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1. Thomas C, Di Maio S, Ma R, Vollans E, Chu C, Clark B, Lee R, McKenzie M, Martin M, Toyota B: Hearing preservation following fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannomas: prognostic implications of cochlear dose. J Neurosurg; 2007 Nov;107(5):917-26
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Hearing preservation following fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannomas: prognostic implications of cochlear dose.
  • OBJECT: The goal in this study was to evaluate hearing preservation rates and to determine prognostic factors for this outcome following fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) of vestibular schwannoma.
  • Permanent trigeminal and facial nerve complications were 0 and 6%, respectively.
  • Radiotherapy dose to the cochlear nucleus, patient age, sex, pre-FSRT hearing grade, tumor volume, and intracanalicular tumor volume failed to show any significance as prognostic factors.
  • [MeSH-major] Cochlea / radiation effects. Hearing. Neuroma, Acoustic / radiotherapy. Radiosurgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Facial Nerve / physiology. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Prospective Studies. Radiation Dosage. Trigeminal Nerve / physiology

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  • (PMID = 17977261.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3085
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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2. Nguyen DQ, Boulat E, Troussier J, Reyt EI, Lavieille JP, Schmerber SI: [The jugulotympanic paragangliomas: 41 cases report]. Rev Laryngol Otol Rhinol (Bord); 2005;126(1):7-13
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  • OBJECTIVE: The jugulotympanic paragangliomas (JTP) represents the most frequent tumour of the middle ear but also of the temporal bone, after the acoustic neurinoma.
  • The management of these vascular tumours remains uncleared.
  • RESULTS: A total tumor removal without recurrence was achieved by surgery in more than 95% of the cases with 6 years follow-up but was associated with significant morbidity (major cranial nerve injury).
  • We noticed one death by laryngospasme (C2Di2 tumour operated by infratemporal A approach).
  • A stabilization of the tumour was obtained with radiotherapy in first intention in 75% of the cases (5 years follow-up) but with a risk of radionecrosis.
  • Because of the slow rate of growth, the radiotherapy is indicated for older patients, at risk for surgery or extensive tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Ear Neoplasms / surgery. Glomus Jugulare Tumor / surgery. Glomus Tympanicum Tumor / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Carotid Body Tumor / pathology. Carotid Body Tumor / surgery. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Neoplasm Staging. Radiotherapy, Adjuvant. Remission Induction. Retrospective Studies. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 16080641.001).
  • [ISSN] 0035-1334
  • [Journal-full-title] Revue de laryngologie - otologie - rhinologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Laryngol Otol Rhinol (Bord)
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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3. Hours M, Bernard M, Montestrucq L, Arslan M, Bergeret A, Deltour I, Cardis E: [Cell Phones and Risk of brain and acoustic nerve tumours: the French INTERPHONE case-control study]. Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique; 2007 Oct;55(5):321-32
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  • [Title] [Cell Phones and Risk of brain and acoustic nerve tumours: the French INTERPHONE case-control study].
  • To evaluate the relationship between the use of cell phones and the development of tumors of the head, a multicentric international study (INTERPHONE), coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, was carried out in 13 countries.
  • METHODS: INTERPHONE is a case-control study focused on tumors of the brain and central nervous system: gliomas, meningiomas and neuromas of cranial nerves.
  • Eligible cases were men and women, residents of Paris or Lyon, aged 30-59, newly diagnosed with a first primary tumor between February 2001 and August 2003.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Neoplasms / etiology. Cell Phones. Neuroma, Acoustic / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Case-Control Studies. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / etiology. Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / etiology. Female. Glioblastoma / etiology. Glioma / etiology. Humans. Male. Meningioma / etiology. Middle Aged. Neuroma / etiology. Risk Factors. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 17851009.001).
  • [ISSN] 0398-7620
  • [Journal-full-title] Revue d'épidémiologie et de santé publique
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] France
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4. Diensthuber M, Lenarz T, Stöver T: [Neurotrophic factor expression in vestibular schwannoma. An overview]. Laryngorhinootologie; 2006 Oct;85(10):731-7
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  • [Title] [Neurotrophic factor expression in vestibular schwannoma. An overview].
  • The vestibular schwannoma is a benign, slow-growing neoplasm that originates from the neurolemmal sheath of the vestibular branch of the VIIIth cranial nerve.
  • This tumor entity accounts for 6 % of all intracranial tumors and the annual incidence of newly diagnosed vestibular schwannoma is reported as 13 per million.
  • The molecular pathogenesis of both sporadic vestibular schwannoma and those occurring in neurofibromatosis type II appears to be associated with an aberration of a tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 22q12.
  • The biological background for the various growth patterns of vestibular schwannoma is, however, largely unknown.
  • This differing clinical and biological behaviour of vestibular schwannoma may be explained by the presence of neurotrophic factors.
  • The results of recent immunohistochemical studies demonstrate the co-expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1 and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in vestibular schwannoma and suggest a trophic synergism of both neurotrophic factors in this tumor.
  • Moreover, expression of numerous different neurotrophic factors has been shown in studies of nerve growth factor (NGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), neuregulin (NRG) and erythropoietin (EPO) indicating a biological role in development, maintainance or growth of vestibular schwannoma.
  • In this article, we summarize the findings on neurotrophic factor expression and discuss their characteristics and biological role in vestibular schwannoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Nerve Growth Factors / metabolism. Neuroma, Acoustic / metabolism. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Animals. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 22 / genetics. Epidermal Growth Factor / metabolism. Epidermal Growth Factor / physiology. Fibroblast Growth Factors / metabolism. Fibroblast Growth Factors / physiology. Genes, Tumor Suppressor. Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor / metabolism. Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor / physiology. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Incidence. Mice. Mice, Hairless. Neurofibromatosis 2 / genetics. Neurofibromatosis 2 / metabolism. Neurofibromatosis 2 / pathology. Schwann Cells / metabolism. Schwann Cells / pathology. Signal Transduction. Transforming Growth Factors / metabolism. Transforming Growth Factors / physiology. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / metabolism. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / physiology

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  • (PMID = 16612755.001).
  • [ISSN] 0935-8943
  • [Journal-full-title] Laryngo- rhino- otologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Laryngorhinootologie
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor; 0 / Nerve Growth Factors; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A; 62031-54-3 / Fibroblast Growth Factors; 62229-50-9 / Epidermal Growth Factor; 76057-06-2 / Transforming Growth Factors
  • [Number-of-references] 78
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5. Yang I, Sughrue ME, Han SJ, Fang S, Aranda D, Cheung SW, Pitts LH, Parsa AT: Facial nerve preservation after vestibular schwannoma Gamma Knife radiosurgery. J Neurooncol; 2009 May;93(1):41-8
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  • [Title] Facial nerve preservation after vestibular schwannoma Gamma Knife radiosurgery.
  • OBJECTIVE: Facial nerve preservation is a critical measure of clinical outcome after vestibular schwannoma treatment.
  • Gamma Knife radiosurgery has evolved into a practical treatment modality for vestibular schwannoma patients, with several reported series from a variety of centers.
  • In this study, we report the results of an objective analysis of reported facial nerve outcomes after the treatment of vestibular schwannomas with Gamma Knife radiosurgery.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: A Boolean Pub Med search of the English language literature revealed a total of 23 published studies reporting assessable and quantifiable outcome data regarding facial nerve function in 2,204 patients who were treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma.
  • (1) Facial nerve preservation rates were reported specifically for vestibular schwannoma, (2) Facial nerve functional outcome was reported using the House-Brackmann classification (HBC) for facial nerve function, (3) Tumor size was documented, and (4) Gamma Knife radiosurgery was the only radiosurgical modality used in the report.
  • The data were then aggregated and analyzed based on radiation doses delivered, tumor volume, and patient age.
  • RESULTS: An overall facial nerve preservation rate of 96.2% was found after Gamma Knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma in our analysis.
  • Patients receiving less than or equal to 13 Gy of radiation at the marginal dose had a better facial nerve preservation rate than those who received higher doses (<or=13 Gy = 98.5% vs. >13 Gy = 94.7%, P < 0.0001).
  • Patients with a tumor volume less than or equal to 1.5 cm(3) also had a greater facial nerve preservation rate than patients with tumors greater than 1.5 cm(3) (<or=1.5 cm(3) 99.5% vs. >1.5 cm(3) 95.5%, P < 0.0001).
  • Superior facial nerve preservation was also noted in patients younger than or equal to 60 years of age (96.8 vs. 89.4%, P < 0.0001).
  • CONCLUSION: Our analysis of case series data aggregated from multiple centers suggests that a facial nerve preservation rate of 96.2% can be expected after Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma.
  • Younger patients with smaller tumors less than 1.5 cm(3) and treated with lower doses of radiation less than 13 Gy will likely have better facial nerve preservation rates after Gamma Knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Facial Nerve / radiation effects. Facial Nerve Injuries / epidemiology. Facial Nerve Injuries / etiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 19430881.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-7373
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 85
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6. Lescanne E, François P, Bakhos D, Velut S, Robier A, Pollak A: Vestibular schwannoma: dissection of the tumor and arachnoidal duplication. Otol Neurotol; 2008 Oct;29(7):989-94
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  • [Title] Vestibular schwannoma: dissection of the tumor and arachnoidal duplication.
  • INTRODUCTION: In vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery, the arachnoidal duplication, based on an epiarachnoidal origin of the tumor, is reputedly induced by medial growth of tumor and helpful in atraumatic dissection.
  • An additional series of 27 TBs without any tumor within the internal auditory meatus were also included.
  • No connective tissue or protrusion of a psammoma body was observed between the nerves and the vs. High magnification failed to demonstrate any meningeal cleavage plane between the facial or cochlear nerve and the tumor.
  • In every case, the transition zone, the vestibular ganglion, or the VS was located in the subarachnoid fluid space.
  • CONCLUSION: We were not able to identify any layer between tumor and the intrameatal contents and did not observe any conjunctive-tissue capsule surrounding the intrameatal VS, as an epiarachnoidal tumor origin would suggest.
  • [MeSH-major] Arachnoiditis / pathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Temporal Bone / pathology. Vestibular Diseases / surgery

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  • (PMID = 18667937.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-4505
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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7. Suzuki M, Yamada C, Inoue R, Kashio A, Saito Y, Nakanishi W: Analysis of vestibular testing in patients with vestibular schwannoma based on the nerve of origin, the localization, and the size of the tumor. Otol Neurotol; 2008 Oct;29(7):1029-33
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  • [Title] Analysis of vestibular testing in patients with vestibular schwannoma based on the nerve of origin, the localization, and the size of the tumor.
  • OBJECTIVES: We aimed to analyze the factors influencing caloric response and vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) in vestibular schwannoma.
  • SUBJECTS: The subjects comprised 130 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma pathologically diagnosed by surgery.
  • METHOD: Caloric response and the amplitude and latency of VEMP were measured and analyzed based on the nerve of origin, localization, and size of the tumor.
  • The tumors were classified into 3 types based on localization: intracanalicular, intermediate, and medial; and into 4 grades based on size: 9 mm or less, 10 to 19 mm, 20 to 29 mm, and 30 mm or greater.
  • RESULTS: : Abnormal rates of caloric response and VEMP in patients with tumors arising from the superior vestibular nerve were not significantly different from those in patients with tumors of the inferior vestibular nerve.
  • In the intermediate and medial type-but not in the intracanalicular type-a significant difference in tumor size was observed between patients with normal caloric response and those with canal paresis as also between patients with normal VEMP and those with abnormal VEMP.
  • In patients with tumors that maximally measured 10 to 19 mm or of the intermediate type, the p- and n-wave latencies of VEMP were significantly prolonged compared with those in the normal opposite ear.
  • CONCLUSION:. 1) The nerve of origin of tumors cannot be predicted based on caloric response and VEMP.
  • 2) In the intermediate and medial types, caloric response and the VEMP amplitude are significantly diminished in association with an increase in tumor size.
  • 3) Prolonged VEMP latencies seem to be not only caused by tumor compression to the brainstem or vestibular spinal tract but also by tumor compression isolated to the inferior vestibular nerve.
  • [MeSH-major] Evoked Potentials, Auditory / physiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / diagnosis. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Vestibular Nerve / pathology. Vestibule, Labyrinth / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Calorimetry. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Reaction Time. Retrospective Studies. Vestibular Function Tests

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  • (PMID = 18698272.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-4505
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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8. Gong S, Chen G, Zhong G, Yan K, Zhang E, Chen P, Lin N, Nie X: [Neurofibromatosis type 2]. Lin Chuang Er Bi Yan Hou Ke Za Zhi; 2006 Aug;20(16):721-3
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  • OBJECTIVE: To recognise the predisposing factors, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2).
  • The patient was diagnosed as NF2 according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) criteria, and received operation on the left acoustic tumor.
  • The tumor was proved to be schwannomas by pathological test.
  • The hearing loss and the facial nerve paralysis (House-Brackmann II) had appeared after operation.
  • CONCLUSION: NF2 is an autosomal dominant, highly penetrant disease which is characterized by bilateral vestibular schwannomas.
  • Early diagnosis and management for tumor is very important for survival and hearing preservation.

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  • (PMID = 17058913.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Lin chuang er bi yan hou ke za zhi = Journal of clinical otorhinolaryngology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lin Chuang Er Bi Yan Hou Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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9. Sauvaget E, Kici S, Kania R, Herman P, Tran Ba Huy P: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss as a revealing symptom of vestibular schwannoma. Acta Otolaryngol; 2005 Jun;125(6):592-5
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  • [Title] Sudden sensorineural hearing loss as a revealing symptom of vestibular schwannoma.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) is a frequent symptom of vestibular schwannoma (VS), often reveals small VSs and does not exhibit specific features.
  • Therefore, every case of SSHL should be evaluated using systematic MRI to rule out VS in order to improve hearing and preservation facial nerve function.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 139 consecutive unilateral VSs operated on between 2000 and 2002 were reviewed and analyzed regarding the prevalence, clinical and audiological features of SSHL and their relation to the size of the tumor.
  • Tumor size was significantly smaller in SSHL-associated VSs compared to other VSs.
  • [MeSH-major] Hearing Loss, Sudden / etiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Audiometry / classification. Cohort Studies. Dizziness / etiology. Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem / physiology. Female. Hearing / physiology. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Petrous Bone / pathology. Recovery of Function / physiology. Retrospective Studies. Tinnitus / etiology. Vertigo / etiology


10. Yu LM, Yang SM, Han DY, Huang DL, Yang WY: [Management of operative complications in acoustic neuroma surgery]. Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2006 Jan;41(1):26-30
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  • [Title] [Management of operative complications in acoustic neuroma surgery].
  • OBJECTIVE: To explore the common complications related to acoustic neuromas and to search methods for preventing from them.
  • METHODS: One hundred and five patients with acoustic neuromas underwent 110 operations with the retrosigmoid approach, middle cranial fossa approach and labyrinth approach.
  • Other complications were cerebrospinal fluid fistulas (CSF, 12.7%, 14/110) , intracranial hematoma (5.5%, 6/110), cranial nerve palsies (4.5%, 5/110), meningitis (3.6%, 4/110), tetraparesis (3.6%, 4/110), balance disturbance (1.8%, 2/110), hemiparalysis and anepia (0.9%, 1/110).
  • CSF in this series was another common complication in acoustic neuroma surgery.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The key factors to avoid the complications include mastering the anatomy of different surgical approach, how much of the tumor size, surgical experience and preoperative evaluation of patients' imaging information and other clinical data.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Postoperative Complications / prevention & control

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  • (PMID = 16646239.001).
  • [ISSN] 1673-0860
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua er bi yan hou tou jing wai ke za zhi = Chinese journal of otorhinolaryngology head and neck surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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11. Perrot X, Fischer C: [Functional assessment of cochlear nerve and hearing]. Neurochirurgie; 2009 Apr;55(2):142-51
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  • [Title] [Functional assessment of cochlear nerve and hearing].
  • Hearing and cochlear nerve exploration can be carried out using three principal methods: pure-tone and speech audiometry, evoked otoacoustic emissions (EOAEs), and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs).
  • CONCLUSION: Auditory functional assessment is essential for optimal care of tumor or functional pathologies involving the cochlear nerve and/or the cerebellopontine angle.
  • [MeSH-major] Audiometry. Cochlear Nerve / surgery. Hearing / physiology. Neurosurgical Procedures. Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Acoustic Stimulation. Audiometry, Pure-Tone. Auditory Threshold / physiology. Electroencephalography. Evoked Potentials, Auditory / physiology. Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem / physiology. Humans. Preoperative Care. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19298983.001).
  • [ISSN] 0028-3770
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuro-Chirurgie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurochirurgie
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Meta-Analysis; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Number-of-references] 61
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12. Gonzalez LF, Lekovic GP, Eschbacher J, Coons S, Spetzler RF: A true malignant schwannoma of the eighth cranial nerve: case report. Neurosurgery; 2007 Aug;61(2):E421-2; discussion E422
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A true malignant schwannoma of the eighth cranial nerve: case report.
  • OBJECTIVE: The clinical presentation, pathology, treatment, and outcome of a 43-year-old woman with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor arising from a benign schwannoma of the eighth cranial nerve are presented.
  • CLINICAL PRESENTATION: Initially, the tumor was debulked.
  • After finding malignant areas within the benign tumor, it was considered to be a malignant transformation of a previously benign tumor.
  • Postoperatively, the tumor bed was radiated for palliation.
  • [MeSH-major] Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / pathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / secondary. Vestibulocochlear Nerve / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Dura Mater / pathology. Fatal Outcome. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Meningeal Neoplasms / secondary

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  • (PMID = 17762727.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4040
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurgery
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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13. Ortigara L, Rosemberg N, Siqueira R, Neto F: Resection of a mediastinal schwannoma using video-assisted thoracoscopy. J Bras Pneumol; 2006 Mar-Apr;32(2):172-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Schwannomas are tumors that are typically benign.
  • They are derived from Schwann cells (glial cells of the peripheral nervous system that serve to separate and isolate nerve cells from adjacent structures).
  • The most common type of schwannoma is a benign tumor of cranial nerve VIII and is referred to as an acoustic neuroma.
  • When extradural, such tumors usually present as masses that can invade adjacent structures, thereby becoming symptomatic, as in the case of intrathoracic schwannomas (typically found in the posterior mediastinum).
  • [MeSH-major] Mediastinal Neoplasms / surgery. Neurilemmoma / surgery. Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted

