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1. Partenskii MB, Jordan PC: "Squishy capacitor" model for electrical double layers and the stability of charged interfaces. Phys Rev E Stat Nonlin Soft Matter Phys; 2009 Jul;80(1 Pt 1):011112
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  • [Title] "Squishy capacitor" model for electrical double layers and the stability of charged interfaces.
  • Negative capacitance (NC), predicted by various electrical double layer (EDL) theories, is critically reviewed.
  • Physically possible for individual components of the EDL, the compact or diffuse layer, it is strictly prohibited for the whole EDL or for an electrochemical cell with two electrodes.
  • However, NC is allowed for the artificial conditions of sigma control, where an EDL is described by the equilibrium electric response of electrolyte to a field of fixed, and typically uniform, surface charge-density distributions, sigma.
  • The contradiction is only apparent; in fact local sigma cannot be set independently, but is established by the equilibrium response to physically controllable variables, i.e., applied voltage phi (phi control) or total surface charge q (q control).
  • NC predictions in studies based on sigma control signify potential instabilities and phase transitions for physically realizable conditions.
  • Building on our previous study of phi control [M. B.
  • Partenskii and P. C.
  • Jordan, Phys. Rev. E 77, 061117 (2008)], here we analyze critical behavior under q control, clarifying the basic picture using an exactly solvable "squishy capacitor" toy model.
  • We find that phi can change discontinuously in the presence of a lateral transition, specify stability conditions for an electrochemical cell, analyze the origin of the EDL's critical point in terms of compact and diffuse serial contributions, and discuss perspectives and challenges for theoretical studies not limited by sigma control.
  • [MeSH-major] Electric Capacitance. Electrons. Models, Chemical
  • [MeSH-minor] Elasticity. Electric Conductivity. Electrochemistry. Static Electricity

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  • (PMID = 19658658.001).
  • [ISSN] 1539-3755
  • [Journal-full-title] Physical review. E, Statistical, nonlinear, and soft matter physics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Phys Rev E Stat Nonlin Soft Matter Phys
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / GM-28643
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
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2. Kong L, Yao SK, Liu JX, Wang N: [The prognostic value of cellular immunity function in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma]. Zhonghua Gan Zang Bing Za Zhi; 2005 Mar;13(3):194-7
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  • [Title] [The prognostic value of cellular immunity function in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma].
  • OBJECTIVES: To study the changes of cellular immunity function in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its correlation with disease severity.
  • METHODS: T lymphocyte subsets and CD28 co-stimulation molecule in CD8+ T cells in 22 HCC patients were detected using three-color flow cytometry.
  • Serum interleukin-2 (IL-2), transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFbeta1), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were determined by ELISA and radioimmunoassay.
  • A group of 30 patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), liver cirrhosis (LC), or normal adults (NC) served as controls.
  • RESULTS: Compared with NC, the number of CD8+CD28- T cells increased and CD8+CD28+ T cells decreased in patients with HCC.
  • The number of CD4+ T cells, CD4+/CD8+ ratios, IL-2 level all decreased and CD8+ T cells, IL-6, TGFbeta1 levels all increased in patients with HCC, LC and CHB.
  • The CD4+ T cells, CD4+/CD8+ ratios and IL-2 level in patients with HCC were lower than those with CHB.
  • Serum IL-6 and TGFbeta1 in patients with HCC were higher than those with LC and CHB.
  • The levels of IL-6 and TGFbeta1 correlated with the stages of the tumors.
  • CONCLUSIONS: HCC patients have a cellular immunity dysfunction.
  • Rectifying the imbalanced function could be a potential way for treating HCC.
  • Measurement of these factors would be useful for early diagnosis and evaluating the prognoses of these patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / immunology. Liver Neoplasms / immunology. T-Lymphocyte Subsets / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Antigens, CD28 / immunology. CD4-CD8 Ratio. CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes / immunology. Female. Humans. Immunity, Cellular / immunology. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis

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  • (PMID = 15760554.001).
  • [ISSN] 1007-3418
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua gan zang bing za zhi = Zhonghua ganzangbing zazhi = Chinese journal of hepatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Gan Zang Bing Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD28
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3. Guldbakke KK, Khachemoune A, Deng A, Sina B: Naevus comedonicus: a spectrum of body involvement. Clin Exp Dermatol; 2007 Sep;32(5):488-92
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  • [Title] Naevus comedonicus: a spectrum of body involvement.
  • Naevus comedonicus (NC) is a rare developmental anomaly, with < 200 cases reported in the literature.
  • It usually occurs on the face, neck or chest, appearing as groups of closely arranged dilated follicular openings with keratin plugs.
  • [MeSH-major] Nevus / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / pathology

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  • (PMID = 17509056.001).
  • [ISSN] 0307-6938
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical and experimental dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Exp. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 0 / Dermatologic Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 34
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4. Ahn SY, Oh Y, Bak H, Ahn SK: Co-occurrence of nevus comedonicus with accessory breast tissue. Int J Dermatol; 2008 May;47(5):530-1
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  • [Title] Co-occurrence of nevus comedonicus with accessory breast tissue.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast. Choristoma / complications. Nevus / complications. Skin / pathology. Skin Neoplasms / complications

