVI-1, lacking the PR domain, is supposed to have an oncogenic effect due to its translocation-induced upregulation in AML.
  • Further characterization of these new partner genes and functional studies should give us more insight into the pathogenesis of AML and MDS mediated by PRDM16, and the role of its partner genes.

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  • (PMID = 27964015.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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32. Ravandi Kashani F, Cortes J, Faderl S, Jones D, Byrd A, Brandt M, Garcia-Manero G, Levis M, Andreeff M, Kantarjian H: Phase I/II study of idarubicin (Ida), high-dose ara-C, and sorafenib (S) in patients (pts) younger than 65 years with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7018

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I/II study of idarubicin (Ida), high-dose ara-C, and sorafenib (S) in patients (pts) younger than 65 years with acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
  • It selectively induces apoptosis in FLT3-mutant human AML cell lines at nM concentrations.
  • METHODS: Objectives of this study are to determine the tolerability and efficacy of combination of S with chemotherapy.
  • In the phase I part, pts with relapsed AML were treated with escalating doses of S (400 mg qod, 400 mg daily, 400 mg bid) for 7 days during induction, and 400 mg bid was established as safe.
  • RESULTS: 10 pts (median age 34, range 21-58) with relapsed AML (median prior therapy 2, range 1-6) were treated in the phase I .
  • 5 pts have relapsed; median CR duration has not been reached, (range; 0.2+ - 10.6+ mo).
  • CONCLUSIONS: S can be safely combined with IA; it has a high CR rate in frontline therapy of younger pts with AML, in particular those with FLT3 mutations.
  • Correlative studies confirm potent activity of S against FLT3 signaling.

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  • (PMID = 27961390.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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33. Chamberlain MC, Raizer J: Extended exposure to alkylator chemotherapy: Delayed appearance of myelodysplasia. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e13030

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVE: A case series of gliomas treated with alkylator-based chemotherapy who subsequently developed myelodysplastic syndrome (tMDS) or acute myelocytic leukemia (AML).
  • The diagnosis of tMDS was determined by bone marrow biopsy in seven patients.
  • Three patients were diagnosed with AML as well (in two determined by bone marrow and one at autopsy).
  • Interval from last chemotherapy exposure to diagnosis of tMDS/AML ranged from 3 months to 31 months (median 24 months).
  • Five patients have died, two as a consequence of recurrent brain tumor, one as a complication of transplantation, and due due to AML.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although rare, induction of tMDS/AML following extended use of alkylator-based chemotherapy may become more relevant with the evolving practice to treat gliomas for protracted periods.

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  • (PMID = 27962878.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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34. Lyman GH, Dale DC, Culakova E, Poniewierski MS, Wolff D, Kuderer NM, Lambert K, Crawford J: Acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome (AML/MDS) and overall mortality with chemotherapy (CT) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF): A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):9524

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome (AML/MDS) and overall mortality with chemotherapy (CT) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF): A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs).
  • : 9524 Background: To evaluate the risk of AML/MDS and overall mortality in patients receiving CT ± G-CSF, a meta-analysis of RCTs were conducted.
  • Eligibility included RCTs of solid tumor or lymphoma patients randomized to CT ± primary G-CSF support, ≥2 years follow-up and reporting AML/MDS or all second malignancies.
  • Pre-specified study categories included: a)same dose/schedule, b)dose-dense or c)dose-escalated CT.
  • Primary outcomes were AML/MDS and mortality.
  • RR for AML/MDS with CT+G-CSF compared to control was 1.92 [P=.006] with ARD increase of 0.4% [P=.008].
  • RR for AML/MDS in study categories to receive the same, dose-dense or dose-escalated CT+G-CSF were 1.95 [P=.346], 1.20 [P=.666] and 2.47 [P=.006], respectively.
  • No differences in estimates of AML/MDS or mortality were observed between industry and non-industry-funded studies.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Risk of AML/MDS is increased with dose escalated CT+G-CSF.
  • Dose-dense regimens are associated with the greatest RR reduction in mortality and lowest risk of AML/MDS.
  • Further research is needed to differentiate any impact of G-CSF on the risk of AML/MDS from that due to increased CT intensity.

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  • (PMID = 27964513.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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35. Giles FJ, O'Brien S, Rizzieri DA, Vey N, Krug U, Sekeres M, Jacobsen TF, Nilsson BI, Staudacher K: A phase II study with CP-4055 in patients with second salvage AML. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7047

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase II study with CP-4055 in patients with second salvage AML.
  • : 7047 Background: CP-4055 (cytarabine 5'-elaidic acid ester) is a novel derivative of cytarabine, independent of nucleoside transporters to enter the cell.
  • The aim of this study was to assess efficacy and safety of CP-4055 when given as second salvage therapy to patients (pts) with acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
  • METHODS: Adult pts who received two previous chemotherapy regimens and who had refractory/relapsed AML (CR after first salvage therapy lasting less than 6 months) were enrolled.
  • 6 pts had previous transplant, the majority of the pts had previous ara-C based therapy, 12 pts had not obtained CR1 or CR2.
  • Only 1 pt did not receive d1-5 dosing.
  • Most frequently reported related AE ≥ grade 3 (CTCAE v3.0) were myelosuppression, abdominal pain, colitis, diarrhoea, nausea, fatigue, liver function test (LFT) elevation.
  • Clinical activity (IWG criteria for AML), 2 CR (1 with no CR1 or CR2), and 1 CRp (CR rate 15%), were reported.
  • CONCLUSIONS: CP-4055 given as second salvage therapy to AML pts show manageable toxicity when administered at 2,000 mg/m<sup>2</sup>/d, 24 h CIV, in a d1-5 q3w schedule.
  • Clinical activity (2 CR and 1 CRp) has been reported among the first 20 late stage AML pts.

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  • (PMID = 27961426.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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36. Stuart RK, Stockerl-Goldstein K, Cooper M, Devetten M, Herzig R, Medeiros B, Schiller G, Wei A, Acton G, Rizzieri D: Randomized phase II trial of the nucleolin targeting aptamer AS1411 combined with high-dose cytarabine in relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7019

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Randomized phase II trial of the nucleolin targeting aptamer AS1411 combined with high-dose cytarabine in relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
  • AS1411 has synergistic effects in combination with cytarabine on AML cell lines in vitro and in vivo.
  • METHODS: This open-label randomized phase II trial compared AS1411 plus high-dose cytarabine (HiDAC) with HiDAC alone in patients with primary refractory or relapsed AML who had received up to 3 previous lines of chemotherapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Data from this first phase II trial of an aptamer in oncology are encouraging.
  • The combination of AS1411 at 10 or 40 mg/kg/day with HiDAC appears well tolerated and shows promising signs of activity in patients with relapsed/refractory AML.

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  • (PMID = 27961391.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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37. Ikawa Y, Sugimoto N, Koizumi S, Yachie A, Saikawa Y: Promoter DNA methylation of CD10 in infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia with MLL/AF4 fusion gene. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10045

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Promoter DNA methylation of CD10 in infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia with MLL/AF4 fusion gene.
  • While CD10 negativity reflects an earlier stage of B-cell development, complete IgH gene rearrangements (VDJ<sub>H</sub>) show more mature IgH status.
  • METHODS: CD10-negative infant ALL with MLL/AF4, CD10-positive infant ALL with germ-line MLL, CD10-positive pre-B ALL cell line, infant AML (M5) with MLL/AF9 and pediatric AML (M2) with AML1/ETO were analyzed for VDJ<sub>H</sub> status and methylation of CD10 gene promoters.
  • In contrast, none or a few of the CpG dinucleotides were methylated in the CD10-positive ALL, AML (M5) with MLL/AF9 or AML (M2) with AML1/ETO.

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  • (PMID = 27962471.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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38. Kunivayalil S, Jain A, Satheesh C, Tejinder S, Lakshmaiah K, Suresh TM, Lokanatha D, Babu G: A comparative study of single-dose pegfilgrastim versus daily filgrastim in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e18005

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A comparative study of single-dose pegfilgrastim versus daily filgrastim in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
  • It can be used during induction and consolidation chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
  • Few studies addressed the use of pegylated filgrasim in AML.
  • Safety profile and complete remission status did not differ between the two groups.

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  • (PMID = 27964003.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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39. Villano JL, Letarte N, Yu JM, Shakir AR, Bressler L: Hematologic adverse events associated with temozolomide (TMZ). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):2053

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 2053 Background: Secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is reported to occur in 3%-10% of patients treated with alkylating agents for Hodgkin's lymphoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, ovarian cancer, breast cancer, and multiple myeloma.
  • The incidence of secondary AML is greatest at 5-10 years after treatment, and AML often follows myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS).
  • Among these patients, we identified 140 cases that we labeled as major hematologic adverse events: agranulocytosis (8 cases), aplasia (42), aplastic anemia (52), leukemia (26), MDS (6), and lymphoma (6).
  • Risk of leukemia/MDS from our review may also be significant, but length of follow-up is insufficient and the real risk is likely still unknown.

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  • (PMID = 27964671.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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40. Batty G, Kantarjian H, Issa JJ, Garcia-Manero G, Pierce S, O'Brien S, Jabbour E, Cortes J, Ravandi F: Feasibility of hypomethylating therapy in patients with renal insufficiency. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7089

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: We investigated the outcomes of pts with RI and MDS, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) receiving therapy with HA.
  • We used the International Working Group criteria to evaluate the response rates.
  • RESULTS: Forty-two pts with sCr ≥ 1.5 mg/dL (including 17 with MDS, 16 with AML, and 9 with CMML) were treated with DAC or 5AZA alone or in combination with other agents (primarily histone deacetylase inhibitors).
  • The incidence of complications, DA, and the response rate were not significantly different for pts with sCr > 2.0 mg/dL.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The use of HA is well tolerated in pts with MDS and AML and RI who achieved comparable OR rates to those without RI.