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  • (PMID = 17273587.001).
  • [ISSN] 1806-3756
  • [Journal-full-title] Jornal brasileiro de pneumologia : publicaça̋o oficial da Sociedade Brasileira de Pneumologia e Tisilogia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Bras Pneumol
  • [Language] eng; por
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
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14. Régis J, Tamura M, Wikler D, Porcheron D, Levrier O: Radiosurgery: operative technique, pitfalls and tips. Prog Neurol Surg; 2008;21:54-64
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  • Topography of petrous structures such as cochlea, vestibulum and facial nerve canal should be visible on the CT scan.
  • High-resolution CISS T2-weighted volumetric pulse sequences (3DT2) allow direct nerve visualization and give superior stereotactic definition attributable to their better resolution minimizing partial volume effects and to their lower magnetic susceptibility minimizing distortions.
  • Tumor volume delineation allows the calculation of conformity, selectivity and gradient indexes.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery / adverse effects. Radiosurgery / methods

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  • (PMID = 18810199.001).
  • [ISSN] 0079-6492
  • [Journal-full-title] Progress in neurological surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prog Neurol Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Number-of-references] 22
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15. Aghi M, Kluwe L, Webster MT, Jacoby LB, Barker FG 2nd, Ojemann RG, Mautner VF, MacCollin M: Unilateral vestibular schwannoma with other neurofibromatosis type 2-related tumors: clinical and molecular study of a unique phenotype. J Neurosurg; 2006 Feb;104(2):201-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Unilateral vestibular schwannoma with other neurofibromatosis type 2-related tumors: clinical and molecular study of a unique phenotype.
  • OBJECT: Although the manifestations of neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) vary, the hallmark is bilateral vestibular schwannomas (VSs).
  • The authors studied the clinical course and genetic basis of unilateral VSs associated with other NF2-related tumors.
  • METHODS: Forty-four adults presenting with unilateral VSs and other NF2-related tumors were identified.
  • A comprehensive review of patient records and cranial imaging was conducted.
  • Molecular analysis of the NF2 locus was performed in available tumors and paired blood specimens.
  • Twenty-two patients (50%) presented with eighth cranial nerve dysfunction.
  • Thirty-eight harbored other intracranial tumors and 27 had spinal tumors, with most lesions situated ipsilateral to the vs. No patient had a relative with NF2, although two of 63 offspring had isolated NF2-related findings.
  • Mosaicism for the NF2 gene mutation was proven in eight patients.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The authors describe the clinical features of this unique phenotype--unilateral VS with other NF2-related tumors.
  • Molecular genetic analysis is best performed using resected tumor specimens and will enable future studies to determine the genetic risks of individuals with mosaicism.
  • [MeSH-major] Neurofibromatosis 2 / complications. Neuroma, Acoustic / genetics. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology


16. McClelland S 3rd, Gerbi BJ, Cho KH, Hall WA: The treatment of a large acoustic tumor with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. J Robot Surg; 2007;1(3):227-30
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  • [Title] The treatment of a large acoustic tumor with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.
  • The treatment of acoustic neuromas (AN) usually involves surgical excision or stereotactic radiosurgery.
  • Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a large, 3.8-cm, right cerebellopontine-angle tumor compressing the fourth ventricle.
  • Following right frontal ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement, the patient underwent FSRT for treatment of the tumor.
  • Following FSRT, local control (defined as the absence of tumor progression) was achieved, and treatment was well tolerated.
  • There was no hearing-related, trigeminal, or facial-nerve morbidity following FSRT at 63-month follow-up.
  • Treating a patient with a large AN with FSRT resulted in local tumor control, with no trigeminal nerve, facial nerve, or hearing-related morbidity.

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  • (PMID = 25484968.001).
  • [ISSN] 1863-2483
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of robotic surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Robot Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4247447
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Acoustic neuroma / Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy / Morbidity / Tumor size
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17. Doherty JK, Friedman RA: Controversies in building a management algorithm for vestibular schwannomas. Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2006 Oct;14(5):305-13
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Controversies in building a management algorithm for vestibular schwannomas.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The present review examines the various mainstream treatment options, benefits and risks, and controversies involved in developing a management algorithm for treatment of vestibular schwannoma.
  • RECENT FINDINGS: Advances in microsurgery and radiosurgery have made tremendous contributions to management of vestibular schwannoma; however, considerable controversy still exists.
  • The auditory and facial nerve functional outcomes have improved with use of intraoperative monitoring for vestibular schwannoma removal and with lower radiosurgery doses; however, risks to the facial and auditory nerves still exist.
  • Observing vestibular schwannomas for growth with serial magnetic resonance imaging is an increasingly popular option for small vestibular schwannomas that allows patients to enjoy hearing and facial function.
  • SUMMARY: The risks and benefits of each treatment option must be weighed for each patient, and management decisions regarding vestibular schwannomas should be individualized for each patient depending on tumor anatomy, patient preferences, and symptoms.
  • [MeSH-major] Algorithms. Ear, Inner / surgery. Neuroma, Acoustic / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Cochlear Nerve / physiology. Facial Nerve / physiology. Hearing Loss / prevention & control. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Microsurgery. Neurofibromatosis 2 / surgery. Neurofibromatosis 2 / therapy. Radiosurgery. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2006 Oct;14(5):297-8 [16974140.001]
  • (PMID = 16974142.001).
  • [ISSN] 1068-9508
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in otolaryngology & head and neck surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 63
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18. Warren FM 3rd, Kaylie DM, Aulino JM, Jackson CG, Weissman JL: Magnetic resonance appearance of the inner ear after hearing-preservation surgery. Otol Neurotol; 2006 Apr;27(3):393-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the appearance of the inner ear on T2-weighted follow-up magnetic resonance imaging correlates with hearing status after hearing-preservation surgery for vestibular schwannoma.
  • PATIENTS: The study includes patients undergoing hearing-preservation surgery for vestibular schwannoma from 1998 to 2003.
  • All 16 of the patients underwent middle fossa removal of vestibular schwannoma.
  • Serviceable hearing according to American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery criteria was preserved in eight patients (50%).
  • Of the eight patients without serviceable hearing, six had the cochlear nerve sacrificed at the time of surgery.
  • All patients with serviceable hearing had normal appearing cochleovestibular signal on T2-weighted images, whereas six of eight patients (75%) with no hearing or poor hearing had abnormal low signal in the inner ear, suggesting inner ear ossification.
  • All but one patient who had the cochlear nerve sacrificed showed abnormal morphology of the labyrinth on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.
  • CONCLUSION: We describe the T2-weighted magnetic resonance findings after hearing-preservation surgery for acoustic tumor removal.
  • Loss of inner ear signal on T2-weighted images correlates with loss of hearing postoperatively, whereas preserved inner ear signal correlates with hearing preservation after middle fossa surgery for vestibular schwannoma removal.
  • [MeSH-major] Ear, Inner / pathology. Hearing Loss / prevention & control. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Otologic Surgical Procedures / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Auditory Threshold. Cochlear Nerve / surgery. Ear Neoplasms / complications. Ear Neoplasms / surgery. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Meningioma / complications. Meningioma / surgery. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16639279.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-7129
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Lin VY, Houlden D, Bethune A, Nolan M, Pirouzmand F, Rowed D, Nedzelski JM, Chen JM: A novel method in predicting immediate postoperative facial nerve function post acoustic neuroma excision. Otol Neurotol; 2006 Oct;27(7):1017-22
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A novel method in predicting immediate postoperative facial nerve function post acoustic neuroma excision.
  • To determine whether the percentage calculated by dividing the amplitude of postexcision direct facial nerve stimulus responses (at pontomedullary junction) by the amplitude of distal ipsilateral transcutaneous (stylomastoid region) maximal stimulus responses and response amplitude progression by increasing stimulus intensities have predictive value for determining normal or near-normal (House-Brackmann Grade 1 or 2) immediate postoperative facial nerve function.
  • Postexcision direct facial nerve stimulation at the pontomedullary junction and transcutaneous maximal facial nerve stimulation at the ipsilateral stylomastoid region and their associated response amplitudes were recorded.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients who underwent acoustic neuroma surgery from January 2004 to March 2006 with intraoperative facial nerve monitoring and an intact facial nerve after tumor excision were included.
  • CONCLUSION: The percentage of the response amplitude of direct facial nerve stimulation at the pontomedullary junction when compared with the maximum response amplitude of ipsilateral transcutaneous stimulation at the stylomastoid foramen is a good predictor of normal to near-normal immediate postoperative facial nerve function.
  • Progression of amplitude response also seems to be a good predictor of normal to near-normal immediate postoperative facial nerve function.
  • [MeSH-major] Facial Nerve / physiopathology. Monitoring, Intraoperative. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Electric Stimulation. Facial Nerve Injuries / prevention & control. Facial Paralysis / prevention & control. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Predictive Value of Tests. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17006353.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-7129
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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20. Zhao H, Li X, Lv Q, Yuan Y, Yu H: A large dumbbell glossopharyngeal schwannoma involving the vagus nerve: a case report and review of the literature. J Med Case Rep; 2008;2:334
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  • [Title] A large dumbbell glossopharyngeal schwannoma involving the vagus nerve: a case report and review of the literature.
  • INTRODUCTION: Schwannoma arising from the glossopharyngeal nerve is a rare intracranial tumor.
  • Accurate pre-operative diagnosis and optimal treatment are still difficult.
  • CASE PRESENTATION: We present one case of schwannoma originating from the ninth cranial nerve with palsies of the trigeminal nerve, facial-acoustic nerve complex, and vagus nerve in addition to ninth nerve dysfunction.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging showed tumors located in the cerebellopontine angle with extracranial extension via the jugular foramen, with evident enhancement on post-contrast scan.
  • A favorable option of approach and appropriate planning of surgical strategy should be the goal of operation for this benign tumor.

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  • [Cites] Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2007 Nov;149(11):1133-7; discussion 1137 [17728994.001]
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  • (PMID = 18954436.001).
  • [ISSN] 1752-1947
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of medical case reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Med Case Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2584006
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21. Meijer OW, Vandertop WP, Lagerwaard FJ, Slotman BJ: Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for bilateral vestibular schwannomas in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2. Neurosurgery; 2008 May;62(5 Suppl):A37-42; discussion A42-3
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  • [Title] Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for bilateral vestibular schwannomas in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2.
  • OBJECTIVE: Patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) patients typically have bilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS) and are at risk for developing bilateral deafness, bilateral trigeminal, and bilateral facial nerve function loss.
  • METHODS: In 204 patients with VS treated with RS or SRT in Amsterdam starting from 1992, we identified 25 patients with NF2 who had bilateral tumors.
  • Indications for treatment were either tumor progression on sequential magnetic resonance imaging scans and/or progressive hearing loss.
  • Mean tumor diameter was 2.5 cm.
  • Stereotactic irradiation was administered to all patients using five noncoplanar arcs with a single isocenter to a dose of 10 to 12.5 Gy in a single fraction or 20 to 25 Gy in five fractions in 1 week prescribed to the 80% isodose encompassing the tumor.
  • On the untreated side, all patients showed hearing loss and eight (32%) had ipsilateral deafness.
  • Local tumor control was obtained in all 20 patients, and no treatment-related trigeminal or facial nerve toxicity was observed.
  • CONCLUSION: In this largest series in the literature of linear accelerator-based RS and SRT for VS NF2 patients, excellent local control rates were found with minimal facial and trigeminal nerve toxicity.
  • [MeSH-major] Neurofibromatosis 2 / complications. Neurofibromatosis 2 / surgery. Neuroma, Acoustic / complications. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery / methods


22. Isaacson B, Telian SA, El-Kashlan HK: Facial nerve outcomes in middle cranial fossa vs translabyrinthine approaches. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2005 Dec;133(6):906-10
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Facial nerve outcomes in middle cranial fossa vs translabyrinthine approaches.
  • OBJECTIVE: To compare the final facial nerve outcomes between middle cranial fossa (MCF) vs translabyrinthine (TL) resection of size-matched vestibular schwannomas.
  • All patients who underwent resection utilizing either MCF or TL approaches with tumors 18 mm or smaller and complete data were included in the analysis.
  • One-week-postoperative and final facial nerve examinations were compared in the two surgical groups.
  • Patients were separately analyzed in subgroups: tumors smaller than 10 mm and those that were between 10 and 18 mm.
  • RESULTS: The tumor size range for the MCF group was 3-18 mm while it was 4-18 mm for the TL group.
  • No statistically significant difference was found in facial nerve outcomes between the two surgical groups, at the first postoperative visit week and at last follow-up.
  • CONCLUSION: Facial nerve outcomes are similar using TL and MCF approaches for resection of vestibular schwannomas up to 18 mm in size.
  • SIGNIFICANCE: Patients undergoing the MCF approach for hearing preservation can be counseled that there is no increased risk of permanent facial nerve weakness, compared to the TL approach.
  • [MeSH-major] Cranial Fossa, Middle / surgery. Ear, Inner / surgery. Facial Nerve / physiopathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Otologic Surgical Procedures / methods

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  • (PMID = 16360512.001).
  • [ISSN] 0194-5998
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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23. Anderson DE, Leonetti J, Wind JJ, Cribari D, Fahey K: Resection of large vestibular schwannomas: facial nerve preservation in the context of surgical approach and patient-assessed outcome. J Neurosurg; 2005 Apr;102(4):643-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Resection of large vestibular schwannomas: facial nerve preservation in the context of surgical approach and patient-assessed outcome.
  • OBJECT: Vestibular schwannoma surgery has evolved as new therapeutic options have emerged, patients' expectations have risen, and the psychological effect of facial nerve paralysis has been studied.
  • For large vestibular schwannomas for which extirpation is the primary therapy, the goals remain complete tumor resection and maintenance of normal neurological function.
  • Improved microsurgical techniques and intraoperative facial nerve monitoring have decreased the complication rate and increased the likelihood of normal to near-normal postoperative facial function.
  • Nevertheless, the impairment most frequently reported by patients as an adverse effect of surgery continues to be facial nerve paralysis.
  • The authors evaluated the extent of facial function, timing of facial nerve recovery, patients' perceptions of this recovery and function, and the prognostic value of intraoperative facial nerve monitoring following resection of large vestibular schwannomas; they then analyzed these results with respect to different surgical approaches.
  • METHODS: The authors retrospectively reviewed a database of 67 patients with 71 vestibular schwannomas measuring 3 cm or larger in diameter.
  • Clinical outcomes were analyzed with respect to intraoperative facial nerve activity, responses to intraoperative stimulation, and time course of recovery.
  • Patients' perceptions of facial nerve function and recovery correlated well with the clinical observations.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Trends in the data lead the authors to suggest that a retrosigmoid exposure, alone or in combination with a translabyrinthine approach, offers the best chance of facial nerve preservation in patients with large vestibular schwannomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Facial Nerve Injuries / etiology. Facial Nerve Injuries / prevention & control. Facial Paralysis / etiology. Facial Paralysis / prevention & control. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Neurosurgical Procedures / methods

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  • [CommentIn] J Neurosurg. 2006 Jan;104(1):175-6; author reply 176 [16509164.001]
  • (PMID = 15871506.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3085
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. Brackmann DE, Cullen RD, Fisher LM: Facial nerve function after translabyrinthine vestibular schwannoma surgery. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2007 May;136(5):773-7
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  • [Title] Facial nerve function after translabyrinthine vestibular schwannoma surgery.
  • OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the long-term facial function of patients after translabyrinthine vestibular schwannoma [VS] surgery and identify factors that influence these outcomes.
  • Patient and tumor characteristics as well as perioperative complications are described.
  • Patients with smaller tumors have significantly better postoperative facial function than those with larger tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Ear, Inner / surgery. Facial Nerve / physiopathology. Facial Paralysis / diagnosis. Facial Paralysis / physiopathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Postoperative Complications / epidemiology


25. Mirzayan MJ, Gerganov VM, Lüdemann W, Oi S, Samii M, Samii A: Management of vestibular schwannomas in young patients-comparison of clinical features and outcome with adult patients. Childs Nerv Syst; 2007 Aug;23(8):891-5
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  • [Title] Management of vestibular schwannomas in young patients-comparison of clinical features and outcome with adult patients.
  • OBJECTS: Vestibular schwannomas (VS) in young patients are rare.
  • The analysis included: age, gender, tumor size, clinical, and neurological pre- and postoperative status including cochlear and facial nerve function, and complications.
  • [MeSH-major] Ear Neoplasms / surgery. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Vestibule, Labyrinth
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Cochlear Nerve / physiology. Electrophysiology. Facial Nerve / physiology. Facial Paralysis / etiology. Facial Paralysis / physiopathology. Female. Hearing Loss / etiology. Humans. Infant. Karnofsky Performance Status. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Neurosurgical Procedures. Postoperative Complications / epidemiology. Postoperative Complications / physiopathology. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17384953.001).
  • [ISSN] 0256-7040
  • [Journal-full-title] Child's nervous system : ChNS : official journal of the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Childs Nerv Syst
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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26. Poetker DM, Jursinic PA, Runge-Samuelson CL, Wackym PA: Distortion of magnetic resonance images used in gamma knife radiosurgery treatment planning: implications for acoustic neuroma outcomes. Otol Neurotol; 2005 Nov;26(6):1220-8
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  • [Title] Distortion of magnetic resonance images used in gamma knife radiosurgery treatment planning: implications for acoustic neuroma outcomes.
  • OBJECTIVE: To quantify the image distortion of our series of acoustic neuromas treated with gamma knife radiosurgery.
  • PATIENTS: Patients undergoing gamma knife radiosurgery for the treatment of acoustic neuromas.
  • Known clinical measurements of audiometric, vestibular, facial, and trigeminal nerve functions were then compared with current measurements of tumor size.
  • Tumor volumes of the treatment plan that fell outside of the internal auditory canal ranged from 0 to 414 mm, with a mean of 90.5 mm.
  • The mean percentage that fell outside of the internal auditory canal was 16.7% of total tumor volume (range, 2.4-77.6%).
  • We could not draw any consistent correlations between degree of image shift and continued tumor growth or objective examination values.
  • Although the image shift does not seem to affect the growth of the acoustic neuromas or auditory or facial nerve function, longer term follow-up is required to fully appreciate the true impact of this image shift.
  • [MeSH-major] Artifacts. Image Processing, Computer-Assisted / standards. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / standards. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery / standards. Radiotherapy Planning, Computer-Assisted / standards. Surgery, Computer-Assisted / standards

