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1. Niino D, Tsukasaki K, Torii K, Imanishi D, Tsuchiya T, Onimaru Y, Tsushima H, Yoshida S, Yamada Y, Kamihira S, Tomonaga M: Human herpes virus 8-negative primary effusion lymphoma with BCL6 rearrangement in a patient with idiopathic CD4 positive T-lymphocytopenia. Haematologica; 2008 Jan;93(1):e21-3
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  • Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) was initially designated as a body-cavity-based lymphoma and recognized as a distinct clinical entity without a contiguous tumor mass.
  • PEL was first reported in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the distinctive feature of PEL originally reported as a B-cell neoplasm characterized by infection of the tumor cells by human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8).
  • However, there have recently been several reports of PEL in patients without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or HHV-8 infection.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD4 / biosynthesis. DNA-Binding Proteins / genetics. Gene Rearrangement. Herpesvirus 8, Human / genetics. Lymphoma, Primary Effusion / genetics. Lymphopenia / therapy. T-Lymphocytes / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology. Dyspnea / diagnosis. HIV Infections / diagnosis. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Male. Pericardial Effusion


2. Martelli C, Alderighi D, Coronnello M, Dei S, Frosini M, Le Bozec B, Manetti D, Neri A, Romanelli MN, Salerno M, Scapecchi S, Mini E, Sgaragli G, Teodori E: N,N-bis(cyclohexanol)amine aryl esters: a new class of highly potent transporter-dependent multidrug resistance inhibitors. J Med Chem; 2009 Feb 12;52(3):807-17
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  • The new compounds showed a wide range of potencies and efficacies on doxorubicin-resistant erythroleukemia K562 cells in the pirarubicin uptake assay.

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  • (PMID = 19140665.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-4804
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of medicinal chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Med. Chem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Cyclohexanols; 0 / Cyclohexylamines; 0 / P-Glycoprotein; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin; D58G680W0G / pirarubicin
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3. Szmigielski S, Sobiczewska E: [Risk of neoplastic diseases in conditions of exposure to power magnetic fields--epidemiologic investigations]. Med Pr; 2009;60(3):223-33
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  • [Title] [Risk of neoplastic diseases in conditions of exposure to power magnetic fields--epidemiologic investigations].
  • Cancer risks of power magnetic fields are small and doubtful, but there exist confirmed epidemiologic investigations that in children living in homes where PMF intensity exceeds 0.3-0.4 microT (0.24-0.32 A/m) an increased risk of certain types of leukemias can be observed.
  • About one percent of children live under conditions of PMF exposure.
  • The authors also discuss the binding regulations on the protection of the general population and workers against power magnetic fields and they conclude that existing permissible exposure levels are incompatible with exposure conditions, the present state of knowledge and health threats.
  • [MeSH-major] Electromagnetic Fields / adverse effects. Electromagnetic Phenomena. Environmental Exposure / statistics & numerical data. Neoplasms / epidemiology. Neoplasms / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Brain Neoplasms / epidemiology. Brain Neoplasms / etiology. Causality. Child. Humans. Leukemia, Radiation-Induced / epidemiology. Leukemia, Radiation-Induced / etiology. Lymphoma / epidemiology. Lymphoma / etiology. Poland / epidemiology. Risk Assessment / statistics & numerical data. Risk Factors. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / epidemiology. Soft Tissue Neoplasms / etiology

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  • (PMID = 19746891.001).
  • [ISSN] 0465-5893
  • [Journal-full-title] Medycyna pracy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Pr
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Number-of-references] 35
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4. Balleari E, Rossi E, Clavio M, Congiu A, Gobbi M, Grosso M, Secondo V, Spriano M, Timitilli S, Ghio R: Erythropoietin plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor is better than erythropoietin alone to treat anemia in low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes: results from a randomized single-centre study. Ann Hematol; 2006 Mar;85(3):174-80
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  • [Title] Erythropoietin plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor is better than erythropoietin alone to treat anemia in low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes: results from a randomized single-centre study.
  • Haemopoietic growth factors (HGF), i.e. erythropoietin [recombinant human erythropoietin (rHEPO)] or granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), alone or in combination, have largely been used to treat anemia in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), but whether combined rHEPO and G-CSF is really superior to rHEPO alone is still under debate.
  • Thirty consecutive patients [10 refractory anemia (RA), 5 RA with ringed sideroblasts, 7 refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia, 5 RA with less than 10% blasts and 3 5q-syndrome] were enrolled in the study.
  • Erythroid response was observed in 6/15 (40%) patients in the rHEPO arm and in 11/15 (73.3%) patients in the rHEPO+G-CSF arm.
  • In 4/9 (44.4%) patients who were unresponsive to rHEPO, the addition of G-CSF induced erythroid response at 16 weeks.
  • Erythroid response to HGF was associated with a relevant improvement in QoL.
  • Progression to acute leukemia was cumulatively observed in 4/30 (13.3%) patients (2 in each arm).
  • [MeSH-major] Anemia / drug therapy. Erythropoietin / administration & dosage. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / administration & dosage. Myelodysplastic Syndromes / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Disease Progression. Disease-Free Survival. Erythropoiesis / drug effects. Female. Humans. Injections, Subcutaneous. Male. Middle Aged. Quality of Life. Recombinant Proteins. Remission Induction. Risk Factors


5. Blaybel R, Théoleyre O, Douablin A, Baklouti F: Downregulation of the Spi-1/PU.1 oncogene induces the expression of TRIM10/HERF1, a key factor required for terminal erythroid cell differentiation and survival. Cell Res; 2008 Aug;18(8):834-45
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  • [Title] Downregulation of the Spi-1/PU.1 oncogene induces the expression of TRIM10/HERF1, a key factor required for terminal erythroid cell differentiation and survival.
  • Sustained expression of the Spi-1/PU.1 and Fli-1 oncoproteins blocks globin gene activation in mouse erythroleukemia cells; however, only Spi-1/PU.1 expression inhibits the inclusion of exon 16 in the mature 4.1R mRNA.
  • This report demonstrates that Spi-1/PU.1 downregulation induces the activation of TRIM10/hematopoietic RING finger 1 (HERF1), a member of the tripartite motif (TRIM)/RBCC protein family needed for globin gene transcription.
  • Additionally, we demonstrate that TRIM10/HERF1 is required for the regulated splicing of exon 16 during late erythroid differentiation.
  • Altogether, these data indicate that primary Spi-1/PU.1 downregulation acts on late erythroid differentiation through at least two pathways, one of which requires TRIM10/HERF1 upregulation and parallels the Spi-1/PU.1-induced Fli-1 shutoff regulatory cascade.
  • [MeSH-major] Cell Differentiation / genetics. Erythroid Cells / metabolism. Hematopoiesis / physiology. Histocompatibility Antigens / metabolism. Proto-Oncogene Proteins / metabolism. Trans-Activators / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 18560381.001).
  • [ISSN] 1748-7838
  • [Journal-full-title] Cell research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cell Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Blood Proteins; 0 / Carrier Proteins; 0 / Epb4.1 protein, mouse; 0 / Fli1 protein, mouse; 0 / Hemoglobins; 0 / Histocompatibility Antigens; 0 / Microfilament Proteins; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Protein c-fli-1; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins; 0 / TRIM10 protein, human; 0 / TRIM10 protein, mouse; 0 / Trans-Activators; 0 / proto-oncogene protein Spi-1; YOW8V9698H / Dimethyl Sulfoxide
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6. Cai Q, Verma SC, Choi JY, Ma M, Robertson ES: Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus inhibits interleukin-4-mediated STAT6 phosphorylation to regulate apoptosis and maintain latency. J Virol; 2010 Nov;84(21):11134-44
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  • Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the infectious viral agent associated with Kaposi's sarcoma and may also contribute to B-cell disorders, which include primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman's disease.
  • In this report, we demonstrate that KSHV suppresses the interleukin-4 (IL-4)-stimulated immune response of B-lymphocyte activation and cell proliferation.
  • Importantly, knockdown of endogenous STAT6 dramatically increases the sensitivity of PEL cells to low-serum stress or chemical-mediated cellular apoptosis and reactivation of KSHV from latent replication.

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  • (PMID = 20719954.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-5514
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of virology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Virol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA091792; United States / NIDCR NIH HHS / DE / DE014136; United States / NIDCR NIH HHS / DE / R01 DE014136; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R00 CA126182-04; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA091792; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K99 CA126182; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / AI067037; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R00 CA126182; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI067037; United States / NIDCR NIH HHS / DE / R01 DE017338; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA126182; United States / NIDCR NIH HHS / DE / DE17338; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA126182-04; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA072510
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / STAT6 Transcription Factor; 0 / STAT6 protein, human; 207137-56-2 / Interleukin-4
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2953196
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7. Cannon M, Cesarman E, Boshoff C: KSHV G protein-coupled receptor inhibits lytic gene transcription in primary-effusion lymphoma cells via p21-mediated inhibition of Cdk2. Blood; 2006 Jan 1;107(1):277-84
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  • [Title] KSHV G protein-coupled receptor inhibits lytic gene transcription in primary-effusion lymphoma cells via p21-mediated inhibition of Cdk2.
  • Infection with Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is now known to be an etiologic force behind KS and primary-effusion lymphoma (PEL).
  • Over time, KSHV has pirated many human genes whose products regulate angiogenesis, inflammation, and the cell cycle.
  • Although it is considered a viral oncogene and causes KS-like lesions in mice, vGPCR expression results in cell-cycle arrest of KSHV-infected PEL cells.

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  • (PMID = 16150942.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-4971
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA068 939; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / K08-AI53 971
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21; 0 / G protein-coupled receptor, Human herpesvirus 8; 0 / Immediate-Early Proteins; 0 / Receptors, Chemokine; 0 / Rta protein, Human herpesvirus 8; 0 / Trans-Activators; 0 / Viral Proteins; EC 2.7.11.22 / CDK2 protein, human; EC 2.7.11.22 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1895347
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8. Kowalska K, Soscia C, Combe H, Vasseur P, Voulhoux R, Filloux A: The C-terminal amphipathic alpha-helix of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PelC outer membrane protein is required for its function. Biochimie; 2010 Jan;92(1):33-40
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  • Biofilm formation results from the production of a matrix mainly comprised of exopolysaccharides. P. aeruginosa possesses several gene clusters which contribute to the formation of the matrix, including the pel genes.
  • Among the pel genes, pelC encodes an outer membrane protein, which may serve as a transporter of polysaccharide to the bacterial cell surface.

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  • [Copyright] 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 19853003.001).
  • [ISSN] 1638-6183
  • [Journal-full-title] Biochimie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biochimie
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins
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9. Zhang K, Han W, Zhang R, Xu X, Pan Q, Hu X: Phenylobacterium zucineum sp. nov., a facultative intracellular bacterium isolated from a human erythroleukemia cell line K562. Syst Appl Microbiol; 2007 Apr;30(3):207-12
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  • [Title] Phenylobacterium zucineum sp. nov., a facultative intracellular bacterium isolated from a human erythroleukemia cell line K562.
  • A bacterial strain HLK1(T) was isolated from the human erythroleukemia cell line K562.
  • The type strain is HLK1(T) (=CGMCC 1.3786(T), DSM=18354).

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  • (PMID = 16908113.001).
  • [ISSN] 0723-2020
  • [Journal-full-title] Systematic and applied microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Syst. Appl. Microbiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] GENBANK/ AY628697/ DQ311665/ DQ311666
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Bacterial; 0 / DNA, Ribosomal; 0 / RNA, Ribosomal, 16S; EC 5.99.1.3 / DNA Gyrase
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10. Abe K, Shimizu R, Pan X, Hamada H, Yoshikawa H, Yamamoto M: Stem cells of GATA1-related leukemia undergo pernicious changes after 5-fluorouracil treatment. Exp Hematol; 2009 Apr;37(4):435-445.e1
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  • [Title] Stem cells of GATA1-related leukemia undergo pernicious changes after 5-fluorouracil treatment.
  • In Gata1.05 gene knockdown mice, Gata1 expression deteriorates to 5% of wild-type allelic expression, a level insufficient for supporting normal erythropoiesis and one that leads to accumulation of erythroid progenitors that are readily transformed into erythroblastic leukemia.
  • To delineate characteristics of leukemic stem cells (LSCs), we analyzed LSCs of Gata1.05 leukemia, which have a potential to reestablish leukemia in mice.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Leukemic cells isolated from the first recipient mice of Gata1.05 leukemia cells were divided into two fractions using Hoechst dye.
  • Fractionated cells were transplanted into second recipient, or analyzed gene expression profiles and cell-cycle status.
  • However, expression of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-related genes was upregulated in the LSP cells.
  • CONCLUSION: Based on this observation, distinct self-renewal regulatory mechanisms in LSCs may be considered as one of the causes of worsening of the features of leukemia after injury and relapse.
  • [MeSH-major] Fluorouracil / pharmacology. GATA1 Transcription Factor / metabolism. Leukemia / drug therapy. Stem Cells / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 19302918.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-2399
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / GATA1 Transcription Factor; 0 / Gata1 protein, mouse; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
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11. Garaci E, Favalli C, Pica F, Sinibaldi Vallebona P, Palamara AT, Matteucci C, Pierimarchi P, Serafino A, Mastino A, Bistoni F, Romani L, Rasi G: Thymosin alpha 1: from bench to bedside. Ann N Y Acad Sci; 2007 Sep;1112:225-34
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  • After the initial dramatic effects, observed in a Lewis lung carcinoma animal model, using a combination of thymosin alpha 1 (Talpha1) and interferon (IFN) after cyclophosphamide, a number of other preclinical models in mice (Friend erythroleukemia and B16 melanoma) and in rats (DHD/K12 colorectal cancer liver metastasis) have confirmed the efficacy of the combination therapy with Talpha1 and either IFN or IL-2 plus chemotherapy.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes / drug effects. CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes / immunology. CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes / drug effects. CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes / immunology. Disease Models, Animal. Killer Cells, Natural / drug effects. Killer Cells, Natural / immunology. Mice. Rats

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  • (PMID = 17600290.001).
  • [ISSN] 0077-8923
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / thymalfasin; 61512-21-8 / Thymosin
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12. Talasz H, Lindner HH, Sarg B, Helliger W: Histone H4-lysine 20 monomethylation is increased in promoter and coding regions of active genes and correlates with hyperacetylation. J Biol Chem; 2005 Nov 18;280(46):38814-22
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  • [Title] Histone H4-lysine 20 monomethylation is increased in promoter and coding regions of active genes and correlates with hyperacetylation.
  • In the case of H3-Lys(4), H3-Lys(9), H3-Lys(27), and H4-Lys(20), the degree of methylation was variable from the mono- to the di- or trimethylated state, each of which was presumed to be involved in the organization of chromatin and the activation or repression of genes.
  • Here we investigated the interplay between histone H4-Lys(20) mono- and trim-ethylation and H4 acetylation at induced (beta-major/beta-minor glo-bin), repressed (c-myc), and silent (embryonic beta-globin) genes during in vitro differentiation of mouse erythroleukemia cells.
  • By using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we found that the beta-major and beta-minor promoter and the beta-globin coding regions as well as the promoter and the transcribed exon 2 regions of the highly expressed c-myc gene were hyperacetylated and monomethylated at H4-Lys(20).
  • Although activation of the beta-globin gene resulted in an increase in hyperacetylated, monomethylated H4, down-regulation of the c-myc gene did not cause a decrease in hyperacetylated, monomethylated H4-Lys(20), thus showing a stable pattern of histone modifications.