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  • (PMID = 27961273.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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41. Santos FP, Qiao W, Cortes JE, Jones D, Ravandi F, Verma D, Kantarjian H, Borthakur G: Prognostic value of FLT3 mutations among different cytogenetic subgroups in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7015

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prognostic value of FLT3 mutations among different cytogenetic subgroups in acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
  • : 7015 Background: Mutations of the FLT3 gene (in special internal tandem duplication -ITD) are common in normal karyotype AML (NK-AML) and are associated with shorter relapse free and overall survival (OS).
  • METHODS: The records of patients (pts) with newly diagnosed AML (from 2003 to 2007) were reviewed.
  • A Cox model was fit for OS, and non-significant variables were eliminated in a step-down fashion with a p- value cut-off of p = .10.
  • No difference was found in median OS between FLT3-mutated and FLT3- wild type pts in the good risk group (not reached (NR) vs NR, P = 0.57) nor in the poor risk group (55 vs 24 weeks, P = 0.44).
  • In intermediate risk, OS was worse in FLT3-ITD positive pts (33 vs 89 weeks, P < 0.0001) but not in FLT3-TKD positive pts (77 vs 70 weeks, P = 0.89).
  • CONCLUSIONS: In our cohort of pts, FLT3 mutations did not have a prognostic impact in AML with good and poor risk karyotype.

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  • (PMID = 27961388.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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42. McHayleh WM, Redner R, Sehgal R, Raptis A, Agha M, Natale J, Luong T, Schlesselman JJ, Foon K, Boyiadzis M: Etoposide and mitoxantrone in newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia patients with persistent leukemia after a course of induction therapy with cytarabine and idarubicin. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7073

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Etoposide and mitoxantrone in newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia patients with persistent leukemia after a course of induction therapy with cytarabine and idarubicin.
  • : 7073 Background: The goal of induction chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is complete remission with restoration of normal bone marrow.
  • If residual leukemia is present after the first course of induction therapy, patients receive a second course identical to the first or receive a non-cross resistant antileukemic regimen.
  • METHODS: In a retrospective study of adult patients with newly-diagnosed AML treated at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute between December 2002 and May 2008, we evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of mitoxantrone (10 mg/m<sup>2</sup>/d) and etoposide (100 mg/m<sup>2</sup>/d), both administered intravenously within 5 days as second course therapy of patients not responding to first-course induction therapy with cytarabine and idarubicin.
  • RESULTS: 74 AML patients (mean age 56 years, range: 18-73 years) completed treatment with etoposide and mitoxantrone; 29 (39%) achieved CR.
  • Lower CR rate was associated with unfavorable cytogenetic risk status at diagnosis and higher percent blasts prior to treatment with mitoxantrone and etoposide.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that the combination of etoposide and mitoxantorne is an active and well-tolerated regimen as second-course therapy in newly diagnosed AML patients who have persistent leukemia after a first course of induction therapy with cytarabine and idarubicin.

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  • (PMID = 27961456.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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43. Barret J, Dumontet C, Annereau J, Brel V, Breillout F, Guminski Y, Imbert T, Guilbaud N, Bailly C: A functional procedure using fresh samples to select patients with acute myeloid leukemia prior to treatment with the novel targeted cytotoxic agent F14512. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):11087

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A functional procedure using fresh samples to select patients with acute myeloid leukemia prior to treatment with the novel targeted cytotoxic agent F14512.
  • This system can be viewed as a suitable molecular gate to deliver selectively polyamine-based molecules into cancer cells.
  • This study was undertaken to investigate the potential of N-methyl-spermine-NBD, a proprietary fluorescent polyamine conjugate, designed to select patients with PTS-positive leukemic cells.
  • METHODS: The uptake of this probe was first measured by flow cytometry in a panel of human leukemia cell lines.
  • RESULTS: Data showed that high level of fluorescence was detected in F14512 -sensitive cancer cell lines whereas leukemia cells responding poorly to F14512 generally exhibited very low levels of PTS.
  • A panel of 50 fresh human acute myeloid leukemia samples showed a larger inter-individual variation and, interestingly, incorporation of the fluorescent probe was generally higher in leukemia blasts than in lymphocytes.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The data show that the PTS can easily be evaluated in fresh AML blasts and provides a simple means to identify patients for future enrollment in clinical trials with F14512.

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  • (PMID = 27963178.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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44. Ding W, Knox TR, Smoley SA, Van Dyke DL, Kay NE: Cytogenetic abnormalities in mesenchymal stem cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients and normal subjects. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e22002

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cytogenetic abnormalities in mesenchymal stem cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients and normal subjects.
  • : e22002 Background: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) residing in the marrow support hematopoiesis and protect cancer cells from undergoing cell death induced by chemotherapy.
  • Recent reports have described clonal cytogenetic abnormalities in the MSC of acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome patients.
  • After 3-4 non-stimulated cell culture passages, the karyotype was analyzed in 5-40 metaphase cells from each subject Abnormalities were considered clonal using the accepted convention of the same chromosomal gain or rearrangement in 2 or more cells or loss in at least 3 cells.

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  • (PMID = 27963169.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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45. Iliopoulou EG, Kountourakis P, Karamouzis MV, Doufexis D, Ardavanis A, Baxevanis CN, Rigatos G, Papamichail M, Perez SA: A phase I trial of adoptive transfer of allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells in patients (pts) with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3001

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase I trial of adoptive transfer of allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells in patients (pts) with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
  • : 3001 Background: HLA-mismatched NK cells have been found effective in acute myeloid leukemia pts.
  • RESULTS: Between 11/2007 and 11/2008 16 pts (performance status 0-1) were enrolled; 1 pt had rapid disease progression before treatment.
  • Pts characteristics: M/F 12/4; histology: adenocarcinoma/squamous cell carcinoma 13/3; stage IIIb/IV 2/14; 1<sup>st</sup>/2<sup>nd</sup> line treatment 13/3; median age 64 years (range, 50-71).
  • With a median follow-up of 6 months (range, 1-14) 3 pts with partial response and 7 pts with disease stabilization were recorded.

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  • (PMID = 27962051.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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46. Popat UR, Saliba R, Hosing C, Khouri I, Alousi AM, Giralt SA, de Lima MJ, Qazilbash MH, Champlin R, Anderlini P: Age at diagnosis does not adversely affect outcome in patients with Hodgkin's Disease (HD) after autologous transplantation. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e19507

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Age at diagnosis does not adversely affect outcome in patients with Hodgkin's Disease (HD) after autologous transplantation.
  • : e19507 Background: Age at diagnosis is a poor prognostic factor for overall survival after standard therapy for HD.
  • Whether older age is a prognostic factor for outcome after autologous transplantation is not known.
  • We sought to evaluate the effect of older age at diagnosis on transplant outcome.
  • Seventy two patients (29%) were older than 40 years of age at the time of initial diagnosis.
  • At transplantation, 63 (25%) were in complete remission (CR); 148 (60%) were in partial remission (PR); and 37 (15%) had stable (SD) or progressive disease (PD).
  • Peripheral blood stem cells were used as stem cell source in 241 (97%) patients.
  • The cumulative incidence of non-relapse mortality at 1 year was 1.6%.
  • The cumulative incidence of secondary MDS or AML was 8%.
  • In univariate analysis, disease status (p<0.001) and number of prior chemotherapy regimens (p=0.007) were the only factors significantly predicting OS.
  • Disease status was the only factor significant (p<0.01) in a multivariate analysis with a hazard ratio of 2.7 (1.1-6.9) and 9.2 (3.4-25) for patients in PR, and SD/PD respectively (CR reference group).
  • Age at diagnosis was not a significant factor (see table ).
  • CONCLUSIONS: High-dose chemotherapy and autologous transplantation abrogate the adverse impact of age at diagnosis in patients with HD.

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  • (PMID = 27960864.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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47. Hirte HW, McGuire W, Edwards R, Husain A, Hoskins P, Michels J, Matulonis U, Sexton C, Michelson G: A phase II trial of voreloxin in women with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):5559

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Clinical activity has been observed in ovarian cancer and AML.
  • METHODS: Pts may have received ≤ 3 prior platinum regimens plus one additional non-platinum regimen.

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  • (PMID = 27962535.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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48. Ayan I, Kebudi R, Ozger H, Yaman Agaoglu F, Gorgun O, Bilgic B, Eralp L, Dizdar Y, Darendeliler E: Childhood osteosarcoma: Evaluation of 94 cases. A single institution study. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10040

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: Between January 1990 and December 2006, 94 children (53 male, 41 female) with a median age of 13 (5-16) years and a histopathologic diagnosis of osteosarcoma were treated with an institutional chemotherapy regimen comprising of 6 courses (3 pre-, 3 postoperatively) of epirubicin (90 mg/m2), cisplatin(100 mg/m2), and ifosfamide(2 g/m2 × 3 days) every 3 weeks.
  • 26 patients died; 20 of disease, 5 of toxicity, and 1 of second malignancy (acute myeloid leukemia).
  • 5 and 10 year EFS for nonmetastatic patients was superior to those with metastatic disease [62.4 % (95% CI 49.9-79.9 %) vs. 6.9 % (95% CI 0-19.9 %)) (p<0.001).
  • 10 year OS for 18 patients (11 metastatic at diagnosis) who progressed during preoperative chemotherapy was 13 % vs. 75 % for those who didnot have progressive disease (p< 0.001).
  • Histologic response (<90 percent necrosis vs ≥90 percent) significantly correlated with 5 year EFS (31 % vs 67.6 %, p=0.023) but not with OS (57.7 % vs 76.5 %, p=0.13).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The presence of metastases at diagnosis was the most significant characteristic influencing outcome.