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  • (PMID = 16272946.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-7129
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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27. Riva C, Donadieu E, Magnan J, Lavieille JP: Age-related hearing loss in CD/1 mice is associated to ROS formation and HIF target proteins up-regulation in the cochlea. Exp Gerontol; 2007 Apr;42(4):327-36
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  • In this study, we explored auditory function of cd/1 mice at the age of 4, 12 and 24 weeks and correlated it with the presence of oxidative damage in the cochlea, and cochlear HIF-1 responsive target genes regulation, involved in pathways promoting inflammation such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), or cell death with the p53 protein, Bax protein and surviving factors with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1).
  • After implantation of electrodes for auditory nerve acoustic thresholds measurements, we analyzed every cochlea.
  • [MeSH-minor] Action Potentials / physiology. Animals. Anoxia / metabolism. Anoxia / physiopathology. Apoptosis / physiology. Caspase 3 / metabolism. Cochlear Nerve / physiopathology. Coloring Agents / administration & dosage. Immunohistochemistry / methods. Injections, Intravenous. Insulin-Like Growth Factor I / analysis. Mice. Nitroimidazoles / administration & dosage. Schwann Cells / physiology. Spiral Ganglion / physiopathology. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / analysis. Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / analysis. Up-Regulation / physiology

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  • (PMID = 17141999.001).
  • [ISSN] 0531-5565
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental gerontology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp. Gerontol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Coloring Agents; 0 / Hif1a protein, mouse; 0 / Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit; 0 / Nitroimidazoles; 0 / Reactive Oxygen Species; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; 46JO4D76R2 / pimonidazole; 67763-96-6 / Insulin-Like Growth Factor I; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspase 3
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28. Phi JH, Kim DG, Chung HT, Lee J, Paek SH, Jung HW: Radiosurgical treatment of vestibular schwannomas in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2: tumor control and hearing preservation. Cancer; 2009 Jan 15;115(2):390-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Radiosurgical treatment of vestibular schwannomas in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2: tumor control and hearing preservation.
  • BACKGROUND: The radiosurgical treatment of vestibular schwannomas in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is controversial.
  • The authors investigated the radiologically proven tumor control rate after gamma knife radiosurgery.
  • The factors that affect tumor control and serviceable hearing preservation were analyzed.
  • The median tumor volume was 3.2 cm3.
  • RESULTS: The actuarial tumor control rate was 81%, 74%, and 66%, respectively, in the first, second, and fifth years.
  • Five tumors required a salvage surgery because of tumor control failure.
  • A low marginal dose and a young age at radiosurgery were associated with poor tumor control.
  • Of the 16 tumors with which ipsilateral hearing was serviceable, the actuarial serviceable hearing preservation rates were 50%, 45%, and 33%, respectively, in the first, second, and fifth years.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas in NF2 patients provided 5-year tumor control in approximately two-thirds of patients and preserved serviceable hearing in approximately one-third.
  • The rates of other cranial nerve deficits were low, and no secondary malignancy was observed.
  • [MeSH-major] Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / surgery. Deafness / prevention & control. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery


29. Ito E, Saito K, Yatsuya H, Nagatani T, Otsuka G: Factors predicting growth of vestibular schwannoma in neurofibromatosis type 2. Neurosurg Rev; 2009 Oct;32(4):425-33
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  • [Title] Factors predicting growth of vestibular schwannoma in neurofibromatosis type 2.
  • We retrospectively reviewed characteristics of patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 to identify factors predicting further growth of bilateral vestibular schwannomas.
  • Subjects comprised 27 neurofibromatosis type 2 patients with 54 vestibular schwannomas, followed for 24-204 months (mean, 86 months).
  • This study investigated factors predictive of vestibular schwannoma growth in neurofibromatosis type 2.
  • Features distinguishing actively growing from quiescent VS were determined for untreated course (28 vestibular schwannomas) and posttreatment course (including either resection or radiosurgery; 33 vestibular schwannomas).
  • A general estimation equation was used to identify factors affecting tumor growth.
  • During the untreated course, 19 vestibular schwannomas showed growth and 9 vestibular schwannomas were stable.
  • [MeSH-major] Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / pathology. Neurofibromatosis 2 / pathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology. Trigeminal Nerve / pathology


30. Bennett M, Haynes DS: Surgical approaches and complications in the removal of vestibular schwannomas. 2007. Neurosurg Clin N Am; 2008 Apr;19(2):331-43, vii
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  • [Title] Surgical approaches and complications in the removal of vestibular schwannomas. 2007.
  • Vestibular schwannomas are benign tumors that usually originate from the balance portion of cranial nerve VIII.
  • The treatment options currently available for vestibular schwannomas include observation with serial imaging, stereotactic radiation, and microsurgical removal.
  • Although the ultimate goal in treatment of vestibular schwannomas is preservation of life, the best option for each patient depends on symptoms, tumor size, tumor location, and the patient's general health and age.
  • Surgical exposure of the cerebellopontine angle for removal of vestibular schwannomas can be performed safely via a translabyrinthine, retrosigmoid, and middle fossa approach.
  • The goal of surgery is complete eradication of tumor with preservation of hearing and facial nerve function when possible.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / history. Neurosurgical Procedures / history. Otologic Surgical Procedures / history

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  • (PMID = 18534343.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-1349
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurg. Clin. N. Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Biography; Classical Article; Historical Article; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Personal-name-as-subject] Bennett M; Haynes DS
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31. Ottinger T, Lindberg R, Ekman S: Malignant acoustic schwannoma in a dog. J Vet Diagn Invest; 2009 Jan;21(1):129-32
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  • [Title] Malignant acoustic schwannoma in a dog.
  • A malignant schwannoma of the right acoustic nerve of a dog is described.
  • The neoplasm was found during necropsy of a 12-year-old, spayed, female Labrador Retriever that experienced a sudden onset of severe pain in the neck and upon opening the mouth.
  • The tumor had infiltrative growth, and the spindle-shaped neoplastic cells were arranged in sheets and concentric whorls.
  • [MeSH-major] Dog Diseases / pathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / veterinary
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cochlear Nerve / pathology. Dogs. Female

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  • (PMID = 19139514.001).
  • [ISSN] 1040-6387
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of veterinary diagnostic investigation : official publication of the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians, Inc
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Vet. Diagn. Invest.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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32. Huang L, Xu WG, Fu YF, Gao W: [Magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis of occupied lesions in cerebellopontine angle area:a report of 78 cases]. Ai Zheng; 2005 May;24(5):591-5
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  • [Title] [Magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis of occupied lesions in cerebellopontine angle area:a report of 78 cases].
  • BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: It is difficult to diagnose cerebellopontine angle area tumor because of many sorts and origins of the tumor.
  • This study was to explore magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis of occupied lesions in cerebellopontine angle area.
  • RESULTS: Of the 78 cases, 48 (61.5%) were unilateral acoustic neuroma, 5(6.4%) were bilateral acoustic neuroma, 12 (15.4%) were meningioma, 4 (5.1%) were trigeminal neuroma, 3 (3.8%) were hemangioblastoma, 3 (3.8%) were lipoma, 2 (2.6%) were melanoma, 1 (1.3%) was medulloblastoma.
  • According to the anatomic site, tumor lesion character, and MRI signal character, the majority of cerebellopontine angle area tumors were diagnosed accurately.
  • CONCLUSION: MRI plays an important role in diagnosis of occupied lesions in cerebellopontine angle area.
  • [MeSH-major] Cerebellar Neoplasms / diagnosis. Cerebellopontine Angle. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neuroma, Acoustic / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / diagnosis. Female. Humans. Male. Meningeal Neoplasms / diagnosis. Meningioma / diagnosis. Middle Aged. Neuroma / diagnosis. Trigeminal Nerve Diseases / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 15890104.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Ai zheng = Aizheng = Chinese journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ai Zheng
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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33. Pawlak-Osińska K, Kaźmierczak W, Kaźmierczak H: [Neurootological symptoms in Bruns' syndrome]. Otolaryngol Pol; 2010 Nov-Dec;64(6):392-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The aim of the study was to present clinical neurootological symptoms in the case of early stage of the fourth ventricle tumor diagnosed finally on the base of MRI.
  • Visual-oculomotor, vestibular-oculomotor, vestibulo-spinal and other electrophysiological signs of the vestibular damage of the brainstem were: paresis of the sixth nerve unilaterally, prolonged latency of III-V waves on brain stem audiological responses (BERA), asymmetry of the fusion limit of optokinetic nystagmus, bilateral areflexia of the caloric and kinetic labyrinth reaction, abnormal Unterberger's test in craniocorpography, the presence of gaze nystagmus.
  • [MeSH-major] Cerebral Ventricle Neoplasms / complications. Cerebral Ventricle Neoplasms / diagnosis. Fourth Ventricle / pathology. Sensation Disorders / diagnosis. Sensation Disorders / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Acoustic Stimulation. Electronystagmography. Female. Hearing Loss / etiology. Humans. Middle Aged. Nystagmus, Pathologic / etiology. Reflex, Vestibulo-Ocular. Syndrome. Vertigo / etiology. Vestibular Function Tests

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  • (PMID = 21302509.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6657
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngologia polska = The Polish otolaryngology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol Pol
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
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34. Lenarz T, Lim HH, Reuter G, Patrick JF, Lenarz M: The auditory midbrain implant: a new auditory prosthesis for neural deafness-concept and device description. Otol Neurotol; 2006 Sep;27(6):838-43
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  • The major group of candidates for the AMI consists of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) patients who develop neural deafness because of growth and/or surgical removal of bilateral acoustic neuromas.
  • Because of the absence of a viable auditory nerve, these patients cannot benefit from cochlear implants.
  • The fact that the ABI is able to produce high levels of speech perception in nontumor patients (with inaccessible cochleae or posttraumatic damage to the cochlear nerve) suggests that limitations in ABI performance in NF2 patients may be associated with cochlear nucleus damage caused by the tumors or the tumor removal process.
  • [MeSH-minor] Algorithms. Auditory Brain Stem Implants. Humans. Neurofibromatosis 2 / complications. Neuroma, Acoustic / complications. Neuroma, Acoustic / etiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16936570.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-7129
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 51
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35. Sughrue ME, Kaur R, Rutkowski MJ, Kane AJ, Yang I, Pitts LH, Parsa AT: A critical evaluation of vestibular schwannoma surgery for patients younger than 40 years of age. Neurosurgery; 2010 Dec;67(6):1646-53; discussion 1653-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A critical evaluation of vestibular schwannoma surgery for patients younger than 40 years of age.
  • BACKGROUND: There are few published prospective data sets specifically focusing on patients younger than 40 years old undergoing microsurgery for vestibular schwannoma.
  • OBJECTIVE: We describe functional outcomes and long-term tumor control after surgery in patients younger than 40 years old enrolled in a prospectively collected database over a 25-year period.
  • METHODS: We selected all vestibular schwannoma patients from a prospectively collected database who were younger than 40 years old at the time of surgical resection for a vestibular schwannoma.
  • Rates of tumor control and hearing preservation were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier analysis, and risk factors for facial nerve palsy, hearing loss, and trigeminal neuropathy were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression.
  • Our data indicate that surgical resection leads to durable long-term freedom from tumor recurrence or progression in 89% of young patients at 15 years of follow-up.
  • Consistent with other published series, hearing was preserved in 68% of patients with smaller tumors (<3 cm).
  • Facial nerve function was preserved in 76% of patients with smaller tumors and 52% of patients with larger tumors (P<.001).
  • On multivariate logistic regression, tumor size was a significant predictor of hearing loss, whereas gross total resection was nearly a significant predictor of hearing loss controlling for other variables (P=.06).
  • CONCLUSION: We present the largest prospectively studied cohort of young patients undergoing microsurgical resection of vestibular schwannoma.
  • These data suggest that surgical resection provides excellent long-term tumor control in these patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / physiopathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Postoperative Complications. Radiosurgery / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Chi-Square Distribution. Facial Nerve Diseases / etiology. Female. Hearing Loss / etiology. Humans. Kaplan-Meier Estimate. Logistic Models. Longitudinal Studies. Male. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome


36. De la Cruz A, Teufert KB: Transcochlear approach to cerebellopontine angle and clivus lesions: indications, results, and complications. Otol Neurotol; 2009 Apr;30(3):373-80
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  • Patients were grouped by whether the facial nerve was mobilized (TC, n = 15) or not (TO, n = 25).
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Indications, postoperative outcomes, and complications including tumor removal and facial nerve status (House-Brackmann grade).
  • The remainder included tumors associated with NF2, acoustic tumors, malignancies, and other lesions.
  • Complete removal was achieved in 92.5% of tumors.
  • Of all patients, 42% and 55% had normal facial nerve function at the time of hospital discharge and follow up, respectively.
  • Moreover, 22% underwent a facial nerve reanastomosis procedure.
  • CONCLUSION: The TC and TO approaches provide access to midline intradural lesions, intradural petroclival tumors, and cerebellopontine angle tumors and cholesteatomas arising anterior to the internal auditory canal, without using brain retractors.
  • Total tumor removal, including its base and blood supply, is possible.
  • Facial weakness is frequent when the facial nerve is rerouted, but excellent facial nerve results are accomplished with the TO approach.
  • With these approaches, recurrence israre when all tumor has been removed.
  • [MeSH-major] Cerebellar Neoplasms / surgery. Cerebellopontine Angle / surgery. Cochlea / surgery. Cranial Fossa, Posterior / surgery. Neurosurgical Procedures / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Carotid Arteries / anatomy & histology. Child, Preschool. Data Interpretation, Statistical. Ear Canal / anatomy & histology. Ear Canal / surgery. Facial Nerve / physiology. Facial Nerve / surgery. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Meningioma / surgery. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19318889.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-4505
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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37. Cullen RD, House JW, Brackmann DE, Luxford WM, Fisher LM: Evaluation of facial function with a questionnaire: reliability and validity. Otol Neurotol; 2007 Aug;28(5):719-22
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVES: To analyze the validity and reliability of assigning House-Brackmann facial nerve grade based on a patient-administered questionnaire.
  • Specifically, the use of a questionnaire was studied for evaluation of the long-term facial function after microsurgical resection of vestibular schwannoma (VS).
  • STUDY DESIGN: Three neurotologists with more than 25 years of experience and 3 neurotology clinical fellows rated facial nerve grade in a blinded fashion based on the questionnaire.
  • The standard to which the questionnaires were compared was the facial nerve grade assigned to the patient during an office visit near the same time as the completed patient questionnaire.
  • The average tumor size was 2.2 cm.
  • RESULTS: The association between the facial nerve grade assigned by the office evaluation and the questionnaire was highly significant (p<0.01), with a mean correlation (Spearman [rho]) equal to 0.94.
  • [MeSH-major] Facial Nerve / physiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / diagnosis. Surveys and Questionnaires

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  • (PMID = 17554227.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-7129
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] United States
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38. Lee CC, Yen YS, Pan DH, Chung WY, Wu HM, Guo WY, Chen MT, Liu KD, Shih YH: Delayed microsurgery for vestibular schwannoma after gamma knife radiosurgery. J Neurooncol; 2010 Jun;98(2):203-12
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  • [Title] Delayed microsurgery for vestibular schwannoma after gamma knife radiosurgery.
  • Stereotactic radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas (VSs) has become popular during the last decade with promising clinical results after long-term follow-up.
  • However, on rare occasions, some cases have needed traditional microsurgery to remove the tumor several months or years after radiosurgery.
  • The mean size of the tumor during GKS was 10.4 ml (range 2.3-23.5 ml).
  • The indications of microsurgery included adverse radiation effect with peri-focal edema, tumor enlargement, and cyst enlargement.
  • The histology showed benign tumor in five patients, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in one, and necrotic tissue in one.
  • [MeSH-major] Microsurgery / methods. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Postoperative Complications / etiology. Postoperative Complications / surgery. Radiosurgery / adverse effects