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  • (PMID = 16166085.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-9258
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of biological chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Biol. Chem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Butyrates; 0 / Chromatin; 0 / Cross-Linking Reagents; 0 / Heterochromatin; 0 / Histones; 0 / Isobutyrates; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc; 1HG84L3525 / Formaldehyde; 8LL210O1U0 / isobutyric acid; 9004-22-2 / Globins; K3Z4F929H6 / Lysine
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13. Cohen R, Steinmaus C, Quinlan P, Ku R, Cooper M, Roberts T: Development of permissible exposure limits: the California experience. Int J Occup Environ Health; 2006 Jul-Sep;12(3):242-7
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  • [Title] Development of permissible exposure limits: the California experience.
  • The California OSHA Airborne Contaminant Advisory Committee reviewed several hundred substances and recommended occupational exposure limits with the intent of worker and employer protection.
  • [MeSH-major] Advisory Committees / organization & administration. Hazardous Substances / standards. Occupational Exposure / standards. Occupational Health / legislation & jurisprudence
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. California. Communication. Humans. Maximum Allowable Concentration. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (U.S.) / standards. No-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level. Program Development. United States

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  • (PMID = 16967831.001).
  • [ISSN] 1077-3525
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of occupational and environmental health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Occup Environ Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hazardous Substances
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14. Vyas P, Roberts I: Down myeloid disorders: a paradigm for childhood preleukaemia and leukaemia and insights into normal megakaryopoiesis. Early Hum Dev; 2006 Dec;82(12):767-73
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  • [Title] Down myeloid disorders: a paradigm for childhood preleukaemia and leukaemia and insights into normal megakaryopoiesis.
  • Newborns and children with Down Syndrome are predisposed to a range of blood disorders, which include acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and acute megakaryocytic leukaemia (AMKL).
  • Like other childhood leukaemias DS AMKL is initiated in utero and can present in the neonatal period as a clinically overt preleukaemic condition, transient myeloproliferative disorder (TMD).
  • In addition to trisomy 21, fetal haemopoietic progenitors acquire N-terminal truncating mutations in the key megakaryocyte-erythroid transcription factor GATA1.
  • Thus, DS TMD and AMKL provide a unique model of childhood leukaemia where the preleukaemic and leukaemic phases are ascertainable and separable allowing distinct steps in leukaemogenesis to be studied individually.
  • These findings also have implications for the clinical management of DS TMD and AMKL specifically and also of childhood leukaemia more generally.
  • [MeSH-major] Down Syndrome / complications. Leukemia, Megakaryoblastic, Acute / physiopathology. Megakaryocytes / physiology. Thrombopoiesis / physiology

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  • (PMID = 17064858.001).
  • [ISSN] 0378-3782
  • [Journal-full-title] Early human development
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Early Hum. Dev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Wellcome Trust / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / GATA1 Transcription Factor; 0 / GATA1 protein, human
  • [Number-of-references] 23
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15. Azzini E, Vitaglione P, Intorre F, Napolitano A, Durazzo A, Foddai MS, Fumagalli A, Catasta G, Rossi L, Venneria E, Raguzzini A, Palomba L, Fogliano V, Maiani G: Bioavailability of strawberry antioxidants in human subjects. Br J Nutr; 2010 Oct;104(8):1165-73
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  • No quercetin and ACN were found in plasma, while coumaric acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4HBA, 56 and 54% of pelargonidin-3-glucoside (Pel-glc) ingested with FS and SS, respectively) and protocatechuic acid (59 and 34% of cyanidin-3-glucoside ingested with FS and SS, respectively) over 8 h from strawberry consumption were retrieved in the plasma.
  • Pelargonidin glucuronide, pelargonidin glucoside and pelargonidin aglycone peaked in urine within 2 h of strawberry consumption, and the 24 h amount excreted was always approximately 0.9% of the Pel-glc dose ingested.
  • Furthermore, in the present study, the metabolism of Pel-glc was elucidated, and, for the first time, 4HBA was suggested to be a major human metabolite of Pel-glc.

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  • (PMID = 20487578.001).
  • [ISSN] 1475-2662
  • [Journal-full-title] The British journal of nutrition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Nutr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anthocyanins; 0 / Antioxidants; 0 / Phenols; 36-88-4 / Carotenoids; 45XWE1Z69V / alpha-carotene
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16. Hancock D, Funnell A, Jack B, Johnston J: Introducing undergraduate students to real-time PCR. Biochem Mol Biol Educ; 2010 Sep;38(5):309-16
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  • The model used is a murine erythroleukemia cell line (MEL cells).
  • These continuously cycling, immature red blood cells, arrested at an early stage in erythropoiesis, can be induced to progress further through the process by 72 h exposure to 1.8% DMSO.
  • The relative levels of three sequences: β globin, amino levulinate synthase, and carbonic anhydrase-1 are estimated by real-time PCR, using 18S rRNA as the reference sequence.
  • The changes in gene expression are robust and reproducible, enabling students to experience a "cutting edge" research technique in an undergraduate lab setting.
  • While the undergraduate student experience in practical classes with such sensitive techniques is often mixed, the changes in gene expression in this model are sufficiently great that students can gain the satisfaction of consistent results.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
  • (PMID = 21567850.001).
  • [ISSN] 1539-3429
  • [Journal-full-title] Biochemistry and molecular biology education : a bimonthly publication of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biochem Mol Biol Educ
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Das KC, Das M, Mohanty D, Jadaon MM, Gupta A, Marouf R, Easow SK: Megaloblastosis: from morphos to molecules. Med Princ Pract; 2005;14 Suppl 1:2-14
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  • OBJECTIVE: Megaloblastosis (i.e., megaloblastic transformation of erythroid precursor cells in the bone marrow) is the cytomorphological hallmark of megaloblastic anemia resulting from vitamin B12 and folate deficiency.
  • RESULTS: Derangement of DNA synthesis occurred due to an impaired de novo pathway of thymidylate synthesis in both vitamin-B12- and folate-deficient human megaloblastic bone marrows as well as in the bone marrows of rhesus monkeys and rats with experimentally induced folate deficiency.
  • On the other hand, megaloblastic changes in the bone marrow of human patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and erythroleukemia were not associated with this DNA synthetic abnormality.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel
  • (PMID = 16103708.001).
  • [ISSN] 1011-7571
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical principles and practice : international journal of the Kuwait University, Health Science Centre
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Princ Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Genetic Markers; 0 / Histones; 9007-49-2 / DNA
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18. Taussig DC, Vargaftig J, Miraki-Moud F, Griessinger E, Sharrock K, Luke T, Lillington D, Oakervee H, Cavenagh J, Agrawal SG, Lister TA, Gribben JG, Bonnet D: Leukemia-initiating cells from some acute myeloid leukemia patients with mutated nucleophosmin reside in the CD34(-) fraction. Blood; 2010 Mar 11;115(10):1976-84
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  • [Title] Leukemia-initiating cells from some acute myeloid leukemia patients with mutated nucleophosmin reside in the CD34(-) fraction.
  • Leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are believed to be restricted to the CD34(+) fraction.
  • However, one of the most frequently mutated genes in AML is nucleophosmin (NPM), and this is associated with low CD34 expression.
  • We transplanted sorted fractions of primary NPM-mutated AML into immunodeficient mice to establish which fractions initiate leukemia.
  • When samples were sorted based on CD34 and CD38 expression, multiple fractions initiated leukemia in primary and secondary recipients.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD34 / metabolism. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / pathology. Neoplastic Stem Cells / pathology. Nuclear Proteins / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antigens, CD38 / metabolism. Cell Separation / methods. Erythroid Precursor Cells / metabolism. Erythroid Precursor Cells / pathology. Erythroid Precursor Cells / transplantation. Humans. Immunotherapy, Adoptive / methods. Mice. Mice, Inbred NOD. Mice, Knockout. Mice, SCID. Mutant Proteins / metabolism. Phenotype. Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays

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  • (PMID = 20053758.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-0020
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / G0501940; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA095426; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P01 CA95426; United Kingdom / Cancer Research UK / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD34; 0 / Mutant Proteins; 0 / Nuclear Proteins; 117896-08-9 / nucleophosmin; EC 3.2.2.5 / Antigens, CD38
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2837317
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19. Herchel R, Sindelár Z, Trávnícek Z, Zboril R, Vanco J: Novel 1D chain Fe(III)-salen-like complexes involving anionic heterocyclic N-donor ligands. Synthesis, X-ray structure, magnetic, (57)Fe Mössbauer, and biological activity studies. Dalton Trans; 2009 Nov 28;(44):9870-80
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  • The iron(III) salen-type complexes [Fe(salen)(L)](n) (1-6) involving heterocyclic N-donor ligands HL {HL = 1H-imidazole (Himz), 1H-tetrazol-5-amine (Hatz), 5-methyl-1H-tetrazole (Hmtz), 1H-benzimidazole (Hbimz), 1H-1,2,4-triazole (Htriz) and 1H-benzotriazole (Hbtriz)} have been prepared and characterised by elemental analysis, FT IR, CI mass and (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopies, and variable temperature magnetic measurements.
  • The compounds have been tested for their SOD-like activity, DNA cleavage activity, and in vitro cytotoxicity against two human cancer cell lines: chronic myelogenous erythroleukemia (K562) and breast adenocarcinoma (MCF7).
  • [MeSH-minor] Adenocarcinoma / metabolism. Breast Neoplasms / metabolism. Cell Line, Tumor. Crystallography, X-Ray. DNA Cleavage. Humans. Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive / metabolism. Ligands. Spectroscopy, Mossbauer. Superoxide Dismutase / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 19885536.001).
  • [ISSN] 1477-9234
  • [Journal-full-title] Dalton transactions (Cambridge, England : 2003)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dalton Trans
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Ferric Compounds; 0 / Ligands; E1UOL152H7 / Iron; EC 1.15.1.1 / Superoxide Dismutase
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20. Drobot L, Husak Z, Ilnytska O, Igumentseva N, Oleksyn H, Kusen' S: Transient activation of Ras-dependent signalling at the early stages of Herbimycin A induced erythroid differentiation of human K562 cells. Exp Oncol; 2005 Mar;27(1):31-7
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  • [Title] Transient activation of Ras-dependent signalling at the early stages of Herbimycin A induced erythroid differentiation of human K562 cells.
  • AIM: To study the dynamics of Ras-dependent signalling in the course of Herbimycin A induced erythroid differentiation of human erythroleukemia K562 cells.
  • Transient rise of Ras-GTP level at 3rd h of incubation in the presence of Herbimycin A correlated with the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins with apparent molecular weight of 210, 160, 140, 116 and 42 kDa, as well as with the activation of Erk2 and increase of binding of a set of pY-containing proteins with recombinant GST-fusion form of Ras activator, adaptor protein Grb2.
  • CONCLUSION: The obtained results suggest that time-dependent changes in Grb2-mediated network of protein-protein interaction events might define implication of Ras-dependent signalling in Herbimycin A-induced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Enzyme Inhibitors / pharmacology. Erythroid Cells / cytology. Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras) / metabolism. Quinones / pharmacology. Signal Transduction / physiology

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  • (PMID = 15812354.001).
  • [ISSN] 1812-9269
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ukraine
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing; 0 / Benzoquinones; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / GRB2 Adaptor Protein; 0 / GRB2 protein, human; 0 / Lactams, Macrocyclic; 0 / Quinones; 146-91-8 / Guanosine Diphosphate; 1W306TDA6S / Rifabutin; 42HK56048U / Tyrosine; 70563-58-5 / herbimycin; 86-01-1 / Guanosine Triphosphate; EC 2.5.1.18 / Glutathione Transferase; EC 3.6.5.2 / HRAS protein, human; EC 3.6.5.2 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras)
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21. Bradbury J: High leukaemia cure rate in Down's syndrome explained. Lancet Oncol; 2005 Mar;6(3):134
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  • [Title] High leukaemia cure rate in Down's syndrome explained.
  • [MeSH-major] Cytarabine / administration & dosage. Down Syndrome / complications. Leukemia, Megakaryoblastic, Acute / complications. Leukemia, Megakaryoblastic, Acute / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] DNA-Binding Proteins / genetics. Erythroid-Specific DNA-Binding Factors. Humans. Mutation. Transcription Factors / genetics

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  • (PMID = 15759357.001).
  • [ISSN] 1470-2045
  • [Journal-full-title] The Lancet. Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lancet Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] News
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / Erythroid-Specific DNA-Binding Factors; 0 / Transcription Factors; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine
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22. Dalmas DA, Tierney LA, Zhang C, Narayanan PK, Boyce RW, Schwartz LW, Frazier KS, Scicchitano MS: Effects of p38 MAP kinase inhibitors on the differentiation and maturation of erythroid progenitors. Toxicol Pathol; 2008 Dec;36(7):958-71
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  • [Title] Effects of p38 MAP kinase inhibitors on the differentiation and maturation of erythroid progenitors.
  • To identify target cell populations affected, a differentiating primary liquid erythroid culture system using sca-1(+)cells from mouse bone marrow was developed and challenged with p38is SB-203580, SB-226882, and SB-267030.
  • Drug-related alterations in genes involved at different stages of erythropoiesis, cell-surface antigen expression (CSAE), burst-forming unit erythroid (BFU-E) colony formation, and cellular morphology (CM), growth (CG), and viability were evaluated.
  • Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction revealed a transient delay in expression of genes involved at early, intermediate, and late stages of erythropoiesis, followed by rebound expression at later time points.
  • The delay in activity is suggestive of effects on sca-1(+)bone marrow cells caused by alterations in expression of genes related to erythroid commitment and differentiation resulting in delayed maturation.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antigens, Ly / metabolism. Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors / metabolism. Bone Marrow Cells / drug effects. Cell Culture Techniques. Cell Survival / drug effects. Cells, Cultured. Colony-Forming Units Assay. Erythroid Precursor Cells / drug effects. GATA2 Transcription Factor / metabolism. Immunophenotyping. Male. Membrane Proteins / metabolism. Mice. Proto-Oncogene Proteins / metabolism. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 19126791.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-1601
  • [Journal-full-title] Toxicologic pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Toxicol Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, Ly; 0 / Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors; 0 / GATA2 Transcription Factor; 0 / Gata2 protein, mouse; 0 / Imidazoles; 0 / Ly6a protein, mouse; 0 / Membrane Proteins; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins; 0 / Pyridines; 0 / SB 203580; 0 / Tal1 protein, mouse; EC 2.7.11.24 / p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
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23. Karsten U, Butschak G, Stahn R, Goletz S: A novel series of anti-human glycophorin A (CD235a) antibodies defining five extra- and intracellular epitopes. Int Immunopharmacol; 2010 Nov;10(11):1354-60
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  • Glycophorin A (GPA, CD235a) is a major membrane glycoprotein and marker of cells of the erythroid lineage.
  • The new panel complements the already known anti-glycophorin antibodies and offers several potential applications for, e.g., differential diagnosis of erythroleukemias, lineage analyses of erythroid cells, isolation of senescent erythrocytes, or a highly sensitive neuraminidase assay.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20727998.001).
  • [ISSN] 1878-1705
  • [Journal-full-title] International immunopharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. Immunopharmacol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Epitopes; 0 / Glycophorin; 0 / Sialoglycoproteins; EC 3.2.1.18 / Neuraminidase
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24. Lesage J, Stanley J, Karoly WJ, Lichtenberg FW: Airborne methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) concentrations associated with the application of polyurethane spray foam in residential construction. J Occup Environ Hyg; 2007 Feb;4(2):145-55
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  • Spray foam applicators and assistants may be exposed to airborne MDI concentrations above the OSHA permissible exposure limit.
  • At these concentrations, OSHA recommends appropriate respiratory protection during spray foam application to prevent airborne MDI exposures above established limits and to protect against exposure to dichlorofluoroethane (HCFC-141b).
  • After 45 min, airborne concentrations were below the limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 0.036-microg per sample.
  • [MeSH-major] Air Pollutants, Occupational / analysis. Chlorofluorocarbons / analysis. Isocyanates / analysis. Occupational Exposure / analysis. Polyurethanes
  • [MeSH-minor] Canada. Chlorofluorocarbons, Ethane. Facility Design and Construction. Housing. Humans. Particle Size. Threshold Limit Values. United States