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  • (PMID = 27962466.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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49. Plunkett W, Thomas DA, O'Brien SM, Federl S, Giles FJ, Nicol SJ, Gill J, Zhao L, Ravandi F, Kantarjian H: Phase I study of pemetrexed in patients with relapsed or refractory acute leukemia or lymphoid blast phase chronic myelogenous leukemia. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7068

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I study of pemetrexed in patients with relapsed or refractory acute leukemia or lymphoid blast phase chronic myelogenous leukemia.
  • The purpose of this phase I trial was to define the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), maximum tolerated dose (MTD), and recommended phase II dose (RP2D) of pemetrexed given with vitamin supplementation to patients with relapsed or refractory leukemia.
  • METHODS: Patients ≥15 years of age were enrolled with relapsed or refractory leukemia, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≤2, adequate renal and hepatic function, and life expectancy of ≥6 weeks.
  • RESULTS: Twenty-two patients entered the trial; median age was 50 years (range: 18-75); 15 patients had acute myeloid leukemia and 7 patients had acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).
  • Two patients were ineligible and did not receive study drug.
  • At the 1,200 and 1,500 mg/m<sup>2</sup> dose levels, 1 patient per level developed grade (G) 3-4 liver enzyme and bilirubin elevations attributed to sepsis.
  • At the 3,600 mg/m<sup>2</sup> dose level, 1 patient had a G3 liver enzyme elevation and 2 added patients also had G3 liver toxicity.
  • In addition, 2 patients in the 3,600 mg/m<sup>2</sup> cohort developed G2 liver abnormalities.
  • Based on liver toxicities, the DLT dose level was established at 3,600 mg/m<sup>2</sup>.
  • Two patients died during the study due to disease progression and 1 patient discontinued due to a subdural hematoma of unknown cause.
  • PK and PD data were not available for this report.

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  • (PMID = 27961463.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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50. Becker H, Marcucci G, Maharry K, Margeson D, Radmacher MD, Whitman SP, Mrózek K, Baer MR, Larson RA, Bloomfield CD, for Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB): NPM1 mutations as an independent prognosticator for older cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN AML). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7000

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] NPM1 mutations as an independent prognosticator for older cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN AML).
  • : 7000 Background: In younger CN AML without FLT3-ITD, NPM1 mutations predict favorable outcome.
  • METHODS: Pretreatment marrow was studied in 189 older CN AML pts [median age 69 y (60 - 83 y); 162 de novo & 27 secondary (s; prior hematologic disorders) cases] enrolled on CALGB 9720 (n=106) & 10201 (n=83).
  • RESULTS: In de novo CN AML, NPM1 mutated (NPM1mut) pts (54%) had more CRs (85% v 45%, P<.0001) & longer relapse-free (RFS) (P=.02; 3 y rates 23% v 10%) & overall survival (OS) (P<.0001; 3 y 34% v 7%) than NPM1 wild-type (NPM1wt) pts.
  • CONCLUSIONS: NPM1 mutations independently predict better outcome in older CN AML.

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  • (PMID = 27963957.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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51. Fernandez HF, Sun Z, Litzow MR, Luger SM, Paietta EM, Dewald G, Ketterling RP, Rowe JM, Lazarus HM, Tallman MS: A randomized trial of anthracycline dose intensification during induction of younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia: Results of Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group study E1900. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7003

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A randomized trial of anthracycline dose intensification during induction of younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia: Results of Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group study E1900.
  • : 7003 Background: In younger adults with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML), anthracycline dose intensification during induction may improve complete remission (CR) rates; however, an improvement in overall survival (OS) in a randomized trial has not been demonstrated.
  • METHODS: Adult patients with previously untreated AML were randomized to receive either SDD (45 mg/m<sup>2</sup>/d) or HDD (90 mg/m<sup>2</sup>/d) each for 3days combined with standard-dose cytarabine (100 mg/m<sup>2</sup>/d) for 7 days by continuous intravenous infusion.
  • Those achieving a CR were allocated to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) or high-dose cytarabine (with or without a single dose of gemtuzumab ozogamicin) prior to autologous HSCT.
  • There were no differences in patient demographics or disease characteristics between the two groups at presentation.
  • In younger AML patients a higher dose of anthracycline in induction should be considered the new standard of care.

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  • (PMID = 27961375.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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52. Lancet JE, Karp J, Cripe L, Roboz G, Wollman M, Berman C, Conroy A, Hawtin R, Fox J, Michelson G: Phase Ib/II pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) study of combination voreloxin and cytarabine in relapsed or refractory AML patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7005

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase Ib/II pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) study of combination voreloxin and cytarabine in relapsed or refractory AML patients.
  • Clinical activity is observed in ovarian cancer and AML.
  • Interim results from a phase Ib/II study in relapsed or refractory AML are reported.
  • METHODS: Dose-escalation in relapsed/refractory AML patients (pts) with ≤ 3 prior induction regimens; phase II expansion in first-relapse pts (CR1 ≥ 3 months) at MTD.

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  • (PMID = 27961377.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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53. Erba HP, Kantarjian HM, Claxton DF, Arellano M, Lyons RM, Kovacsovics TJ, Gabrilove J, Eckert S, Faderl S: Updated remission duration and survival results of single-agent clofarabine in previously untreated older adult patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) unlikely to benefit from standard induction chemotherapy due to unfavorable baseline risk factor(s). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7062

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Updated remission duration and survival results of single-agent clofarabine in previously untreated older adult patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) unlikely to benefit from standard induction chemotherapy due to unfavorable baseline risk factor(s).
  • We now report updated duration of remission (DOR), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS).
  • METHODS: Single arm, multi-center, phase II, open-label, 2-stage study of patients with untreated AML, ≥60 years old, and at least one adverse prognostic factor: age ≥70 years, antecedent hematologic disorder (AHD), PS = 2, and/or intermediate/unfavorable risk karyotype.
  • Clofarabine (CLO) administered days 1-5 at 30 mg/m<sup>2</sup> during induction and 20 mg/m<sup>2</sup> during re-induction/consolidation for maximum 6 cycles.
  • Median DOR (censored at alternative therapy) for CR/CRp was 56 weeks (95% CI, 33 weeks - not yet estimable [n/e]) and for CR 65 weeks (95% CI, 41 weeks - n/e).
  • Median DFS (not censored at alternative therapy) for CR/CRp was 34 weeks (95% CI, 24 - 65 weeks).
  • CONCLUSIONS: These data expand on the previously reported efficacy and safety data of single agent CLO in adult AML.
  • These results suggest that single agent CLO is an effective and tolerable treatment option for older adult patients with untreated AML and 1 or more unfavorable baseline prognostic factor(s).

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  • (PMID = 27961436.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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54. Pratz KW, Cho E, Karp J, Levis M, Zhao M, Rudek M, Wright J, Smith BD: Phase I dose escalation trial of sorafenib as a single agent for adults with relapsed and refractory acute leukemias. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7065

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I dose escalation trial of sorafenib as a single agent for adults with relapsed and refractory acute leukemias.
  • Based on preclinical activity in FLT3 mutant AML, sorafenib was studied in refractory acute leukemia.
  • METHODS: The primary objective was to determine the safety and tolerability of sorafenib in refractory acute leukemias.
  • RESULTS: Fifteen patients (13 = AML, 2 = ALL) were enrolled (ages 37-85) and treated on three dosing schedules (400 mg BID x 14 d, 400 mg BID x 21 days, 600 mg BID x 21days) of single agent sorafenib.
  • No patients met criteria for complete or partial response, but 11 of 15 (73%) patients experienced stable disease as best response, with 6 showing a reduction in bone marrow blasts after only one cycle, half of who experienced a >50% reduction in bone marrow blasts.

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  • (PMID = 27961441.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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55. Kadia TM, Faderl S, Estrov Z, Konopleva M, George S, Lee W, Puzanov I, Chen A, Kantarjian H, Ravandi F: Final results of phase I and pharmacokinetic study of SJG-136 administered on a daily x 5 schedule. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e13506

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Here we report the results of a CTEP-sponsored phase I trial of SJG-136 administered on a daily x 5 schedule in pts with relapsed or refractory (R/R) leukemias.
  • METHODS: Previously treated pts with R/R acute leukemias (AML, ALL, high risk MDS, CML blast phase) or R/R CLL with adequate organ function and ECOG performance status of ≤ 2 were eligible for the study.
  • Thirteen (81%) pts had R/R AML, and 3 (19%) had R/R ALL of which 5 (31%) had diploid and 6 (38%) had adverse cytogenetics.
  • Other non-dose limiting toxicities included nausea, dyspnea, fatigue, bloating, and insomnia.
  • One pt had a PR, 8 pts had stable disease, and 6 had progression.
  • CONCLUSIONS: SJG-136 is safe and active in patients with advanced leukemias.