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  • (PMID = 20405307.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-7373
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Ki-67 Antigen; 0 / S100 Proteins
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39. Coelho DH, Roland JT Jr, Rush SA, Narayana A, St Clair E, Chung W, Golfinos JG: Small vestibular schwannomas with no hearing: comparison of functional outcomes in stereotactic radiosurgery and microsurgery. Laryngoscope; 2008 Nov;118(11):1909-16
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Small vestibular schwannomas with no hearing: comparison of functional outcomes in stereotactic radiosurgery and microsurgery.
  • OBJECTIVES: To date, numerous studies have compared functional outcomes between stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and microsurgery (MS) in the treatment of vestibular schwannomas (VS).
  • However, most of them involve tumors of difference sizes, radiation dosages, and surgical approaches.
  • By studying only patients with small tumors and no hearing, we sought to minimize confounding variables.
  • All MS patients underwent the translabyrinthine approach to their tumors.
  • Outcomes measurements included tumor control, facial nerve function, tinnitus, trigeminal function, and imbalance.
  • RESULTS: Patients undergoing SRS had comparable rates of tumor control, facial nerve function, tinnitus, and trigeminal function to MS patients.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In our study population, patients with small tumors and no serviceable hearing, these data suggest that MS results in comparable minimal morbidity with SRS, though posttreatment dysequilibrium is significantly decreased.
  • [MeSH-major] Facial Nerve / physiopathology. Hearing / physiology. Microsurgery / methods. Neuroma, Acoustic / physiopathology. Postural Balance / physiology. Radiosurgery / methods. Trigeminal Nerve / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 18849856.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-4995
  • [Journal-full-title] The Laryngoscope
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Laryngoscope
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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40. Combs SE, Thilmann C, Debus J, Schulz-Ertner D: Long-term outcome of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with acoustic neuromas. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys; 2006 Apr 1;64(5):1341-7
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  • [Title] Long-term outcome of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with acoustic neuromas.
  • PURPOSE: To evaluate the effectiveness and long-term outcome of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for acoustic neuromas (AN).
  • RESULTS: The overall actuarial 5-year and 10-year tumor control probability in all patients was 91%.
  • Two patients developed tumor progression after SRS at 36 and 48 months.
  • Nineteen patients (73%) were at risk of treatment-related facial nerve toxicity; of these, 1 patient developed a complete facial nerve palsy after SRS (5%).
  • Two patients (8%) developed mild dysesthesia of the trigeminal nerve after SRS.
  • CONCLUSION: Stereotactic radiosurgery results in good local control rates of AN and the risk of cranial nerve toxicities is acceptable.
  • [MeSH-major] Hearing / radiation effects. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Facial Nerve / radiation effects. Facial Paralysis / etiology. Female. Hearing Loss / etiology. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neurofibromatosis 2 / complications. Radiation Injuries / etiology. Trigeminal Neuralgia / etiology

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  • (PMID = 16464537.001).
  • [ISSN] 0360-3016
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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41. Kiyomizu K, Matsuda K, Nakayama M, Tono T, Matsuura K, Kawano H, Toyama K, Komune S: Preservation of the auditory nerve function after translabyrinthine removal of vestibular schwannoma. Auris Nasus Larynx; 2006 Mar;33(1):7-11
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Preservation of the auditory nerve function after translabyrinthine removal of vestibular schwannoma.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the function of the postoperative auditory nerve preserved after translabyrinthine (TL) vestibular schwannoma (VS) removal.
  • METHODS: Fifteen patients, who underwent unilateral VS resection via a TL approach, were preserved auditory nerve anatomically.
  • RESULTS: Four cases (27%) out of fifteen patients were retained the functional integrity of the auditory nerve after surgery.
  • The maximum tumor size in the group with a positive response to EST or EABR was significantly smaller than that in the group with a negative response to EST.
  • It seems to be difficult to preserve auditory nerve function in cases where a tumor extends to the fundus of internal auditory canal.
  • CONCLUSION: These results suggest that size of tumor and/or extension of tumor to the fundus might be important factors in preserving the auditory nerve function even if using a TL approach.
  • [MeSH-major] Cochlear Nerve / injuries. Ear, Inner / surgery. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures / methods


42. Sakata H, Fujimura M, Watanabe M, Tominaga T: Association of cavernous malformation within vestibular schwannoma: immunohistochemical analysis of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9. Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo); 2007 Nov;47(11):509-12
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  • [Title] Association of cavernous malformation within vestibular schwannoma: immunohistochemical analysis of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9.
  • A 65-year-old man presented with a rare case of cavernous malformation with hemorrhage located within vestibular schwannoma.
  • Neurological examination revealed hearing loss, facial nerve paresis, and left cerebellar ataxia.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a left vestibular schwannoma 35 mm in diameter, as well as a heterogeneous area associated with hypointense rim within the tumor, indicating intratumoral hemorrhage.
  • Subtotal removal of the tumor together with the fibrously encapsulated hematoma was performed through a left retrosigmoid craniotomy.
  • Histological examination of the surgical specimen revealed cavernous malformation within vestibular schwannoma.
  • His symptoms significantly improved after surgery and he underwent gamma-knife therapy for the residual tumor.
  • MMP-2 and -9, which are implicated in angiogenesis and hemorrhage, may be upregulated in such tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Cerebellar Neoplasms / enzymology. Cerebellopontine Angle. Hemangioma, Cavernous, Central Nervous System / enzymology. Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 / metabolism. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 / metabolism. Neuroma, Acoustic / enzymology

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  • (PMID = 18037806.001).
  • [ISSN] 0470-8105
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurologia medico-chirurgica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurol. Med. Chir. (Tokyo)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.4.24.24 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 2; EC 3.4.24.35 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 9
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43. Beegle RD, Friedman WA, Bova FJ: Effect of treatment plan quality on outcomes after radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma. J Neurosurg; 2007 Nov;107(5):913-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effect of treatment plan quality on outcomes after radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma.
  • OBJECT: The goal in this study was to review the effects of treatment plan quality on outcomes after radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma (VS).
  • Multivariate statistics were used to determine the effects of these variables on tumor control and on two types of complication, facial weakness and facial numbness.
  • RESULTS: The 5-year actuarial tumor control was 91%.
  • Dosimetry had no effect on tumor control.
  • In this model, prior tumor growth was also significant.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Patient Care Planning / standards. Radiosurgery / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Facial Nerve Diseases / etiology. Humans. Postoperative Complications. Radiometry

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  • (PMID = 17977260.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3085
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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44. Hempel JM, Hempel E, Wowra B, Schichor Ch, Muacevic A, Riederer A: Functional outcome after gamma knife treatment in vestibular schwannoma. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol; 2006 Aug;263(8):714-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Functional outcome after gamma knife treatment in vestibular schwannoma.
  • Radiosurgery (RS) is a noninvasive, ambulatory special neurosurgical procedure for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma (VS).
  • The actual tumor control rate of 8.2 years (mean) after GK surgery for all patients and a single treatment was calculated to be 96.7%.
  • Facial nerve function, graded according to the House-Brackmann scale, deteriorated in none of the patients; 5.8% reported a trigeminal neuralgia.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Audiometry, Pure-Tone. Auditory Threshold. Facial Nerve Injuries. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Hearing Loss. Humans. Incidence. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Postoperative Complications. Retrospective Studies. Tinnitus. Treatment Outcome. Trigeminal Nerve / physiopathology. Trigeminal Nerve Injuries. Trigeminal Neuralgia / etiology. Trigeminal Neuralgia / physiopathology. Vertigo

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  • (PMID = 16741754.001).
  • [ISSN] 0937-4477
  • [Journal-full-title] European archives of oto-rhino-laryngology : official journal of the European Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies (EUFOS) : affiliated with the German Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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45. Meyer TA, Canty PA, Wilkinson EP, Hansen MR, Rubinstein JT, Gantz BJ: Small acoustic neuromas: surgical outcomes versus observation or radiation. Otol Neurotol; 2006 Apr;27(3):380-92
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Small acoustic neuromas: surgical outcomes versus observation or radiation.
  • OBJECTIVE: Evaluate factors affecting outcomes of small acoustic neuroma (AN) removal via a middle cranial fossa (MCF) approach, and compare results to published data on observation and radiation therapy.
  • METHODS: 162 consecutive patients (ages 19-70) with unilateral AN (0.2-2.5 cm in largest dimension) removed through a MCF approach were reviewed focusing on preservation of hearing, facial nerve function and complications.
  • RESULTS: Both tumor size and pre-operative WRS were related to post-operative WRS (p<0.01).
  • When the patients were stratified by tumor size, the patients with small tumors (2-10 mm) faired better than the overall group.
  • WRS for eight others improved to >70% after surgery.
  • When the tumor was 1.1-1.4 cm (N=34), the chance of preserving some hearing decreased to 42% (14/33).
  • When the tumor reached 1.5-2.5 cm (N=35), the hearing preservation rate was 43%.
  • If the WRS was also >70% (N=24), only eight (33%) maintained WRS of 70%, and one other improved to >70%.
  • The addition of intra-operative whole eighth nerve near field monitoring improved results during small tumor (<or=1.0 cm) removal preserving some hearing in 80% (32/40) and preserving >70% WRS in 76% (22/29) of those with >70% pre-operative WRS.
  • Good facial nerve function (HB I-II) was achieved in 97% (86% HB I).
  • When tumor size was <or=1.0 cm (N=93), however, good facial nerve function was obtained in 100% (94% HB I).
  • CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that removal of unilateral AN through an MCF approach when the tumor is small and hearing is good provides the best opportunity for hearing preservation and normal facial nerve function.
  • Observation historically results in tumor growth in young and middle-age patients with subsequent hearing loss.
  • Radiation may prevent most tumors from growing, and more data are needed to determine long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates.
  • [MeSH-major] Auditory Threshold. Facial Nerve / physiology. Hearing Loss / prevention & control. Neuroma, Acoustic / radiotherapy. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery

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  • (PMID = 16639278.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-7129
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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46. Propp JM, McCarthy BJ, Davis FG, Preston-Martin S: Descriptive epidemiology of vestibular schwannomas. Neuro Oncol; 2006 Jan;8(1):1-11
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  • [Title] Descriptive epidemiology of vestibular schwannomas.
  • Vestibular schwannomas, commonly termed acoustic neuromas, arise from the vestibular branch of the eighth cranial nerve (acoustic nerve) and are benign, slow-growing brain tumors that negatively impact patient quality of life.
  • They are thought to account for the majority of intracranial nerve sheath tumors.
  • To describe incidence rate patterns and trends of primary nerve sheath tumors of the brain/CNS and the subset of vestibular schwannomas in two population-based incidence registries, data were obtained from 11 Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States (CBTRUS) collaborating state registries and the Los Angeles County Cancer Surveillance Program (LACCSP) (1975-1998).
  • Multiplicative Poisson regression models were used to compare trends in primary nerve sheath tumors of the brain/CNS overall and in subgroups, including vestibular schwannomas, controlling for age, gender, race, microscopic confirmation, and region.
  • The overall incidence of primary nerve sheath tumors of the brain/CNS was 1.1 per 100,000 person-years (CBTRUS, 1995-1999 and LACCSP, 1995-1998).
  • The incidence of vestibular schwannomas was similar for both data sets: 0.6 per 100,000 person-years (CBTRUS, 1995-1999) and 0.8 per 100,000 person-years (LACCSP, 1995-1998).
  • Moreover, the incidence of primary nerve sheath tumors of the brain/CNS overall (CBTRUS, 1985-1999 and LACCSP, 1975-1998) and of vestibular schwannomas (CBTRUS, 1992-1999 and LACCSP, 1992-1998) increased over time.
  • However, the incidence of benign schwannomas in sites other than the acoustic nerve either decreased (CBTRUS, 1992-1999) or experienced no significant change (LACCSP, 1992-1998).
  • While improvements in diagnosis and reporting may explain some of these trends, further consideration of potential etiologic factors may be warranted.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / epidemiology. Registries

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  • (PMID = 16443943.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-8517
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuro-oncology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1871924
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47. Harsha WJ, Backous DD: Counseling patients on surgical options for treating acoustic neuroma. Otolaryngol Clin North Am; 2005 Aug;38(4):643-52
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  • [Title] Counseling patients on surgical options for treating acoustic neuroma.
  • The selection of surgical approach for the removal of AN is a complex one, depending on factors related to specific tumor anatomy, patient characteristics, and the familiarity and skill level of the skull base team.Overall, the literature supports that surgical outcomes are acceptable in regard to tumor removal, patient safety, and complication rates.
  • The inconsistent reporting methods in the current literature make it difficult to assess logically the rates for hearing preservation, facial nerve outcome, and complications as controlled for tumor size and other preoperative patient characteristics.
  • The best conclusions would be from prospective surgical trials controlling for patient factors, size of the tumor, and experience of the skull base team.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures
  • [MeSH-minor] Cerebrospinal Fluid Otorrhea / etiology. Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea. Counseling. Facial Nerve. Humans. Postoperative Complications. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16005723.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6665
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngologic clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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48. Paek SH, Chung HT, Jeong SS, Park CK, Kim CY, Kim JE, Kim DG, Jung HW: Hearing preservation after gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery of vestibular schwannoma. Cancer; 2005 Aug 1;104(3):580-90
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  • [Title] Hearing preservation after gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery of vestibular schwannoma.
  • BACKGROUND: To evaluate the hearing preservation rate and to determine its prognostic factors after gamma knife (GK) stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with vestibular schwannoma, the authors used a prospective study design to analyze these patients.
  • METHODS: Between December 1997 and January 2002, 25 patients with vestibular schwannoma with serviceable hearing were enrolled in the current study.
  • The median tumor volume was 3.0 cc (0.16-9.1 cc).
  • The tumor control rate and complications were evaluated by focusing on hearing preservation and its prognostic factors.
  • RESULTS: Based on radiologic study, the tumor control rate was 92% during the median follow-up period of 45 months.
  • The trigeminal and facial nerve preservation rates were 95% and 100%, respectively.
  • [MeSH-major] Cochlear Nerve / pathology. Hearing Loss / prevention & control. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Postoperative Complications / prevention & control. Radiosurgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies. Stereotaxic Techniques. Treatment Outcome. Tumor Burden

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2005 American Cancer Society.
  • (PMID = 15952200.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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49. Colletti V, Fiorino F: Is the middle fossa approach the treatment of choice for intracanalicular vestibular schwannoma? Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2005 Mar;132(3):459-66
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  • [Title] Is the middle fossa approach the treatment of choice for intracanalicular vestibular schwannoma?
  • OBJECTIVES: To compare the 2 surgical techniques most commonly used during vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery, i.e., the middle fossa (MF) and the retrosigmoid-transmeatal (RS-TM) routes, when hearing preservation is attempted.
  • Selection criteria included tumor confined to the internal auditory canal (IAC) with a length ranging from 4 to 12 mm and hearing class A or B.
  • Patients were alternately assigned to 1 of the 2 groups regardless of auditory class and distance of the tumor from the IAC fundus.
  • RESULTS: No significant differences in auditory and facial nerve function results between the 2 techniques were observed.
  • The RS-TM approach, however, showed better facial nerve results at discharge.
  • The present longitudinal investigation shows that the MF approach does not afford any particular advantages over the RS-TM route in terms of auditory results in intracanalicular VS, with the exception of tumors reaching the IAC fundus.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cranial Fossa, Middle. Humans. Middle Aged. Otologic Surgical Procedures / methods. Prospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 15746862.001).
  • [ISSN] 0194-5998
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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50. Iwai Y, Yamanaka K, Yamagata K, Yasui T: Surgery after radiosurgery for acoustic neuromas: surgical strategy and histological findings. Neurosurgery; 2007 Feb;60(2 Suppl 1):ONS75-82; discussion ONS82
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  • [Title] Surgery after radiosurgery for acoustic neuromas: surgical strategy and histological findings.
  • OBJECTIVE: To retrospectively review the authors' experience with surgical resections after failed radiosurgery for acoustic neuromas.
  • METHODS: The study group consisted of six patients with acoustic neuromas.
  • RESULTS: The tumors were subtotally removed (> or = 80%) in four patients and partially removed (< 80%) in the other two patients.
  • Preexisting facial nerve palsy improved in two patients and deteriorated in one patient, and one patient experienced new facial palsy.
  • Histological features were typical of acoustic schwannoma, and some tumors were associated with foamy macrophages, myxoid degeneration, and necrosis attributed to radiation effects.
  • At follow-up, the residual tumor was decreased in five patients and increased in one patient with an expanding intratumoral hematoma.
  • It must be carefully considered because of the natural regression of transient tumor swelling over time.
  • In patients with tumor enlargement several years after radiosurgery, the possibility of chronic intratumoral bleeding resulting from delayed radiation injury must be considered.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery

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  • (PMID = 17297369.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4040
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurgery
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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51. Chu SM, Young YH: Ipsilateral and contralateral vestibular schwannomas in unilateral long-term deaf ears. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol; 2007 Jun;264(6):693-6
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  • [Title] Ipsilateral and contralateral vestibular schwannomas in unilateral long-term deaf ears.
  • In the past decade, we have encountered two patients with unilateral long-term deaf ear having vestibular schwannoma.
  • Although similar physiological findings were disclosed on the deaf ears, MRI scan demonstrated vestibular schwannoma on the different side, that is, one in deaf ear and the other in hearing ear.
  • For the former, absent ABR and caloric results indicate that the tumor originates from the superior vestibular nerve.
  • In contrast with the latter, normal ABR and caloric responses, but absent vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials on the hearing ear imply that the tumor originates from the inferior vestibular nerve.
  • The ipsilateral tumor on the deaf ear underwent intracranial surgical excision, followed by radiosurgery due to tumor recurrence 10 years later, while the contralateral one on the only hearing ear received radiosurgery only.
  • [MeSH-major] Deafness. Neuroma, Acoustic / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Audiometry, Pure-Tone. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Radiosurgery / methods. Stereotaxic Techniques

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  • (PMID = 17476518.001).
  • [ISSN] 0937-4477
  • [Journal-full-title] European archives of oto-rhino-laryngology : official journal of the European Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies (EUFOS) : affiliated with the German Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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52. Zaouche S, Ionescu E, Dubreuil C, Ferber-Viart C: Pre- and intraoperative predictive factors of facial palsy in vestibular schwannoma surgery. Acta Otolaryngol; 2005 Apr;125(4):363-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pre- and intraoperative predictive factors of facial palsy in vestibular schwannoma surgery.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine pre- and perioperative factors influencing facial nerve (FN) outcome in vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery.
  • Qualitative parameters: gender; side of the tumor; angle between the tumor and the internal auditory canal (VS/IAC angle) < or = or > 30 degrees; MRI aspect (n = 69); surgical approach; ease of the surgical procedure, the use or non-use of laser dissection; and the histological Antoni's type of the tumor.
  • [MeSH-major] Facial Paralysis / etiology. Intraoperative Complications / etiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Postoperative Complications / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Audiometry, Pure-Tone. Brain Stem / physiopathology. Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem / physiology. Facial Nerve / physiopathology. Female. Humans. Laser Therapy. Male. Middle Aged. Otoacoustic Emissions, Spontaneous / physiology. Predictive Value of Tests. Preoperative Care. Reference Values. Retrospective Studies. Risk Assessment. Speech Reception Threshold Test