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  • (PMID = 17249149.001).
  • [ISSN] 1545-9624
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of occupational and environmental hygiene
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Occup Environ Hyg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Air Pollutants, Occupational; 0 / Chlorofluorocarbons; 0 / Chlorofluorocarbons, Ethane; 0 / Isocyanates; 0 / Polyurethanes; 101-68-8 / 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate; 1717-00-6 / 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane; 9009-54-5 / polyurethane foam
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25. Nadali F, Pourfathollah AA, Alimoghaddam K, Nikougoftar M, Rostami S, Dizaji A, Azizi E, Zomorodipour A, Ghavamzadeh A: Multidrug resistance inhibition by antisense oligonucleotide against MDR1/mRNA in P-glycoprotein expressing leukemic cells. Hematology; 2007 Oct;12(5):393-401
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  • INTRODUCTION: Acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) is the most common form of acute leukemia in adults.
  • One major problem in this disease is the emergence of leukemic blast cells that are resistant to anticancer drugs.
  • One cause of MDR is the expression of the MDR1 gene and its product, P-glycoprotein (Pgp).
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Pgp expressing cell line was established from a parental K562 (Erythroleukemia) cell line with increasing concentrations of doxorubicin, and named KDI/20.
  • The effect of PS-ODN was assessed at the cellular level by flow cytometry (for Pgp detection), and Rhodamine 123 assay (for functional assessment of Pgp) at the molecular level by RT-PCR (for MDR1/mRNA detection) and MTT assay in order to assess the sensitivity of cell to doxorubicin.
  • Therefore, our data showed that antisense can reverse the MDR phenotype at the transcription level and the PEI vector is more efficient than cationic lipid.
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Resistance, Multiple / drug effects. Leukemia / drug therapy. Oligonucleotides, Antisense / pharmacology. P-Glycoprotein / drug effects. RNA, Messenger / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 17852455.001).
  • [ISSN] 1607-8454
  • [Journal-full-title] Hematology (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hematology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / ABCB1 protein, human; 0 / Oligonucleotides; 0 / Oligonucleotides, Antisense; 0 / P-Glycoprotein; 0 / P-Glycoproteins; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Thionucleotides; 80168379AG / Doxorubicin
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26. Tan PK, Wang J, Littler PL, Wong KK, Sweetnam TA, Keefe W, Nash NR, Reding EC, Piu F, Brann MR, Schiffer HH: Monitoring interactions between receptor tyrosine kinases and their downstream effector proteins in living cells using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer. Mol Pharmacol; 2007 Dec;72(6):1440-6
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  • A total of 22 BRET assays have been established for nine RTKs derived from four subfamilies [erythroblastic leukemia viral (v-erb-b) oncogene homolog (ErbB), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor (TRK), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)] monitoring the interactions with five effectors (Grb2, p85, Stat5a, Shc46, PLCgamma1).
  • RTK BRET assays are highly sensitive for quantifying ligand-independent (constitutive), agonist-induced, or antagonist-inhibited RTK activity levels.


27. Selga E, Oleaga C, Ramírez S, de Almagro MC, Noé V, Ciudad CJ: Networking of differentially expressed genes in human cancer cells resistant to methotrexate. Genome Med; 2009;1(9):83
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  • [Title] Networking of differentially expressed genes in human cancer cells resistant to methotrexate.
  • These are especially useful to rationalize how external perturbations propagate through the expression of genes.
  • To address this issue in the case of drug resistance, we constructed biological association networks of genes differentially expressed in cell lines resistant to methotrexate (MTX).
  • METHODS: Seven cell lines representative of different types of cancer, including colon cancer (HT29 and Caco2), breast cancer (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468), pancreatic cancer (MIA PaCa-2), erythroblastic leukemia (K562) and osteosarcoma (Saos-2), were used.
  • Genes deregulated in common between the different cancer cell lines served to generate biological association networks using the Pathway Architect software.
  • RESULTS: Dikkopf homolog-1 (DKK1) is a highly interconnected node in the network generated with genes in common between the two colon cancer cell lines, and functional validations of this target using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) showed a chemosensitization toward MTX.
  • Members of the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A (UGT1A) family formed a network of genes differentially expressed in the two breast cancer cell lines. siRNA treatment against UGT1A also showed an increase in MTX sensitivity.
  • Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 alpha 1 (EEF1A1) was overexpressed among the pancreatic cancer, leukemia and osteosarcoma cell lines, and siRNA treatment against EEF1A1 produced a chemosensitization toward MTX.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Biological association networks identified DKK1, UGT1As and EEF1A1 as important gene nodes in MTX-resistance.
  • Treatments using siRNA technology against these three genes showed chemosensitization toward MTX.

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  • (PMID = 19732436.001).
  • [ISSN] 1756-994X
  • [Journal-full-title] Genome medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Genome Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2768990
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28. Palusa SG, Golovkin M, Shin SB, Richardson DN, Reddy AS: Organ-specific, developmental, hormonal and stress regulation of expression of putative pectate lyase genes in Arabidopsis. New Phytol; 2007;174(3):537-50
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  • [Title] Organ-specific, developmental, hormonal and stress regulation of expression of putative pectate lyase genes in Arabidopsis.
  • Pectate lyases catalyse the eliminative cleavage of de-esterified homogalacturonan in pectin, a major component of the primary cell walls in higher plants.
  • In the completed genome of Arabidopsis, there are 26 genes (AtPLLs) that encode pectate lyase-like proteins.
  • Interestingly, all PLL genes are expressed in flowers.
  • Analysis of expression of all PLL genes in seedlings treated with hormones, abiotic stresses and elicitors of defense responses revealed significant changes in the expression of some PLLs without affecting the other PLLs.
  • The stability of transcripts of PLLs varied considerably among different genes.
  • [MeSH-major] Arabidopsis / genetics. Arabidopsis Proteins / genetics. Gene Expression Regulation, Plant. Polysaccharide-Lyases / genetics

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  • (PMID = 17447910.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-646X
  • [Journal-full-title] The New phytologist
  • [ISO-abbreviation] New Phytol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Arabidopsis Proteins; 0 / Deoxyadenosines; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 73-03-0 / cordycepin; EC 4.2.2.- / Polysaccharide-Lyases; EC 4.2.2.2 / pectate lyase
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29. De Filippi R, Iaccarino G, Frigeri F, Di Francia R, Crisci S, Capobianco G, Arcamone M, Becchimanzi C, Amoroso B, De Chiara A, Corazzelli G, Pinto A: Elevation of clonal serum free light chains in patients with HIV-negative primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and PEL-like lymphoma. Br J Haematol; 2009 Nov;147(3):405-8
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  • [Title] Elevation of clonal serum free light chains in patients with HIV-negative primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and PEL-like lymphoma.

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  • (PMID = 19681885.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2141
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Letter; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / Immunoglobulin Light Chains
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30. Xu R, Shi X, Zhang W, Xu Y, Tian Z, Lu X, Han X, Bao X: Cooperative structure-directing effect in the synthesis of aluminophosphate molecular sieves in ionic liquids. Phys Chem Chem Phys; 2010 Mar 14;12(10):2443-9
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  • Combining with the characterizations of the solid products by solid-state NMR, it is verified that different aggregates of organic amines with imidazolium cations, which is similar to self-assembled supramolecular analogues, could act as the structure-directing agents for selective tuning of the framework topologies such as AEL, AFI and LTA in the final solid products.

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  • (PMID = 20449358.001).
  • [ISSN] 1463-9084
  • [Journal-full-title] Physical chemistry chemical physics : PCCP
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Phys Chem Chem Phys
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Aluminum Compounds; 0 / Ionic Liquids; 0 / Phosphates; F92V3S521O / aluminum phosphate
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31. Prokhorova TA, Rigbolt KT, Johansen PT, Henningsen J, Kratchmarova I, Kassem M, Blagoev B: Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and quantitative comparison of the membrane proteomes of self-renewing and differentiating human embryonic stem cells. Mol Cell Proteomics; 2009 May;8(5):959-70
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  • Of the 811 identified membrane proteins, six displayed significantly higher expression levels in the undifferentiated state compared with differentiating cells.
  • This group includes the established marker CD133/Prominin-1 as well as novel candidates for hESC surface markers: Glypican-4, Neuroligin-4, ErbB2, receptor-type tyrosine-protein phosphatase zeta (PTPRZ), and Glycoprotein M6B.
  • Our study also revealed 17 potential markers of hESC differentiation as their corresponding protein expression levels displayed a dramatic increase in differentiated embryonic stem cell populations.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Biomarkers / metabolism. Cell Proliferation. Cells, Cultured. Culture Media, Conditioned. Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental. Humans. Mice. Phosphoproteins / analysis. Pluripotent Stem Cells / cytology. Proteomics. RNA, Messenger / genetics. RNA, Messenger / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19151416.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-9484
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cell Proteomics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Amino Acids; 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Culture Media, Conditioned; 0 / Membrane Proteins; 0 / Phosphoproteins; 0 / Proteome; 0 / RNA, Messenger
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2689770
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32. Jost PJ, Ruland J: Aberrant NF-kappaB signaling in lymphoma: mechanisms, consequences, and therapeutic implications. Blood; 2007 Apr 1;109(7):2700-7
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  • However, constitutive NF-kappaB activation can promote continuous lymphocyte proliferation and survival and has recently been recognized as a critical pathogenetic factor in lymphoma.
  • Various molecular events lead to deregulation of NF-kappaB signaling in Hodgkin disease and a variety of T- and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas either up-stream or downstream of the central IkappaB kinase.
  • This review provides an overview of the NF-kappaB pathway and discusses the mechanisms of NF-kappaB deregulation in distinct lymphoma entities with defined aberrant pathways: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia (ATL).
  • [MeSH-minor] Hodgkin Disease / physiopathology. Humans. Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell / physiopathology. Lymphocytes / physiology. Lymphoma, B-Cell / physiopathology. Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / genetics. Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone / physiopathology. Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse / physiopathology. Models, Biological. Oncogene Proteins, Viral / physiology. Prognosis. Signal Transduction / physiology. Translocation, Genetic

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  • (PMID = 17119127.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-4971
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / NF-kappa B; 0 / Oncogene Proteins, Viral
  • [Number-of-references] 96
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33. Küçükkaya B, Oztürk G, Yalçintepe L: Nitric oxide levels during erythroid differentiation in K562 cell line. Indian J Biochem Biophys; 2006 Aug;43(4):251-3
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  • [Title] Nitric oxide levels during erythroid differentiation in K562 cell line.
  • This study was designed to investigate the possible role of NO during erythroid differentiation in K562 erythroleukemia cells.
  • The chronic myelogenous leukemia (K562) cell line can be triggered in culture to differentiate along the erythrocytic pathway, in response to a variety of stimulatory agents.
  • We investigated NOx (nitrate+nitrite) levels in uninduced (control) and hemin-induced K562 cell lysates during erythroid differentiation.
  • Our results showed that NO levels decreased significantly on fourth and sixth day both in hemin-induced and control cells; the decrease was, however, more in hemin-induced group than in control group.

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  • (PMID = 17133771.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-1208
  • [Journal-full-title] Indian journal of biochemistry & biophysics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Indian J. Biochem. Biophys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hemoglobins; 0 / Nitrates; 0 / Nitrites; 31C4KY9ESH / Nitric Oxide; 743LRP9S7N / Hemin
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34. Towata T, Komizu Y, Suzu S, Ueoka R, Okada S: Highly selective fusion and accumulation of hybrid liposomes into primary effusion lymphoma cells along with induction of apoptosis. Biochem Biophys Res Commun; 2010 Mar 12;393(3):445-8
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  • Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is an aggressive neoplasm caused by human herpes virus-8 infection, and is generally resistant to chemotherapy.
  • Hybrid liposomes, composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and polyoxyethylene (21) dodecyl ether (C12(EO)21) (HL-21), were rapidly accumulated in the membrane of PEL cells.
  • HL-21 also increased membrane fluidity of PEL cells, and induced caspase-3 activation along with cell death.
  • These results suggest that HL-21 should be an effective and attractive regent for PEL treatment.

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  • [Copyright] 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20138834.001).
  • [ISSN] 1090-2104
  • [Journal-full-title] Biochemical and biophysical research communications
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Liposomes; 0AWH8BFG9A / polidocanol; 30IQX730WE / Polyethylene Glycols; U86ZGC74V5 / Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine
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35. Iyamu E, Perdew H, Woods G: Growth inhibitory and differentiation effects of chloroquine and its analogue on human leukemic cells potentiate fetal hemoglobin production by targeting the polyamine pathway. Biochem Pharmacol; 2009 Mar 15;77(6):1021-8
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  • Elevated arginase activity has been implicated in several pathological conditions in sickle cell disease (SCD) and other inflammatory disorders.
  • However, the effects of CQ and its analogue, hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) on erythroid differentiation leading to induced fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) production is unknown.
  • Further, we showed that CQ or HCQ maximally stimulated intracellular cGMP levels by 6.6- and 3.0-fold at 6 and 3h, respectively, as demonstrated by immunosorbent assay.
  • [MeSH-minor] Arginase / antagonists & inhibitors. Arginase / physiology. Drug Delivery Systems / methods. Drug Synergism. Humans. K562 Cells. Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute / drug therapy. Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute / metabolism. Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute / pathology. Signal Transduction / drug effects. Signal Transduction / physiology

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  • (PMID = 19073155.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-2968
  • [Journal-full-title] Biochemical pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biochem. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / KO1 HL076695-01
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Growth Inhibitors; 0 / Polyamines; 4QWG6N8QKH / Hydroxychloroquine; 886U3H6UFF / Chloroquine; 9034-63-3 / Fetal Hemoglobin; EC 3.5.3.1 / Arginase
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36. Simonelli C, Tedeschi R, Gloghini A, Bortolin MT, Spina M, Bidoli E, Cinelli R, De Paoli P, Carbone A, Tirelli U: Characterization of immunologic and virological parameters in HIV-infected patients with primary effusion lymphoma during antiblastic therapy and highly active antiretroviral therapy. Clin Infect Dis; 2005 Apr 1;40(7):1022-7
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  • BACKGROUND: Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) represents a peculiar lymphoma infected with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) and occurs predominantly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients.
  • The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunologic and virological parameters, including HHV-8 viremia, of 5 HIV-infected patients with PEL whose disease was diagnosed and treated at our institute.
  • Biological parameters, such as latent and lytic HHV-8 antigen levels, plasma HHV-8 load, Epstein-Barr virus plasma DNA load, HIV-1 load, and CD4 cell count, were assessed before treatment, during therapy, and at follow-up.
  • RESULTS: Four patients were treated with chemotherapy and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), and 1 was treated with HAART alone; 3 of 5 patients reached complete remission.
  • HHV-8 levels decreased after therapy in 4 patients.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis demonstrates that HHV-8 can be detected in the plasma at the onset of PEL; its prognostic role needs to be explored.
  • CD4 cell count seems to be the most important indicator of progression of PEL.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Anti-HIV Agents. CD4 Lymphocyte Count. Disease Progression. Female. Gene Expression Regulation, Viral. Herpesvirus 8, Human. Humans. Male. Viral Load. Viral Proteins / metabolism. Viremia