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  • (PMID = 18412880.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-4632
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of dermatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Dermatol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Letter
  • [Publication-country] United States
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5. Cai JL, Xin DQ, He Q, Tang XQ, Na YQ: [Pathological changes of benign hyperplastic prostate after removal of innervation of cholinergic pelvic nerve: experiment with spontaneous hypertension rats]. Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi; 2008 May 13;88(18):1284-8
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  • [Title] [Pathological changes of benign hyperplastic prostate after removal of innervation of cholinergic pelvic nerve: experiment with spontaneous hypertension rats].
  • OBJECTIVE: To study the pathological change of benign hyperplastic prostate after removal of the innervation of cholinergic parasympathetic pelvic nerve.
  • METHODS: Sixty-five male spontaneous hypertension rats (SHRs) were randomly assigned into 3 groups: operation group (n = 30) undergoing truncation of bilateral originating branches of parasympathetic pelvic nerve of major pelvic ganglion (MPG) followed by cystostomy, sham operation group (operation control group, n = 30) undergoing cystostomy, and normal control group (n = 5) not undergoing operation.
  • 3, 7, 11, 15 and > or = 21 days after operation 6 rats from the 2 operation groups and 1 from the control group were sacrificed to observe the gross morphology and histological and cellular changes of the prostate glands.
  • RESULTS: The prostate of the operation group on post-operational day 7 showed mild granular solidification and such change progressed gradually over time, the ratio of prostate wet weight/rat body weight was (0.4764 +/- 0.0125) mg/g on day 3, then gradually decreased, and became (0.2749 +/- 0.0197) mg/g > or = 21 days post-operationally; while the ratio of prostate tissue dry weight/wet weight on day 3 was (0.1966 +/- 0.0062), then gradually increased, and became (0.2596 +/- 0.0035) > or = 21 days post-operationally.
  • HE staining showed that the glandular structure gradually became dilated and rounded, with accumulation of prostatic fluid.
  • The glandular epithelial cells showed gradual degeneration, necrosis, and detachment.
  • The glandular epithelium became progressively thinner, the smooth muscles elongated and thinned progressively, and the stromal components showed mild to moderate overgrowth.
  • Electron microscopy showed that the glandular cells gradually underwent vacuolar degeneration and the structures of the basement membrane became fuzzy.
  • The smooth muscle cells degenerated mildly, and the fibroblasts and collagenous fibers in the stroma overgrew slowly.
  • All these histological changes were not found in the sham operation control and normal control groups.
  • CONCLUSION: Remarkable atrophy occurs in benign hyperplastic prostatic gland after radical removal of the innervation of cholinergic parasympathetic pelvic nerve.
  • Such operation may represent a novel therapy for BPH.
  • [MeSH-major] Parasympathetic Nervous System / physiopathology. Pelvis / innervation. Prostatic Hyperplasia / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Body Weight. Cystostomy. Hypertension / physiopathology. Male. Organ Size. Parasympathectomy. Prostate / pathology. Prostate / physiopathology. Prostate / surgery. Random Allocation. Rats. Rats, Inbred SHR. Receptors, Cholinergic / physiology. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 18844105.001).
  • [ISSN] 0376-2491
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua yi xue za zhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Receptors, Cholinergic
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6. Xiong Y, Tang H, Li X, Liang YB, Liao XX, Zhan H, Jing XL, Li YJ, Ma ZF: [The expression and clinical implication of advanced oxidized protein products in patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome]. Zhongguo Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue; 2008 Sep;20(9):542-5
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  • [Title] [The expression and clinical implication of advanced oxidized protein products in patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome].
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the expression and clinical implication of advanced oxidized protein products (AOPP) in patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS).
  • METHODS: Serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) and AOPP were determined in 180 patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) or MODS (90 patients, respectively).
  • The acute physiology and chronic health evaluation III (APACHE III) scoring system was applied to assess severity of patients' condition.
  • The contents of serum CRP and AOPP in MODS group, SIRS group and normal control group, and also in survivor and dead patients in MODS group were determined and compared.
  • The correlation between CRP and AOPP levels and the correlation between AOPP levels and severity of MODS were also observed.
  • Ninety healthy volunteers who matched with study subjects in age and gender comprised the normal control group.
  • RESULTS: The CRP [(22.22+/-4.32) mg/L] and AOPP [(130.66+/-18.08) micromol/L] levels in patients with MODS were significantly higher than those in normal control group [(2.38+/-0.89) mg/L and (33.20+/-5.32) micromol/L, respectively] and SIRS group [(5.32+/-1.22) mg/L and (48.58+/-6.03) micromol/L, respectively, all P < 0.05], and were positively correlated with APACHE III scores [(98.66+/-20.87) scores] of the patient (r1 = 0.469, r2 = 0.528, both P < 0.01).
  • However, there was no significant difference between SIRS group and normal control group.
  • The CRP and AOPP levels were found to be significantly higher in the patients who eventually died (47 cases) as compared to those in the patients who survived (43 cases, both P < 0.05).
  • Positive correlations were noted between AOPP and CRP level (r = 0.448, P < 0.01).
  • The serum concentrations of CRP and AOPP levels were elevated with the increase of the number of failed organs in MODS patients(all P < 0.05).
  • CONCLUSION: The data show that AOPP might participate in the process of pathogenesis of MODS.
  • The serum AOPP level may be taken as a diagnostic and prognostic indicator for MODS.
  • [MeSH-major] Multiple Organ Failure / blood. Proteins / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] APACHE. Adult. Aged. C-Reactive Protein / metabolism. Case-Control Studies. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Protein Carbonylation. Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome / blood