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  • (PMID = 27961262.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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56. Fauzdar A, Mahajan A, Jain D, Mishra M, Raina V: Amplification of RUNX1 gene in two new cases of childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A case report. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e21000

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Amplification of RUNX1 gene in two new cases of childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A case report.
  • : e21000 Background: Chromosome abnormalities of leukemia cells have important prognostic significance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
  • B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) ETV6/RUNX1 (alias TEL/AML1) is most frequent i.e.
  • We report two new cases with Pre B- cell ALL without ETV6/RUNX1 rearrangement, showing amplification of AML1 gene detected by FISH analysis.
  • RESULTS: In first case a 3-year girl with four copies of AML (RUNX1) gene were observed in 95% of the cell with normal two copies of TEL (ETV6) gene in both interphase and metaphase FISH.
  • In second case, a 4-year male we observed four copies of AML and two copies of TEL gene in more than 80% of cells.

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  • (PMID = 27960689.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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57. Vey N, Bourhis J, Dombret H, Bordessoule D, Prebet T, Charbonnier A, Squiban P, Damholt B, Blaise D, Olive D: A phase I study of the anti-natural killer inhibitory receptor (KIR) monoclonal antibody (1-7F9, IPH2101) in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):3015

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase I study of the anti-natural killer inhibitory receptor (KIR) monoclonal antibody (1-7F9, IPH2101) in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
  • : 3015 Background: The outcome of the majority of patients with AML remains poor, especially in the oldest patients.
  • Allogeneic SCT is a curative approach for AML.
  • In some models, it has been shown that KIR mismatch is important for the anti-leukemic effect of the graft, most probably through unleashed NK cells towards AML blasts, as suggested by enhanced in vitro NK lytic activity of KIR-HLA mismatched donor NK against recipient blasts.
  • We present the results of the first-in-human phase I trial of this agent in patients with AML in complete remission (CR).
  • METHODS: Patients aged 60-80 years with non promyelocytic AML in first CR following induction and 1-6 cycles of consolidation chemotherapy, normal renal, and hepatic functions, KIR-expression on patient NK-cells and who signed informed consent were eligible.Dose escalation (0.0003, 0.003, 0.015, 0.075, 0.3, 1, 3 mg/kg) was studied using a 3+3 scheme.
  • As expected for an IgG4, NK cell numbers were unaffected by the treatment.
  • Upregulation of CD69 on NK cells and concomitant increases in TNF and MIP1b circulating cytokines were observed in some patients at the highest doses (0.075, 0.1, 0.3 mg/kg) but a dose dependency has not been reached yet.
  • At the 0.3mg/kg dose, MTD has not been reached, but a one week receptor blockade and signs of NK activation were observed.

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  • (PMID = 27962059.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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58. Maris MB, Ravandi F, Stuart R, Stone R, Cripe L, Cooper M, Strickland S, Turturro F, Stock W, Berman C: A phase II study of voreloxin as single agent therapy for elderly patients (pts) with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7048

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A phase II study of voreloxin as single agent therapy for elderly patients (pts) with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
  • Interim results of REVEAL-1, a phase II study of single agent voreloxin in newly diagnosed elderly AML pts, are reported.
  • Eligibility: newly diagnosed AML (de novo or secondary AML), pts age ≥ 60 and ≥ 1 additional adverse risk factor (age ≥ 70, secondary AML, intermediate or unfavorable cytogenetics, or PS 2).
  • Median duration of remission has not been reached.
  • Voreloxin PK were similar to those in an earlier single agent phase I study in relapsed/refractory AML.
  • Ex-vivo sensitivity did not predict clinical response.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In REVEAL-1, voreloxin demonstrates clinical activity with 2 dosing schedules in previously untreated elderly (age ≥ 60) patients with AML who are unlikely to benefit from standard chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 27961427.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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59. Baylin SB, Mufti GJ: Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) comprise a closely linked continuum of malignant hematologic diseases. Introduction. Nat Clin Pract Oncol; 2005 Dec;2 Suppl 1:S1-3
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) comprise a closely linked continuum of malignant hematologic diseases. Introduction.
  • [MeSH-major] Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic / therapeutic use. DNA Modification Methylases / antagonists & inhibitors. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / drug therapy. Myelodysplastic Syndromes / drug therapy


60. Spadaro P, Ingemi M, Pitini V, Arrigo C, Soto Parra H: Myelodysplastic syndromes developing after imatinib therapy for GIST. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10532

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: Between January 2007 and December 2008, bone marrow samples for morphologic analysis, FISH and classical cytogenetics were obtained from 49 pts. (30 male; 19 female, mean age 62) with unresectable or metastatic GIST before and during treatment with 400 mg/d of imatinib.
  • For pts. with progressive disease (15 pts.) or exon 9 mutant disease (5 pts.
  • All pathologic material was reviewed to identify pts. with MDS or AML according to the WHO classification.
  • One patient developed a RAEB-1 with monosomy 7 which rapidly transformed into AML.

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  • (PMID = 27963910.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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61. Ryningen A, Ersvaer E, Øyan AM, Kalland KH, Vintermyr OK, Gjertsen BT, Bruserud Ø: Stress-induced in vitro apoptosis of native human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells shows a wide variation between patients and is associated with low BCL-2:Bax ratio and low levels of heat shock protein 70 and 90. Leuk Res; 2006 Dec;30(12):1531-40
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYTARABINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Stress-induced in vitro apoptosis of native human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells shows a wide variation between patients and is associated with low BCL-2:Bax ratio and low levels of heat shock protein 70 and 90.
  • Spontaneous in vitro apoptosis reflects a true biological heterogeneity between patients which has to be considered when in vitro models are used to study regulation of apoptosis in native human AML cells.
  • Even though the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic signaling seems to have a prognostic impact in AML, the possible clinical relevance of spontaneous apoptosis remains to be clarified.
  • High apoptosis/low viability was associated with low levels of heat shock proteins 70 and 90 as well as low Bcl-2:Bax ratio for patients heterogeneous with regard to morphology, membrane molecule expression, genetic abnormalities and response to therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis. HSC70 Heat-Shock Proteins / metabolism. HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins / metabolism. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / metabolism. Oxidative Stress. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 / metabolism. bcl-2-Associated X Protein / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Cell Survival / drug effects. Cells, Cultured. Coculture Techniques. Cytarabine / pharmacology. Female. Flow Cytometry. Gene Expression Profiling. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor / pharmacology. Humans. Leukocytes, Mononuclear / drug effects. Leukocytes, Mononuclear / metabolism. Male. Middle Aged. RNA, Messenger / genetics

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  • (PMID = 16600371.001).
  • [ISSN] 0145-2126
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / BAX protein, human; 0 / HSC70 Heat-Shock Proteins; 0 / HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / bcl-2-Associated X Protein; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine; 83869-56-1 / Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
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62. Rowe JM: Is there a role for postremission therapy in older adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)? Leukemia; 2005 Aug;19(8):1324-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Is there a role for postremission therapy in older adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)?
  • [MeSH-major] Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Age Factors. Aged. Disease-Free Survival. Humans. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies. Remission Induction. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 15944718.001).
  • [ISSN] 0887-6924
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leukemia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Addresses
  • [Publication-country] England
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63. Niebuhr B, Iwanski GB, Schwieger M, Roscher S, Stocking C, Cammenga J: Investigation of C/EBPalpha function in human (versus murine) myelopoiesis provides novel insight into the impact of CEBPA mutations in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Leukemia; 2009 May;23(5):978-83
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Investigation of C/EBPalpha function in human (versus murine) myelopoiesis provides novel insight into the impact of CEBPA mutations in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).
  • [MeSH-major] CCAAT-Enhancer-Binding Proteins / physiology. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / genetics. Mutation / genetics. Myelopoiesis / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Differentiation. Colony-Forming Units Assay. Dimerization. Humans. Mice. Myeloid Cells / metabolism. RNA, Small Interfering / pharmacology. Stem Cells / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19020539.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-5551
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leukemia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Letter; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CCAAT-Enhancer-Binding Proteins; 0 / CEBPA protein, human; 0 / CEBPA protein, mouse; 0 / RNA, Small Interfering
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64. Gupta A, Singh M, Singh H, Kumar L, Sharma A, Bakhshi S, Raina V, Thulkar S: Febrile neutropenia during acute myeloid leukemia therapy: Single institution experience from a developing country. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e18000

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Febrile neutropenia during acute myeloid leukemia therapy: Single institution experience from a developing country.
  • : e18000 Background: Febrile neutropenia poses a major challenge during treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML).
  • METHODS: Episodes of febrile neutropenia in 104 consecutive patients of AML admitted to the medical oncology ward between May 2001 and December 2006 were studied.
  • RESULTS: 402 febrile episodes including 363 episodes of febrile neutropenia (180 in induction, 183 in consolidation) and 39 non-neutropenic episodes (18 in induction, 21 in consolidation) occurred.
  • Prompt and proper institution of antibiotics and antifungals besides considering alternative diagnosis peculiar to the region (e.g. tuberculosis, malaria) may aid in better management.

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  • (PMID = 27964014.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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65. Ritchie EK, Roboz G, Hinchcliff K, Curcio T, Scandura J, Feldman E: Phase I trial of laromustine in combination with infusional ara-C in elderly patients over age 60 with newly diagnosed AML or high-grade MDS. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7054

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase I trial of laromustine in combination with infusional ara-C in elderly patients over age 60 with newly diagnosed AML or high-grade MDS.
  • : 7054 Background: Laromustine is a novel sulfonylhydrazine-alkylating agent with activity in acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
  • Laromustine in phase I and II trials shows activity in patients with relapsed/refractory leukemia (1) and elderly patients with new AML (2).
  • Based on this data, a phase I study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of combining escalating doses of laromustine with infusional ara-C in AML and MDS patients over 60.
  • METHODS: Laromustine 300 mg/m2 (cohort 1, n = 6), 400 mg/m2 (cohort 2, n = 5) and 500 mg/m2 (cohort 3) was administered by IV infusion over 1 hour on day 1 in combination with ara-C 100 mg/m2/day as a continuous infusion for 7 days.
  • Patients achieving CR after induction therapy were offered up to 2 cycles of consolidation therapy for a maximum cumulative laromustine dose of 1,000 mg/m2.