53. Bernat I, Grayeli AB, Esquia G, Zhang Z, Kalamarides M, Sterkers O: Intraoperative electromyography and surgical observations as predictive factors of facial nerve outcome in vestibular schwannoma surgery. Otol Neurotol; 2010 Feb;31(2):306-12
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Intraoperative electromyography and surgical observations as predictive factors of facial nerve outcome in vestibular schwannoma surgery.
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the predictive value of electromyographic recordings for the immediate facial nerve outcome after solitary vestibular schwannoma (VS) removal.
  • Intraoperative direct facial nerve stimulation at the brainstem (proximal pre site) before resection and at the brainstem (proximal post and distal sites, respectively) and internal acoustic meatus after resection were performed.
  • Poor facial nerve outcomes were observed for large tumor with a facial nerve superior to the tumor with a strong adhesion to the nerve.
  • With a stimulation threshold at proximal site after proximal site tumor resection at less than or equal to 0.04 mA, a good facial function was observed in 77% at Day 8.
  • CONCLUSION: Using CM recording stimulation and supramaximal stimulation of the facial nerve in combination with thresholds seem to increase the predictive value of the monitoring for the immediate facial nerve function for VS surgery.
  • [MeSH-major] Ear Neoplasms / surgery. Facial Nerve Injuries / epidemiology. Facial Nerve Injuries / etiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Otologic Surgical Procedures / adverse effects. Postoperative Complications / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Brain Stem / physiology. Electric Stimulation. Electromyography. Facial Nerve / physiology. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Monitoring, Intraoperative. Neural Conduction / physiology. Predictive Value of Tests. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19816232.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-4505
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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54. Engh JA, Kostov D, St Martin MB, Yeaney G, Rothfus W, Hirsch B, Kassam AB: Cavernous malformation tumors: a case study and review of the literature. Otol Neurotol; 2010 Feb;31(2):294-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cavernous malformation tumors: a case study and review of the literature.
  • RESULTS: The most common clinical signs associated with this tumor are hearing loss (86.7%), followed by facial paresis (53.8%).
  • In general, outcomes for patients with this tumor are favorable, with most patients cured by surgical resection.
  • An understanding of the clinical and radiographic differences between this lesion and a vestibular schwannoma helps to minimize perioperative morbidity.
  • Surgical resection should be performed with special attention to preserving facial nerve function.
  • [MeSH-major] Cerebellar Neoplasms / surgery. Cerebellopontine Angle / pathology. Cerebellopontine Angle / surgery. Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformations / pathology. Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformations / surgery. Otologic Surgical Procedures
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Facial Paralysis / etiology. Female. Hearing Loss, Sensorineural / etiology. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology. Postoperative Complications / epidemiology. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 19887972.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-4505
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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55. McClelland S 3rd, Dusenbery KE, Higgins PD, Hall WA: Treatment of a facial nerve neuroma with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg; 2007;85(6):299-302
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  • [Title] Treatment of a facial nerve neuroma with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.
  • BACKGROUND: Facial nerve neuromas are extremely rare and are often mistaken for acoustic neuromas when located near the vestibular nerve.
  • Usually presenting with facial weakness and hearing loss, facial nerve neuromas of the cerebellopontine angle have commonly been managed by surgery.
  • We present the first reported case of a facial nerve neuroma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT).
  • She underwent a middle fossa craniotomy only to reveal a facial nerve tumor rather than an acoustic neuroma that was not resected due to the high risk of facial paralysis.
  • Following surgery, her facial function worsened and was associated with tumor enlargement on MRI.
  • RESULTS: Three months after treatment she had no worsening of her pretreatment symptoms, and at the 1-year follow-up, she experienced facial weakness improvement accompanied by an absence of tumor growth on MRI.
  • CONCLUSION: In the first report of a facial nerve neuroma treated with FSRT, this treatment resulted in excellent long-term (4-year) tumor control with improvement of pretreatment symptomatology and absence of morbidity.
  • This report demonstrates the potential for using FSRT to treat facial nerve neuromas of the cerebellopontine angle that could otherwise be associated with significant operative morbidity.
  • [MeSH-major] Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Dose Fractionation. Facial Nerve / radiography. Neuroma / radiotherapy

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 17709984.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-0372
  • [Journal-full-title] Stereotactic and functional neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Stereotact Funct Neurosurg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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56. Feiden S, Sartorius E, Feiden W: [The role of diagnostic neuropathology in familial tumour syndromes]. Pathologe; 2010 Oct;31(6):464-70
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  • [Title] [The role of diagnostic neuropathology in familial tumour syndromes].
  • For the surgical neuropathologist the possibility in individual patients of a familial tumour syndrome needs to be considered in the case of special tumours such as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST), medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity (MBEN) or even atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour (AT/RT) of the brain.
  • Furthermore, tumour location and patient age may point to a familial tumour syndrome as in the case of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) with typical bilateral vestibular schwannoma in young age.
  • This short review discusses some of the diagnostic aspects in this field relating to neurofibromatosis type 1 and 2 (NF1, NF2), as well as the two rare tumors MBEN in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome and AT/RT in particular.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasms / genetics. Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Central Nervous System Neoplasms / genetics. Central Nervous System Neoplasms / pathology. Chromosome Mapping. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 16. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 22. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9. Genes, Neurofibromatosis 1. Genes, Neurofibromatosis 2. Humans. Li-Fraumeni Syndrome / genetics. Li-Fraumeni Syndrome / pathology. Neurofibromatosis 1 / genetics. Neurofibromatosis 1 / pathology. Neurofibromatosis 2 / genetics. Neurofibromatosis 2 / pathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / genetics. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology. Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms / genetics. Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms / pathology. Rhabdoid Tumor / genetics. Rhabdoid Tumor / pathology. Teratoma / genetics. Teratoma / pathology. Tuberous Sclerosis / genetics. Tuberous Sclerosis / pathology

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  • [Cites] Genet Med. 2010 Jan;12(1):1-11 [20027112.001]
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  • (PMID = 20848106.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-1963
  • [Journal-full-title] Der Pathologe
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pathologe
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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57. Fiscina F, Gouveris H, Mann W: Influence of nerve branch of origin and extracanalicular extension of the tumor on hearing after middle fossa removal of vestibular schwannoma. Acta Otolaryngol; 2007 Oct;127(10):1058-61
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Influence of nerve branch of origin and extracanalicular extension of the tumor on hearing after middle fossa removal of vestibular schwannoma.
  • CONCLUSION: Neither nerve branch of origin nor extracanalicular (up to 1 cm) extension of a vestibular schwannoma (VS) influence the postoperative hearing outcome in patients operated via a middle cranial fossa (MCF) approach.
  • OBJECTIVE: To test whether the nerve branch of tumor origin and an extracanalicular, up to 1 cm, tumor extension influences hearing outcome after MCF VS surgery.
  • Twenty patients had a superior vestibular nerve (SVN) tumor and 27 patients had an inferior vestibular nerve (IVN) tumor.
  • In three patients the nerve branch of origin of the VS could not be unequivocally determined.
  • Thirty-four patients had a purely intracanalicular (IC) tumor and 16 patients had an extracanalicular extension in the cerebello-pontine angle.
  • RESULTS: Neither vestibular nerve branch of origin nor extracanalicular tumor extension (up to 1 cm) caused any significant difference in the degree of postoperative hearing change at any of the tested PTA frequencies.
  • [MeSH-major] Cranial Fossa, Middle / surgery. Hearing / physiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Otologic Surgical Procedures / methods. Vestibular Nerve / pathology. Vestibule, Labyrinth / innervation

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  • (PMID = 17851965.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6489
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta oto-laryngologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Otolaryngol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Norway
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58. Cioffi JA, Yue WY, Mendolia-Loffredo S, Hansen KR, Wackym PA, Hansen MR: MicroRNA-21 overexpression contributes to vestibular schwannoma cell proliferation and survival. Otol Neurotol; 2010 Dec;31(9):1455-62
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  • [Title] MicroRNA-21 overexpression contributes to vestibular schwannoma cell proliferation and survival.
  • HYPOTHESIS: Elevated levels of hsa-microRNA-21 (miR-21) in vestibular schwannomas (VSs) may contribute to tumor growth by downregulating the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and consequent hyperactivation of protein kinase B (AKT), a key signaling protein in the cellular pathways that lead to tumor growth.
  • BACKGROUND: Vestibular schwannomas are benign tumors that arise from the vestibular nerve.
  • Left untreated, VSs can result in hearing loss, tinnitus, vestibular dysfunction, trigeminal nerve dysfunction, and can even become life threatening.
  • RESULTS: We found consistent overexpression of miR-21 when compared with normal vestibular nerve tissue.

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  • (PMID = 20856158.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-4505
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / DC009801-03; United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / K08DC006211; United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / R01 DC002971; United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / DC006211-05; United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / K08 DC006211-05; United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / R01DC02971; United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / R01 DC009801; United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / R01 DC009801-03; United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / DC002971-14; United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / R01 DC002971-14; United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / K08 DC006211
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / MIRN21 microRNA, human; 0 / MicroRNAs; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / RNA, Neoplasm; EC 3.1.3.48 / PTEN protein, human; EC 3.1.3.67 / PTEN Phosphohydrolase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS237186; NLM/ PMC2978772
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59. Mazzoni A, Dubey SP, Poletti AM, Colombo G: Sporadic acoustic neuroma in pediatric patients. Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol; 2007 Oct;71(10):1569-72
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  • [Title] Sporadic acoustic neuroma in pediatric patients.
  • OBJECTIVE: Sporadic acoustic neuroma, usually occur between the ages of 40 and 70 years, are very rare in children.
  • We review the experiences of 10 cases of sporadic (non-NF2) acoustic neuromas in pediatric patients.
  • Among these almost 900 cases were acoustic neuromas.
  • Deafness were the commonest presentation and were seen in eight patients.
  • Among these eight cases, two patients have sudden onset of hearing loss.
  • The diameter of the tumors varied widely with minimum of 10 mm to maximum up to 60 mm.
  • Five patients each underwent resection of the tumor by translabyrinthine and retrosigmoid approach, respectively.
  • Postoperatively seven cases the facial nerve recovered to grade I, and one each to grade II and grade VI of House-Brackmann classification.
  • The youngest patient with largest tumor diameter of 60 mm developed transient hemiparesis in the immediate postoperative period and he recovered fully in due course.
  • CONCLUSION: We found preservation of facial nerve function is more easier than hearing in this group of patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Hearing Loss, Sensorineural / diagnosis. Hearing Loss, Sensorineural / epidemiology. Humans. Incidence. Male. Paresis / diagnosis. Paresis / epidemiology. Paresis / etiology. Postoperative Complications. Prevalence. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 17643497.001).
  • [ISSN] 0165-5876
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Pediatr. Otorhinolaryngol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
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60. Nakamura M, Roser F, Dormiani M, Samii M, Matthies C: Intraoperative auditory brainstem responses in patients with cerebellopontine angle meningiomas involving the inner auditory canal: analysis of the predictive value of the responses. J Neurosurg; 2005 Apr;102(4):637-42
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  • The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the reliability and predictive importance of auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) for the determination of postoperative auditory function in patients with CPA meningiomas in comparison with results obtained in patients who undergo surgery for vestibular schwannomas.
  • On analysis, ABR monitoring demonstrated stable findings in 24 patients throughout tumor resection and fluctuating signals in 10 patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Cerebellar Neoplasms / complications. Cerebellar Neoplasms / surgery. Cochlear Nerve / pathology. Hearing Loss / etiology. Meningioma / complications. Meningioma / surgery. Postoperative Complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cerebellopontine Angle. Ear, Inner / pathology. Ear, Inner / physiology. Evoked Potentials, Auditory. Female. Humans. Intraoperative Period. Male. Middle Aged. Neuroma, Acoustic / complications. Predictive Value of Tests. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 15871505.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3085
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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61. Chen L, Chen LH, Ling F, Liu YS, Samii M, Samii A: Removal of vestibular schwannoma and facial nerve preservation using small suboccipital retrosigmoid craniotomy. Chin Med J (Engl); 2010 Feb 5;123(3):274-80
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  • [Title] Removal of vestibular schwannoma and facial nerve preservation using small suboccipital retrosigmoid craniotomy.
  • BACKGROUND: Vestibular schwannoma, the commonest form of intracranial schwannoma, arises from the Schwann cells investing the vestibular nerve.
  • At present, the surgery for vestibular schwannoma remains one of the most complicated operations demanding for surgical skills in neurosurgery.
  • And the trend of minimal invasion should also be the major influence on the management of patients with vestibular schwannomas.
  • We summarized the microsurgical removal experience in a recent series of vestibular schwannomas and presented the operative technique and cranial nerve preservation in order to improve the rates of total tumor removal and facial nerve preservation.
  • METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed in 145 patients over a 7-year period who suffered from vestibular schwannomas that had been microsurgically removed by suboccipital retrosigmoid transmeatus approach with small craniotomy.
  • CT thinner scans revealed the tumor size in the internal auditory meatus and the relationship of the posterior wall of the internal acoustic meatus to the bone labyrinths preoperatively.
  • The posterior wall of the internal acoustic meatus was designedly drilled off.
  • RESULTS: Total tumor resection was achieved in 140 cases (96.6%) and subtotal resection in 5 cases.
  • The anatomical integrity of the facial nerve was preserved in 91.0% (132/145) of the cases.
  • Intracranial end-to-end anastomosis of the facial nerve was performed in 7 cases.
  • Functional preservation of the facial nerve was achieved in 115 patients (Grade I and Grade II, 79.3%).
  • Preservation of nerves and vessels were as important as tumor removal during the operation.
  • CT thinner scan could show the relationship between the posterior wall of the internal acoustic meatus and bone labyrinths, that is helpful for a safe drilling of the posterior wall of the internal acoustic meatus.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The goal of every surgery should be the preservation of function of all cranial nerves.
  • Knowing the microanatomy of the cerebellopontine angle and internal auditory meatus, intraoperating neurophysiological monitoring of the facial nerve function, and the microsurgical techniques of the surgeons are all important factors for improving total tumor removal and preserving facial nerve function.
  • [MeSH-major] Craniotomy / methods. Facial Nerve / surgery. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery

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  • (PMID = 20193244.001).
  • [ISSN] 0366-6999
  • [Journal-full-title] Chinese medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chin. Med. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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62. Lei T, Li L: [Prevention of facial nerve injury in acoustic neuroma microsurgery]. Zhonghua Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2008 Jan 1;46(1):58-60
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  • [Title] [Prevention of facial nerve injury in acoustic neuroma microsurgery].
  • OBJECTIVE: To summarize and analyse the techniques of avoiding facial nerve injury during acoustic neuroma microsurgery.
  • METHODS: One hundred and eighty patients with large acoustic neuroma (> or =4 cm) and 70 patients with medium acoustic neuroma (2.4-4.0 cm) were diagnosed by MRI/ CT scan before operation and confirmed by postoperative pathologic examination.
  • All of patients were treated by sub-occipital retrosigmoid approach for tumor removal and facial nerve reservation during operation.
  • The relationships among the bone, arachnoid, nerve and vascular anatomy were particularly observed during the operation.
  • After decompression of the tumor, the origination and location of the facial nerve as well as the relationship between the tumor and the facial nerve should be identified.
  • The patients were followed-up from 6 months to 1 year postoperatively and assessed by House-Brackmann facial nerve function grading system.
  • RESULTS: Total tumor resection was achieved in 240 of 250 cases (96%) and subtotal in 10 cases including 1 case died because of cerebellar encephalomalacia after operation.
  • According to the House-Brackmann facial nerve function grading, recovery of normal function (grade I) was achieved in 214 cases (85.6%), grade II in 25 cases (10%), grade III in 5 cases (2.09%) and grade IV in 5 cases (2.09%).
  • CONCLUSION: Microneurosurgical techniques are helpful for total resection of acoustic neuroma and keeping facial nerve anatomic intact.
  • [MeSH-major] Facial Nerve Injuries / prevention & control. Intraoperative Complications / prevention & control. Microsurgery / methods. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery

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  • (PMID = 18510007.001).
  • [ISSN] 0529-5815
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua wai ke za zhi [Chinese journal of surgery]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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63. Wang CP, Hsu WC, Young YH: Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in neurofibromatosis 2. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol; 2005 Jan;114(1 Pt 1):69-73
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  • [Title] Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in neurofibromatosis 2.
  • Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) is characterized by bilateral vestibular neurofibromas.
  • Although the facial nerve, the cochlear nerve, and the superior division of the vestibular nerve can be evaluated before surgery, whether the inferior division of the vestibular nerve is affected remains undetermined without an operation.
  • A total of 7 patients with NF2 (2 men and 5 women) underwent pure tone audiometry, caloric testing, vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) testing, and magnetic resonance imaging.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging depicted space-occupying lesions in all 14 auditory canals: small tumors in 3 ears, medium tumors in 7 ears, and large tumors in 4 ears.
  • The tumor size of NF2 is related to the caloric response, but is unrelated to the mean hearing level or VEMPs.
  • In conclusion, NF2 originates from the superior vestibular nerve more often than the inferior vestibular nerve.
  • It more often infiltrates the cochlear nerve than the inferior vestibular nerve.
  • [MeSH-major] Evoked Potentials, Auditory / physiology. Neurofibromatosis 2 / physiopathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / physiopathology. Vestibular Function Tests
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Audiometry, Pure-Tone. Caloric Tests. Facial Paralysis / etiology. Female. Hearing Loss / etiology. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / pathology. Nystagmus, Pathologic. Radiosurgery. Tinnitus / etiology