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  • (PMID = 18786315.001).
  • [ISSN] 1003-0603
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhongguo wei zhong bing ji jiu yi xue = Chinese critical care medicine = Zhongguo weizhongbing jijiuyixue
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhongguo Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Proteins; 9007-41-4 / C-Reactive Protein
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7. Smith DR, Lee RW: Nucleotide diversity in the mitochondrial and nuclear compartments of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: investigating the origins of genome architecture. BMC Evol Biol; 2008;8:156
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  • [Title] Nucleotide diversity in the mitochondrial and nuclear compartments of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: investigating the origins of genome architecture.
  • BACKGROUND: The magnitude of intronic and intergenic DNA can vary substantially both within and among evolutionary lineages; however, the forces responsible for this disparity in genome compactness are conjectural.
  • One explanation, termed the mutational-burden hypothesis, posits that genome compactness is primarily driven by two nonadaptive processes: mutation and random genetic drift - the effects of which can be discerned by measuring the nucleotide diversity at silent sites (pisilent), defined as noncoding sites and the synonymous sites of protein-coding regions.
  • The mutational-burden hypothesis holds that pisilent is negatively correlated to genome compactness.
  • We used the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which has a streamlined, coding-dense mitochondrial genome and an noncompact, intron-rich nuclear genome, to investigate the mutational-burden hypothesis.
  • For measuring pisilent we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome and portions of 7 nuclear genes from 7 geographical isolates of C. reinhardtii.
  • RESULTS: We found significantly more nucleotide diversity in the nuclear compartment of C. reinhardtii than in the mitochondrial compartment: net values of pisilent for the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes were 32 x 10-3 and 8.5 x 10-3, respectively; and when insertions and deletions (indels) are factored in, these values become 49 x 10-3 for the nuclear DNA and 11 x 10-3 for the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA).
  • Furthermore, our investigations of C. reinhardtii revealed 4 previously undiscovered mitochondrial introns, one of which contains a fragment of the large-subunit (LSU) rRNA gene and another of which is found in a region of the LSU-rRNA gene not previously reported (for any taxon) to contain introns.
  • CONCLUSION: At first glance our results are in opposition to the mutational-burden hypothesis: pisilent was approximately 4 times greater in the nuclear compartment of C. reinhardtii relative to the mitochondrial compartment.
  • However, when we consider the encumbrance of noncoding DNA in each of these C. reinhardtii compartments, we conclude that introns in the mtDNA impose a greater burden than those in the nuclear DNA and suggest that the same may be true for the intergenic regions.
  • Overall, we cannot reject the mutational-burden hypothesis and feel that more data on nucleotide diversity from green algae and other protists are needed.
  • [MeSH-major] Chlamydomonas reinhardtii / genetics. Genetic Variation. Genome, Mitochondrial. Genome, Protozoan
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Base Sequence. Chromosome Mapping. DNA, Mitochondrial / genetics. Introns. Molecular Sequence Data. Open Reading Frames. Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 18495022.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2148
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC evolutionary biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Evol. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA, Mitochondrial
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2412866
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8. Yang SY, Feng EZ, Shen JL, Xu J, Zhao LH, Wu XM: [Study on the clinical significance of plasma adrenomedullin and brain natriuretic polypeptide in the patients with chronic cor pulmonale on highland]. Zhongguo Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue; 2005 Jun;17(6):361-3
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  • [Title] [Study on the clinical significance of plasma adrenomedullin and brain natriuretic polypeptide in the patients with chronic cor pulmonale on highland].
  • OBJECTIVE: To study the clinical significance of plasma adrenomedullin (ADM) and brain natriuretic polypeptide (BNP) in the patients with chronic cor pulmonale on highland (HACCP).
  • METHODS: The levels of ADM and BNP in plasma of 44 patients with HACCP in the acute and in the remission stages were determined with radioimmunoassay.
  • Their correlations with partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood (PaO(2)), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and the ratio of right ventricular pre-ejection time to the pulmonary flow acceleration time (RVPEP/AT), which reflected the degree of pulmonary hypertension, were investigated.
  • Twenty healthy subjects served as a normal control group.
  • RESULTS: The levels of ADM [(38.8+/-7.2)ng/L and (26.2+/-5.3)ng/L] and BNP [(81.4+/-13.8)ng/L and (58.9+/-9.3)ng/L] in the acute and remission stages of cor pulmonale groups were both significantly higher than those in the normal control group [(15.0+/-3.2)ng/L, (38.6+/-3.4)ng/L, respectively, all P<0.01].
  • The levels of ADM and BNP in acute stage were both significantly higher than those in remission stage (both P<0.01).
  • In the acute and in the remission stages, the levels of ADM in plasma were negatively correlated with PaO(2) (r(a)=-0.826, P<0.01; r(r)=-0.783, P<0.01), positively correlated with ET-1 (r(a)=0.755, P<0.01; r(r)=0.668, P<0.01) and RVPEP/AT ratio (r(a)=0.788, P<0.01; r(r)=0.734, P<0.01).
  • In the acute and in the remission stages, the levels of BNP in plasma were negatively correlated with PaO(2) (r(a)=-0.787, P<0.01; r(r)=-0.554, P<0.01), positively correlated with ET-1 (r(a)=0.725, P<0.01; r(r)=0.679, P<0.01) and RVPEP/AT ratio (r(a)=0.771, P<0.01; r(r)=0.722, P<0.01).
  • CONCLUSION: The study suggests that ADM and BNP are involved in the pathophysiological process of HACCP in the patients and may play a compensatory role in the disease.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenomedullin / blood. Natriuretic Peptide, Brain / blood. Pulmonary Heart Disease / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Altitude. Chronic Disease. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 15970104.001).
  • [ISSN] 1003-0603
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhongguo wei zhong bing ji jiu yi xue = Chinese critical care medicine = Zhongguo weizhongbing jijiuyixue
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhongguo Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 114471-18-0 / Natriuretic Peptide, Brain; 148498-78-6 / Adrenomedullin
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9. Morita K, Saito Y, Sato K, Oka K, Hotta K, Sakakibara Y: Genome-wide searching with base-pairing kernel functions for noncoding RNAs: computational and expression analysis of snoRNA families in Caenorhabditis elegans. Nucleic Acids Res; 2009 Feb;37(3):999-1009
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  • [Title] Genome-wide searching with base-pairing kernel functions for noncoding RNAs: computational and expression analysis of snoRNA families in Caenorhabditis elegans.
  • Despite the accumulating research on noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), it is likely that we are seeing only the tip of the iceberg regarding our understanding of the functions and the regulatory roles served by ncRNAs in cellular metabolism, pathogenesis and host-pathogen interactions.
  • Therefore, more powerful computational and experimental tools for analyzing ncRNAs need to be developed.
  • To this end, we propose novel kernel functions, called base-pairing profile local alignment (BPLA) kernels, for analyzing functional ncRNA sequences using support vector machines (SVMs).
  • We extend the local alignment kernels for amino acid sequences in order to handle RNA sequences by using STRAL's; scoring function, which takes into account sequence similarities as well as upstream and downstream base-pairing probabilities, thus enabling us to model secondary structures of RNA sequences.
  • As a test of the performance of BPLA kernels, we applied our kernels to the problem of discriminating members of an RNA family from nonmembers using SVMs.
  • The results indicated that the discrimination ability of our kernels is stronger than that of other existing methods.
  • Furthermore, we demonstrated the applicability of our kernels to the problem of genome-wide search of snoRNA families in the Caenorhabditis elegans genome, and confirmed that the expression is valid in 14 out of 48 of our predicted candidates by using qRT-PCR.
  • Finally, highly expressed six candidates were identified as the original target regions by DNA sequencing.
  • [MeSH-major] Artificial Intelligence. Caenorhabditis elegans / genetics. Genome, Helminth. RNA, Small Nucleolar / chemistry. Sequence Analysis, RNA / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Base Pairing. Base Sequence. Gene Expression. Genomics / methods. Molecular Sequence Data. Nucleic Acid Conformation. Sequence Alignment