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  • (PMID = 27961420.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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66. Rubnitz J, Inaba H, Ribeiro R, Pounds S, Pui C, Leung W: Pilot study of haploidentical natural killer cell transplantation in childhood acute myeloid leukemia. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):10034

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pilot study of haploidentical natural killer cell transplantation in childhood acute myeloid leukemia.
  • : 10034 Background: In the setting of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), donor natural killer (NK) cells exhibit potent anti-leukemic effects without causing graft-versus-host disease.
  • We hypothesized that the transplantation of purified haploidentical NK cells may be a safe and effective form of consolidation therapy that will reduce the risk of relapse among children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are not treated with HSCT.
  • In this pilot study, we assessed the safety, feasibility, and engraftment of NK cell infusions in 10 patients with AML in first remission.
  • RESULTS: The 10 patients had a median age of 2.5 years (range, 8 months to 21 years) and a median leukocyte count of 62 x 10<sup>9</sup>/L (range, 4 to 487) at diagnosis.
  • Leukemic cell genetic abnormalities included CBFβ-MYH11in 4 cases, RBM15-MKL1in 2 cases, MLL-ENL and MLL-AF9 in 1 case each; 2 cases had no detectable abnormalities.
  • All patients had detectable donor NK cells at one or more time points: donor NK cell chimerism ranged from 0% to 30% during the first 4 weeks after the infusions and was greater than 1% in 9 cases at week 1, 4 cases at week 2, 5 cases at week 3, and 3 cases at week 4.
  • One patient had prolonged NK engraftment (189 days), but no non-hematological toxicity.
  • Grade 3-4 non-hematological toxicity was limited to one respiratory viral infection and one episode of febrile neutropenia.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Haploidentical NK cells can be safely administered to AML patients who are in remission.
  • We have recently opened a new trial to evaluate the efficacy of NK cell therapy in children in first remission of AML.

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  • (PMID = 27962581.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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67. Graubert T: AML1 and Evi1: coconspirators in MDS/AML? Blood; 2008 Apr 15;111(8):3916-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] AML1 and Evi1: coconspirators in MDS/AML?
  • In this issue of Blood, Watanabe-Okochi and colleagues use a mouse bone marrow transplantation model to demonstrate that mutant alleles of AML1 (RUNX1) can initiate a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) that progresses to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in association with overexpression of Evi1.

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  • [CommentOn] Blood. 2008 Apr 15;111(8):4297-308 [18192504.001]
  • (PMID = 18434965.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-4971
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comment; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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68. Schwind S, Marcucci G, Maharry K, Radmacher MD, Whitman SP, Paschka P, Mrózek K, Kolitz JE, Larson RA, Bloomfield CD, Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB): MicroRNA 181a (miR-181a) expression as a prognosticator in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN AML). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7001

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] MicroRNA 181a (miR-181a) expression as a prognosticator in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN AML).
  • : 7001 Background: We showed recently that CEBPA mutations (mut) in CN AML are associated with better outcome and a unique microRNA expression profile, including miR-181a upregulation.
  • METHODS: We analyzed 187 de novo CN AML adult patients (pts) aged <60 years (y; median 45) similarly treated on CALGB 9621 and 19808.
  • Of these, 122 had molecular high risk [FLT3-ITD or NPM1 wild type (wt)] and 65 low risk (no FLT3-ITD, NPM1 mut) CN AML.
  • The mean of 2 miR-181a probe log intensities was used as a continuous variable for analyses.
  • RESULTS: Higher miR-181a levels (miR-181a↑) were associated with CEBPA mut, NPM1 wt, no FLT3-TKD, lower ERG expression, higher %FAB M1/M2, lower WBC and age, higher blood blasts, and lower % gum hypertrophy. miR-181a↑ tended to associate with more complete remissions (CRs; p = .07) and significantly associated with longer disease-free (DFS; p = .05) and overall (OS; p = .01) survival (median follow-up 6.5 y for pts alive).
  • CONCLUSIONS: miR-181a expression is a prognostic marker in CN AML, mainly in the molecular high risk group, where it predicts outcome independently of other variables including CEBPA mutations.
  • As miR-181a↑ confer better treatment response, novel approaches increasing miR-181a levels might benefit not only CN but also other AML pts.

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  • (PMID = 27961373.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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69. Jabbour E, Faderl S, Ravandi F, Konopleva M, Verstovsek S, Cortes J, Wierda W, Newsome WM, Yang H, Kantarjian H, Garcia-Manero G: Phase II study of vorinostat (V) in combination with idarubicin and high-dose cytarabine (IA) as front-line therapy in patients (pts) with high-risk myelodyplsatic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7004

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II study of vorinostat (V) in combination with idarubicin and high-dose cytarabine (IA) as front-line therapy in patients (pts) with high-risk myelodyplsatic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
  • : 7004 Background: Standard induction therapy for pts with AML has not changed over the last 2 decades nor has the outcome of these pts.
  • We designed a phase II study of V with IA as front-line therapy for MDS/AML.
  • METHODS: Pts with untreated int-2/high-risk MDS or AML ages 15-65 with adequate liver and renal functions and PS, and EF ≥ 50% were eligible.
  • 3 pts with relapsed/refractory AML were treated in the run-in phase.
  • 8 (47%) had secondary disease.
  • The median PFS has not been reached.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The combination of IA and V is safe and active in AML/MDS.
  • Results will be compared with those of a parallel IA study at MDACC.

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  • (PMID = 27961376.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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70. Tsujimura H, Mimura N, Ise M, Sakai C, Shimada H, Nagata M, Kumagai K: Incidence of therapy-related leukemia following chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e15663

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Incidence of therapy-related leukemia following chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer.
  • METHODS: From July 2000 to March 2008, 348 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma underwent CRT.
  • RESULTS: Four patients, who achieved CR after CRT, developed leukemia.
  • Case1, 60-yo-male, developed overt acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from myelodysplastic syndrome 48 months after CRT.
  • Case2, 64-yo-male, developed AML M0 with t(9;22)(q34;q11) 44 months after CRT.
  • Case3, 72-yo-male, developed Burkitt leukemia with t(8;14)(q24;q32) 19 months after CRT.
  • Case4, 65-yo-male, developed myeloid crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia with complicated abnormalities including t(9;22)(q34;q11) 48 months after CRT.
  • Case 1 and 3 had localized disease and received single course of neoadjuvant CRT.
  • Case 2 and 4 had advance disease and received 2 courses of CRT.
  • All patients eventually died of leukemia.
  • To this end, atypical cytogenetic abnormalities seen in the present cases give a new insight into the biology of therapy-related leukemia.
  • Notably, this is the first report presenting the incidence of secondary leukemia by nedaplatin.

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  • (PMID = 27962759.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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71. Krug U, Serve H, Müller-Tidow C, Mesters RM, Steffen B, Büchner T, Berdel WE: New molecular therapy targets in acute myeloid leukemia. Recent Results Cancer Res; 2007;176:243-62
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] New molecular therapy targets in acute myeloid leukemia.
  • Despite improvements to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) therapy during the last 25 years, the majority of patients still succumb to the disease.
  • The present chapter focuses on exciting areas of research in the field of AML therapy, including promising results with regards to recent improvements in our understanding of angiogenesis, tyrosine kinase signaling, farnesylation, cell cycling, modulation of gene expression, protein degradation, modulation of intracellular proteins, apoptosis, metabolism, and the possible retargeting of oncogenic proteins.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Leukemia, Myeloid / metabolism. Neovascularization, Pathologic / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Apoptosis / drug effects. Cell Cycle / drug effects. Gene Expression / drug effects. Humans. Oncogenes / drug effects. Proteins / drug effects. Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / antagonists & inhibitors

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  • (PMID = 17607931.001).
  • [ISSN] 0080-0015
  • [Journal-full-title] Recent results in cancer research. Fortschritte der Krebsforschung. Progrès dans les recherches sur le cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Recent Results Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Proteins; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
  • [Number-of-references] 145
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72. Vogel MN, Vogel W, Bares R, Wehrmann M, Claussen CD, Horger MS: Unusual distribution of red marrow mimicking chloroma in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. Skeletal Radiol; 2007 Jun;36(6):547-50
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  • [Title] Unusual distribution of red marrow mimicking chloroma in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia.
  • We present a case of unusual distribution of red marrow in a patient with extramedullary acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).
  • Nodular islets of red marrow located in the epiphyseal and distal parts of the limbs may mimic tumoral infiltration and be mistaken for chloroma in a patient with AML.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Marrow / pathology. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / pathology. Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Biopsy. Contrast Media. Diagnosis, Differential. Gadolinium DTPA. Humans. Male. Radiopharmaceuticals. Sarcoma, Myeloid / pathology. Tomography, Emission-Computed


73. Licht JD, Sternberg DW: The molecular pathology of acute myeloid leukemia. Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program; 2005;:137-42
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The molecular pathology of acute myeloid leukemia.
  • The pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) involves an array of molecular alterations that disrupt almost every facet of cell transformation.
  • These processes include the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, self-renewal, survival, cell cycle checkpoint control, DNA repair and chromatin stability, and cell dissemination.
  • This overview describes some of the critical molecular alterations and implicates the rogue leukemogenic proteins in the onset and progression of AML.