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  • (PMID = 15697166.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-4894
  • [Journal-full-title] The Annals of otology, rhinology, and laryngology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Otol. Rhinol. Laryngol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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64. Likhterov I, Allbright RM, Selesnick SH: LINAC radiosurgery and radiotherapy treatment of acoustic neuromas. 2007. Neurosurg Clin N Am; 2008 Apr;19(2):345-65, vii
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  • [Title] LINAC radiosurgery and radiotherapy treatment of acoustic neuromas. 2007.
  • This article provides an introduction to radiation therapy as it applies to intracranial tumors.
  • It also provides a review of the natural growth progression of acoustic neuromas and accuracy of tumor size determination.
  • Literature on the use of linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated radiotherapy in acoustic neuroma management is reviewed and summarized.
  • Specifically, the rates of reported tumor control, hearing preservation, facial and trigeminal nerve complications, and hydrocephalus are analyzed.
  • Although the complication rates associated with linear accelerator therapy are relatively low, hearing preservation is poor and acoustic neuroma control is variable.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / history. Radiosurgery / history

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  • (PMID = 18534344.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-1349
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurg. Clin. N. Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Biography; Classical Article; Historical Article; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Personal-name-as-subject] Likhterov I; Allbright RM; Selesnick SH
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65. Sinha S, Sharma BS: Cystic acoustic neuromas: surgical outcome in a series of 58 patients. J Clin Neurosci; 2008 May;15(5):511-5
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  • [Title] Cystic acoustic neuromas: surgical outcome in a series of 58 patients.
  • We aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics and surgical outcomes of surgically treated cystic acoustic neuromas, and to determine the prognostic significance of the presence of cystic components, by comparing surgical outcomes for solid and cystic tumors.
  • A total of 58 patients (20.4%) with newly diagnosed cystic tumor were studied.
  • The surgical outcome was analyzed in terms of extent of tumor removal, facial nerve preservation, morbidity and mortality; and was compared with that in patients with solid tumors.
  • Facial nerve preservation rates were much better for solid tumors (82.7%) than for cystic tumors (67.9%).
  • The extent of tumor removal was complete in 75.9% of patients with cystic tumors as compared with 90.2% for solid acoustic neuromas.
  • Cystic tumors differ from solid acoustic neuromas by having a rapid growth pattern, short clinical history and more frequent facial nerve involvement.
  • [MeSH-major] Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / surgery. Cysts / surgery. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Neurosurgery / methods

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  • (PMID = 18329881.001).
  • [ISSN] 0967-5868
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical neuroscience : official journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Neurosci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
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66. Wackym PA, Runge-Samuelson CL, Nash JJ, Poetker DM, Albano K, Bovi J, Michel MA, Friedland DR, Zhu YR, Hannley MT: Gamma knife surgery of vestibular schwannomas: volumetric dosimetry correlations to hearing loss suggest stria vascularis devascularization as the mechanism of early hearing loss. Otol Neurotol; 2010 Dec;31(9):1480-7
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  • [Title] Gamma knife surgery of vestibular schwannomas: volumetric dosimetry correlations to hearing loss suggest stria vascularis devascularization as the mechanism of early hearing loss.
  • OBJECTIVE: Determine which variables are correlated with early hearing changes after gamma knife surgery of vestibular schwannomas (VSs).
  • STUDY DESIGN: Prospective clinical study of hearing outcomes, radiation dosimetry, conformity, and tumor size of all sporadic unilateral VS patients treated between June 2000 and July 2009.
  • INTERVENTIONS: Audiometry and imaging were performed to determine auditory thresholds, speech discrimination, and tumor size.
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pretreatment and posttreatment comparisons were performed with regard to change in tumor size; radiation dose to specific volumes including the internal auditory canal, cochlea, basal turn of the cochlea, and modiolus; and conformity of the treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Ear Neoplasms / surgery. Hearing Loss / epidemiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Otologic Surgical Procedures. Postoperative Complications / epidemiology. Radiosurgery. Stria Vascularis / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Audiometry, Pure-Tone. Blood Vessels / pathology. Cochlea / pathology. Facial Nerve Diseases / epidemiology. Facial Nerve Diseases / etiology. Female. Headache / epidemiology. Headache / etiology. Humans. Longitudinal Studies. Male. Prospective Studies. Radiometry. Regional Blood Flow / physiology. Speech Discrimination Tests. Trigeminal Nerve Diseases / epidemiology. Trigeminal Nerve Diseases / etiology. Vascular System Injuries. Vestibule, Labyrinth / blood supply

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  • (PMID = 20930653.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-4505
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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67. Yong RL, Westerberg BD, Dong C, Akagami R: Length of tumor-cochlear nerve contact and hearing outcome after surgery for vestibular schwannoma. J Neurosurg; 2008 Jan;108(1):105-10
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Length of tumor-cochlear nerve contact and hearing outcome after surgery for vestibular schwannoma.
  • OBJECTIVES: Tumor size is likely to be a major determinant of hearing preservation after surgery for vestibular schwannoma.
  • Findings in some large case series have not supported this concept, possibly due to variation in the technique used for tumor measurement.
  • The authors sought to determine if the length of tumor-cochlear nerve contact was predictive of hearing outcome in adults undergoing resection of a vestibular schwannoma.
  • METHODS: Patients who underwent a hearing-preserving approach for resection of a vestibular schwannoma at one institution by a neurosurgeon/neurotologist team between 2001 and 2005 were screened.
  • Magnetic resonance images were reviewed and used to calculate the length of tumor-cochlear nerve contact.
  • Tumors were also measured according to AAO-HNS guidelines.
  • Univariate analysis revealed that extracanalicular length of tumor-cochlear nerve contact (p = 0.0365), preoperative hearing class (p = 0.028), I-V interpeak latency of the brainstem auditory evoked potential (p = 0.021), and the interaural I-V interpeak latency difference (p = 0.018) were predictive of hearing outcome.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Vestibular schwannomas with greater lengths of tumor-cochlear nerve contact increase a patient's risk for hearing loss after surgery with attempted hearing preservation.
  • Data from the experience of a single surgical team can be used to estimate the probability of good hearing outcome for any given patient with serviceable hearing and a vestibular schwannoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Cochlear Nerve / pathology. Cochlear Nerve / surgery. Hearing Loss / etiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery

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  • (PMID = 18173318.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3085
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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68. Yang SM, Yu LM, Yu LM, Han DY: [Technique of hearing preservation during acoustic neuroma surgery]. Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2008 Aug;43(8):564-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Technique of hearing preservation during acoustic neuroma surgery].
  • OBJECTIVE: To explore the possibility of hearing protection in acoustic neurinoma (AN) resection and to evaluate the effect of dynamic auditory monitoring and the effect of oto-endoscope for hearing protection.
  • Maximal diameters of the tumor varied between 12 and 33 millimeters with an average of 19.9 millimeters.
  • All cases were operated on by retrosigmoid approach with routine facial nerve monitoring.
  • RESULTS: In all 18 cases, tumors were resected completely in 16 cases, but sub-totally removed in 2 cases which were II neurofibromatosis.
  • In all 18 cases, there were 5 cases with tumor diameter more than 20 millimeters, in which only 2 cases of them preserved hearing function (2/5).
  • However, 9 cases preserved their hearing function in the other 13 cases whose tumors diameter less than 20 millimeters (69.2%, 9/13).
  • During operative monitoring, when drilling posterior lip of internal auditory canal (IAC), dragging and electric coagulating nearby IAC, especially clamping labyrinthine artery, removing tumor in IAC or electric coagulating arachnoid blood vessel on the top of tumor tissue, the ABR waves were affected greatly.
  • [MeSH-major] Hearing Loss / prevention & control. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Otologic Surgical Procedures

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  • (PMID = 18959258.001).
  • [ISSN] 1673-0860
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua er bi yan hou tou jing wai ke za zhi = Chinese journal of otorhinolaryngology head and neck surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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69. Goddard JC, Schwartz MS, Friedman RA: Fundal fluid as a predictor of hearing preservation in the middle cranial fossa approach for vestibular schwannoma. Otol Neurotol; 2010 Sep;31(7):1128-34
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Fundal fluid as a predictor of hearing preservation in the middle cranial fossa approach for vestibular schwannoma.
  • OBJECTIVES: Determine if the presence of cerebrospinal fluid in the fundal region of the internal auditory canal on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans is predictive of improved hearing preservation after removal of vestibular schwannoma through the middle cranial fossa approach.
  • Relationships between fundal fluid, tumor nerve of origin, tumor size, and hearing preservation also are examined.
  • PATIENTS: One hundred one patients with preoperative MRI, complete preoperative and postoperative audiologic data, and histopathologically confirmed vestibular schwannoma treated with a middle cranial fossa approach between January 1, 2006, and June 30, 2009.
  • INTERVENTIONS: Primary middle cranial fossa approach for removal of vestibular schwannoma.
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Fundal fluid status (presence or absence), preoperative and postoperative pure-tone average, and speech discrimination scores and tumor nerve of origin.
  • Tumors arising from the superior vestibular nerve also were associated with a higher rate of preserved, serviceable, and measurable hearing, whereas the combination of the presence of fundal fluid and superior nerve tumor had a significantly better chance of hearing preservation than either factor alone.
  • CONCLUSION: The presence of fundal fluid on preoperative MRI is predictive of hearing outcomes and should be used in counseling patients who are considering hearing preservation surgery via a middle cranial fossa approach for the treatment of isolated vestibular schwannoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Cranial Fossa, Middle / surgery. Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / surgery. Hearing / physiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Otologic Surgical Procedures

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  • (PMID = 20657334.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-4505
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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70. Malhotra PS, Sharma P, Fishman MA, Grumbine FL, Tholey R, Dam VQ, Dasgupta A, Pequignot E, Willcox TO: Clinical, radiographic, and audiometric predictors in conservative management of vestibular schwannoma. Otol Neurotol; 2009 Jun;30(4):507-14
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  • [Title] Clinical, radiographic, and audiometric predictors in conservative management of vestibular schwannoma.
  • OBJECTIVE: Vestibular schwannomas (VS) can be managed by observation.
  • Data collection included presenting symptoms, symptom progression, tumor size, audiologic measures, and global clinical outcomes.
  • Presenting tumor size differed for patients who failed conservative management, with a mean of 14.0 versus 8.4 mm (p = 0.0006).
  • Increased tumor size at presentation also may indicate the same, although no threshold could be achieved.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Cranial Nerve Diseases / etiology. Dizziness / etiology. Female. Hearing Loss / etiology. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Tinnitus / etiology. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] Otol Neurotol. 2010 Apr;31(3):548 [19887976.001]
  • (PMID = 19373122.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-4505
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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71. Gouveris H, Akkafa S, Lippold R, Mann W: Influence of nerve of origin and tumor size of vestibular schwannoma on dynamic posturography findings. Acta Otolaryngol; 2006 Dec;126(12):1281-5
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  • [Title] Influence of nerve of origin and tumor size of vestibular schwannoma on dynamic posturography findings.
  • CONCLUSION: Condition 5-score (C5S) and vestibular ratio (VER) correlate, but condition-6-score (C6S) and mean overall balance score (MOBS) do not, with the size of an inferior vestibular nerve (IVN) vestibular schwannoma (VS).
  • OBJECTIVES: To test whether the size of a superior vestibular nerve (SVN) or IVN VS, as measured on MRI scans, correlates with computerized dynamic platform posturography (CDPP) findings and whether CDPP findings could preoperatively predict the nerve of origin of the vs. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This was a retrospective study.
  • Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were calculated between the tumor's larger dimension and each of the four parameters for SVN and IVN vs. The nerve of VS origin was identified intraoperatively.
  • Neither C6S nor MOBS showed any significant correlation with the tumor's larger dimension.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology. Postural Balance. Vestibular Nerve / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17101589.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6489
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta oto-laryngologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Otolaryngol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Norway
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72. Samii M, Gerganov VM, Samii A: Functional outcome after complete surgical removal of giant vestibular schwannomas. J Neurosurg; 2010 Apr;112(4):860-7
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  • [Title] Functional outcome after complete surgical removal of giant vestibular schwannomas.
  • OBJECT: The authors evaluated the outcome of radical surgery in a consecutive series of patients with giant vestibular schwannomas (VSs).
  • Outcome measures included completeness of tumor removal, facial nerve function, hearing, and the surgery-related complication rate.
  • RESULTS: The mean tumor size in Group A was 4.4 cm and that in Group B was 2.3 cm.
  • The anatomical integrity of the facial nerve was preserved in 92% in Group A and in 98.8% in Group B.
  • At last follow-up 75% of the patients with giant VSs had excellent or good facial nerve function, 19% had fair function, and 6% had poor function.
  • Newly developed lower cranial nerve dysfunction occurred in 3 patients but proved to be temporary in 2 of them.
  • Compared with Group B, a significant difference was found only in the rates of the following parameters: excellent facial nerve function, useful and good hearing, lower cranial nerve dysfunction, and blood collection (p < 0.05).
  • CONCLUSIONS: In patients with a giant VS, total tumor removal can be achieved via the retrosigmoid approach with a 0% mortality rate and low morbidity rate, especially with regards to facial nerve function.
  • Tumor size significantly correlates with postoperative outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Hearing Loss / epidemiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / epidemiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Neurosurgical Procedures / statistics & numerical data. Postoperative Complications / epidemiology. Recovery of Function
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cochlear Nerve / physiology. Facial Nerve / physiology. Facial Nerve Diseases / epidemiology. Female. Hearing. Humans. Incidence. Male. Middle Aged. Morbidity. Retrospective Studies. Severity of Illness Index. Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases / epidemiology. Young Adult

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  • [CommentIn] J Neurosurg. 2011 Nov;115(5):894-5 [21838509.001]
  • (PMID = 19663543.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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73. van Eck AT, Horstmann GA: Increased preservation of functional hearing after gamma knife surgery for vestibular schwannoma. J Neurosurg; 2005 Jan;102(s_supplement):204-206
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  • [Title] Increased preservation of functional hearing after gamma knife surgery for vestibular schwannoma.
  • OBJECT: Gamma knife surgery (GKS) for vestibular schwannoma is still associated with an additional hearing loss of approximately 30%.
  • METHODS: Seventy-eight of 95 patients who entered a prospective protocol with a follow up of at least 12 months (mean 22 months) were evaluated.
  • The mean tumor volume was 2.28 cm<sup>3</sup>.
  • After a mean follow-up duration of 22 months, the magnetic resonance imaging-based tumor control rate was 87%.
  • One patient suffered transient facial nerve impairment.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Reducing the maximum dose to 20 Gy seems to be an effective treatment, which probably increases preservation of functional hearing without sacrificing the high tumor control rates achieved in radiosurgery.
  • Post-radiosurgery tumor swelling occurred in 25% of the cases and was not correlated with hearing deterioration.

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  • (PMID = 28306452.001).
  • [ISSN] 1933-0693
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; acoustic neurinoma / gamma knife surgery / hearing preservation / tumor swelling / vestibular schwannoma
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74. Bouccara D, Kalamarides M, Bozorg Grayeli A, Ambert-Dahan E, Rey A, Sterkers O: [Auditory brainstem implant: indications and results]. Ann Otolaryngol Chir Cervicofac; 2007 Jul;124(3):148-54
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  • Emergent indications are bilateral total ossified cochlea, vestibular schwannoma with controlateral lesions, cochlear nerve aplasia or inner ear's malformations.
  • RESULTS: In NF2 patients, best results are obtained in cases of smaller vestibular schwannoma and none, or short term, auditory deprivation.
  • Negative prognostic factors are duration of total hearing loss (>10 years), tumor size (>30 mm), difficulties in electrode array placement, complications during post-operative course and number of active electrodes (<10).
  • CONCLUSION: These results show a clear benefit of ABI in NF2 patients, with or without previous tumor removal, in case of small tumor with a short duration of hearing loss.
  • [MeSH-minor] Brain / pathology. Calcinosis / etiology. Calcinosis / pathology. Cochlear Diseases / etiology. Cochlear Diseases / pathology. Cochlear Nerve / pathology. Cochlear Nerve / surgery. Electrodes, Implanted. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Middle Aged. Neurofibromatosis 2 / complications. Neuroma, Acoustic / complications. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery

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  • (PMID = 17320034.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-438X
  • [Journal-full-title] Annales d'oto-laryngologie et de chirurgie cervico faciale : bulletin de la Société d'oto-laryngologie des hôpitaux de Paris
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Otolaryngol Chir Cervicofac
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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75. Vachhani JA, Friedman WA: Radiosurgery in patients with bilateral vestibular schwannomas. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg; 2007;85(6):273-8
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  • [Title] Radiosurgery in patients with bilateral vestibular schwannomas.
  • BACKGROUND: Patients with bilateral vestibular schwannomas offer a unique opportunity to determine the effectiveness of radiosurgery.
  • By using the untreated tumor as an internal control, one can determine whether radiosurgery was able to interrupt the natural history of the treated tumor.
  • METHODS: From September 1998 to November 2004, 13 patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 had 14 tumors treated with radiosurgery at the University of Florida.
  • Actuarial statistics were used to analyze local control in both the treated and untreated tumor.
  • Actuarial local control in the treated tumors was 100% at 1 year and 92% at 2 and 5 years.
  • Only 1 of the treated tumors continued to grow.
  • In the untreated tumors, actuarial local control was 100% at 1 year, 78% at 2 years and 21% at 5 years.
  • None of the untreated tumors decreased in size.
  • CONCLUSION: In all but 1 patient with follow-up data, radiosurgery successfully prevented or reversed tumor growth.
  • Additionally, half of the untreated tumors continued to grow.
  • This study shows that radiosurgery alters the natural history of vestibular schwannomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Neurofibromatosis 2 / surgery. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery. Vestibular Nerve / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Functional Laterality. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Retrospective Studies