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  • (PMID = 19129214.001).
  • [ISSN] 1362-4962
  • [Journal-full-title] Nucleic acids research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nucleic Acids Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Small Nucleolar
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2647286
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10. Cantaloube JF, Laperche S, Gallian P, Bouchardeau F, de Lamballerie X, de Micco P: Analysis of the 5' noncoding region versus the NS5b region in genotyping hepatitis C virus isolates from blood donors in France. J Clin Microbiol; 2006 Jun;44(6):2051-6
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  • [Title] Analysis of the 5' noncoding region versus the NS5b region in genotyping hepatitis C virus isolates from blood donors in France.
  • The 5' noncoding region (5' NCR) of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) has become the standard for genotyping even though several reports show that its use can result in classification errors.
  • The purpose of this study was to perform genotyping based on sequence analysis of the NS5b region in a set of 357 HCV strains isolated from blood donors in France in 2002 and 2003.
  • Results were compared with those previously obtained using 5' NCR analysis, and HCV subtype distribution was reevaluated.
  • Twenty-six of 120 strains (approximately 22%) initially identified as genotype 1b by 5' NCR region sequence analysis were reclassified as genotype 1a by NS5b region sequence analysis.
  • Similarly, 14 of 23 strains (approximately 61%) initially identified as 2a/2c were reclassified as non-2a and non-2c subtypes, and 12 of 22 strains (approximately 45%) initially identified as 4c/4d subtypes were reclassified as non-4c and non-4d subtypes.
  • Sequence analysis of the NS5b region also revealed 5 putative new subtype 2 variants and 2 putative new subtype 4 variants.
  • Although these findings demonstrated full agreement between 5' NCR and NS5b sequence analysis with regard to type classification, genotyping based on phylogenetic analysis of the NS5b region is more accurate for subtype determination than genotyping based on analysis of the 5' NCR.
  • Sequence analysis of the NS5b region is mandatory for epidemiologic studies.
  • [MeSH-major] 5' Untranslated Regions / genetics. Blood Donors. Hepacivirus / classification. Hepatitis C / virology. Viral Nonstructural Proteins / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Base Sequence. France. Genotype. Humans. Molecular Sequence Data. Phylogeny. Sequence Analysis, DNA

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  • (PMID = 16757597.001).
  • [ISSN] 0095-1137
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Microbiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 5' Untranslated Regions; 0 / NS-5 protein, hepatitis C virus; 0 / Viral Nonstructural Proteins
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1489428
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11. Ingravallo F, Schenck CH, Plazzi G: Injurious REM sleep behaviour disorder in narcolepsy with cataplexy contributing to criminal proceedings and divorce. Sleep Med; 2010 Oct;11(9):950-2
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  • [Title] Injurious REM sleep behaviour disorder in narcolepsy with cataplexy contributing to criminal proceedings and divorce.
  • We present a case of violent sleep-related behaviour in a patient with narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC) and REM sleep behaviour disorder (RBD), causing injuries to his wife that resulted in charge of assault, followed by a divorce case.
  • [MeSH-major] Cataplexy / psychology. Narcolepsy / psychology. REM Sleep Behavior Disorder / psychology. Spouse Abuse / psychology

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  • (PMID = 20810310.001).
  • [ISSN] 1878-5506
  • [Journal-full-title] Sleep medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Sleep Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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12. Yang HS, Salizzoni M: Gravitational instantons from gauge theory. Phys Rev Lett; 2006 May 26;96(20):201602
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  • [Title] Gravitational instantons from gauge theory.
  • A gauge theory can be formulated on a noncommutative (NC) spacetime.
  • This NC gauge theory has anequivalent dual description through the so-called Seiberg-Witten (SW) map in terms of an ordinary gauge theory on a commutative spacetime.
  • We show that all NC U(1) instantons of Nekrasov-Schwarz type are mapped to asymptotically locally Euclidean (ALE) gravitational instantons by the exact SW map and thatthe NC gauge theory of U(1) instantons is equivalent to the theory of hyper-Kähler geometries.
  • It implies the remarkable consequence that ALE gravitational instantons can emerge from local condensates of purely NC photons.

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  • (PMID = 16803164.001).
  • [ISSN] 0031-9007
  • [Journal-full-title] Physical review letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Phys. Rev. Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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13. Luckay RC, Sheng X, Strasser CE, Raubenheimer HG, Safin DA, Babashkina MG, Klein A: Competitive bulk liquid membrane transport of some metal ions using RC(S)NHP(S)(OiPr)(2) as ionophores. Unusual supramolecular "honeycomb" aggregate of the polynuclear copper(I) complex of H(2)NC(S)NHP(S)(OiPr)(2). Dalton Trans; 2009 Jun 28;(24):4646-52
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  • [Title] Competitive bulk liquid membrane transport of some metal ions using RC(S)NHP(S)(OiPr)(2) as ionophores. Unusual supramolecular "honeycomb" aggregate of the polynuclear copper(I) complex of H(2)NC(S)NHP(S)(OiPr)(2).
  • Competitive transport experiments involving metal ions from an aqueous source phase through a chloroform membrane into an aqueous receiving phase have been carried out using a series of N-(thio)phosphorylated (thio)amide and thiourea ligands as ionophores in the organic phase.
  • The source phase contained equimolar concentrations of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Ag(I), Cd(II) and Pb(II) with the source and receiving phases being buffered at different pH.
  • Good transport properties were observed for Ag(I) in the case of (13).
  • The best extraction properties have been shown by (3)L(1), (3)L(8), (2)L(7), (3)L(9) and (3)L(11) which contain an unsubstituted nitrogen atom at the C[double bond, length as m-dash]S groups ((3)L(1) and (3)L(9)), or a third nitrogen atom, capable of participating in additional coordination ((3)L(8), (2)L(7) and (3)L(11)).
  • Reaction of Cu(NO(3))(2).6H(2)O with the potassium salt of the N-thiophosphorylated thiourea NH(2)C(S)NHP(S)(OiPr)(2) formed a new supramolecular Cu(I) complex, [{Cu(6)((2)L(1))(6)}{Cu(3)((2)L(1))(3)}.4Me(2)CO] that contains both trinuclear and hexanuclear forms in its solid state structure, and in solution.