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  • (PMID = 16304371.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-4383
  • [Journal-full-title] Hematology. American Society of Hematology. Education Program
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K08 CA82261; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA59936
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / Transcription Factors
  • [Number-of-references] 40
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74. Ghavamzadeh A, Hashemi S, Alimoghaddam K, Nasri Moghaddam Z, Shadpour M, Jalili M: Phase II trial of old age acute myeloid leukemia treatment by arsenic trioxide and low-dose subcutaneous cytosin arabinoside. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7075

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phase II trial of old age acute myeloid leukemia treatment by arsenic trioxide and low-dose subcutaneous cytosin arabinoside.
  • : 7075 Background: AML is a disease of old age, but unfortunately due to several factors standard treatment can not be delivered to these patients.
  • Patients couldn't tolerate standard treatment of AML due to old age or comorbid disorders.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although prognosis of old age AML remain poor, but with this type of treatment RR is acceptable.
  • In this very high-risk group of very old AML, combination of ATO and ARA-C possibly could improve survival.

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  • (PMID = 27961458.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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75. Mullally A, Ebert BL: NF1 inactivation revs up Ras in adult acute myelogenous leukemia. Clin Cancer Res; 2010 Aug 15;16(16):4074-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] NF1 inactivation revs up Ras in adult acute myelogenous leukemia.
  • Mutations in the Ras pathway are common in myeloid malignancies.
  • NF1, a tumor suppressor and negative regulator of Ras, is inactivated in a subset of adult acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cases.
  • Loss of NF1 function sensitizes cells to inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a downstream effector of Ras activation, highlighting a potential therapeutic opportunity for some AML patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic / genetics. Genes, Neurofibromatosis 1. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / genetics. Signal Transduction / genetics. ras Proteins / biosynthesis

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  • [CommentIn] Clin Cancer Res. 2010 Aug 15;16(16):4135-47 [20505189.001]
  • (PMID = 20587590.001).
  • [ISSN] 1078-0432
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.6.5.2 / ras Proteins
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76. Shepard RC, Talluto CC, Jacob G: Phase I study results of nanomolecular liposomal annamycin in refractory ALL. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7066

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • : 7066 Background: There continues to be no effective second-line therapy for refractory AML or ALL and the cure rate with current therapy has not significantly improved in decades.
  • The first-line therapy for adult AML has remained the same 7 + 3 that it was a generation ago.
  • The MTD was determined to be 150 mg/m2/day for 3 days.
  • We are now testing it in a phase I study in children and young adults with refractory ALL or AML.

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  • (PMID = 27961442.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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77. Singh T, Satheesh C, Ankit J, Sajeevan KV, Appaji L, Arunakumari B, Padma M, Mamatha HS: Use of Port-A-Cath in pediatric cancer patients: Experience from a tertiary cancer center in south India. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e20747

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Disease distribution included ALL(80%), AML(5%), NHL(5%), neuroblastoma (5%) and RMS (5%).

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  • (PMID = 27962033.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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78. Ghavamzadeh A, Allahyari A, Alimoghaddam K, Karimi A, Shamshiri A, Abolhasani R, Manookian A, Asadi M, Khatami F: Outpatient versus inpatient autologous stem cell transplantation for malignant hematologic disorders. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7042

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Outpatient versus inpatient autologous stem cell transplantation for malignant hematologic disorders.
  • : 7042 Background: High-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support is utilized for the treatment of a variety of malignancies including Hodgkin/non-Hodgkins lymphoma and acute leukemias.
  • The aim of this study was to compare the time of engraftment and mortality rate and cost of neutropenic treatment in outpatient versus inpatient autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT).
  • METHODS: 9 outpatients (5 HL, 2 NHL, and 2 AML) were compared with 32 inpatients (15 HL, 8 NHL, and 9 AML; for whom the outpatient facilities were not ready) from May 2008 to December 2008.
  • They received conditioning regimen (CEAM for NHL and HL, busulfan and etoposide for AML) and stem cell infusion in hospital.
  • The day after SCT, outpatient group were discharged and followed by outpatient SCT team, and to be re-hospitalized in case of febrile neutropenia, after sepsis workup and performing chest x-ray, they were received the first dose of antibiotic in hospital and treatment continued in home.

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  • (PMID = 27961405.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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79. Bello CM, Yu D, Zhu W, Wetzstein GA, Lancet JE: Outcomes following induction chemotherapy in patients with AML arising from MDS: Analysis of prognostic factors. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7088

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Outcomes following induction chemotherapy in patients with AML arising from MDS: Analysis of prognostic factors.
  • : 7088 Background: Secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML) arising from myelodysplasia (MDS) or a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) has a poor prognosis.
  • METHODS: Retrospective chart review of patients with untreated AML from MDS/MPN treated with standard induction therapy from January 2004 to September 2008.
  • Multivariable analysis indicated that the same three factors were significantly negatively associated with CR/CRp as well as OS: PR cytogenetics, prior treatment with DM/L, and long transformation to AML on log scale.
  • Only 32% of the group that received prior treatment with a DM/L achieved CR/CRp compared to 78% in non DM/L-treated patients (OR = 0.13, 95% CI: 0.04-0.42).
  • The median OS for those treated with a DM/L was 3.7 mo compared to 10.5 mo for non DM/L-treated patients (p < 0.0001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Prior MDS treatment with a DM/L, PR cytogenetics and long transformation to AML are independent negative prognostic factors for response and OS in patients with sAML following induction therapy, suggesting that such patients may be better served by novel approaches, and that stratification for these risk factors should be considered in future clinical trials.

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  • (PMID = 27961482.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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80. Song KY, Kang WK, Park CW, Choi YJ, Rha SE, Park CH: Mucormycosis resulting in gastric perforation in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia: report of a case. Surg Today; 2006;36(9):831-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Mucormycosis resulting in gastric perforation in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia: report of a case.
  • Mucormycosis is an uncommon opportunistic fungal infection that may develop in immunocompromised patients with conditions such as diabetes mellitus, leukemia, lymphoma, or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), or after transplantation with immunosupperessive therapy.
  • We report a case of gastric perforation caused by a mucormycosis infection in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).
  • [MeSH-major] Amphotericin B / therapeutic use. Antifungal Agents / therapeutic use. Gastrectomy. Intestinal Perforation / etiology. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / drug therapy. Mucormycosis / complications. Stomach / injuries. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16937290.001).
  • [ISSN] 0941-1291
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgery today
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surg. Today
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antifungal Agents; 7XU7A7DROE / Amphotericin B
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81. Fulcher JW, Allred TJ, Kulharya A, Satya-Prakash KL, Seigler M, Neibarger D, Mazzella FM: Granular acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults: report of a case and review of the literature. South Med J; 2006 Aug;99(8):894-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Granular acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults: report of a case and review of the literature.
  • The diagnosis of granular acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) can be problematic as the cytoplasmic granules found in many blast cells may mimic those seen in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).
  • This rare variant of B-cell ALL is more commonly diagnosed in children, but may occur in adults.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Marrow Cells / pathology. Cytoplasmic Granules / pathology. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Flow Cytometry. Humans. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 16929890.001).
  • [ISSN] 0038-4348
  • [Journal-full-title] Southern medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] South. Med. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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82. Hollmig K, Waheed S, Nair B, Haessler J, Petty N, Pineda-Roman M, Alsayed Y, van Rhee F, Crowley J, Barlogie B: MDS-associated cytogenetic abnormalities (MDS-CA) after total therapy (TT) regimens for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM): Apparent surge after introduction of post-transplant consolidation chemotherapy (CONS) in TT2 and TT3. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):8595

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Despite reduced induction chemotherapy prior to and CONS after tandem melphalan (200mg/m2)-based autotransplants from 4 in TT2 to 2 in TT3, overall and persistent MDS-CA increased significantly in TT3.
  • Clinical MDS and AML were rarely observed and a full account of hematopathologic findings will be presented.

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  • (PMID = 27962291.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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83. Tsai J, Lee EY: MDCT imaging findings of extramedullary granulocytic sarcoma of the heart. J Thorac Imaging; 2010 Feb;25(1):W14-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] MDCT imaging findings of extramedullary granulocytic sarcoma of the heart.
  • Granulocytic sarcoma, also known as chloroma, is an uncommon tumor typically seen in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).
  • Extramedullary cardiac involvement of granulocytic sarcoma is rare and there is a paucity of information regarding its multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) imaging appearance.
  • We present a case of extramedullary granulocytic sarcoma of the heart detected on MDCT in a young adult male with AML.
  • An understanding of how extramedullary granulocytic sarcoma of the heart appears on MDCT may decrease or prevent delays in diagnosing this uncommon, although important, complication from AML.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Neoplasms / radiography. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / complications. Sarcoma, Myeloid / radiography. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Contrast Media. Diagnosis, Differential. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Iohexol / analogs & derivatives. Male. Radiographic Image Enhancement / methods. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20160585.001).
  • [ISSN] 1536-0237
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of thoracic imaging
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Thorac Imaging
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Contrast Media; 4419T9MX03 / Iohexol; 712BAC33MZ / iopromide
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84. Fernandez-Calotti P, Jordheim LP, Giordano M, Dumontet C, Galmarini CM: Substrate cycles and drug resistance to 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (araC). Leuk Lymphoma; 2005 Mar;46(3):335-46
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is the most common form of acute leukemia in adults.
  • After diagnosis, patients with AML are mainly treated with standard induction chemotherapy combining cytarabine (araC) and anthracyclines.
  • Resistance to chemotherapy therefore remains a major obstacle in the effective treatment of patients with AML.
  • [MeSH-major] Cytarabine / metabolism. Cytarabine / pharmacology. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 15621823.001).
  • [ISSN] 1042-8194
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia & lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Deoxyribonucleotides; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine
  • [Number-of-references] 108
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85. Sandhu SK, Sekeres MA: Myelodysplastic syndromes: more prevalent than we know. Geriatrics; 2008 Nov;63(11):10-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), a hematopoietic disorder for which formal tracking began as recently as 2001, is rapidly gaining recognition as a cause of anemia.
  • The disease can follow an indolent course or rapidly progress to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).
  • Comorbidities and functional issues make this disease challenging to diagnose and treat in geriatric patients.
  • This article reviews the epidemiology, classification, and treatment options for MDS.
  • [MeSH-minor] Age Factors. Aged. Biopsy. Bone Marrow / pathology. Disease Progression. Humans. Prevalence