37. Cui JW, Li YJ, Sarkar A, Brown J, Tan YH, Premyslova M, Michaud C, Iscove N, Wang GJ, Ben-David Y: Retroviral insertional activation of the Fli-3 locus in erythroleukemias encoding a cluster of microRNAs that convert Epo-induced differentiation to proliferation. Blood; 2007 Oct 1;110(7):2631-40
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  • [Title] Retroviral insertional activation of the Fli-3 locus in erythroleukemias encoding a cluster of microRNAs that convert Epo-induced differentiation to proliferation.
  • Friend erythroleukemia has been used as an excellent system for the identification and characterization of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes involved in neoplastic transformation.
  • Using this model, we have isolated a novel integration site designated Fli-3, from a Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV)-induced erythroleukemia.
  • The Fli-3 transcription unit is a murine homologue of the human gene C13orf25 that includes a region encoding the mir-17-92 miRNA cluster.
  • C13orf25 is the target gene of 13q31 chromosomal amplification in human B-cell lymphomas and other malignancies.
  • The erythroleukemias that have acquired either insertional activation or amplification of Fli-3 express higher levels of the primary or mature miRNAs derived from mir-17-92.
  • The ectopic expression of Fli-3 in an erythroblastic cell line switches erythropoietin (Epo)-induced differentiation to Epo-induced proliferation through activation of the Ras and PI3K pathways.
  • These findings highlight the potential of the Fli-3 encoding mir-17-92 in the development of erythroleukemia and its important role in hematopoiesis.
  • [MeSH-major] Cell Differentiation / drug effects. Erythropoietin / pharmacology. Friend murine leukemia virus / genetics. Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute / metabolism. Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute / pathology. MicroRNAs / genetics. Viral Proteins / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Base Sequence. Cell Line. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic. Gene Expression Regulation, Viral. Humans. Mice. Multigene Family. Mutagenesis, Insertional / genetics. Transcription, Genetic / genetics

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  • (PMID = 17586726.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-4971
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / MicroRNAs; 0 / Viral Proteins; 11096-26-7 / Erythropoietin
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38. Mardini L, Gasiorek J, Derjuga A, Carrière L, Schranzhofer M, Paw BH, Ponka P, Blank V: Antagonistic roles of the ERK and p38 MAPK signalling pathways in globin expression, haem biosynthesis and iron uptake. Biochem J; 2010 Nov 15;432(1):145-51
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  • Late-stage erythroid cells synthesize large quantities of haemoglobin, a process requiring the co-ordinated regulation of globin and haem synthesis as well as iron uptake.
  • In the present study, we investigated the role of the ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signalling pathways in MEL (mouse erythroleukaemia) cell differentiation.
  • We found that treatment of HMBA (hexamethylene bisacetamide)-induced MEL cells with the ERK pathway inhibitor UO126 results in an increase in intracellular haem and haemoglobin levels.
  • The transcript levels of the genes coding for β(major)-globin, the haem biosynthesis enzyme 5-aminolevulinate synthase 2 and the mitochondrial iron transporter mitoferrin 1 are up-regulated.
  • Reporter assays showed that globin promoter and HS2 enhancer-mediated transcription was under the control of MAPKs, as inhibition of the ERK and p38 MAPK pathways led to increased and decreased gene activity respectively.
  • Our present results suggest that the ERK1/2 and p38α/β MAPKs play antagonistic roles in HMBA-induced globin gene expression and erythroid differentiation.
  • These results provide a novel link between MAPK signalling and the regulation of haem biosynthesis and iron uptake in erythroid cells.

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  • (PMID = 20738258.001).
  • [ISSN] 1470-8728
  • [Journal-full-title] The Biochemical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biochem. J.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / P01 HL032262; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK070838; Canada / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / / MOP-79361
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)imidazole; 0 / Acetamides; 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Butadienes; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Hemoglobins; 0 / Imidazoles; 0 / Nitriles; 0 / Pyridines; 0 / U 0126; 42VZT0U6YR / Heme; 9004-22-2 / Globins; E1UOL152H7 / Iron; EC 2.7.11.24 / Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1; EC 2.7.11.24 / Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3; EC 2.7.11.24 / Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases; EC 2.7.11.24 / p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases; LA133J59VU / hexamethylene bisacetamide
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39. Chen D, Sandford G, Nicholas J: Intracellular signaling mechanisms and activities of human herpesvirus 8 interleukin-6. J Virol; 2009 Jan;83(2):722-33
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  • While vIL-6 is generally considered to be a lytic gene, several reports have noted its low-level expression in latently infected primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cultures, in the absence of other lytic gene expression.
  • Knockdown of vIL-6 expression in PEL cells led to markedly reduced cell growth in normal culture, independently of extracellular cytokines.

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  • (PMID = 18987143.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-5514
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of virology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Virol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA076445; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01-CA76445
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / IL6R protein, human; 0 / Interleukin-6; 0 / Receptors, Interleukin-6; 0 / Viral Proteins; 0 / interleukin-6, RRV-HHV-8; 133483-10-0 / Cytokine Receptor gp130
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2612405
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40. Matsumoto T, Matsubara M, Oana K, Kasuga E, Suzuki T, Hidaka E, Shigemura T, Yamauchi K, Honda T, Ota H, Kawakami Y: First case of bacteremia due to chromosome-encoded CfxA3-beta-lactamase-producing Capnocytophaga sputigena in a pediatric patient with acute erythroblastic leukemia. Eur J Med Res; 2008 Mar 31;13(3):133-5
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  • [Title] First case of bacteremia due to chromosome-encoded CfxA3-beta-lactamase-producing Capnocytophaga sputigena in a pediatric patient with acute erythroblastic leukemia.
  • Bacteremia due to Capnocytophaga sputigena occurred in a 4-year and 9-month-old Japanese girl patient with acute erythroblastic leukemia in Shinshu University Hospital, Japan.
  • The causative Capnocytophaga sputigena isolate was found to be a beta-lactamase-producer demonstrating to possess cfxA3 gene.
  • The gene responsible for the production of CfxA3-beta-lactamase was proved to be chromosome-encoded, by means of southern hybridization analysis.
  • [MeSH-major] Bacteremia / microbiology. Capnocytophaga / isolation & purification. Chromosomes, Bacterial. Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute / complications. beta-Lactamases / biosynthesis

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  • (PMID = 18499560.001).
  • [ISSN] 0949-2321
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of medical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Med. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; EC 3.5.2.6 / beta-Lactamases
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41. Tsai YH, Wu MF, Wu YH, Chang SJ, Lin SF, Sharp TV, Wang HW: The M type K15 protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus regulates microRNA expression via its SH2-binding motif to induce cell migration and invasion. J Virol; 2009 Jan;83(2):622-32
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  • [Title] The M type K15 protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus regulates microRNA expression via its SH2-binding motif to induce cell migration and invasion.
  • The KSHV open reading frame K15 is a KSHV-specific gene encoding a transmembrane protein.
  • The two K15 alleles resemble the latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) gene of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in their genomic locations and protein topology.
  • K15 therefore appears to be a hybrid of a distant evolutionary relative of EBV LMP1 and LMP2A.
  • In this study, we show that K15M is latently expressed in KSHV-positive PEL cells and knockdown of K15M in PEL cells reduces cell motility.
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Migration Assays. Gene Knockdown Techniques. Humans. Intracellular Membranes / chemistry. Lysosomes / chemistry. NF-kappa B / biosynthesis

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  • (PMID = 18971265.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-5514
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of virology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Virol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / K15 protein, Human herpesvirus 8; 0 / MIRN21 microRNA, human; 0 / MIRN31 microRNA, human; 0 / MicroRNAs; 0 / NF-kappa B; 0 / Viral Proteins
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2612383
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42. Mirabelli P, Di Noto R, Lo Pardo C, Morabito P, Abate G, Gorrese M, Raia M, Pascariello C, Scalia G, Gemei M, Mariotti E, Del Vecchio L: Extended flow cytometry characterization of normal bone marrow progenitor cells by simultaneous detection of aldehyde dehydrogenase and early hematopoietic antigens: implication for erythroid differentiation studies. BMC Physiol; 2008;8:13
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  • [Title] Extended flow cytometry characterization of normal bone marrow progenitor cells by simultaneous detection of aldehyde dehydrogenase and early hematopoietic antigens: implication for erythroid differentiation studies.
  • BACKGROUND: Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) is a cytosolic enzyme highly expressed in hematopoietic precursors from cord blood and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor mobilized peripheral blood, as well as in bone marrow from patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia.
  • The goal of our work was to provide new information about the dissection of normal bone marrow progenitor cells based upon the simultaneous detection by flow cytometry of ALDH and early hematopoietic antigens, with particular attention to the expression of ALDH on erythroid precursors.
  • ii) fluorescence activated cell sorting of distinct subpopulations of progenitor cells, followed by in vitro induction of erythroid differentiation;.
  • iii) detection of ALDH+ cellular subsets in bone marrow from pure red cell aplasia patients.
  • Of interest, ALDH+CD34- population disclosed a straightforward erythroid commitment, on the basis of three orders of evidences.
  • Finally, ALDH+CD34- precursors were not detectable in patients with pure red cell aplasia (PRCA).
  • To the best of our knowledge this finding is new and could be useful for basic studies about normal erythropoietic differentiation as well as for enabling the employment of ALDH as a red cell marker in polychromatic flow cytometry characterization of bone marrow from patients with aplastic anemia and myelodysplasia.

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  • (PMID = 18510759.001).
  • [ISSN] 1472-6793
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens; EC 1.2.1.3 / Aldehyde Dehydrogenase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2426712
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43. Dykxhoorn DM, Schlehuber LD, London IM, Lieberman J: Determinants of specific RNA interference-mediated silencing of human beta-globin alleles differing by a single nucleotide polymorphism. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A; 2006 Apr 11;103(15):5953-8
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  • A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the sickle beta-globin gene (beta(S)) leads to sickle cell anemia.
  • RNA interference (RNAi) uses small interfering (si)RNAs for sequence-specific gene silencing.
  • A beta(S) siRNA with position 10 of the guide strand designed to align with the targeted beta(S) SNP specifically silences beta(S) gene expression without affecting the expression of the gamma-globin or normal beta-globin (beta(A)) genes.
  • Specific beta(S) silencing was demonstrated by using a luciferase reporter and full-length beta(S) cDNA transfected into HeLa cells and mouse erythroleukemia cells, where it was expressed in the context of the endogenous beta-globin gene promoter and the locus control region enhancers.
  • When this strategy was used to target beta(E), silencing was not limited to the mutant gene but also targeted the normal beta(A) gene. siRNAs, mismatched with their target at position 10, guided mRNA cleavage in all cases except when two bulky purines were aligned.
  • The specific silencing of the beta(S)-globin gene, as compared with beta(E), as well as studies of silencing SNP mutants in other diseases, indicates that siRNAs developed to target a disease-causing SNP will be specific if the mutant residue is a pyrimidine and the normal residue is a purine.

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  • (PMID = 16585504.001).
  • [ISSN] 0027-8424
  • [Journal-full-title] Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / 5 T32 HL007556-19; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / P01 HL 055435-11; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / U19 AI056900; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / AI056900; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / P01 HL055435; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / T32 HL007556
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 9004-22-2 / Globins; EC 1.13.12.5 / Luciferases, Renilla
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1458679
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44. Di Donato A, Di Giampaolo L, Reale M, Dadorante V, Alparone F, Stocchi M, Fattorini E, Di Gioacchino M, Magrini A, Boscolo P: Effect of occupational stress and anxiety on natural killer lymphocyte activity of men and women employed in a university. Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol; 2006 Oct-Dec;19(4 Suppl):79-84
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  • [Title] Effect of occupational stress and anxiety on natural killer lymphocyte activity of men and women employed in a university.
  • The aim of this study is the immune response of the staff of a university and a museum (referent group).
  • Blood samples were collected for determining NK cytotoxic activity vs human erythroleukaemia cells and the lymphocyte subsets CD45+, CD45+-CD3+, CD45+-CD3+-CD4+, CD45+-CD3+-CD8+, CD45+-CD3-CD8+, CD3+-CD16+-56+ and CD3+-CD19+.
  • Group F of men showed higher levels of occupational stress and both STAI I and II than groups E and G.
  • The scores of STAI I and II were negatively correlated with the cytotoxic activity expressed per ml of blood and/or total lymphocytes. and/or NK CD45+-CD16+-CD56+ cells.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Female. Humans. Lymphocyte Subsets. Male. Middle Aged. Universities


45. Kettle R, Simmons J, Schindler F, Jones P, Dicker T, Dubois G, Giddings J, Van Heeke G, Jones CE: Regulation of neuregulin 1beta1-induced MUC5AC and MUC5B expression in human airway epithelium. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol; 2010 Apr;42(4):472-81
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  • The mucins, MUC5AC and MUC5B, contribute to the viscoelastic properties of mucus, and are found at elevated levels in the airways of individuals with chronic respiratory diseases.
  • The T helper type 2 cell cytokine, IL-13, is known to regulate MUC5AC expression in goblet cells of the airways, although much less is known about the regulation of MUC5B expression.
  • NRG1beta1-induced expression of MU5AC and MUC5B was shown to involve v-erb-b2 erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog (ErbB) and ErbB3 receptors, but not ErbB4 receptors.
  • [MeSH-major] Gene Expression Regulation. Goblet Cells / metabolism. Mucin 5AC / biosynthesis. Mucin-5B / biosynthesis. Neuregulin-1 / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line. Cells, Cultured. Chronic Disease. Humans. Interleukin-13 / metabolism. Mice. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3 / metabolism. Phosphorylation / drug effects. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / pharmacology. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / metabolism. Receptor, ErbB-2 / metabolism. Receptor, ErbB-3 / metabolism. Receptor, ErbB-4. Respiration Disorders / metabolism. Th2 Cells / metabolism. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19556605.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-4989
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of respiratory cell and molecular biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interleukin-13; 0 / MUC5AC protein, human; 0 / MUC5B protein, human; 0 / Mucin 5AC; 0 / Mucin-5B; 0 / NRG1 protein, human; 0 / Neuregulin-1; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; EC 2.7.10.1 / ERBB2 protein, human; EC 2.7.10.1 / ERBB4 protein, human; EC 2.7.10.1 / Erbb4 protein, mouse; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, ErbB-2; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, ErbB-3; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, ErbB-4; EC 2.7.11.24 / Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3; EC 2.7.11.24 / p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
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46. Turner SJ, Zhuang S, Zhang T, Boss GR, Pilz RB: Effects of lovastatin on Rho isoform expression, activity, and association with guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors. Biochem Pharmacol; 2008 Jan 15;75(2):405-13
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  • 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase (EC1.1.1.88) inhibitors (statins) reduce cholesterol synthesis and prevent cardiovascular disease; they can also inhibit prenylation of Ras and Rho proteins, and have anti-neoplastic effects.
  • We found that the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor lovastatin markedly induced the expression of RhoA, B, and C in human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells.

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  • (PMID = 17920041.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-2952
  • [Journal-full-title] Biochemical pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biochem. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / R01 AR051300-07; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / AR051300-07; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / AR051300-09; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / R01-AR051300; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / AR051300-08; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / 5T32-HL07261; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / R01 AR051300-09; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / T32 HL007261; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / R01 AR051300; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / R01 AR051300-08
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / ARHGDIA protein, human; 0 / Guanine Nucleotide Dissociation Inhibitors; 0 / Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors; 0 / RHOC protein, human; 0 / rho Guanine Nucleotide Dissociation Inhibitor alpha; 0 / rho-Specific Guanine Nucleotide Dissociation Inhibitors; 124671-05-2 / RHOA protein, human; 86-01-1 / Guanosine Triphosphate; 9LHU78OQFD / Lovastatin; EC 3.6.5.2 / rho GTP-Binding Proteins; EC 3.6.5.2 / rhoA GTP-Binding Protein; EC 3.6.5.2 / rhoB GTP-Binding Protein
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS37750; NLM/ PMC2228324
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47. Einarsdóttir K, Rosenberg LU, Humphreys K, Bonnard C, Palmgren J, Li Y, Li Y, Chia KS, Liu ET, Hall P, Liu J, Wedrén S: Comprehensive analysis of the ATM, CHEK2 and ERBB2 genes in relation to breast tumour characteristics and survival: a population-based case-control and follow-up study. Breast Cancer Res; 2006;8(6):R67
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  • [Title] Comprehensive analysis of the ATM, CHEK2 and ERBB2 genes in relation to breast tumour characteristics and survival: a population-based case-control and follow-up study.
  • BACKGROUND: Mutations in the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and checkpoint kinase 2 (CHEK2) genes and amplification of the v-erb-b2 avian erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 2 (ERBB2) gene have been suggested to have an important role in breast cancer aetiology.
  • However, whether common variation in these genes has a role in the development of breast cancer or breast cancer survival in humans is still not clear.
  • METHODS: We performed a comprehensive haplotype analysis of the ATM, CHEK2 and ERBB2 genes in a Swedish population-based study, which included 1,579 breast cancer cases and 1,516 controls.
  • We selected seven haplotype-tagging SNPs (tagSNPs) in the ATM gene, six tagSNPs in the CHEK2 gene and seven tagSNPs in the ERBB2 gene that predicted both haplotypic and single locus variations in the respective genes with R2 values > or = 0.8.
  • RESULTS: We found no association between any genetic variation in the ATM, CHEK2 or ERBB2 genes and breast cancer survival or the risk of developing tumours with certain characteristics.
  • CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that common variants in the ATM, CHEK2 or ERBB2 genes are not involved in modifying breast cancer survival or the risk of tumour-characteristic-defined breast cancer.