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  • (PMID = 19513472.001).
  • [ISSN] 1477-9226
  • [Journal-full-title] Dalton transactions (Cambridge, England : 2003)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dalton Trans
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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14. Valassi E, Biller BM, Swearingen B, Pecori Giraldi F, Losa M, Mortini P, Hayden D, Cavagnini F, Klibanski A: Delayed remission after transsphenoidal surgery in patients with Cushing's disease. J Clin Endocrinol Metab; 2010 Feb;95(2):601-10
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  • [Title] Delayed remission after transsphenoidal surgery in patients with Cushing's disease.
  • BACKGROUND: Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is the treatment of choice for Cushing's disease (CD).
  • Postoperative hypercortisolemia mandates further therapy.
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to characterize patients without immediate postoperative remission who have a delayed decrease to normal or low cortisol levels without further therapy.
  • DESIGN AND SETTING: A retrospective case series was conducted at three tertiary care centers.
  • PATIENTS AND INTERVENTION: We reviewed the records of 620 patients (512 females, 108 males; mean age, 38 +/- 13 yr) who underwent transsphenoidal pituitary surgery for CD between 1982 and 2007.
  • RESULTS: Outcomes were classified into the following three groups based upon the postoperative pattern of cortisol testing: group IC (immediate control) included 437 of the 620 patients (70.5%) with hypocortisolism and/or cortisol normalization throughout the postoperative follow-up; group NC (no control) included 148 of 620 patients (23.9%) with persistent hypercortisolism; and group DC (delayed control) included 35 of 620 patients (5.6%) who had early elevated or normal UFC levels and developed a delayed and persistent cortisol decrease after an average of 38 +/- 50 postoperative days.
  • The total rate of recurrence was 13% at a median follow-up time of 66 months after TSS; the cumulative rate of recurrence at 4.5 yr was significantly higher in group DC vs. group IC (43 vs. 14%; P = 0.02).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Hormonal assessment in the immediate postoperative period after TSS for CD may be misleading because delayed remission can occur in a subset of patients.
  • Expectant management and retesting may spare some patients from unnecessary further treatment.
  • Optimal timing to determine the need for further therapy after TSS remains to be determined.
  • [MeSH-major] Pituitary ACTH Hypersecretion / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenocorticotropic Hormone / blood. Adult. Female. Humans. Hydrocortisone / urine. Male. Middle Aged. Retrospective Studies. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 20080848.001).
  • [ISSN] 1945-7197
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / UL1 RR025758; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / UL1 RR025758
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 9002-60-2 / Adrenocorticotropic Hormone; WI4X0X7BPJ / Hydrocortisone
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2840864
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16. Xia DZ, Yu XF, Wang HM, Ren QY, Chen BM: Anti-obesity and hypolipidemic effects of ethanolic extract from Alpinia officinarum Hance (Zingiberaceae) in rats fed high-fat diet. J Med Food; 2010 Aug;13(4):785-91
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  • [Title] Anti-obesity and hypolipidemic effects of ethanolic extract from Alpinia officinarum Hance (Zingiberaceae) in rats fed high-fat diet.
  • To investigate the anti-obesity and hypolipidemic effects of Alpinia officinarum ethanolic extract (AOE) for the first time, anti-obesity models in vivo were used.
  • Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed normal control diet (NC); other groups of rats were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) with or without different proportions of AOE (AOE-1, 3%; AOE-2, 5%) for 6 weeks to examine feed intake, body and adipose tissue weight, serum total cholesterol (Total-C), triacylglycerol (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and leptin levels, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotranferase activities, hepatic Total-C and TG levels, and the pathological changes in liver and epididymal adipose tissues.
  • Interestingly, feed intakes among the experimental groups were not significantly different.
  • Body weight gains were significantly lowered in the AOE-1 and AOE-2 groups compared with the HFD group (P < .05) and near to the level of the NC group.
  • AOE also improved the lipid profile in serum and the pathological changes in liver and adipose tissue and decreased the relative weights of epididymal and perirenal white adipose tissues.
  • They improved lipid profile by lowering serum Total-C, TG, and LDL-C concentrations, leptin content, and the atherogenic index compared with the HFD group.
  • The HDL-C concentration and the ratio of HDL-C/Total-C significantly increased compared with those of the HFD group.
  • The serum ALT activity of the AOE-2 group was notably lower than that of the HFD group.
  • Our data suggest that AOE can be considered as an anti-obesity agent that is effective for suppressing body weight gain and decreasing lipid profile.
  • [MeSH-major] Alpinia / chemistry. Hypoglycemic Agents / administration & dosage. Hypolipidemic Agents / administration & dosage. Obesity / drug therapy. Plant Extracts / administration & dosage
  • [MeSH-minor] Adipose Tissue / drug effects. Adipose Tissue / metabolism. Animals. Cholesterol / blood. Dietary Fats / administration & dosage. Dietary Fats / adverse effects. Disease Models, Animal. Ethanol / chemistry. Humans. Male. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Triglycerides / blood

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  • (PMID = 20482258.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-7600
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of medicinal food
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Med Food
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dietary Fats; 0 / Hypoglycemic Agents; 0 / Hypolipidemic Agents; 0 / Plant Extracts; 0 / Triglycerides; 3K9958V90M / Ethanol; 97C5T2UQ7J / Cholesterol
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17. Raffo E, François J, Ferrandon A, Koning E, Nehlig A: Calorie-restricted ketogenic diet increases thresholds to all patterns of pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures: critical importance of electroclinical assessment. Epilepsia; 2008 Feb;49(2):320-8
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  • [Title] Calorie-restricted ketogenic diet increases thresholds to all patterns of pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures: critical importance of electroclinical assessment.
  • PURPOSE: Thresholds to pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) seizures were usually based only on clinical symptoms.
  • Our purpose was to use electroclinical patterns to assess the efficacy of a ketogenic and/or calorie-restricted diet on PTZ-induced seizures.
  • METHODS: Forty 50-day-old rats were divided in four weight-matched groups and fed controlled diets: normocalorie carbohydrate (NC), hypocalorie carbohydrate (HC), normocalorie ketogenic (NK), and hypocalorie ketogenic (HK).
  • After 21 days, blood glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate levels were determined and seizures were induced by continuous infusion of PTZ.
  • The clinical and EEG thresholds to each seizure pattern were compared between the different groups.
  • RESULTS: The electroclinical course of PTZ-induced seizures was similar in all groups.
  • The HK group exhibited higher thresholds than the other ones for most clinical features: absence (p = 0.003), first overt myoclonia (p = 0.028), clonic seizure (p = 0.006), and for EEG features: first spike (p = 0.036), first spike-and-wave discharge (p = 0.014), subcontinuous spike-and-wave discharges (p = 0.005).
  • NK, HC, and NC groups were not significantly different from each other.
  • Blood glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate levels were not correlated with electroclinical seizure thresholds.
  • After the clonic seizure, despite stopping PTZ infusion, a tonic seizure occurred in some animals, without significant difference regarding the diet.
  • CONCLUSION: This approach permitted a precise study of the electroclinical course of PTZ-induced seizures.
  • In addition to the usually studied first overt myoclonia, we clearly demonstrated the efficiency of a calorie restricted KD in elevating thresholds to most electroclinical seizure patterns.
  • We confirmed the lack of efficiency of the KD to reduce seizure severity once the seizure has started.
  • [MeSH-major] Caloric Restriction / methods. Electroencephalography / statistics & numerical data. Epilepsy / chemically induced. Epilepsy / physiopathology. Ketosis / metabolism. Pentylenetetrazole
  • [MeSH-minor] 3-Hydroxybutyric Acid / blood. Animals. Blood Glucose / analysis. Body Weight / physiology. Cerebral Cortex / drug effects. Cerebral Cortex / physiopathology. Dietary Carbohydrates / administration & dosage. Dietary Carbohydrates / metabolism. Dietary Fats / administration & dosage. Dietary Fats / metabolism. Disease Models, Animal. Energy Intake. Male. Rats. Rats, Wistar