86. Cammenga J: Gatekeeper pathways and cellular background in the pathogenesis and therapy of AML. Leukemia; 2005 Oct;19(10):1719-28
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Gatekeeper pathways and cellular background in the pathogenesis and therapy of AML.
  • Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is characterized by the accumulation of immature cells due to disturbed differentiation and proliferation of the myeloid lineage.
  • Genetic alterations affecting transcription factors and receptor tyrosine kinases have been identified in AML and causally linked to the disease.
  • The goal of this review is to address the role of the different genetic alterations in self-renewal and proliferation and to discuss the cellular background in which these events occur during the pathogenesis of AML.
  • Data from AML samples, clinical studies and mouse models for AML will be used to support the different theories regarding the leukemogenesis of AML.
  • Finally, this review wants to highlight the implication of these findings for the therapy of AML.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / etiology. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / therapy. Signal Transduction / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Differentiation. Cell Lineage. Cell Proliferation. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic. Genes, Tumor Suppressor / physiology. Humans. Oncogenes / physiology

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  • (PMID = 16107893.001).
  • [ISSN] 0887-6924
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leukemia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 97
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87. Advani AS: Targeting the c-kit receptor in the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia. Curr Hematol Malig Rep; 2006 Jun;1(2):101-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Targeting the c-kit receptor in the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia.
  • Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a difficult disease to treat.
  • The c-kit receptor represents a potential therapeutic target for AML.
  • The receptor is expressed on more than 10% of blasts in 64% of patients with de novo AML and 95% of those with relapsed AML.
  • It mediates proliferation and anti-apoptotic effects in AML.
  • This review discusses the biology of c-kit in normal and malignant hematopoiesis and the recent clinical trials targeting c-kit in AML.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / drug therapy. Neoplasm Proteins / antagonists & inhibitors. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / pharmacology. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit / antagonists & inhibitors
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Apoptosis / drug effects. Apoptosis / physiology. Cell Division / drug effects. Cell Division / physiology. Clinical Trials as Topic. Drug Delivery Systems. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm / genetics. Hematopoiesis / drug effects. Hematopoiesis / physiology. Hematopoietic Stem Cells / drug effects. Hematopoietic Stem Cells / enzymology. Humans. Middle Aged. Multicenter Studies as Topic. Neoplastic Stem Cells / drug effects. Neoplastic Stem Cells / enzymology

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  • (PMID = 20425339.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-822X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hematologic malignancy reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Hematol Malig Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; EC 2.7.10.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit
  • [Number-of-references] 55
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88. Advani AS: C-kit as a target in the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia. Curr Hematol Rep; 2005 Jan;4(1):51-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] C-kit as a target in the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia.
  • Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a difficult disease to treat.
  • The c-kit receptor represents a potential therapeutic target for AML.
  • The receptor is expressed on more than 10% of blasts in 64% of de novo AMLs and 95% of relapsed AMLs.
  • C-kit mediates proliferation and anti-apoptotic effects in AML.
  • This review will discuss the biology of c-kit in normal and malignant hematopoiesis, and the recent clinical trials targeting c-kit in AML.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Leukemia, Myeloid / drug therapy. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / pharmacology. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit / drug effects. Stem Cell Factor / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Angiogenesis Inhibitors / pharmacology. Angiogenesis Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Animals. Benzamides. Cell Line, Tumor. Clinical Trials as Topic. Hematopoiesis. Humans. Imatinib Mesylate. Indoles / pharmacology. Indoles / therapeutic use. Mice. Piperazines / therapeutic use. Protein Processing, Post-Translational / drug effects. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use. Pyrroles / pharmacology. Pyrroles / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 15610660.001).
  • [ISSN] 1541-0714
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hematology reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Hematol. Rep.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Indoles; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Pyrimidines; 0 / Pyrroles; 0 / Stem Cell Factor; 71IA9S35AJ / Semaxinib; 8A1O1M485B / Imatinib Mesylate; 9RL37ZZ665 / orantinib; EC 2.7.10.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit
  • [Number-of-references] 103
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89. Aytaç S, Pekcan S, Doğru D, Dörttepe I, Kara A, Cetin M: Cystic fibrosis with acute myelogenous leukemia. Turk J Pediatr; 2009 May-Jun;51(3):290-3
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cystic fibrosis with acute myelogenous leukemia.
  • Hematologic malignancies including acute leukemias rarely associate with cystic fibrosis (CF).
  • In this paper, we describe a case who was diagnosed with CF when she was three months old and presented with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) at the age of 17 years.
  • She is the first CF patient who developed AML in our department among 296 CF patients over a 22-year period.
  • [MeSH-major] Cystic Fibrosis / complications. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / complications. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Antineoplastic Agents / administration & dosage. Bone Marrow / pathology. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Lung Diseases, Fungal / etiology. Sepsis / etiology


90. Aguilera SB, Zarraga M, Rosen L: Leukemia cutis in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia: a case report and review of the literature. Cutis; 2010 Jan;85(1):31-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Leukemia cutis in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia: a case report and review of the literature.
  • Leukemia cutis is an infiltration of malignant neoplastic leukocytes or their precursors into the epidermis, dermis, or subcutis.
  • Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is the second most common cause of leukemia cutis and the most common leukemia among adults.
  • In the elderly population, AML presents a challenge to the medical community because of the number of preexisting comorbid conditions and the safety profile of useful chemotherapeutic agents.
  • [MeSH-major] Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / pathology. Leukemic Infiltration. Skin / pathology

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  • (PMID = 20184209.001).
  • [ISSN] 0011-4162
  • [Journal-full-title] Cutis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cutis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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91. White MS, Martin PL, McLean TW: Acute myelogenous leukemia associated with Ollier disease. Pediatr Blood Cancer; 2008 Mar;50(3):645-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Acute myelogenous leukemia associated with Ollier disease.
  • Ollier disease is a rare disorder characterized by the presence of multiple enchondromas and a propensity to develop malignancies.
  • We report the case of a 7-year-old Caucasian male with Ollier disease who developed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).
  • This report describes a patient with Ollier disease and AML and may offer a clue into the genetic pathogenesis of these disorders.
  • [MeSH-major] Enchondromatosis / genetics. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / etiology. Neoplastic Syndromes, Hereditary / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Aminoglycosides / administration & dosage. Antibodies, Monoclonal / administration & dosage. Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized. Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Bone Marrow Transplantation / adverse effects. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 14 / ultrastructure. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21 / ultrastructure. Cytarabine / administration & dosage. Daunorubicin / administration & dosage. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Graft vs Host Disease. Humans. Infant. Male. Mitoxantrone / administration & dosage. Translocation, Genetic

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 16991136.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-5017
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric blood & cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Blood Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Aminoglycosides; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; 0 / gemtuzumab; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; BZ114NVM5P / Mitoxantrone; ZS7284E0ZP / Daunorubicin
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92. Keeshan K, Shestova O, Ussin L, Pear WS: Tribbles homolog 2 (Trib2) and HoxA9 cooperate to accelerate acute myelogenous leukemia. Blood Cells Mol Dis; 2008 Jan-Feb;40(1):119-21
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Tribbles homolog 2 (Trib2) and HoxA9 cooperate to accelerate acute myelogenous leukemia.
  • Mice reconstituted with hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) retrovirally expressing Trib2 uniformly developed fatal transplantable acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).
  • Trib2-induced AML was clonal and we sought to identify cooperating genes in Trib2-induced AML.
  • Mice reconstituted with HSC cotransduced with HoxA9 and Trib2 had accelerated onset of AML compared to either gene alone.
  • These data identify Trib2 and HoxA9 as cooperating genes in AML.
  • [MeSH-major] Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Homeodomain Proteins / pharmacology. Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins / pharmacology. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / etiology. Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 17988908.001).
  • [ISSN] 1079-9796
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood cells, molecules & diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood Cells Mol. Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Homeodomain Proteins; 0 / Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; 0 / Oncogene Proteins; 0 / homeobox protein HOXA9; 0 / tribbles 2 protein, mouse; EC 2.7.11.1 / Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
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93. Motyckova G, Stone RM: The role of molecular tests in acute myelogenous leukemia treatment decisions. Curr Hematol Malig Rep; 2010 Apr;5(2):109-17
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The role of molecular tests in acute myelogenous leukemia treatment decisions.
  • The prognosis for patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is dependent on age, karyotype, and the genetics of the neoplastic cell.
  • Gene expression profiles and microRNA expression patterns in AML may prove highly useful in defining the prognosis of AML.
  • Cytogenetic and, increasingly, molecular findings are used in determining the best therapy for AML patients, especially the choice of whether to perform allogeneic stem cell transplantation.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / genetics. Gene Expression Profiling. Leukemia, Myeloid / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Humans. Karyotyping. MicroRNAs / genetics. Mutation. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 20425404.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-822X
  • [Journal-full-title] Current hematologic malignancy reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Hematol Malig Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / MicroRNAs
  • [Number-of-references] 56
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94. Goldman S, Coiffier B, Reiter A, Younes A, Cairo MS, International TLS Expert Panel: A medical decision tree for the prophylaxis (P) and treatment (T) of tumor lysis syndrome (TLS): An international TLS consensus panel. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e17575