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  • (PMID = 17132159.001).
  • [ISSN] 1465-542X
  • [Journal-full-title] Breast cancer research : BCR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Breast Cancer Res.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA104021; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA 104021
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cell Cycle Proteins; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Proteins; EC 2.7.1.11 / Checkpoint Kinase 2; EC 2.7.11.1 / ATM protein, human; EC 2.7.11.1 / Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins; EC 2.7.11.1 / CHEK2 protein, human; EC 2.7.11.1 / Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1797028
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48. Langebrake C, Creutzig U, Reinhardt D: Immunophenotype of Down syndrome acute myeloid leukemia and transient myeloproliferative disease differs significantly from other diseases with morphologically identical or similar blasts. Klin Padiatr; 2005 May-Jun;217(3):126-34
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  • [Title] Immunophenotype of Down syndrome acute myeloid leukemia and transient myeloproliferative disease differs significantly from other diseases with morphologically identical or similar blasts.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Children with Down Syndrome (DS) have a 20-40 fold increased risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia (AML), mainly of the megakaryoblastic subtype (AMKL).
  • Approximately 10 % of newborns with DS show transient myeloproliferative disease (TMD) which normally resolves spontaneously.
  • The blast cells of both entities show megakaryoblastic/erythroblastic features (M7/M6) and cannot be distinguished by morphological characteristics.
  • Non-DS children with morphologically related diseases, i. e. myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), or AML-M6 and AML-M7, did not show this expression profile.
  • The higher amount of CD34 co-expression in TMD may be interpreted to indicate that TMD is a slightly more immature disease than DS-AMKL.
  • [MeSH-major] Down Syndrome / complications. Immunophenotyping. Leukemia, Myeloid / immunology. Myeloproliferative Disorders / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Data Interpretation, Statistical. Diagnosis, Differential. Flow Cytometry / methods. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Leukemia, Megakaryoblastic, Acute / diagnosis. Leukemia, Megakaryoblastic, Acute / immunology. Microscopy, Fluorescence / methods. Sensitivity and Specificity. Time Factors


49. Ratel D, Ravanat JL, Charles MP, Platet N, Breuillaud L, Lunardi J, Berger F, Wion D: Undetectable levels of N6-methyl adenine in mouse DNA: Cloning and analysis of PRED28, a gene coding for a putative mammalian DNA adenine methyltransferase. FEBS Lett; 2006 May 29;580(13):3179-84
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  • [Title] Undetectable levels of N6-methyl adenine in mouse DNA: Cloning and analysis of PRED28, a gene coding for a putative mammalian DNA adenine methyltransferase.
  • Three methylated bases, 5-methylcytosine, N4-methylcytosine and N6-methyladenine (m6A), can be found in DNA.
  • To reinvestigate the presence of m6A in mammalian DNA, we used a highly sensitive method capable of detecting one N6-methyldeoxyadenosine per million nucleosides.
  • Our results suggest that the total mouse genome contains, if any, less than 10(3) m6A.

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  • (PMID = 16684535.001).
  • [ISSN] 0014-5793
  • [Journal-full-title] FEBS letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] FEBS Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Mitochondrial; 5142-22-3 / 1-methyladenine; EC 2.1.1.72 / PRED28 protein, mouse; EC 2.1.1.72 / Site-Specific DNA-Methyltransferase (Adenine-Specific); JAC85A2161 / Adenine
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50. Brimo F, Popradi G, Michel RP, Auger M: Primary effusion lymphoma involving three body cavities. Cytojournal; 2009;6:21
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  • Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a human herpes virus-8 (HHV8)-associated large-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma localized in body cavities and presenting as pleural, peritoneal, or pericardial lymphomatous effusions.
  • We describe herein a case of PEL affecting three body cavity sites in an immunocompetent patient.
  • An examination of the fluid by cytology showed large atypical lymphocytes with abundant basophilic cytoplasm, either central or eccentric nuclei having irregular outlines, and multiple prominent nucleoli.
  • A diagnosis of PEL was rendered.
  • Despite chemotherapy and valganciclovir, the disease progressed to involve the pleural and pericardial cavities and the patient died 5 months following the initial diagnosis.
  • Although PEL is a B-cell lymphoma, it is usually of null phenotype by immunohistochemistry, and can rarely aberrantly express T-cell markers, as seen in the current case.
  • The key to the diagnosis of PEL rests on identifying HHV8 in the neoplastic cells.
  • Therefore, restricting the term of PEL only to those cases that are HHV8 positive is important in order to differentiate PEL from other lymphomas that can present as serous effusions and that carry, in general, a more favorable prognosis than PEL.

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  • (PMID = 19876384.001).
  • [ISSN] 1742-6413
  • [Journal-full-title] CytoJournal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cytojournal
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2762694
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Effusion / Epstein–Barr virus / human herpes virus-8 / lymphoma
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51. Wong SS, Vargas J, Thomas A, Fastje C, McLaughlin M, Camponovo R, Lantz RC, Heys J, Witten ML: In vivo comparison of epithelial responses for S-8 versus JP-8 jet fuels below permissible exposure limit. Toxicology; 2008 Dec 5;254(1-2):106-11
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  • [Title] In vivo comparison of epithelial responses for S-8 versus JP-8 jet fuels below permissible exposure limit.
  • This study was designed to characterize and compare the pulmonary effects in distal lung from a low-level exposure to jet propellant-8 fuel (JP-8) and a new synthetic-8 fuel (S-8).
  • A pulmonary function test performed 24h after the final exposure indicated that there was a significant increase in expiratory lung resistance in the S-8 mice, whereas JP-8 mice had significant increases in both inspiratory and expiratory lung resistance compared to control values.

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  • (PMID = 18930109.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-483X
  • [Journal-full-title] Toxicology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Toxicology
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / ES006694-14; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / P30 ES006694; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / ES06694; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / P30 ES006694-14
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hydrocarbons; 0 / JP8 aviation fuel; 0 / S-8 fuel
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS208577; NLM/ PMC2927360
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52. Pilzer D, Saar M, Koya K, Fishelson Z: Mortalin inhibitors sensitize K562 leukemia cells to complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Int J Cancer; 2010 Mar 15;126(6):1428-35
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  • [Title] Mortalin inhibitors sensitize K562 leukemia cells to complement-dependent cytotoxicity.
  • Its elevated expression has been correlated with malignant transformation and poor cancer prognosis.
  • Treatment of human erythroleukemia K562 and colorectal carcinoma HCT116 cells with MKT-077 sensitizes them to cell death mediated by MAC but not by streptolysin O.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Bacterial Proteins / pharmacology. Blotting, Western. Calcimycin / pharmacology. Cell Survival / drug effects. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. HCT116 Cells. Hemolysis / drug effects. Humans. Ionophores / pharmacology. K562 Cells. Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute / genetics. Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute / metabolism. Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute / pathology. Pyridines / pharmacology. Rabbits. Recombinant Proteins / metabolism. Recombinant Proteins / pharmacology. Streptolysins / pharmacology. Thiazoles / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 19739077.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0215
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bacterial Proteins; 0 / Complement C9; 0 / HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins; 0 / Ionophores; 0 / MKT 077; 0 / Pyridines; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 0 / Streptolysins; 0 / Thiazoles; 0 / mortalin; 0 / streptolysin O; 37H9VM9WZL / Calcimycin
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53. Rotoli BM, Closs EI, Barilli A, Visigalli R, Simon A, Habermeier A, Bianchi N, Gambari R, Gazzola GC, Bussolati O, Dall'Asta V: Arginine transport in human erythroid cells: discrimination of CAT1 and 4F2hc/y+LAT2 roles. Pflugers Arch; 2009 Oct;458(6):1163-73
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  • [Title] Arginine transport in human erythroid cells: discrimination of CAT1 and 4F2hc/y+LAT2 roles.
  • Since arginine metabolites, such as nitric oxide and polyamines, influence the expression of genes involved in erythroid differentiation, the transport of the cationic amino acid may play an important role in erythroid cells.
  • Using erythroleukemia K562 cells and normal erythroid precursors, we demonstrate here that arginine transport in human erythroid cells is due to the additive contributions of a leucine-sensitive and leucine-insensitive component.
  • Lastly, silencing of SLC7A6, the gene for y(+)LAT2, lowers arginine transport and doubles the intracellular content of the cationic amino acid in K562 cells.
  • We conclude that arginine transport in human erythroid cells is due to both system y(+) (CAT1 transporter) and system y(+)L (4F2hc/y(+)LAT2 isoform), which mainly contribute, respectively, to the influx and to the efflux of the cationic amino acid.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD98 Heavy Chain / physiology. Erythroid Precursor Cells / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing / physiology. Amino Acid Transport System y+ / metabolism. Amino Acid Transport Systems, Basic / physiology. Animals. Arginine / metabolism. Cationic Amino Acid Transporter 1 / metabolism. Gene Silencing. Humans. K562 Cells. Large Neutral Amino Acid-Transporter 1 / metabolism. Oocytes / metabolism. Xenopus laevis

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  • (PMID = 19562367.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-2013
  • [Journal-full-title] Pflugers Archiv : European journal of physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pflugers Arch.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] Italy / Telethon / / GGP07257
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing; 0 / Amino Acid Transport System y+; 0 / Amino Acid Transport Systems, Basic; 0 / Antigens, CD98 Heavy Chain; 0 / Cationic Amino Acid Transporter 1; 0 / LAT2 protein, human; 0 / Large Neutral Amino Acid-Transporter 1; 0 / SLC3A2 protein, human; 0 / SLC7A6 protein, human; 94ZLA3W45F / Arginine
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54. Kawai T, Choi U, Whiting-Theobald NL, Linton GF, Brenner S, Sechler JM, Murphy PM, Malech HL: Enhanced function with decreased internalization of carboxy-terminus truncated CXCR4 responsible for WHIM syndrome. Exp Hematol; 2005 Apr;33(4):460-8
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  • [Title] Enhanced function with decreased internalization of carboxy-terminus truncated CXCR4 responsible for WHIM syndrome.
  • OBJECTIVE: WHIM (warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, recurrent bacterial infection, myelokathexis) syndrome is an autosomal dominant immune deficiency with severe chronic neutropenia and marrow neutrophil apoptosis.
  • Control vectors included similar constructs with wild-type CXCR4 (WT-CXCR4) or only GFP.
  • RESULTS: Healthy human CD34+ cells and/or human erythroleukemia K562 cells transduced to express mutated CXCR4, WT-CXCR4, or GFP alone demonstrated that mutated CXCR4 was associated with enhanced calcium flux and enhanced migration.
  • CONCLUSION: We propose that decreased internalization of WHIM-associated mutated CXCR4 leads to prolongation/enhancement of signaling in response to SDF1 and that this may provide the biochemical basis for the autosomal dominant abnormalities of cell trafficking and function associated with WHIM syndrome.
  • [MeSH-minor] Agammaglobulinemia. Bacterial Infections. Cell Line. Chemokine CXCL12. Chemokines, CXC / pharmacology. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Humans. Kinetics. Neutropenia. Signal Transduction / drug effects. Syndrome. Transduction, Genetic. Warts

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  • (PMID = 15781337.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-472X
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental hematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp. Hematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CXCL12 protein, human; 0 / Chemokine CXCL12; 0 / Chemokines, CXC; 0 / Receptors, CXCR4
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55. Coyle AT, Kinsella BT: Characterization of promoter 3 of the human thromboxane A receptor gene. A functional AP-1 and octamer motif are required for basal promoter activity. FEBS J; 2005 Feb;272(4):1036-53
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  • [Title] Characterization of promoter 3 of the human thromboxane A receptor gene. A functional AP-1 and octamer motif are required for basal promoter activity.
  • Hence, the ability of Prm3 and a series of Prm3 deleted/mutated subfragments to direct reporter gene expression in human erythroleukemia 92.1.7 and human embryonic kidney 293 cells was investigated.
  • Furthermore, three distinct regulatory regions comprising of an upstream repressor sequence, located between -404 to -320, and two positive regulatory regions required for efficient basal gene expression, located between -154 to -106 and -50 to +1, were identified within the core Prm3.
  • [MeSH-major] Gene Expression / physiology. Promoter Regions, Genetic. Receptors, Thromboxane A2, Prostaglandin H2 / genetics

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  • (PMID = 15691336.001).
  • [ISSN] 1742-464X
  • [Journal-full-title] The FEBS journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] FEBS J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / Octamer Transcription Factor-1; 0 / Octamer Transcription Factor-2; 0 / POU2F1 protein, human; 0 / POU2F2 protein, human; 0 / Phorbol Esters; 0 / Receptors, Thromboxane A2, Prostaglandin H2; 0 / Transcription Factor AP-1; 0 / Transcription Factors; 20839-06-9 / phorbol-12-myristate
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56. Kern RM, Yang Z, Kim PS, Grody WW, Iyer RK, Cederbaum SD: Arginase induction by sodium phenylbutyrate in mouse tissues and human cell lines. Mol Genet Metab; 2007 Jan;90(1):37-41
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  • Hyperargininemia is a urea cycle disorder caused by mutations in the gene for arginase I (AI) resulting in elevated blood arginine and ammonia levels.
  • The elevated arginine levels induce the second arginase (AII) in patient kidney and kidney tissue culture.
  • It has been shown that NaPB increases expression of some target genes and we tested its effect on arginase induction.
  • In some cell lines, NaPB increased arginase activity up to fivefold depending on dose (1-5 mM) and exposure time (2-5 days); control and NaPB activities, respectively, are: erythroleukemia, HEL, 0.06 and 0.31 U/mg, and K562, 0.46 and 1.74 U/mg; embryonic kidney, HEK293, 1.98 and 3.58 U/mg; breast adenocarcinoma, MDA-MB-468, 1.11 and 4.06 U/mg; and prostate adenocarcinoma, PC-3, 0.55 and 3.20 U/mg.