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  • (PMID = 17941845.001).
  • [ISSN] 0013-9580
  • [Journal-full-title] Epilepsia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Epilepsia
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Blood Glucose; 0 / Dietary Carbohydrates; 0 / Dietary Fats; TZP1275679 / 3-Hydroxybutyric Acid; WM5Z385K7T / Pentylenetetrazole
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18. Alattar M, Harrington JJ, Mitchell CM, Sloane P: Sleep problems in primary care: a North Carolina Family Practice Research Network (NC-FP-RN) study. J Am Board Fam Med; 2007 Jul-Aug;20(4):365-74
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  • BACKGROUND: The prevalence and nature of sleep disorders in primary care has not been widely studied.
  • As part of a survey conducted in 5 family practice offices in North Carolina, we screened adult patients for sleep syndromes and sought to ascertain which demographic status and health status were associated with these disorders.
  • Because sleep disorders are associated with a significant health impact, positive responses to questions regarding sleep symptoms should prompt further diagnostic inquiry.
  • [MeSH-major] Family Practice. Primary Health Care. Sleep Wake Disorders / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 17615417.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-2625
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine : JABFM
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Am Board Fam Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. Palikhe NS, Kim SH, Choi GS, Ye YM, Park HS: No evidence of association between interleukin-13 gene polymorphism in aspirin intolerant chronic urticaria. Allergy Asthma Immunol Res; 2009 Oct;1(1):36-40
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  • [Title] No evidence of association between interleukin-13 gene polymorphism in aspirin intolerant chronic urticaria.
  • Aspirin-intolerant chronic urticaria (AICU) is a common condition among the chronic urticaria population, but the genetic mechanism is not yet understood.
  • In this study, the genotypes and haplotypes of three interleukin (IL)-13 polymorphisms, -1510 A>C, -1055C>T, and Arg110Gln (110G>A), as well as their respective clinical phenotypes were examined to determine whether genetic variants of IL-13 play a role in AICU.
  • Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping was used to compare IL-13 genotype and allele frequencies among 135 patients with AICU, 146 with aspirin-tolerant chronic urticaria (ATCU), and 430 normal controls (NC).
  • Relationships among the AICU phenotype, atopy, and total IgE level were also investigated.
  • The results failed to show a significant difference in the allele or genotype frequencies between the AICU group and either the ATCU or NC group (P>0.05, respectively).
  • Haplotype analysis confirmed that there was no significant difference among the three study groups (P>0.05), nor was there a significant difference in atopy or total IgE level according to the three genetic polymorphisms (P>0.05, respectively).
  • Our data lead to the conclusion that there is no evidence supporting genetic polymorphisms in IL-13 as a genetic risk factor for the development of AICU.

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  • (PMID = 20224668.001).
  • [ISSN] 2092-7363
  • [Journal-full-title] Allergy, asthma & immunology research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Allergy Asthma Immunol Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2831567
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; IL-13 / aspirin / urticaria
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20. Cicchetti D, Curtis WJ: An event-related potential study of the processing of affective facial expressions in young children who experienced maltreatment during the first year of life. Dev Psychopathol; 2005;17(3):641-77
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  • [Title] An event-related potential study of the processing of affective facial expressions in young children who experienced maltreatment during the first year of life.
  • This investigation examined the effects of maltreatment during the first year of life on the neural correlates of processing facial expressions of emotion at 30 months of age.
  • Event-related potentials (ERPs) in response to children passively viewing standardized pictures of female models posing angry, happy, and neutral facial expressions were examined.
  • Four ERP waveform components were derived: early negative (N150), early positive (P260), negative central (Nc), and positive slow wave (PSW).
  • Differences in these waveforms between a group of 35 maltreated and 24 nonmaltreated children were reported.
  • The groups did not differ on the early perceptual negative component (N150), whereas the maltreated children had greater P260 amplitude at frontal leads compared to the nonmaltreated children in response to viewing angry facial expressions.
  • For the Nc component, the nonmaltreated comparison children exhibited greater amplitude while viewing pictures of happy faces compared to angry and neutral faces, whereas the maltreated children showed greater Nc amplitude at central sites while viewing angry faces.
  • For the PSW, the nonmaltreated group showed a greater area score in the right hemisphere in response to viewing angry facial expressions compared to the maltreated group.
  • The results are discussed in terms of brain development and function, as well as their implications for the design and evaluation of preventive interventions.
  • [MeSH-major] Affect. Brain / physiology. Child Abuse / psychology. Evoked Potentials / physiology. Facial Expression. Visual Perception
  • [MeSH-minor] Demography. Electroencephalography. Ethnic Groups. Female. Functional Laterality / physiology. Humans. Infant. Male