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A medical decision tree for the prophylaxis (P) and treatment (T) of tumor lysis syndrome (TLS): An international TLS consensus panel.
  • METHODS: We convened an international panel (N = 17) of experts in pediatric and adult hematological malignancies and solid tumors (ST) to develop a medical decision tree for the P and T of TLS based on the risk classification (low, medium, high) and management recommendations of Coiffier et al (J Clin Oncol.
  • 2008) Results: Patients without evidence of LTLS were assigned to either low-risk disease (LRD), medium-risk (MRD), or high-risk (HRD).
  • Risk factors included pathological classification stage, bulk, disease burden (WBC/LDH) and renal impairment/involvement.
  • HRD was assigned to patients with either B-ALL, ALL/AML ≥100K/mm<sup>3</sup>, BL/LL stage III/IV, and/or high LDH, DLBCL/PTCL/MCL/ATL with bulky and elevated LDH and patients with MRD with renal impairment/involvement.
  • MRD consisted of ALL ≤100K/mm<sup>3</sup>, AML 25-100K/mm<sup>3</sup>, BL/LL stage I/II and low LDH, childhood ALCL, DLBCL/PTCL/MCL/ATL non-bulky but elevated LDH, CLL treated with targeted therapy, and LRD with renal impairment/involvement.
  • LRD consisted of ST (except bulky sensitive to cytotoxic therapy [MRD]), CML, MM, HL, other NHL and AML <25K/mm<sup>3</sup>.

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  • (PMID = 27963935.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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95. Dutreix C, Huntsman Labed A, Roesel J, Lanza C, Wang Y: Midostaurin: Review of pharmacokinetics (PK) and PK/pharmacodynamic (PD) relationship in AML/MDS patients. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):e14540

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Midostaurin: Review of pharmacokinetics (PK) and PK/pharmacodynamic (PD) relationship in AML/MDS patients.
  • : e14540 Background: Midostaurin is a multi-tyrosine-kinases inhibitor targeting class III tyrosine-protein-kinases, including Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3), involved in hematopoiesis and leukemia.
  • METHODS: The two studies presented here involved patients with wild-type or FLT3-mutated de novo (phase Ib) or relapsed (phase II) AML or MDS.
  • However, evaluation of available bone marrow blast (BM) response data revealed that a much higher midostaurin plasma would be needed for a satisfactory BM response.
  • These results support the ongoing phase III AML study in AML FLT3-mutated patients with midostaurin given in combination with chemotherapy.

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  • (PMID = 27963644.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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96. Pardee TS, Zuber J, Lowe SW: Effects of the Flt3 ITD on response to chemotherapy in a murine model of acute myeloid leukemia. J Clin Oncol; 2009 May 20;27(15_suppl):7060

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effects of the Flt3 ITD on response to chemotherapy in a murine model of acute myeloid leukemia.
  • : 7060 Background: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive, genetically heterogeneous malignancy.
  • The Flt3 receptor tyrosine kinase containing an internal tandem duplication (Flt3 ITD) is a common mutation in AML and associated with a poor prognosis; however, its effect on chemotherapy response is currently unknown.
  • METHODS: Murine AML was generated by retroviral transduction of an MLL-ENL fusion protein into fetal liver cells and subsequent transplantation into syngeneic mice.
  • Blasts were harvested from moribund animals and myeloid lineage confirmed by immunophenotyping.
  • In contrast there was no difference in leukemic burden between Ara-C treated, dox treated or control animals in AML without Flt3 ITD (p = 0.2833).
  • These results suggest AML patients with Flt3 ITD may benefit more from high-dose cytarabine regimens then anthracyclines.

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  • (PMID = 27961434.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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97. Kara IO, Sahin B, Paydas S, Kara B: Granulocytic sarcoma of the heart: extramedullary relapse of acute myeloblastic leukemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation successfully treated by chemotherapy alone. Leuk Lymphoma; 2005 Jul;46(7):1081-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Granulocytic sarcoma of the heart: extramedullary relapse of acute myeloblastic leukemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation successfully treated by chemotherapy alone.
  • We present a case of granulocytic sarcoma (GS) of the heart.
  • A 28-year-old man with relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML-M2) had undergone a non-myeloablative allogeneic peripheral stem cell transplantation.
  • Three years following transplantation, masses were evidenced in his heart by echocardiography but had completely disappeared following a common chemotherapy etoposide, mitoxantrone, ara-C (EMA) regimen for relapsed AML.
  • The involvement of the heart with GS is very rare and this is the first case of extramedullary disease in the heart after allogeneic transplantation.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / therapeutic use. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / therapy. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation / adverse effects. Sarcoma, Myeloid / drug therapy. Sarcoma, Myeloid / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Cytarabine / administration & dosage. Etoposide / administration & dosage. Heart Neoplasms / diagnosis. Heart Neoplasms / drug therapy. Heart Neoplasms / etiology. Humans. Male. Mitoxantrone / administration & dosage. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / drug therapy. Remission Induction. Transplantation, Homologous

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  • (PMID = 16019562.001).
  • [ISSN] 1042-8194
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia & lymphoma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Lymphoma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine; 6PLQ3CP4P3 / Etoposide; BZ114NVM5P / Mitoxantrone
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98. Yoneda K, Morii T, Nieda M, Tsukaguchi N, Amano I, Tanaka H, Yagi H, Narita N, Kimura H: The peripheral blood Valpha24+ NKT cell numbers decrease in patients with haematopoietic malignancy. Leuk Res; 2005 Feb;29(2):147-52
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The peripheral blood Valpha24+ NKT cell numbers decrease in patients with haematopoietic malignancy.
  • In this study, we assessed the Valpha24+ NKT cell numbers in peripheral blood (PB) from 30 healthy donors and 70 patients with haematopoietic malignancy including chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), malignant lymphoma (ML), acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS).
  • Here, we demonstrated that PB Valpha24+ NKT cell numbers were significantly decreased in all the patients with haematopoietic malignancy in comparison with that in healthy donors (P < 0.005).
  • In particular CD4- CD8- Valpha24+ NKT cell numbers were more significantly decreased in the patients with haematopoietic malignancy (P < 0.0001).
  • [MeSH-major] Hematologic Neoplasms / blood. Killer Cells, Natural / cytology. Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, alpha-beta / biosynthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Antigens, CD4 / biosynthesis. Antigens, CD8 / biosynthesis. Flow Cytometry. Humans. Lymphocyte Count. Lymphocytes / cytology. Lymphocytes / immunology. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 15607362.001).
  • [ISSN] 0145-2126
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD4; 0 / Antigens, CD8; 0 / Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, alpha-beta
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99. Forman SJ: What is the role of reduced-intensity transplantation in the treatment of older patients with AML? Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program; 2009;:406-13
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] What is the role of reduced-intensity transplantation in the treatment of older patients with AML?
  • Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), either de novo or arising out of antecedent myelodysplasia, increases with age and is rarely curable by standard treatments used for younger patients.
  • Recent clinical trials using reduced-intensity allogeneic transplantation regimens suggest that a proportion of patients with this disease can be cured, with results comparable to those achieved in younger patients undergoing fully ablative transplant.
  • Although those patients who undergo transplant in a first remission often do well, the vast majority of older patients have not benefited because of the low successful remission achieved with standard therapy, the delay in initiating a donor search, and the lack of significant benefit from transplantation in patients who are not in remission.
  • New approaches to induction, improvements in reduced-intensity regimens, and earlier donor identification will help expand the potential clinical benefit to a larger number of older patients with the disease.

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  • (PMID = 20008226.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-4383
  • [Journal-full-title] Hematology. American Society of Hematology. Education Program
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Myeloablative Agonists
  • [Number-of-references] 32
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100. Ostronoff F, Bueso-Ramos C, Cortes J, Giralt S: Normal hematopoietic function and multiple bone marrow clonal abnormalities in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia after two mismatched stem-cell transplants with graft failure and autologous reconstitution. Am J Hematol; 2007 Aug;82(8):744-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Normal hematopoietic function and multiple bone marrow clonal abnormalities in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia after two mismatched stem-cell transplants with graft failure and autologous reconstitution.
  • A 13-year-old male with primary refractory acute myelogenous leukemia (AML-M0), underwent two mismatched stem cell transplantations (SCT) and experienced graft failure after both procedures.
  • Of interest, his peripheral blood cell counts are normal 7 years after his first SCT, his bone marrow is morphologically normal, however, cytogenetic analysis reveals multiple recurring cytogenetic abnormalities.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Marrow / abnormalities. Graft Rejection / immunology. Graft Rejection / pathology. Hematopoiesis. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / immunology. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / pathology. Stem Cell Transplantation
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Biopsy. Cell Shape. Donor Selection. Humans. Male. Transplantation, Autologous

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  • (PMID = 17506066.001).
  • [ISSN] 0361-8609
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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