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  • (PMID = 16935537.001).
  • [ISSN] 1096-7192
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular genetics and metabolism
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Genet. Metab.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / HD-0402411; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / HD-06576; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / HD-36415
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Isoenzymes; 0 / Phenylbutyrates; 7WY7YBI87E / 4-phenylbutyric acid; EC 3.5.3.1 / Arg2 protein, mouse; EC 3.5.3.1 / Arginase; EC 3.5.3.1 / arginase II, human
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57. Kuykendall JR, Cox R, Kinder D: 1-Methylnicotinamide stimulates cell growth and inhibits hemoglobin synthesis in differentiating murine erythroleukemia cells. Toxicol In Vitro; 2007 Dec;21(8):1656-62
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  • [Title] 1-Methylnicotinamide stimulates cell growth and inhibits hemoglobin synthesis in differentiating murine erythroleukemia cells.
  • Exposure of murine erythroleukemia cells (MELCs) to nicotinamide (NA) or its synthetic analog N'-methylnicotinamide (N'-MN) reduces cell growth and induces terminal differentiation, marked by increased heme and globin accumulation.
  • When combined with NA or several chemically-unrelated inducers of hemoglobin synthesis in cultured MELCs, 1-MN reduced the globin mRNA levels and heme accumulation by 40-80%.
  • 1-MN was able to inhibit heme production if present during only the first 24-48 h after NA exposure.
  • [MeSH-major] Cell Differentiation / drug effects. Erythropoiesis / drug effects. Hemoglobins / biosynthesis. Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute / metabolism. Niacinamide / analogs & derivatives

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  • (PMID = 17826027.001).
  • [ISSN] 0887-2333
  • [Journal-full-title] Toxicology in vitro : an international journal published in association with BIBRA
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Toxicol In Vitro
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-15189
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hemoglobins; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 25X51I8RD4 / Niacinamide; 3106-60-3 / N(1)-methylnicotinamide; 9004-22-2 / Globins
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58. Ajore R, Dhanda RS, Gullberg U, Olsson I: The leukemia associated ETO nuclear repressor gene is regulated by the GATA-1 transcription factor in erythroid/megakaryocytic cells. BMC Mol Biol; 2010;11:38
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  • [Title] The leukemia associated ETO nuclear repressor gene is regulated by the GATA-1 transcription factor in erythroid/megakaryocytic cells.
  • BACKGROUND: The Eight-Twenty-One (ETO) nuclear co-repressor gene belongs to the ETO homologue family also containing Myeloid Translocation Gene on chromosome 16 (MTG16) and myeloid translocation Gene-Related protein 1 (MTGR1).
  • By chromosomal translocations ETO and MTG16 become parts of fusion proteins characteristic of morphological variants of acute myeloid leukemia.
  • The goal of this work was to identify structural and functional promoter elements upstream of the coding sequence of the ETO gene in order to explore lineage-specific hematopoietic expression and get hints to function.
  • Strong ETO promoter activity was specifically observed upon transfection of a promoter reporter construct into erythroid/megakaryocytic cells, which have endogeneous ETO gene activity.
  • The promoter was stimulated by overexpression of GATA-1 into erythroid/megakaryocytic cells.
  • Electrophoretic mobility shift assay with erythroid/megakaryocytic cells showed specific binding of GATA-1 to the GATA -636 site.
  • The results suggest that the GATA -636 site may have a role in activation of the ETO gene activity in cells with erythroid/megakaryocytic potential.
  • Leukemia associated AML1-ETO strongly suppressed an ETO promoter reporter in erythroid/megakaryocytic cells.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that the GATA-1 transcription factor binds and transactivates the ETO proximal promoter in an erythroid/megakaryocytic-specific manner.
  • Thus, trans-acting factors that are essential in erythroid/megakaryocytic differentiation govern ETO expression.
  • [MeSH-major] GATA1 Transcription Factor / metabolism. Gene Expression Regulation. Megakaryocytes / metabolism. Proto-Oncogene Proteins / genetics. Transcription Factors / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Base Sequence. COS Cells. Cell Line, Tumor. Cercopithecus aethiops. Core Binding Factor Alpha 2 Subunit / metabolism. HL-60 Cells. Humans. Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute / genetics. Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute / metabolism. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / genetics. Molecular Sequence Data. Oncogene Proteins, Fusion / metabolism. Promoter Regions, Genetic

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  • (PMID = 20487545.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2199
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC molecular biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Mol. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / AML1-ETO fusion protein, human; 0 / Core Binding Factor Alpha 2 Subunit; 0 / GATA1 Transcription Factor; 0 / GATA1 protein, human; 0 / Oncogene Proteins, Fusion; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins; 0 / RUNX1T1 protein, human; 0 / Transcription Factors
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2882371
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59. Papetti M, Wontakal SN, Stopka T, Skoultchi AI: GATA-1 directly regulates p21 gene expression during erythroid differentiation. Cell Cycle; 2010 May 15;9(10):1972-80
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  • [Title] GATA-1 directly regulates p21 gene expression during erythroid differentiation.
  • Lineage-determination transcription factors coordinate cell differentiation and proliferation by controlling the synthesis of lineage-specific gene products as well as cell cycle regulators.
  • Its role in regulating erythroid-specific genes has been extensively studied, whereas its role in controlling genes that regulate cell proliferation is less understood.
  • Ectopic expression of GATA-1 in erythroleukemia cells releases the block to their differentiation and leads to terminal cell division.
  • An early event in reprogramming the erythroleukemia cells is induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21.
  • Remarkably, ectopic expression of p21 also induces the erythroleukemia cells to differentiate.
  • We now report that GATA-1 directly regulates transcription of the p21 gene in both erythroleukemia cells and normal erythroid progenitors.
  • Using reporter, electrophoretic mobility shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we show that GATA-1 stimulates p21 gene transcription by binding to consensus binding sites in the upstream region of the p21 gene promoter.
  • Our findings indicate that p21 is a crucial downstream gene target and effector of GATA-1 during red blood cell terminal differentiation.

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  • (PMID = 20495378.001).
  • [ISSN] 1551-4005
  • [Journal-full-title] Cell cycle (Georgetown, Tex.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cell Cycle
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA013330-369034; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA013330-369034; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL078381-31; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL078381; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 2P30CA13330; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL078381-31; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / 1F32HL077242-0102; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL078381; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / 5T32GM07288; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / T32 GM007288; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA013330
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21; 0 / GATA1 Transcription Factor; 0 / GATA1 protein, human
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS239846; NLM/ PMC3019278
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60. Riggleman RA, Douglas JF, de Pablo JJ: Characterization of the potential energy landscape of an antiplasticized polymer. Phys Rev E Stat Nonlin Soft Matter Phys; 2007 Jul;76(1 Pt 1):011504
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  • The nature of the individual transitions on the potential energy landscape (PEL) associated with particle motion are directly examined for model fragile glass-forming polymer melts, and the results are compared to those of an antiplasticized polymer system.
  • In the present work, we find that the antiplasticizing molecules reduce the energy barriers for relaxation compared to the pure polymer, implying that the antiplasticized system has smaller barriers to overcome in order to explore its configuration space.
  • Notably, the stringlike collective motion identified by our PEL analysis corresponds to incremental displacements that occur within larger-scale stringlike particle displacement processes associated with PEL metabasin transitions that mediate structural relaxation.
  • Film confinement makes the energy barriers substantially smaller in the pure polymer, while it has little effect on the energy barriers in the antiplasticized system.

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  • (PMID = 17677447.001).
  • [ISSN] 1539-3755
  • [Journal-full-title] Physical review. E, Statistical, nonlinear, and soft matter physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Phys Rev E Stat Nonlin Soft Matter Phys
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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61. Chadburn A, Hyjek EM, Tam W, Liu Y, Rengifo T, Cesarman E, Knowles DM: Immunophenotypic analysis of the Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV; HHV-8)-infected B cells in HIV+ multicentric Castleman disease (MCD). Histopathology; 2008 Nov;53(5):513-24
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  • [Title] Immunophenotypic analysis of the Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV; HHV-8)-infected B cells in HIV+ multicentric Castleman disease (MCD).
  • AIMS: Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) is aetiologically related to Kaposi sarcoma, classical and extracavitary primary effusion lymphoma (PEL; EC-PEL) and multicentric Castleman disease (MCD), entities preferentially occurring in HIV-infected individuals.
  • Characterization of HIV-associated PELs/EC-PELs suggests that the KSHV-infected malignant cells originate from a pre-terminal stage of B-cell differentiation.
  • However, only limited phenotypic studies have been performed on HIV+ MCD, including for PR domain containing 1 with zinc finger domain/B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (PRDM1/BLIMP1), a key regulator of terminal B-cell differentiation.
  • METHODS AND RESULTS: Double immunohistochemistry and immunohistochemistry-in situ hybridization were used to characterize the KSHV-infected cells in MCD; the results were compared with the phenotypic profiles of 39 PELs/EC-PELs and seven PEL cell lines.
  • Whereas the immunophenotype of KSHV-infected cells in MCD and malignant KSHV+ PEL cells was similar (PAX5, Bcl-6-; PRDM1/BLIMP1, IRF4/MUM1+; Ki67+), the MCD KSHV-infected cells differed, as they expressed OCT2, cytoplasmic lambda immunoglobulin; variably expressed CD27; lacked CD138; and were Epstein-Barr virus negative.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although both PEL and MCD originate from KSHV-infected pre-terminally differentiated B cells, these findings, with previously reported genetic studies, indicate HIV+ MCD may arise from extrafollicular B cells, whereas PELs may originate from cells that have traversed the germinal centre.
  • [MeSH-major] B-Lymphocytes / virology. Giant Lymph Node Hyperplasia / virology. HIV Infections / complications. Herpesviridae Infections / virology. Herpesvirus 8, Human. Lymphoma, Primary Effusion / virology


62. Voon HP, Wardan H, Vadolas J: siRNA-mediated reduction of alpha-globin results in phenotypic improvements in beta-thalassemic cells. Haematologica; 2008 Aug;93(8):1238-42
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  • Excess alpha-globin precipitates in erythroid progenitor cells resulting in cell death, ineffective erythropoiesis and severe anemia.
  • One highly effective siRNA sequence (si-alpha 4) was identified and reduced alpha-globin by approximately 65% at both the RNA and the protein level.
  • Electroporation of si-alpha 4 into murine thalassemic primary erythroid cultures restored alpha :beta-globin ratios to balanced wild-type levels and resulted in detectable phenotypic correction.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Death. Disease Models, Animal. Gene Expression Regulation. Humans. Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute / blood. Mice. Mice, Knockout. Phenotype. Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 18556409.001).
  • [ISSN] 1592-8721
  • [Journal-full-title] Haematologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Haematologica
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Small Interfering; 9004-22-2 / Globins
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63. Lausen J, Pless O, Leonard F, Kuvardina ON, Koch B, Leutz A: Targets of the Tal1 transcription factor in erythrocytes: E2 ubiquitin conjugase regulation by Tal1. J Biol Chem; 2010 Feb 19;285(8):5338-46
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  • Despite the importance of Tal1 in erythropoiesis, only a small number of erythroid differentiation target genes are known.
  • A chromatin precipitation and cloning approach was established to uncover novel Tal1 target genes in erythropoiesis.
  • Tal1 was found to bind in the vicinity of 31 genes including the E2-ubiquitin conjugase UBE2H gene.
  • UBE2H expression is increased during erythroid differentiation of hCD34(+) cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors / metabolism. Erythrocytes / metabolism. Erythroid Precursor Cells / metabolism. Erythropoiesis / physiology. Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic / physiology. Proto-Oncogene Proteins / metabolism. Ubiquitin-Conjugating Enzymes / biosynthesis

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  • (PMID = 20028976.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-351X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of biological chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Biol. Chem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD34; 0 / Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins; 0 / Ubiquitin; 135471-20-4 / TAL1 protein, human; EC 6.3.2.19 / UBE2H protein, human; EC 6.3.2.19 / Ubiquitin-Conjugating Enzymes
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2820762
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64. Zuclich JA, Lund DJ, Stuck BE: Wavelength dependence of ocular damage thresholds in the near-ir to far-ir transition region: proposed revisions to MPES. Health Phys; 2007 Jan;92(1):15-23
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  • This report summarizes the results of a series of infrared (IR) laser-induced ocular damage studies conducted over the past decade.
  • The studies examined retinal, lens, and corneal effects of laser exposures in the near-IR to far-IR transition region (wavelengths from 1.3-1.4 mum with exposure durations ranging from Q-switched to continuous wave).
  • The corneal and retinal damage thresholds are tabulated for all pulsewidth regimes, and the wavelength dependence of the IR thresholds is discussed and contrasted to laser safety standard maximum permissible exposure limits.
  • The analysis suggests that the current maximum permissible exposure limits could be beneficially revised to (1) relax the IR limits over wavelength ranges where unusually high safety margins may unintentionally hinder applications of recently developed military and telecommunications laser systems;.
  • (2) replace step-function discontinuities in the IR limits by continuously varying analytical functions of wavelength and pulsewidth which more closely follow the trends of the experimental retinal (for point-source laser exposures) and corneal ED50 threshold data; and (3) result in an overall simplification of the permissible exposure limits over the wavelength range from 1.2-2.6 mum.
  • A specific proposal for amending the IR maximum permissible exposure limits over this wavelength range is presented.
  • [MeSH-major] Eye Injuries / diagnosis. Eye Injuries / etiology. Infrared Rays / adverse effects. Radiation Injuries / diagnosis. Radiation Injuries / etiology. Radiation Protection / standards. Radiometry / standards

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  • (PMID = 17164595.001).
  • [ISSN] 0017-9078
  • [Journal-full-title] Health physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Health Phys
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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65. Suh HC, Gooya J, Renn K, Friedman AD, Johnson PF, Keller JR: C/EBPalpha determines hematopoietic cell fate in multipotential progenitor cells by inhibiting erythroid differentiation and inducing myeloid differentiation. Blood; 2006 Jun 1;107(11):4308-16
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  • [Title] C/EBPalpha determines hematopoietic cell fate in multipotential progenitor cells by inhibiting erythroid differentiation and inducing myeloid differentiation.
  • C/EBPalpha is an essential transcription factor required for myeloid differentiation.
  • We found increased numbers of erythroid progenitors and erythroid cells in C/EBPalpha(-/-) fetal liver (FL).
  • Also, enforced expression of C/EBPalpha in hematopoietic stem cells resulted in a loss of erythroid progenitors and an increase in myeloid cells by inhibition of erythroid development and inducing myeloid differentiation.
  • Conditional expression of C/EBPalpha in murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells induced myeloid-specific genes, while inhibiting erythroid-specific gene expression including erythropoietin receptor (EpoR), which suggests a novel mechanism to determine hematopoietic cell fate.
  • Thus, C/EBPalpha functions in hematopoietic cell fate decisions by the dual actions of inhibiting erythroid and inducing myeloid gene expression in multipotential progenitors.

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  • (PMID = 16469877.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-4971
  • [Journal-full-title] Blood
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Blood
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CO / N01-CO-12400
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CCAAT-Enhancer-Binding Protein-alpha; 0 / Receptors, Erythropoietin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1895788
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66. Grossmann C, Ganem D: Effects of NFkappaB activation on KSHV latency and lytic reactivation are complex and context-dependent. Virology; 2008 May 25;375(1):94-102
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  • The latent v-FLIP gene is a strong activator of NFkappaB, and in primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells, blockade of NFkappaB activation is associated with enhanced lytic gene expression, while overexpression of p65 impairs expression of reporter genes driven by lytic promoters.
  • In accord with earlier work, we find that inhibition of NFkappaB signaling in PEL cells is associated with enhanced lytic reactivation of KSHV.
  • Similarly, in de novo KSHV infection of primary endothelial cells, inhibition of NFkappaB signaling leads to an increase in lytic gene expression and enhanced virion production.
  • Moreover, if NFkappaB activation is always inhibitory to lytic gene expression, one might expect its activation to be suppressed during the lytic cycle.
  • Together these data indicate that (i) the relationship of NFkappaB activation to latency and lytic reactivation is not uniform, but is dependent on the cellular context; and (ii) even though NFkappaB activation is inhibitory to lytic gene expression in some contexts, such inhibition is at least partially bypassed or overridden during lytic growth.