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 17709979.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-0372
  • [Journal-full-title] Stereotactic and functional neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Stereotact Funct Neurosurg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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76. Kiratli H, Yildiz S, Soylemezoğlu F: Neurofibromatosis type 2: optic nerve sheath meningioma in one orbit, intramuscular schwannoma in the other. Orbit; 2008;27(6):451-4
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  • [Title] Neurofibromatosis type 2: optic nerve sheath meningioma in one orbit, intramuscular schwannoma in the other.
  • A highly unusual patient with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) presenting with simultaneous bilateral orbital tumors is described.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging studies showed bilateral cerebellopontine angle tumors, a tumor surrounding the right intraorbital optic nerve, and a large left lateral orbital mass mixed with the lateral rectus muscle.
  • The histopathological diagnoses following incisional biopsies were right optic nerve sheath meningioma and left intramuscular schwannoma.
  • The left-sided orbital schwannoma and the right-sided vestibular schwannoma were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Meningeal Neoplasms / pathology. Meningioma / pathology. Muscle Neoplasms / pathology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / pathology. Neurilemmoma / pathology. Neurofibromatosis 2 / pathology. Orbital Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Child. Female. Functional Laterality. Hamartoma / pathology. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neoplasm Proteins / analysis. Neuroma, Acoustic / chemistry. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Oculomotor Muscles / pathology. Radiosurgery. Radiotherapy, Conformal. Retinal Diseases / pathology


77. Linskey ME: Hearing preservation in vestibular schwannoma stereotactic radiosurgery: what really matters? J Neurosurg; 2008 Dec;109 Suppl:129-36
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  • [Title] Hearing preservation in vestibular schwannoma stereotactic radiosurgery: what really matters?
  • Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for vestibular schwannomas has evolved and improved over time.
  • Although early short-term follow-up reports suggest that fractionation yields hearing preservation rates equivalent to modern single-dose SRS techniques, significant questions remain regarding long-term tumor control after the use of fractionation in a late responding tumor with a low proliferative index and alpha/beta ratio.
  • 2) careful delineation of the 3D tumor margin to exclude the cochlear nerve when visualizable with contrast-enhanced T2-weighted MR volumetric imaging techniques and exclusion the dura mater of the anterior border of the internal auditory canal;.
  • 3) a tumor margin dose prescription <or= 12 Gy;.
  • 4) optimization of the tumor treatment gradient index without sacrificing coverage and conformality; and 5) strict attention to prescription dose 3D conformality so that the modiolus and the basal turn of the cochlea receive the lowest possible dose (ideally < 4-5.33 Gy).
  • [MeSH-major] Hearing Loss / prevention & control. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Ear, Inner / pathology. Humans. Neoplasm Invasiveness. Radiotherapy Dosage. Tumor Burden

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  • (PMID = 19123899.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3085
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 38
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78. Sughrue ME, Yang I, Aranda D, Lobo K, Pitts LH, Cheung SW, Parsa AT: The natural history of untreated sporadic vestibular schwannomas: a comprehensive review of hearing outcomes. J Neurosurg; 2010 Jan;112(1):163-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The natural history of untreated sporadic vestibular schwannomas: a comprehensive review of hearing outcomes.
  • OBJECT: Observation is an important consideration when discussing management options for patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS).
  • The effects of initial tumor size and tumor growth rate on hearing function at latest follow-up were analyzed.
  • RESULTS: A total of 982 patients met the inclusion criteria for this analysis, with a mean initial tumor size of 11.3 +/- 0.68 mm.
  • Patients with preserved hearing at latest follow-up had a statistically larger initial tumor size than those whose hearing declined during the observation period (11.5 +/- 2.3 mm vs 9.3 +/- 2.7 mm, p < 0.0001), but the 2-mm difference of means was at the limit of imaging resolution and observer reliability.
  • In contrast, patients with lower rates of tumor growth (<or= 2.5 mm/year) had markedly higher rates of hearing preservation (75 vs 32%, p < 0.0001) compared with patients with higher tumor growth rates.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that a growth rate of > 2.5 mm/year is a better predictor of hearing loss than the initial tumor size for patients undergoing observation management of VSs < 25 mm in largest diameter.
  • [MeSH-major] Hearing Disorders / etiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Facial Nerve Diseases / diagnosis. Facial Nerve Diseases / etiology. Facial Nerve Diseases / physiopathology. Hearing. Humans. Prognosis


79. Zhang X, Fei Z, Chen YJ, Fu LA, Zhang JN, Liu WP, He XS, Jiang XF: Facial nerve function after excision of large acoustic neuromas via the suboccipital retrosigmoid approach. J Clin Neurosci; 2005 May;12(4):405-8
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  • [Title] Facial nerve function after excision of large acoustic neuromas via the suboccipital retrosigmoid approach.
  • We review our results for facial nerve preservation in 105 patients with large acoustic neuromas (diameter 4.0 cm or larger) undergoing excision via the suboccipital retrosigmoid approach.
  • Microneurosurgical techniques and facial nerve monitoring were used.
  • Complete tumor removal was achieved in 91 cases (86.7%) and subtotal removal in 14 (13.3%).
  • The facial nerve was preserved anatomically in 83 (79.1%) patients.
  • Using the House-Brackmann grading system, facial nerve function was assessed immediately after surgery, at the time of discharge and 1 year after surgery.
  • The suboccipital retrosigmoid approach resulted in good anatomical and functional preservation of the facial nerve during excision of large acoustic neuromas, with minimal other morbidity and low mortality.
  • We recommend this approach for excision of large acoustic neuromas.
  • [MeSH-major] Facial Nerve / physiopathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Neurosurgical Procedures / methods. Occipital Bone / surgery. Otologic Surgical Procedures / methods

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  • (PMID = 15925770.001).
  • [ISSN] 0967-5868
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical neuroscience : official journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Neurosci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
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80. Hillman T, Chen DA, Arriaga MA, Quigley M: Facial nerve function and hearing preservation acoustic tumor surgery: does the approach matter? Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg; 2010 Jan;142(1):115-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Facial nerve function and hearing preservation acoustic tumor surgery: does the approach matter?
  • OBJECTIVE: The retrosigmoid and middle fossa approaches to acoustic tumor excision allow for hearing preservation but differ in the angle of approach to the facial nerve.
  • The authors comparatively examined facial nerve results of each approach.
  • SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The authors reviewed facial nerve outcomes of patients undergoing acoustic tumor excision at a single subspecialty practice that had used a hearing preservation approach for the past 15 years.
  • RESULTS: One hundred thirty-eight patients had adequate data for inclusion in this study.
  • There were more recurrent/residual tumors in the retrosigmoid group and better hearing preservation in the middle fossa group.
  • CONCLUSION: There are small but important functional outcome differences between the retrosigmoid and middle fossa approach for acoustic tumors.
  • [MeSH-major] Facial Nerve / physiology. Hearing. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery

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  • (PMID = 20096234.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-6817
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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81. Kurowska-Mroczek E, Zabek M, Osuch B, Stelmachów J: Therapeutic management of acoustic neurinoma during twin pregnancy: a case report. J Reprod Med; 2009 Jun;54(6):393-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Therapeutic management of acoustic neurinoma during twin pregnancy: a case report.
  • BACKGROUND: Acoustic neuromas belong to relatively rare illnesses in pregnant women.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging showed a vestibular acoustic neuroma of cranial nerve VII on the right side.
  • On the 14th postoperative day a team of neurosurgeons performed a right suboccipital craniectomy and completely removed the tumor.
  • CONCLUSION: The treatment of acoustic neuroma depends on the general health of a patient and the length of pregnancy.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / diagnosis. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic / diagnosis. Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic / surgery. Pregnancy, Multiple

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  • (PMID = 19639930.001).
  • [ISSN] 0024-7758
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of reproductive medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Reprod Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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82. Bozorg Grayeli A, Kalamarides M, Fraysse B, Deguine O, Favre G, Martin C, Mom T, Sterkers O: Comparison between intraoperative observations and electromyographic monitoring data for facial nerve outcome after vestibular schwannoma surgery. Acta Otolaryngol; 2005 Oct;125(10):1069-74
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  • [Title] Comparison between intraoperative observations and electromyographic monitoring data for facial nerve outcome after vestibular schwannoma surgery.
  • Determination of stimulation thresholds (STs) below 0.05 mA improves facial prognostic information after vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery.
  • Intraoperative observations were made concerning adhesion and nerve stretch, and facial function was graded (House-Brackmann classification) at postoperative Days 1 and 8.Facial function at postoperative Days 1 and 8 was related to the intraoperative nerve STs at the brainstem and in the adhesion zone (range 0.01-3 mA for a response > 100 microV).
  • These STs were related to the degree of tumor adhesion and not to the nerve stretch.
  • [MeSH-major] Electromyography / instrumentation. Facial Nerve / pathology. Facial Nerve / physiopathology. Monitoring, Intraoperative / instrumentation. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery

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  • (PMID = 16298788.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6489
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta oto-laryngologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Otolaryngol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Norway
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83. Roche PH, Khalil M, Thomassin JM: Microsurgical removal of vestibular schwannomas after failed previous microsurgery. Prog Neurol Surg; 2008;21:158-62
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  • [Title] Microsurgical removal of vestibular schwannomas after failed previous microsurgery.
  • Recurrent and regrowing large vestibular schwannomas (VSs) may require another microsurgical procedure.
  • Eight of them were supposed to have a radical surgery at the initial step, while 2 had experienced a subtotal resection.
  • Additional surgery was justified by a large-sized growing tumor in main cases and/or occurrence of new symptoms.
  • Preservation of a good facial nerve motion (H-B gd I or II) was obtained in 3 out of the 6 cases who displayed this preoperative status.
  • Excluding the facial nerve injury, no major complication was observed in these cases.
  • Assuming that radiosurgery is an effective tool to control small- to middle-sized VSs, priority was recently given to the facial nerve preservation during the surgical removal of recurrent and regrowing VSs.
  • [MeSH-major] Microsurgery. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cohort Studies. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm, Residual. Reoperation. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Failure. Tumor Burden

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  • (PMID = 18810214.001).
  • [ISSN] 0079-6492
  • [Journal-full-title] Progress in neurological surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prog Neurol Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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84. Kabil MS, Shahinian HK: A series of 112 fully endoscopic resections of vestibular schwannomas. Minim Invasive Neurosurg; 2006 Dec;49(6):362-8
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  • [Title] A series of 112 fully endoscopic resections of vestibular schwannomas.
  • We report a consecutive series of 112 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma (VS) having undergone fully endoscopic resection of their tumors in the period from October, 2001 to January, 2005.
  • Patients' outcomes were evaluated especially with regards to cochlear nerve (hearing) preservation, facial nerve preservation, postoperative complications and completeness of the resection.
  • The patient population consisted of 112 consecutive cases with unilateral, "de novo" VS(s); patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NFT2) or with a recurrent tumor were excluded from this study.
  • Tumors ranged in size from 0.6-5.7 cm, most tumors were less than 3 cm in diameter (mean: 2.6 cm).
  • This shift towards smaller and also less symptomatic tumors may be due to an increase in the awareness of patients and earlier detection of their tumors (MRI era).
  • Tumors were removed via 1.5-cm "keyhole" retrosigmoid craniotomies.
  • Utilizing the fully endoscopic technique, 106/112 (95%) tumors were completely removed; subtotal removal was performed in 6/112 (5%) patients in an attempt to preserve their hearing.
  • Anatomic preservation of the facial nerve was achieved in all of the patients and of the cochlear nerve in 83/101 (82%) hearing ears.
  • There were no major neurological complications such as quadriparesis, hemiparesis, bacterial or aseptic meningitis, lower cranial nerve deficits, or deaths.
  • From our experience, we conclude that the endoscope is ideally suited for a minimally invasive approach for the resection of vestibular schwannomas.
  • [MeSH-major] Endoscopy. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Audiometry, Pure-Tone. Dominance, Cerebral / physiology. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Microsurgery. Middle Aged. Postoperative Complications / diagnosis. Postoperative Complications / etiology. Tomography, X-Ray Computed

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  • (PMID = 17323265.001).
  • [ISSN] 0946-7211
  • [Journal-full-title] Minimally invasive neurosurgery : MIN
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Minim Invasive Neurosurg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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85. Cayé-Thomasen P, Borup R, Stangerup SE, Thomsen J, Nielsen FC: Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas. Otol Neurotol; 2010 Feb;31(2):256-66
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  • [Title] Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas.
  • OBJECTIVE: In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: RNA was extracted from 3 vestibular nerves (serving as control) and 16 solid, sporadic vestibular schwannomas.
  • Differentially expressed genes were identified as differences between control and tumor tissue larger than 2-fold, with a conservative p value of less than 0.000161 and means of differences greater than 25.
  • RESULTS: Eighty-seven probe sets, representing 78 genes, were significantly up- or down-regulated in tumor tissue.
  • CONCLUSION: We conclude that a number of transcripts are deregulated in sporadic vestibular schwannomas, and that several of these have functional annotations implicated in tumorigenesis.
  • [MeSH-major] Ear Neoplasms / genetics. Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic / genetics. Neuroma, Acoustic / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Apoptosis / genetics. Cell Adhesion / genetics. Cell Cycle / genetics. Cell Differentiation / genetics. Extracellular Matrix / genetics. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Morphogenesis / genetics. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis. Prospective Studies. RNA, Messenger / biosynthesis. RNA, Messenger / genetics. Vestibular Nerve / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19816230.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-4505
  • [Journal-full-title] Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otol. Neurotol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Messenger
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86. Wandong S, Meng L, Xingang L, Yuguang L, Shugan Z, Lei W, Chengyuan W: Cystic acoustic neuroma. J Clin Neurosci; 2005 Apr;12(3):253-5
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  • [Title] Cystic acoustic neuroma.
  • To define the clinical characteristics of cystic acoustic neuroma, we retrospectively analyzed 22 patients with cystic acoustic neuroma and reviewed the literature with regard to clinical manifestation, imaging features, diagnosis, surgical procedures and prognosis.
  • An acoustic neuroma was defined as cystic according to the following criteria: the presence of hypodense/hypointense areas on CT or MRI, the identification of cystic elements at operation and histological verification.
  • At the end of surgery, the facial nerve was anatomically intact in 86.4% of cystic acoustic neuromas.
  • Complete removal of the tumor was achieved in 18 cases (81.8%).
  • We conclude that patients with cystic acoustic neuroma need prompt surgery with special attention paid to the preservation of the facial nerve.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Facial Nerve / surgery. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Neurosurgical Procedures. Prognosis. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 15851076.001).
  • [ISSN] 0967-5868
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical neuroscience : official journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Neurosci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
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87. Yu LM, Yang SM, Han DY, Yu LM, Yang WY: [Preliminary study of intraoperative auditory monitoring techniques in acoustic neuroma surgery]. Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2006 May;41(5):335-40
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  • [Title] [Preliminary study of intraoperative auditory monitoring techniques in acoustic neuroma surgery].
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the value of intraoperative auditory monitoring techniques in acoustic neuroma surgery.
  • METHODS: Ten cases with acoustic neuroma were resected with retrosigmoid approach.
  • The hearing was preserved in 2 cases, which had class A hearing post operation with tumor size <2 cm.
  • In another case, the waves of I, III could be evoked after the tumor resection with the disappearance of wave V.
  • The CAP amplitudes decreased significantly in 4 cases and even dropped to zero while dissecting the tumor at the lateral end of the internal auditory canal (IAC) or clamping the internal auditory artery (IAA) during operation.
  • In one case, although the cochlear nerve was cut down, the CAP could still be recorded after the tumor resection.
  • However, the CAP amplitudes was dropped to zero while pressurized and pulled cochlea nerve of brainstem lateral and the wave disappeared post-operation in another cases.
  • One of them showed low amplitude of CAP wave when the tumor partially removed.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In combination with ABR monitoring, ECochG proved to be a useful supplementary tool for hearing preservation in acoustic neurinoma surgery.
  • Drilling of the IAC and tumor removal at the lateral end of the IAC were the most critical steps for achieving hearing preservation.
  • The surgeon's experience are the most significant factors influencing the hearing outcome after removal of acoustic neuroma.
  • [MeSH-major] Cochlear Nerve / physiopathology. Monitoring, Intraoperative / methods. Neuroma, Acoustic / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 16848284.001).
  • [ISSN] 1673-0860
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua er bi yan hou tou jing wai ke za zhi = Chinese journal of otorhinolaryngology head and neck surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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88. Kabacińska A, Dabrowska A, Tarnowska C, Cyryłowski L: [Diagnostic problems of rare cerebellopontine angle tumors]. Otolaryngol Pol; 2007;61(2):184-7
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  • [Title] [Diagnostic problems of rare cerebellopontine angle tumors].
  • Astrocytoma (neuroepithelial tumor) determine about 25% all the cerebroma but their original location in cerebellopontine angle is seldom.
  • In case of this kind of tumors in this place, the symptoms can be non-characteristic and similar to these, which appear in the acoustic neurinoma.
  • The most important in case of this diagnosis is both that this tumors can infiltrate of the brain tissues and the fact that they can transformate toward the anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma multiforme (very malignant tumors).
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: [corrected] A rare case of astrocytoma presenting as a cerebellopontine angle tumor is discussed.
  • The special characteristics of this tumor and unusual clinical course are disscused.
  • CONCLUSION: The early diagnosis of the astrocytoma increases the patient's chance on convalescence and limits extension of the operation, and consequently of the neurological complication.
  • [MeSH-major] Astrocytoma / radiography. Astrocytoma / surgery. Cerebellar Neoplasms / radiography. Cerebellar Neoplasms / surgery. Cerebellopontine Angle / radiography. Cerebellopontine Angle / surgery. Facial Nerve Diseases / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Diagnosis, Differential. Follow-Up Studies. Hearing Loss / etiology. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Postoperative Complications. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17668807.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6657
  • [Journal-full-title] Otolaryngologia polska = The Polish otolaryngology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Otolaryngol Pol
  • [Language] pol
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Poland
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89. Feiz-Erfan I, Zabramski JM, Herrmann LL, Coons SW: Cavernous malformation within a schwannoma: review of the literature and hypothesis of a common genetic etiology. Acta Neurochir (Wien); 2006 Jun;148(6):647-52; discussion 652
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  • The finding of cavernous malformations within tumors of the central or peripheral nervous system is a rare occurrence.
  • We report a case of a histologically proven cavernous malformation found within an eighth cranial nerve schwannoma in a 76-year-old man.
  • Symptoms improved significantly after the tumor was subtotally resected through a left retrosigmoid craniotomy.
  • Including the present report, 34 cases of cavernous malformations associated with tumors of nervous system origin, 24 cases (71%) involving tumors of Schwann cell origin, and 9 cases (26%) involving gliomas have been published.
  • Conjoined association, in which the cavernous malformation is located within the tissue of the nervous system tumor, and discrete association, in which the cavernous malformation and nervous system tumor are in separate locations.
  • [MeSH-major] Blood Vessels / pathology. Genetic Predisposition to Disease / genetics. Hemangioma, Cavernous, Central Nervous System / diagnosis. Hemangioma, Cavernous, Central Nervous System / genetics. Neuroma, Acoustic / diagnosis. Neuroma, Acoustic / genetics. Vestibulocochlear Nerve / blood supply. Vestibulocochlear Nerve / pathology