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  • (PMID = 16262986.001).
  • [ISSN] 0954-5794
  • [Journal-full-title] Development and psychopathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dev. Psychopathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / MH067792-02
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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21. Abbasoglu R: DFT Investigation of the Mechanism and Stereochemistry of Electrophilic Transannular Addition Reaction of Chlorine to Bisbenzotetracyclo[6.2.2.23,6 .02,7]tetradeca-4,9,11,13-tetraene. Acta Chim Slov; 2010 Dec;57(4):842-8
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  • [Title] DFT Investigation of the Mechanism and Stereochemistry of Electrophilic Transannular Addition Reaction of Chlorine to Bisbenzotetracyclo[6.2.2.23,6 .02,7]tetradeca-4,9,11,13-tetraene.
  • The mechanism and stereochemistry of electrophilic addition of chlorine to bisbenzotetracyclo[6.2.2.23,6.02,7]tetradeca-4,9,11,13-tetraene (BBTT) molecule were investigated by DFT methods.
  • The geometry and the electronic structure of BBTT molecule was studied by DFT/B3LYP method using the 6-311G(d) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets.
  • The double bonds of BBTT molecule are endo-pyramidalized.
  • The structure and stability of the cationic intermediates and products of the addition reaction were investigated by B3LYP/6-311G(d) and B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p) methods.
  • The solvent effect was evaluated using SCI-PCM method.
  • The bridged chloronium cation is isomerized into the more stable nonclassical delocalized N- and U-type cations, and the difference between the stability of these cations is small.
  • For the determination of the direction of addition reaction and the stereochemistry of the products, the stability of nonclassical delocalized N- and U-type ions and the structure of their cationic centres play a vital role for the determination of the direction of addition reaction and the stereochemistry of the products.
  • Since the cationic centre of the N-type ion is in interaction with the benzene ring from the exo face, the nucleophilic attack of the chloride anion to this centre occurs from the endo face, and the exo,endo-isomer of the N-type product is obtained.
  • The attack of chloride anion towards the cationic centre of U-type ion from the endo face is sterically hindered by the hydrogen atom, therefore the attack occurs from the exo face, which interacts with the benzene ring and the more stable exo,exo-isomer of U-type product is formed.
  • Although, the U-type cation was 3.485 kcal mol-1 more stable than the N-type cation, the U-type product was 1.886 kcal mol-1 [SCI-PCM-B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p)// B3LYP/6-311G(d)] less stable than the N-type product.

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  • (PMID = 24061886.001).
  • [ISSN] 1318-0207
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta chimica Slovenica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Chim Slov
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Slovenia
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22. Gangjee A, Kurup S, Namjoshi O: Dihydrofolate reductase as a target for chemotherapy in parasites. Curr Pharm Des; 2007;13(6):609-39
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  • [Title] Dihydrofolate reductase as a target for chemotherapy in parasites.
  • Opportunistic infections are known to cause morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised individuals.
  • In addition, serious infections due to several parasites are also known to affect the quality and duration of life in normal individuals.
  • The importance of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) in parasitic chemotherapy arises from its function in DNA biosynthesis and cell replication.
  • DHFR catalyzes the reduction of dihydrofolate (DHF) to tetrahydrofolate (THF), an essential cofactor in the biosynthesis of thymidylate monophosphate (dTMP).
  • Inhibition of DHFR leads to a deficiency of dTMP since DHF cannot be recycled, and thus causes inhibition of cell growth.
  • Methotrexate (MTX) and aminopterin (AMT) were among the first known classical inhibitors of DHFR.
  • Trimethoprim (TMP) and pyrimethamine (PYR) are among the first known non classical inhibitors of DHFR.
  • TMP and PYR are selective but weak inhibitors of DHFR from several parasitic organisms and coadministration of sulfonamides is required to provide synergistic effects for clinical utility.
  • Unfortunately, the side effects associated with sulfa drugs in this combination often result in cessation of therapy.
  • Trimetrexate (TMQ) and piritrexim (PTX) are two potent non classical inhibitors, neither of which exhibit selectivity for pathogen DHFR and must be used with host rescue.
  • However, the current combination therapy suffers from high cost, in addition, several mutations have been reported in the active site of parasitic DHFR rendering the infections refractive to known DHFR inhibitors.
  • The selectivity of TMP is a hallmark in the development of DHFR inhibitors and several efforts have been made to combine the potency of PTX and TMQ with the selectivity of TMP.
  • Thus the structural requirements for DHFR inhibition are of critical importance in the design of antifolates for parasitic chemotherapy.
  • Structural requirements for inhibition have been studied extensively and novel agents that exploit the differences in the active site of human and parasitic DHFR have been proposed.
  • This review discusses the synthesis and structural requirements for selective DHFR inhibition and their relevance to parasitic chemotherapy, since 1995.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiparasitic Agents / administration & dosage. Drug Delivery Systems / methods. Folic Acid Antagonists / administration & dosage. Tetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase / genetics. Tetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Humans

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  • (PMID = 17346178.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-4286
  • [Journal-full-title] Current pharmaceutical design
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Pharm. Des.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiparasitic Agents; 0 / Folic Acid Antagonists; EC 1.5.1.3 / Tetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase
  • [Number-of-references] 194
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23. Wallis OC, Mac-Kwashie AO, Makri G, Wallis M: Molecular evolution of prolactin in primates. J Mol Evol; 2005 May;60(5):606-14
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  • [Title] Molecular evolution of prolactin in primates.
  • Pituitary prolactin, like growth hormone (GH) and several other protein hormones, shows an episodic pattern of molecular evolution in which sustained bursts of rapid change contrast with long periods of slow evolution.
  • A period of rapid change occurred in the evolution of prolactin in primates, leading to marked sequence differences between human prolactin and that of nonprimate mammals.
  • We have defined this burst more precisely by sequencing the coding regions of prolactin genes for a prosimian, the slow loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus), and a New World monkey, the marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).
  • Slow loris prolactin is very similar in sequence to pig prolactin, so the episode of rapid change occurred during primate evolution, after the separation of lines leading to prosimians and higher primates.
  • Marmoset prolactin is similar in sequence to human prolactin, so the accelerated evolution occurred before divergence of New World monkeys and Old World monkeys/apes.
  • The burst of change was confined largely to coding sequence (nonsynonymous sites) for mature prolactin and is not marked in other components of the gene sequence.
  • This and the observations that (1) there was no apparent loss of function during the episode of rapid evolution, (2) the rate of evolution slowed toward the basal rate after this burst, and (3) the distribution of substitutions in the prolactin molecule is very uneven support the idea that this episode of rapid change was due to positive adaptive selection.
  • In the slow loris and marmoset there is no evidence for duplication of the prolactin gene, and evidence from another New World monkey (Cebus albifrons) and from the chimpanzee and human genome sequences, suggests that this is the general position in primates, contrasting with the situation for GH genes.
  • The chimpanzee prolactin sequence differs from that of human at two residues and comparison of human and chimpanzee prolactin gene sequences suggests that noncoding regions associated with regulating expression may be evolving differently from other noncoding regions.
  • [MeSH-major] Evolution, Molecular. Phylogeny. Primates / genetics. Prolactin / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Acid Sequence. Animals. Base Composition. Base Sequence. Cloning, Molecular. Cluster Analysis. Gene Components. Humans. Molecular Sequence Data. Sequence Alignment. Sequence Analysis, DNA