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  • (PMID = 18321555.001).
  • [ISSN] 0042-6822
  • [Journal-full-title] Virology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Virology
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA073506-10; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA073506; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA073506-10
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / NF-kappa B
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS51306; NLM/ PMC2822626
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67. Daesslé LW, Lugo-Ibarra KC, Tobschall HJ, Melo M, Gutiérrez-Galindo EA, García-Hernández J, Alvarez LG: Accumulation of as, pb, and cu associated with the recent sedimentary processes in the colorado delta, South of the United States-Mexico boundary. Arch Environ Contam Toxicol; 2009 May;56(4):680-92
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  • Flushing by river and tide flows appear to be responsible of a lower pollutant deposition in the CR compared to the adjacent Hardy River (HR).
  • Arsenic in the buried clay units of the HR has concentrations above the probable toxic effect level (PEL) for dwelling organisms, with maximum concentrations of 30 microg g(-1).

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  • (PMID = 18797954.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-0703
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of environmental contamination and toxicology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Arsenicals; 0 / Soil Pollutants; 0 / Water Pollutants, Chemical; 2P299V784P / Lead; 789U1901C5 / Copper
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68. Park KS, Kang SY, Lee WI: [HLA-B27 subtypes in Korean patients with ankylosing spondylitis]. Korean J Lab Med; 2008 Feb;28(1):46-52
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  • Pel-Freez SSP Unitray HLA-B*27 kit (Dynal Biotech, USA) including 16 primers was used to define HLA-B27 subtypes from B*2701 to B*2735.
  • [MeSH-major] HLA-B27 Antigen / genetics. Spondylitis, Ankylosing / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Alleles. Female. Gene Frequency. Genotype. Humans. Korea / epidemiology. Male. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Polymorphism, Genetic. Reagent Kits, Diagnostic

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  • (PMID = 18309255.001).
  • [ISSN] 1598-6535
  • [Journal-full-title] The Korean journal of laboratory medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Korean J Lab Med
  • [Language] kor
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / HLA-B27 Antigen; 0 / Reagent Kits, Diagnostic
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69. Watanabe Y, Fukui N, Nunokawa A, Muratake T, Kaneko N, Kitamura H, Someya T: No association between the ERBB3 gene and schizophrenia in a Japanese population. Neurosci Res; 2007 Apr;57(4):574-8
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  • [Title] No association between the ERBB3 gene and schizophrenia in a Japanese population.
  • There is cumulative evidence that neuregulin 1 (NRG1) is a susceptibility gene for schizophrenia.
  • Postmortem studies on brains from schizophrenia patients have revealed changes in the mRNA expression levels of v-erb-b2 erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 3 (ERBB3), one of the NRG1 receptor genes.
  • To assess whether the ERBB3 gene could be implicated in vulnerability to schizophrenia, we conducted a case-control (399 patients and 438 controls) association study in Japanese subjects.
  • [MeSH-major] Genetic Predisposition to Disease. Receptor, ErbB-3 / genetics. Schizophrenia / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Case-Control Studies. Female. Gene Frequency. Genotype. Humans. Japan / epidemiology. Linkage Disequilibrium. Male. Middle Aged. Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide


70. Herok R, Konopacka M, Polanska J, Swierniak A, Rogolinski J, Jaksik R, Hancock R, Rzeszowska-Wolny J: Bystander effects induced by medium from irradiated cells: similar transcriptome responses in irradiated and bystander K562 cells. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2010 May 1;77(1):244-52
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  • This work analyzes and compares changes in global transcript levels induced by direct irradiation and by bystander effects in K562 (human erythroleukemia) cells.
  • RESULTS: The level of the majority (72%) of transcripts changed similarly (increase, decrease, or no change) in cells grown in irradiation-conditioned medium or irradiated, whereas only 0.6% showed an opposite response.
  • Transcript level changes in bystander and irradiated cells were significantly different from those in untreated cells grown for the same amount of time and were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction for selected genes.
  • [MeSH-major] Bystander Effect / radiation effects. Culture Media, Conditioned / pharmacology. Gene Expression Profiling / methods. K562 Cells / radiation effects. Signal Transduction / radiation effects

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  • (PMID = 20394856.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-355X
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Culture Media, Conditioned
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71. Das DK: Serous effusions in malignant lymphomas: a review. Diagn Cytopathol; 2006 May;34(5):335-47
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  • [Title] Serous effusions in malignant lymphomas: a review.
  • Although the frequency of pleural effusion is 20-30% in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin's disease (HD), the involvement of peritoneal and pericardial cavities is uncommon.
  • Cytologic features of specific lymphoma subtypes such as lymphoblastic lymphoma, follicular center cell lymphoma, including Burkitt-type lymphoma, marginal zone lymphoma, MALT lymphoma, and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, etc., have been described in the literature.
  • ICC not only distinguishes lymphomas from reactive lymphocytoses and SRCTs, it significantly modifies the morphologic diagnosis to achieve a better classification of lymphomas.
  • Morphometry also distinguishes reactive lymphocytoses from malignant lymphoma with a high degree of sensitivity (>85%) and specificity (>95%).
  • Although lymphomas rarely present as serous effusions without the involvement of other thoracic and extrathoracic sites, a small group of lymphomas called primary effusion lymphomas (PEL) exhibit exclusive or dominant involvement of serous cavities, without a detectable solid tumor mass.
  • Cytomorphologically, PEL is usually a large-cell lymphoma, which appears to bridge features of large-cell immunoblastic and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL).
  • The presence of pleural effusion at the time of presentation is not only associated with extremely poor outcome of lymphomas, it is also a predictor of disease relapse after chemotherapy and decreased survival.
  • In such situations, cytology along with ancillary studies not only gives a quick diagnosis of lymphoma, but also offers prognostically significant information such as classification of lymphomas, its grade and immunophenotype, and presence/absence of viral DNAs and tumor lysis syndrome.
  • [MeSH-major] Cytodiagnosis / methods. Lymphoma / complications. Pleural Effusion, Malignant / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Ascitic Fluid / pathology. Carcinoma, Small Cell / pathology. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Hodgkin Disease / pathology. Humans. Immunophenotyping. Lymphocytosis / pathology. Male. Pericardial Effusion / etiology. Pericardial Effusion / pathology. Reed-Sternberg Cells / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16604559.001).
  • [ISSN] 8755-1039
  • [Journal-full-title] Diagnostic cytopathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Diagn. Cytopathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 136
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72. Coupland SE, Charlotte F, Mansour G, Maloum K, Hummel M, Stein H: HHV-8-associated T-cell lymphoma in a lymph node with concurrent peritoneal effusion in an HIV-positive man. Am J Surg Pathol; 2005 May;29(5):647-52
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] HHV-8-associated T-cell lymphoma in a lymph node with concurrent peritoneal effusion in an HIV-positive man.
  • Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is an uncommon large cell lymphoma, usually seen in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients.
  • PEL is characterized by various clinical, histomorphologic, and immunophenotypical features, and is associated with the human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8).
  • PEL may present as either a body cavity-based lymphomatous effusion or a solid tumor mass.
  • Most so-called "solid PEL" usually have an extranodal location; exceptionally rarely, they occur in lymph nodes.
  • The majority of PEL consist of malignant cells of B-cell genotype; seldom they are of T-cell origin.
  • We report a rare case of HHV-8-associated "solid PEL" of T-cell type in a 41-year-old HIV-seropositive man with a concomitant peritoneal effusion.
  • The T-cell lymphoma was diagnosed on the basis of morphologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular findings of a lymph node biopsy.
  • The tumor cells strongly expressed CD45R0, CD7, CD43, MUM1/IRF4, CD30, HHV-8, and EBER, and demonstrated a clonal rearrangement of T-cell receptor-gamma chain gene.
  • The following case provides another example of a lymph node-based "solid" PEL, demonstrating the variety within the spectrum of HHV-8-associated lymphoma.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Clone Cells. Gene Rearrangement, gamma-Chain T-Cell Antigen Receptor. Humans. Male

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  • (PMID = 15832089.001).
  • [ISSN] 0147-5185
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of surgical pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Clinical Conference; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
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73. Yamaguchi T, Koga T, Katsuki S: Water proton spin-lattice relaxation time during the apoptotic process in ultraviolet-irradiated murine erythroleukemia cells. J Physiol Sci; 2009 Mar;59(2):131-6
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  • [Title] Water proton spin-lattice relaxation time during the apoptotic process in ultraviolet-irradiated murine erythroleukemia cells.
  • Thus, we examined the (1)H spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of intracellular water during apoptosis in murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis / radiation effects. Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute / pathology. Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute / radiotherapy. Osmosis / radiation effects. Protons. Water
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Caspases / metabolism. Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Membrane / radiation effects. Cell Membrane / ultrastructure. Cell Size / radiation effects. DNA Fragmentation / radiation effects. Disease Models, Animal. Mice. Ultraviolet Rays

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  • (PMID = 19340553.001).
  • [ISSN] 1880-6562
  • [Journal-full-title] The journal of physiological sciences : JPS
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Physiol Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Protons; 059QF0KO0R / Water; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspases
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74. Dombrowski F, Klotz L, Bannasch P, Evert M: Renal carcinogenesis in models of diabetes in rats: metabolic changes are closely related to neoplastic development. Diabetologia; 2007 Dec;50(12):2580-90
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  • METHODS: Rats (n = 850), which were either spontaneously diabetic, streptozotocin-diabetic or normoglycaemic, were examined with special reference to Armanni-Ebstein lesions (AEL).
  • RESULTS: Irrespective of the cause of diabetes, diabetic but not normoglycaemic rats developed typical glycogenotic clear-cell AEL.
  • AEL showed strong proliferative activity, which was nearly completely inhibited by EGF receptor blockade (Gefitinib treatment).
  • Many findings suggested a stepwise development of RCCs from AEL.
  • In contrast to the proximal tubules, the distal tubular system, including glycogenotic AEL, had the same levels of enzyme activities as RCC (e.g. high glycogen phosphorylase and synthase activity, lack of glucose 6-phosphatase activity) and the same expression patterns of cytokeratin 7 and several growth factors, along with their receptors and signal transduction proteins (TGF-alpha, EGF receptor, IGF-I, IGF-I receptor, IGF-II receptor, insulin receptor substrate 1, v-raf-1 murine leukemia viral oncogene homologue 1 and mitogen activated protein kinase kinase 1).
  • In addition, direct morphological transitions between distal tubules, AEL and RCCs were frequently observed.
  • All these findings indicate a common origin and a precursor-product relationship of AEL and RCCs.
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Proliferation. Disease Models, Animal. Disease Progression. Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins / metabolism. Keratin-7 / metabolism. Kidney / pathology. Male. Precancerous Conditions / enzymology. Precancerous Conditions / metabolism. Precancerous Conditions / pathology. Rats. Rats, Inbred Lew. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Signal Transduction. Streptozocin. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 17952403.001).
  • [ISSN] 0012-186X
  • [Journal-full-title] Diabetologia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Diabetologia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; 0 / Keratin-7; 5W494URQ81 / Streptozocin
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75. Peniket A, Wainscoat J, Side L, Daly S, Kusec R, Buck G, Wheatley K, Walker H, Chatters S, Harrison C, Boultwood J, Goldstone A, Burnett A: Del (9q) AML: clinical and cytological characteristics and prognostic implications. Br J Haematol; 2005 Apr;129(2):210-20
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  • [Title] Del (9q) AML: clinical and cytological characteristics and prognostic implications.
  • Del (9q) is a recurrent cytogenetic abnormality in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML).
  • We report an analysis of 81 patients with del(9q) as a diagnostic karyotypic abnormality entered into the Medical Research Council AML trials 10, 11 and 12.
  • Sole del(9q) was associated with a characteristic bone marrow phenotype at diagnosis: a single Auer rod was found in all cases examined.
  • There was also an association with erythroid dysplasia (74%) and granylocytic lineage vacuolation (90%).
  • It is likely that the deletion of single or multiple tumour suppressor genes located in this region may underlie the pathogenesis of del (9q) AML.
  • [MeSH-major] Gene Deletion. Genes, Tumor Suppressor. Leukemia, Myeloid / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Bone Marrow Cells / pathology. Child. Child, Preschool. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8. Cytogenetic Analysis. Disease-Free Survival. Female. Genetic Markers. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Survival Rate. Translocation, Genetic

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  • [CommentIn] Br J Haematol. 2005 Sep;130(6):969; author reply 969 [16156871.001]
  • (PMID = 15813849.001).
  • [ISSN] 0007-1048
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of haematology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Haematol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Genetic Markers
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76. Pech D, Vidal-Martínez VM, Aguirre-Macedo ML, Gold-Bouchot G, Herrera-Silveira J, Zapata-Pérez O, Marcogliese DJ: The checkered puffer (Spheroides testudineus) and its helminths as bioindicators of chemical pollution in Yucatan coastal lagoons. Sci Total Environ; 2009 Mar 15;407(7):2315-24
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  • Results from sediment analyses demonstrated the presence of hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls at varying concentrations, some of which exceeded the Probability Effect Level (PEL).

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  • (PMID = 19135703.001).
  • [ISSN] 0048-9697
  • [Journal-full-title] The Science of the total environment
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Sci. Total Environ.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Water Pollutants, Chemical; 059QF0KO0R / Water
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77. Patel BB, Gupta D, Elliott AA, Sengupta V, Yu Y, Majumdar AP: Curcumin targets FOLFOX-surviving colon cancer cells via inhibition of EGFRs and IGF-1R. Anticancer Res; 2010 Feb;30(2):319-25
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  • Forty-eight-hour treatment of colon cancer HCT-116 and HT-29 cells with FOLFOX resulted in 60-70% survival, accompanied by a marked activation of insulin like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and minor to moderate increase in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), v-erb-b2 erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 2 (HER-2) as well as v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (AKT), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and cyclin-D1.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols / pharmacology. Colonic Neoplasms / drug therapy. Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor / metabolism. Receptor, IGF Type 1 / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 20332435.001).
  • [ISSN] 1791-7530
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / R01 AG014343; United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / R01 AG014343
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Organoplatinum Compounds; 0 / RNA, Small Interfering; 04ZR38536J / oxaliplatin; EC 2.7.10.1 / EGFR protein, human; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, IGF Type 1; IT942ZTH98 / Curcumin; U3P01618RT / Fluorouracil
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS521056; NLM/ PMC3836443
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78. Schnekenburger M, Morceau F, Henry E, Blasius R, Dicato M, Trentesaux C, Diederich M: Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of glutathione S-transferase P1 expression during butyric acid-induced differentiation of K562 cells. Leuk Res; 2006 May;30(5):561-8
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  • Over-expression of glutathione S-transferase P1 is related to chemotherapeutic drug resistance as well as to differentiation of human erythroleukemia cells.
  • In opposition to previously described differentiating inducers which enhance the GST-resistance phenotype, time- and concentration-dependent activation of both erythroid and megakaryocytic differentiation pathways by butyric acid progressively diminished GSTP1 mRNA expression.
  • [MeSH-major] Butyric Acid / pharmacology. Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic / drug effects. Glutathione S-Transferase pi / genetics. Transcription, Genetic

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  • (PMID = 16213016.001).
  • [ISSN] 0145-2126
  • [Journal-full-title] Leukemia research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Leuk. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Messenger; 107-92-6 / Butyric Acid; EC 2.5.1.18 / GSTP1 protein, human; EC 2.5.1.18 / Glutathione S-Transferase pi
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79. Mitra AK, Krishna M: Radiation-induced bystander effect: activation of signaling molecules in K562 erythroleukemia cells. J Cell Biochem; 2007 Mar 1;100(4):991-7
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  • [Title] Radiation-induced bystander effect: activation of signaling molecules in K562 erythroleukemia cells.
  • Gap junction independent signaling mechanism was investigated using K562 human erythroleukemia cells.
  • [MeSH-minor] Collagen Type XI / metabolism. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21 / metabolism. Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel. Humans. K562 Cells. Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute / metabolism. Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute / pathology. Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute / physiopathology. NF-kappa B / metabolism. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 / metabolism. Signal Transduction / radiation effects