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  • (PMID = 16450046.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6268
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta neurochirurgica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Neurochir (Wien)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Austria
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / KRIT1 protein, human; 0 / Microtubule-Associated Proteins; 0 / Neurofibromin 1; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins
  • [Number-of-references] 50
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90. Aarhus M, Bruland O, Sætran HA, Mork SJ, Lund-Johansen M, Knappskog PM: Global gene expression profiling and tissue microarray reveal novel candidate genes and down-regulation of the tumor suppressor gene CAV1 in sporadic vestibular schwannomas. Neurosurgery; 2010 Oct;67(4):998-1019; discussion 1019
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  • [Title] Global gene expression profiling and tissue microarray reveal novel candidate genes and down-regulation of the tumor suppressor gene CAV1 in sporadic vestibular schwannomas.
  • BACKGROUND: The vestibular nerve is the predilection site for schwannomas.
  • Few transcriptomic studies have been performed on solely sporadic vestibular schwannomas (VSs).
  • Tumor size, previous Gamma Knife surgery, neurofibromatosis type II mutations, and cystic tumors were distributed equally in both.
  • Among these, down-regulation of CAV1 at both the mRNA and protein levels is of particular interest because this tumor suppressor normally is expressed in Schwann cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Caveolin 1 / metabolism. Down-Regulation / physiology. Gene Expression Profiling / methods. Neuroma, Acoustic. Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis / methods

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  • (PMID = 20881564.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4040
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurgery
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CAV1 protein, human; 0 / Caveolin 1; 0 / RNA, Messenger
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91. Kim CH, Chung KW, Kong DS, Nam DH, Park K, Kim JH, Hong SH, Cho YS, Chung WH, Lee JI: Prognostic factors of hearing preservation after gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma. J Clin Neurosci; 2010 Feb;17(2):214-8
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  • [Title] Prognostic factors of hearing preservation after gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma.
  • We conducted a prospective study to identify prognostic factors of hearing preservation after gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS).
  • Tumor growth was controlled in 26 of the 27 patients (96.3%), and rates of hearing preservation were 85.1% and 68.1% at 2 and 3 years, respectively.
  • [MeSH-major] Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / pathology. Hearing Loss, Sensorineural / pathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology. Postoperative Complications / pathology. Radiosurgery / adverse effects. Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cochlear Nerve / pathology. Cochlear Nerve / radiation effects. Cochlear Nerve / surgery. Electroencephalography. Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem / physiology. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Predictive Value of Tests. Preoperative Care. Prognosis. Prospective Studies. Radiation Dosage. Vestibular Nerve / pathology. Vestibular Nerve / radiography. Vestibular Nerve / surgery. Young Adult

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20056421.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-2653
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical neuroscience : official journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Neurosci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
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92. McClelland S 3rd, Gerbi BJ, Higgins PD, Orner JB, Hall WA: Safety and efficacy of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for acoustic neuromas. J Neurooncol; 2008 Jan;86(2):191-4
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  • [Title] Safety and efficacy of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for acoustic neuromas.
  • BACKGROUND: The treatment of acoustic neuromas (AN) has historically involved surgical excision or stereotactic radiosurgery, with a relatively limited number of reports available describing the use of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT).
  • Median tumor size (maximum diameter) was 2.1 cm (range, 1.1-3.4 cm).
  • RESULTS: Following FSRT, local tumor control was achieved in every patient, with the treatment well-tolerated by all patients.
  • No patient experienced acute complications or facial nerve weakness.
  • Two patients experienced permanent trigeminal nerve morbidity manifesting as facial numbness.
  • CONCLUSION: In our series of 20 patients with AN, all had local tumor control following FSRT, with minimal morbidity.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery / methods. Stereotaxic Techniques
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Dose Fractionation. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Hearing Loss / etiology. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. Radiography. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome. Trigeminal Nerve / surgery

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  • (PMID = 17622486.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-594X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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93. Arístegui M, Denia A: Simultaneous cochlear implantation and translabyrinthine removal of vestibular schwannoma in an only hearing ear: report of two cases (neurofibromatosis type 2 and unilateral vestibular schwannoma). Otol Neurotol; 2005 Mar;26(2):205-10
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  • [Title] Simultaneous cochlear implantation and translabyrinthine removal of vestibular schwannoma in an only hearing ear: report of two cases (neurofibromatosis type 2 and unilateral vestibular schwannoma).
  • OBJECTIVE: The goal is to confirm the effectiveness of cochlear implantation performed at the time of surgery for tumor removal, using a translabyrinthine approach.
  • STUDY DESIGN: This is a retrospective case review of two cases of vestibular schwannoma (VS) in the only hearing ear in which a cochlear implant (CI) was placed simultaneous to removal of VS through a modified enlarged translabyrinthine approach.
  • CONCLUSION: The present cases demonstrate that cochlear implantation can be successful after a translabyrinthine approach for VS, regardless of the tumor size, the kind of patient (NF2, unilateral VS), and the type of implant.
  • The results also are suggestive that cochlear implantation is more successful if done concurrent with surgery for tumor removal and before hearing is completely lost.
  • [MeSH-major] Cochlear Implantation / methods. Hearing Loss, Bilateral / surgery. Neurofibromatosis 2 / surgery. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Audiometry, Pure-Tone. Cochlear Nerve / pathology. Cochlear Nerve / surgery. Combined Modality Therapy. Ear, Inner / surgery. Ear, Middle / pathology. Ear, Middle / surgery. Electrodes, Implanted. Facial Nerve / pathology. Facial Nerve / surgery. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Postoperative Complications / diagnosis. Postoperative Complications / surgery. Prosthesis Design. Reoperation / methods. Speech Discrimination Tests. Tomography, X-Ray Computed


94. Park CK, Jung HW, Kim JE, Son YJ, Paek SH, Kim DG: Therapeutic strategy for large vestibular schwannomas. J Neurooncol; 2006 Apr;77(2):167-71
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Therapeutic strategy for large vestibular schwannomas.
  • Management of large vestibular schwannoma (VS) remains a difficult problem for which the extent of tumor resection and the role of radiosurgery continue to be the subject of debate.
  • The authors carefully reviewed the clinical data of 50 surgical cases of large VS, defined as tumors with an average diameter over 3 cm in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
  • Among the 33 patients with R-STR and STR, eight had undergone adjuvant radiosurgery for the residual mass.
  • Average tumor volume and diameter were 26.8 cm(3) (13.5-55.1) and 36.4 mm (30.0-47.2), respectively.
  • The tumor control rate and facial nerve function according to the extent of removal were analyzed.
  • The overall tumor control rate was 82%.
  • Perfect tumor control was achieved after NTR and R-STR with adjuvant radiosurgery.
  • Overall favorable outcome of facial nerve function (H-B grade 1 or 2) was achieved in 78% of the patients.
  • The facial nerve preservation rate was inversely proportional to the extent of tumor removal.
  • NTR or R-STR with adjuvant radiosurgery might be acceptable therapeutic options for large VS in terms of achieving good tumor control and functional preservation of facial nerve.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Postoperative Complications / epidemiology. Radiosurgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Facial Nerve Injuries / etiology. Facial Paralysis / etiology. Humans. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / epidemiology. Neoplasm, Residual. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16397752.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-594X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuro-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurooncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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95. Yomo S, Arkha Y, Delsanti C, Roche PH, Thomassin JM, Régis J: Repeat gamma knife surgery for regrowth of vestibular schwannomas. Neurosurgery; 2009 Jan;64(1):48-54; discussion 54-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Repeat gamma knife surgery for regrowth of vestibular schwannomas.
  • OBJECTIVE: Gamma knife surgery (GKS) has become established as a minimally invasive treatment modality for patients with vestibular schwannomas.
  • Treatment failure and/or tumor regrowth, however, is occasionally encountered, and microsurgical resection is usually warranted in such cases.
  • The goal of this study was to investigate whether repeat GKS is an effective treatment for recurrent vestibular schwannomas and to assess the conservation of residual neurological function.
  • METHODS: Between July 1992 and December 2007, 1951 patients harboring a unilateral vestibular schwannoma were treated with GKS.
  • Of these, 48 patients (2.5%) had to undergo a subsequent intervention because of progression or regrowth of the tumor.
  • The median tumor volume was 0.51 and 1.28 mL at the initial and second GKS treatments, respectively.
  • Six patients demonstrated a significant reduction in tumor volume.
  • In 1 patient, the final tumor volume was less than the initial volume.
  • The other 2 patients showed stabilization of tumor growth.
  • Neither aggravation of facial nerve dysfunction nor other neurological deficits secondary to GKS were observed.
  • CONCLUSION: This is the first report to address repeat GKS for vestibular schwannomas.
  • After long-term follow-up, repeat GKS with a low marginal dose seems to be a safe and effective treatment in selected patients harboring regrowth of small vestibular schwannomas that have previously been treated with GKS.
  • [MeSH-major] Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / surgery. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery

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  • (PMID = 19050660.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4040
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurgery
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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96. Lee SH, Rhee BA, Choi SK, Koh JS, Lim YJ: Cerebellopontine angle tumors causing hemifacial spasm: types, incidence, and mechanism in nine reported cases and literature review. Acta Neurochir (Wien); 2010 Nov;152(11):1901-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cerebellopontine angle tumors causing hemifacial spasm: types, incidence, and mechanism in nine reported cases and literature review.
  • OBJECTIVE: Although hemifacial spasm is usually caused by vascular compression around the root exit zone of the facial nerve, it is sometimes brought on by a cerebellopontine angle tumor.
  • We reviewed and analyzed data from past experience with hemifacial spasm induced by cerebellopontine angle tumors.
  • METHODS: Nine patients of a total 2,050, who had presented with hemifacial spasms associated with cerebellopontine angle tumors between 1986 and 2009, were reviewed.
  • RESULTS: Two vestibular schwannomas, five meningiomas, and two epidermoid tumors were included in this study.
  • Hemifacial spasm occurred on the same side of the lesion in eight patients whereas it occurred on the opposite side of the lesion in one patient.
  • With respect to the pathogenesis of hemifacial spasms, offending vessels were found in six patients, tumor encasement of the facial nerve in one patient, hypervascular tumor compression of the facial nerve without offending vessels in one patient, and a huge tumor compressing the brain stem and, thus, contralateral facial nerve compression in one patient.
  • Hemifacial spasm was resolved in seven patients, whereas in two patients with a vestibular schwannoma and an epidermoid tumor, it improved transiently and then recurred in a month.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Each type of tumor had different characteristics with respect to the induction of hemifacial spasm; therefore, it is suggested that neurosurgeons, who are planning surgeries both for the purposes of relieving hemifacial spasm and removal of cerebellopontine angle tumor, should thoroughly prepare appropriate approaches and specific dissecting strategies according to each causative lesion.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Stem / pathology. Facial Nerve / pathology. Hemifacial Spasm / etiology. Neuroma, Acoustic / complications. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology

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  • (PMID = 20845049.001).
  • [ISSN] 0942-0940
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta neurochirurgica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Neurochir (Wien)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Austria
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97. Durko M, Jankowski A, Durko T, Gajewicz W, Pajor A: [Coexistence of acoustic neuroma and pineal region tumor in patient with sudden deafness]. Otolaryngol Pol; 2008;62(2):204-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Coexistence of acoustic neuroma and pineal region tumor in patient with sudden deafness].
  • INTRODUCTION: Acoustic neuroma usually presents as an unilateral tumor, seldom - bilateral and rarely in coexistence with other central nervous system neoplasms.
  • Audiometry revealed moderate sensorineural hearing loss in left ear (for low and middle frequencies), brainstem auditory evoked potentials were absent on the left side and ENG examination showed left peripheral vestibular impairment.
  • MRI study revealed in the left internal acoustic meatus mass (7 x 7 x 14 mm) suggesting acoustic neuroma and an oval mass (7 x 9 x 14 mm) in the pineal gland presenting radiological features of pinealoma.
  • Acoustic neuroma has been removed by suboccipital approach and pinealoma has been left for further observation as it was found incidentally.
  • Histopathological examination confirmed diagnosis of left VIII nerve schwannoma.
  • The postoperative course shows no evidence of acoustic neuroma recurrence.
  • [MeSH-major] Deafness / etiology. Neoplasms, Second Primary / diagnosis. Neuroma, Acoustic / diagnosis. Pinealoma / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Audiometry, Pure-Tone. Hearing Loss, Sensorineural / diagnosis. Hearing Loss, Sensorineural / etiology. Humans. Male. Tinnitus / diagnosis. Tinnitus / etiology. Treatment Outcome. Vertigo / diagnosis. Vertigo / etiology


98. Koh ES, Millar BA, Ménard C, Michaels H, Heydarian M, Ladak S, McKinnon S, Rutka JA, Guha A, Pond GR, Laperriere NJ: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for acoustic neuroma: single-institution experience at The Princess Margaret Hospital. Cancer; 2007 Mar 15;109(6):1203-10
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for acoustic neuroma: single-institution experience at The Princess Margaret Hospital.
  • BACKGROUND: The clinical outcome and toxicity of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) was assessed for acoustic neuroma in 60 patients treated in a single institution.
  • METHODS: Between October 1996 and February 2005, 60 patients received FSRT for acoustic neuroma (AN).
  • The median irradiated tumor volume was 4.9 cm(3) (range, 0.3-49.0 cm(3)).
  • Five of 6 patients with initial cranial nerve V (CNV) numbness remained stable post-FSRT.
  • All 3 patients with nonsurgically related facial nerve weakness either improved or achieved stability in function.
  • There were no cases of new cranial nerve toxicity post-FSRT.
  • [MeSH-major] Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Cranial Nerves / surgery. Female. Hearing Loss / epidemiology. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Microsurgery / adverse effects. Microsurgery / methods. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 17318817.001).
  • [ISSN] 0008-543X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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99. Taoka T, Hirabayashi H, Nakagawa H, Sakamoto M, Myochin K, Hirohashi S, Iwasaki S, Sakaki T, Kichikawa K: Displacement of the facial nerve course by vestibular schwannoma: preoperative visualization using diffusion tensor tractography. J Magn Reson Imaging; 2006 Nov;24(5):1005-10
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Displacement of the facial nerve course by vestibular schwannoma: preoperative visualization using diffusion tensor tractography.
  • PURPOSE: To preoperatively visualize the course of the facial nerve, which is displaced by vestibular schwannoma, using diffusion tensor (DT) tractography, and to evaluate the agreement with surgical findings.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: The subjects were eight patients with vestibular schwannoma who had undergone removal surgery.
  • DT MR images were obtained and tracts that were considered to represent the facial nerve were constructed.
  • RESULTS: We obtained a tract that connected the internal auditory meatus and brainstem, and was considered to represent the facial nerve in seven of eight cases.
  • One exception was a case in which the tumor was too large to enable intraoperative observation of the facial nerve; however, the facial nerve appeared to be displaced anteriorly at intracapsular resection, in agreement with tractography.
  • We consider DT tractography to be a useful tool for preoperatively predicting facial nerve displacement in vestibular schwannoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods. Facial Nerve / pathology. Nerve Fibers, Myelinated / pathology. Neurilemmoma / pathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / pathology. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Surgery, Computer-Assisted / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Facial Nerve Injuries / pathology. Facial Nerve Injuries / prevention & control. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 17031835.001).
  • [ISSN] 1053-1807
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of magnetic resonance imaging : JMRI
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Magn Reson Imaging
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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100. Nagano O, Higuchi Y, Serizawa T, Ono J, Matsuda S, Yamakami I, Saeki N: Transient expansion of vestibular schwannoma following stereotactic radiosurgery. J Neurosurg; 2008 Nov;109(5):811-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Transient expansion of vestibular schwannoma following stereotactic radiosurgery.
  • OBJECT: The authors prospectively analyzed volume changes in vestibular schwannomas (VSs) after stereotactic radiosurgery.
  • The frequency and degree of transient tumor expansion were documented and possible prognostic factors were analyzed.
  • Concurrently, neurological deterioration involving trigeminal, facial, and cochlear nerve functions were also assessed.
  • Tumor volumes at GKS averaged 2.7 cm3 (range 0.1-13.2 cm3), and the lesions were irradiated at the mean 52.2% isodose line for the tumor margin (range 50-67%), with a mean dose of 12.2 Gy (range 10.5-13 Gy) at the periphery.
  • The tumor volume was increased by 23% at 3 months and 27% at 6 months.
  • Tumors shrank to their initial size over a mean period of 12 months.
  • The peak tumor expansion averaged 47% (range 0-613%).
  • A high-dose (> or = 3.5 Gy/min) treatment appears to be the greatest risk factor for transient tumor expansion, although the difference did not reach statistical significance.
  • Transient facial palsy and facial dysesthesia correlated strongly with tumor expansion, but only half of the hearing loss was coincident with this phenomenon.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Transient expansion of VSs after GKS was found to be much more frequent than previously reported, strongly suggesting a correlation with deterioration of facial and trigeminal nerve functions.
  • [MeSH-major] Ear Neoplasms / surgery. Neuroma, Acoustic / surgery. Radiosurgery / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Cranial Nerves / physiopathology. Facial Nerve / physiopathology. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies. Risk Factors. Treatment Outcome. Trigeminal Nerve / physiopathology. Tumor Burden

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  • (PMID = 18976069.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3085
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosurg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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