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  • (PMID = 17063479.001).
  • [ISSN] 0730-2312
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cellular biochemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cell. Biochem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / COL11A2 protein, human; 0 / Collagen Type XI; 0 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21; 0 / NF-kappa B; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2
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80. Landon P, Breysse P, Chen Y: Noise exposures of rail workers at a North American chemical facility. Am J Ind Med; 2005 Apr;47(4):364-9
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  • Peak and maximum sound levels were also recorded during each sampling period.
  • RESULTS: Full-shift noise exposures were all below the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) and action level for a 12-hr workday.
  • Peak impact sound levels exceeded 140 dB in 17 of 18 samples (94%) with a mean peak sound level of 143.9 dB.
  • Maximum continuous sound levels were greater than 115 dBA in 4 of 18 samples (22%) with a mean maximum sound level of 113.1 dBA.
  • The source of peak impact sound levels was a daily exposure to a concussion caused by a sudden break in a freight airline.
  • Peak impact and maximum continuous sound levels can be attenuated through the use of hearing protection or by increasing distances from railroad noise sources.
  • [MeSH-major] Chemical Industry. Noise, Occupational. Occupational Exposure / analysis. Railroads

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  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 15776466.001).
  • [ISSN] 0271-3586
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of industrial medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Ind. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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81. Hussain AR, Al-Jomah NA, Siraj AK, Manogaran P, Al-Hussein K, Abubaker J, Platanias LC, Al-Kuraya KS, Uddin S: Sanguinarine-dependent induction of apoptosis in primary effusion lymphoma cells. Cancer Res; 2007 Apr 15;67(8):3888-97
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  • Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is an incurable, aggressive B-cell malignancy that develops rapid resistance to conventional chemotherapy.
  • In efforts to identify novel approaches to block proliferation of PEL cells, we found that sanguinarine, a natural compound isolated from the root plant Sanguinaria canadendid, inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in several PEL cell lines.
  • Our data show that sanguinarine treatment of PEL cells results in up-regulation of death receptor 5 (DR5) expression via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and causes activation of caspase-8 and truncation of Bid (tBid).
  • In addition, we show that pretreatment of PEL cells with carbobenzoxy-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone, a universal inhibitor of caspases, abrogates caspase and PARP activation and prevents cell death induced by sanguinarine.
  • Moreover, treatment of PEL cells with sanguinarine down-regulates expression of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAP).
  • Taken together, our findings suggest that sanguinarine is a potent inducer of apoptosis of PEL cells via up-regulation of DR5 and raise the possibility that this agent may be of value in the development of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of PEL.
  • [MeSH-minor] BH3 Interacting Domain Death Agonist Protein / metabolism. Caspases / metabolism. Cell Growth Processes / drug effects. Cell Line, Tumor. Collagen Type XI / metabolism. Cytochromes c / metabolism. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Enzyme Activation / drug effects. Exudates and Transudates / cytology. Humans. Isoenzymes / metabolism. Membrane Potential, Mitochondrial / drug effects. Mitochondria / drug effects. Mitochondria / metabolism. Mitochondria / physiology. Molecular Conformation. Reactive Oxygen Species / metabolism. Receptors, TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand / biosynthesis. Receptors, TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand / genetics. Signal Transduction / drug effects. Up-Regulation / drug effects. bcl-2-Associated X Protein / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17440103.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-5472
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Alkaloids; 0 / BAX protein, human; 0 / BH3 Interacting Domain Death Agonist Protein; 0 / BID protein, human; 0 / Benzophenanthridines; 0 / COL11A2 protein, human; 0 / Collagen Type XI; 0 / Isoenzymes; 0 / Isoquinolines; 0 / Reactive Oxygen Species; 0 / Receptors, TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand; 0 / bcl-2-Associated X Protein; 9007-43-6 / Cytochromes c; AV9VK043SS / sanguinarine; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspases
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82. Kwok KW, Bjorgesaeter A, Leung KM, Lui GC, Gray JS, Shin PK, Lam PK: Deriving site-specific sediment quality guidelines for Hong Kong marine environments using field-based species sensitivity distributions. Environ Toxicol Chem; 2008 Jan;27(1):226-34
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  • As the construction of f-SSDs requires the use of a collection of responses from individual species to a chemical gradient in sediment, data screening criteria on the minimum abundance of the species were evaluated and optimized to ensure sufficient statistical power for estimating these responses.
  • The community-adjusted hazardous concentrations of 5% and 10% of the f-SSDs were adopted to represent the threshold effects level (TEL) and predicted effects level (PEL), respectively.

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  • (PMID = 18092863.001).
  • [ISSN] 0730-7268
  • [Journal-full-title] Environmental toxicology and chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Environ. Toxicol. Chem.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Environmental Pollutants; 0 / Metals, Heavy; 0 / Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic; DFC2HB4I0K / Polychlorinated Biphenyls
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83. Jädersten M, Montgomery SM, Dybedal I, Porwit-MacDonald A, Hellström-Lindberg E: Long-term outcome of treatment of anemia in MDS with erythropoietin and G-CSF. Blood; 2005 Aug 1;106(3):803-11
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  • We report long-term results of treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with erythropoietin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF).
  • Erythroid response rate was 39% and median response duration 23 months (range, 3-116 months or more).
  • The time until 25% developed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was longer in the good and intermediate predictive groups for erythroid response compared with the poor predictive group (52 versus 13 months, P = .008).
  • Only 1 of 20 long-term responders developed AML.
  • There was no difference in survival (odds ratio [OR], 0.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7-1.2; P = .55) or risk of AML evolution (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.7-2.2; P = .40) between treated and untreated patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Anemia / drug therapy. Erythropoietin / therapeutic use. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor / therapeutic use. Myelodysplastic Syndromes / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Analysis of Variance. Cell Transformation, Neoplastic. Female. Humans. Leukemia, Myeloid / etiology. Male. Middle Aged. Predictive Value of Tests. Prognosis. Survival Analysis. Treatment Outcome


84. Cozma D, Thomas-Tikhonenko A: Kit-activating mutations in AML: lessons from PU.1-induced murine erythroleukemia. Cancer Biol Ther; 2006 Jun;5(6):579-81
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  • [Title] Kit-activating mutations in AML: lessons from PU.1-induced murine erythroleukemia.
  • Gain-of-function mutations in c-Kit have been described in a number of human cancers, including testicular germinomas, acute myeloid leukemia and gastrointestinal stromal tumors.
  • Without Kit mutations, these mice suffer from a benign disease whose hallmark is erythropoietin-dependent expansion of undifferentiated red blood cell precursors.
  • Gleevac), the authors demonstrate that Kit mutations are important for the autonomous expansion of malignant cells via the MEK/Erk1/2 and PI3K/Akt pathways.
  • These findings validate the notion that one differentiation-blocking (e.g., PU.1 activation) and one proliferative (e.g., c-Kit mutations) event are required for the development of frank leukemia.
  • [MeSH-major] Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute / genetics. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / genetics. Mutation. Proto-Oncogene Proteins / genetics. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit / genetics. Trans-Activators / genetics


85. Miyazaki T, Kirino Y, Takeno M, Samukawa S, Hama M, Tanaka M, Yamaji S, Ueda A, Tomita N, Fujita H, Ishigatsubo Y: Expression of heme oxygenase-1 in human leukemic cells and its regulation by transcriptional repressor Bach1. Cancer Sci; 2010 Jun;101(6):1409-16
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  • However, little is known about the regulation of HO-1 in human primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells.
  • Here we investigated the expression of HO-1 in primary and established AML cells as well as other types of leukemic cells and normal monocytes, and its regulatory mechanism by the transcriptional repressor, BTB and CNC homology 1 (Bach1), and the activator, nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2).
  • Leukemic cell lines such as U937 expressed little HO-1, whereas most freshly isolated AML cells and monocytes expressed substantial amounts of HO-1, along with Bach1 and Nrf2.
  • When U937 cells were treated with phorbol myristate acetate (PHA) or gamma-interferon, they significantly expressed both HO-1 and Bach1, like primary AML cells.
  • Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay of these cells revealed the preferential binding of Nrf2 over Bach1 to Maf-recognition elements, the enhancer regions of the HO-1 gene.
  • The downregulation of the HO-1 gene with siRNA increased a cytotoxic effect of an anticancer drug on primary AML cells, whereas the downregulation of Bach1 increased HO-1 expression, leading to enhanced survival.
  • These and other results show that Bach1 plays a critical role in regulating HO-1 gene expression in AML cells and its expression suppresses their survival by downregulating HO-1 expression.
  • [MeSH-major] Basic-Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors / physiology. Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group Proteins / physiology. Heme Oxygenase-1 / genetics. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / enzymology. Repressor Proteins / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line, Tumor. Cell Survival. Gene Expression Regulation. Humans. Lipopolysaccharides / pharmacology. Monocytes / metabolism. NF-E2-Related Factor 2 / genetics. Tetradecanoylphorbol Acetate / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 20345481.001).
  • [ISSN] 1349-7006
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / BACH1 protein, human; 0 / Basic-Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors; 0 / Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group Proteins; 0 / Lipopolysaccharides; 0 / NF-E2-Related Factor 2; 0 / NFE2L2 protein, human; 0 / Repressor Proteins; EC 1.14.99.3 / HMOX1 protein, human; EC 1.14.99.3 / Heme Oxygenase-1; NI40JAQ945 / Tetradecanoylphorbol Acetate
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86. Yiakoumis X, Pangalis GA, Kyrtsonis MC, Vassilakopoulos TP, Kontopidou FN, Kalpadakis C, Korkolopoulou P, Levidou G, Androulaki A, Siakantaris MP, Sachanas S, Andreopoulos A: Primary effusion lymphoma in two HIV-negative patients successfully treated with pleurodesis as first-line therapy. Anticancer Res; 2010 Jan;30(1):271-6
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  • Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) mostly occurring in HIV-positive patients.
  • We report two HIV-negative, HHV8-positive patients with PEL of the pleural cavity who achieved a durable remission after pleurodesis with bleomycin and no systemic therapy.
  • We also perform a review of the relevant literature regarding the clinical data, treatment, and survival of PEL in HIV-negative patients.

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  • (PMID = 20150647.001).
  • [ISSN] 1791-7530
  • [Journal-full-title] Anticancer research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anticancer Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin
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87. Moore A, Merad Boudia M, Lehalle D, Massrieh W, Derjuga A, Blank V: Regulation of globin gene transcription by heme in erythroleukemia cells: analysis of putative heme regulatory motifs in the p45 NF-E2 transcription factor. Antioxid Redox Signal; 2006 Jan-Feb;8(1-2):68-75
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  • [Title] Regulation of globin gene transcription by heme in erythroleukemia cells: analysis of putative heme regulatory motifs in the p45 NF-E2 transcription factor.
  • The function of the NF-E2 transcription factor, a p45/small Maf heterodimer, was analyzed in the erythroleukemia cell lines MEL and CB3.
  • In contrast to MEL cells, CB3 cells are null for p45 and thus express only extremely low levels of adult globin transcripts upon induction by agents promoting erythroid differentiation.
  • We investigated the response of erythroleukemia cells to hemin treatment.
  • Hemin rapidly induces beta-globin gene transcript levels in MEL cells, but not in CB3 cells.
  • Stable expression of the large p45 NF-E2 subunit in CB3 cells restores hemin mediated beta-globin gene transcription, suggesting that the presence of a functional NF-E2 is required for strong induction of beta-globin mRNA levels by hemin in erythroleukemia cells.
  • In addition, we showed that p45 NF-E2 HRM mutants are able to restore beta-globin gene transcription in CB3 cells upon induction by hemin.
  • Our results suggest that globin gene activation by heme appears to be independent of the putative HRMs in the p45 subunit of the NF-E2 transcription factor.
  • [MeSH-major] Gene Expression Regulation. Globins / genetics. Heme / metabolism. NF-E2 Transcription Factor, p45 Subunit / metabolism. Transcription, Genetic
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blotting, Northern. Cell Line, Tumor. DNA Primers. Hemin / biosynthesis. Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute. Mice. Mutagenesis, Site-Directed. Protein Subunits / metabolism. Transcriptional Activation

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  • (PMID = 16487039.001).
  • [ISSN] 1523-0864
  • [Journal-full-title] Antioxidants & redox signaling
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Antioxid. Redox Signal.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA Primers; 0 / NF-E2 Transcription Factor, p45 Subunit; 0 / Protein Subunits; 42VZT0U6YR / Heme; 743LRP9S7N / Hemin; 9004-22-2 / Globins
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88. Hasegawa H, Chatterjee A, Cui Y, Chatterjee AK: Elevated temperature enhances virulence of Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora strain EC153 to plants and stimulates production of the quorum sensing signal, N-acyl homoserine lactone, and extracellular proteins. Appl Environ Microbiol; 2005 Aug;71(8):4655-63
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  • Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica, E. carotovora subsp. betavasculorum, and E. carotovora subsp. carotovora produce high levels of extracellular enzymes, such as pectate lyase (Pel), polygalacturonase (Peh), cellulase (Cel), and protease (Prt), and the quorum-sensing signal N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) at 28 degrees C.
  • At elevated temperatures these bacteria produce high levels of RsmA, an RNA binding protein that promotes RNA decay. E. carotovora subsp. carotovora strain EC153 is an exception in that it produces higher levels of Pel, Peh, Cel, and Prt at 34.5 degrees C than at 28 degrees C.
  • EC153 also causes extensive maceration of celery petioles and Chinese cabbage leaves at 34.5 degrees C, which correlates with a higher growth rate and higher levels of rRNA and AHL.
  • The lack of pectinase production by E. carotovora subsp. carotovora strain Ecc71 at 34.5 degrees C limits the growth of this organism in plant tissues and consequently impairs its ability to cause tissue maceration.
  • Comparative studies with ahlI (the gene encoding a putative AHL synthase), pel-1, and peh-1 transcripts documented that at 34.5 degrees C the RNAs are more stable in EC153 than in Ecc71.
  • Our data reveal that overall metabolic activity, AHL levels, and mRNA stability are responsible for the higher levels of extracellular protein production and the enhanced virulence of EC153 at 34.5 degrees C compared to 28 degrees C.
  • [MeSH-major] 4-Butyrolactone / analogs & derivatives. Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial. Pectobacterium carotovorum / enzymology. Pectobacterium carotovorum / pathogenicity. Temperature

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  • (PMID = 16085860.001).
  • [ISSN] 0099-2240
  • [Journal-full-title] Applied and environmental microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bacterial Proteins; 0 / RNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / Repressor Proteins; 0 / RsmA protein, Erwinia carotovora; 1192-20-7 / homoserine lactone; OL659KIY4X / 4-Butyrolactone
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1183306
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89. Katzmann JA, Kyle RA, Benson J, Larson DR, Snyder MR, Lust JA, Rajkumar SV, Dispenzieri A: Screening panels for detection of monoclonal gammopathies. Clin Chem; 2009 Aug;55(8):1517-22
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  • BACKGROUND: The repertoire of serologic tests for identifying a monoclonal gammopathy includes serum and urine protein electrophoresis (PEL), serum and urine immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE), and quantitative serum free light chain (FLC).
  • METHODS: Patients with a PCPD and all 5 assays performed within 30 days of diagnosis were included (n = 1877).
  • The diagnoses were multiple myeloma (MM) (n = 467), smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) (n = 191), monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) (n = 524), plasmacytoma (n = 29), extramedullary plasmacytoma (n = 10), Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) (n = 26), primary amyloidosis (AL) (n = 581), light chain deposition disease (LCDD) (n = 18), and POEMS syndrome (n = 31).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The major impact of using a simplified screening panel of serum PEL plus FLC rather than PEL, IFE, and FLC is an 8% reduction in sensitivity for MGUS, 23% for POEMS (7 patients), 4% for plasmacytoma (1 patient), 1% for AL, and 0.5% for SMM.

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