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  • (PMID = 15983870.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-2844
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of molecular evolution
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Mol. Evol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 9002-62-4 / Prolactin
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24. Ouellet DL, Provost P: Current knowledge of MicroRNAs and noncoding RNAs in virus-infected cells. Methods Mol Biol; 2010;623:35-65
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  • [Title] Current knowledge of MicroRNAs and noncoding RNAs in virus-infected cells.
  • Within the past few years, microRNAs (miRNAs) and other noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have emerged as elements with critically high importance in posttranscriptional control of cellular and, more recently, viral processes.
  • Endogenously produced by a component of the miRNA-guided RNA silencing machinery known as Dicer, miRNAs are known to control messenger RNA (mRNA) translation through recognition of specific binding sites usually located in their 3' untranslated region.
  • Recent evidences indicate that the host miRNA pathway may represent an adapted antiviral defense mechanism that can act either by direct miRNA-mediated modulation of viral gene expression or through recognition and inactivation of structured viral RNA species by the protein components of the RNA silencing machinery such as Dicer.
  • This latter process, however, is a double-edge sword, as it may yield viral miRNAs exerting gene regulatory properties on both host and viral mRNAs.
  • Our knowledge of the interaction between viruses and host RNA silencing machineries, and how this influences the course of infection, is becoming increasingly complex.
  • This chapter aims to summarize our current knowledge about viral miRNAs/ncRNAs and their targets, as well as cellular miRNAs that are modulated by viruses upon infection.

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  • (PMID = 20217543.001).
  • [ISSN] 1940-6029
  • [Journal-full-title] Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Methods Mol. Biol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] Canada / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / / 69151; Canada / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / / ; Canada / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / / 83069; None / None / / 69151; None / None / / 83069
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / MicroRNAs; 0 / RNA, Untranslated
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ CAMS1321; NLM/ PMC2906133
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25. Poggi A, Massaro AM, Negrini S, Contini P, Zocchi MR: Tumor-induced apoptosis of human IL-2-activated NK cells: role of natural cytotoxicity receptors. J Immunol; 2005 Mar 1;174(5):2653-60
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  • [Title] Tumor-induced apoptosis of human IL-2-activated NK cells: role of natural cytotoxicity receptors.
  • We provide evidence that tumor cells can induce apoptosis of NK cells by engaging the natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCR) NKp30, NKp44, and NKp46.
  • Indeed, the binding between NCR on NK cells and their putative ligands on tumor target cells led to NK cell apoptosis, and this event was abolished by blocking NCR/NCR-ligand interaction by anti-NCR-specific mAbs.
  • The engagement of NCR induced up-regulation of Fas ligand (FasL) mRNA, FasL protein synthesis, and release.
  • In turn, FasL interacting with Fas at NK cell surface causes NK cell suicide, as apoptosis of NK cells was inhibited by blocking FasL/Fas interaction with specific mAbs.
  • Interestingly, NK cell apoptosis, but not killing of tumor target cells, is inhibited by cyclosporin A, suggesting that apoptosis and cytolysis are regulated by different biochemical pathways.
  • These findings indicate that NCR are not only triggering molecules essential for antitumor activity, but also surface receptors involved in NK cell suicide.
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis / immunology. Cell Communication / immunology. Cytotoxicity, Immunologic. Interleukin-2 / pharmacology. Killer Cells, Natural / immunology. Lymphocyte Activation / immunology. Melanoma / immunology. Receptors, Immunologic / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antibodies, Monoclonal / metabolism. Antigens, CD95 / physiology. Calcium / physiology. Caspase 3. Caspases / metabolism. Cell Line, Transformed. Cells, Cultured. Clone Cells. Enzyme Activation. Fas Ligand Protein. Humans. Membrane Glycoproteins / biosynthesis. Membrane Glycoproteins / genetics. Membrane Glycoproteins / physiology. Membrane Glycoproteins / secretion. Natural Cytotoxicity Triggering Receptor 1. Natural Cytotoxicity Triggering Receptor 2. Natural Cytotoxicity Triggering Receptor 3. RNA, Messenger / biosynthesis. Up-Regulation / immunology

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Melanoma.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CALCIUM, ELEMENTAL .
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  • (PMID = 15728472.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-1767
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Immunol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antigens, CD95; 0 / FASLG protein, human; 0 / Fas Ligand Protein; 0 / Interleukin-2; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / NCR1 protein, human; 0 / NCR2 protein, human; 0 / NCR3 protein, human; 0 / Natural Cytotoxicity Triggering Receptor 1; 0 / Natural Cytotoxicity Triggering Receptor 2; 0 / Natural Cytotoxicity Triggering Receptor 3; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Receptors, Immunologic; EC 3.4.22.- / CASP3 protein, human; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspase 3; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspases; SY7Q814VUP / Calcium
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26. Liu C, Mehdy MC: A nonclassical arabinogalactan protein gene highly expressed in vascular tissues, AGP31, is transcriptionally repressed by methyl jasmonic acid in Arabidopsis. Plant Physiol; 2007 Nov;145(3):863-74
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  • [Title] A nonclassical arabinogalactan protein gene highly expressed in vascular tissues, AGP31, is transcriptionally repressed by methyl jasmonic acid in Arabidopsis.
  • In response to wounding and pathogens, jasmonate (JA) serves as a signal molecule for both induction and repression of gene expression.
  • To examine defense-regulated gene repression in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we have identified a nonclassical arabinogalactan protein (AGP) gene, AGP31, and show that its mRNA decreased to about 30% of its original level within 8 h in response to methyl JA (MeJA) treatment of whole 7-d-old seedlings.
  • Wounding and abscisic acid treatment had similar effects.
  • MeJA suppression primarily depends on the action of the JA-signaling protein, COI1, as shown by much lower MeJA suppression in coi1-1 mutant plants.
  • The main mechanism of mRNA suppression by MeJA is repression of transcription, as shown by nuclear run-on experiments.
  • The AGP31 protein shares features with several known and putative nonclassical AGPs from other species: a putative signal peptide, a histidine-rich region near the N terminus followed by a repetitive proline-rich domain, and a cysteine-rich C-terminal PAC (for proline-rich protein and AGP, containing cysteine) domain.
  • Positive Yariv reagent interaction demonstrated that the protein is an AGP.
  • Monosaccharide analysis of purified AGP31 indicated it is a galactose-rich AGP.
  • Expression of an AGP31-enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion protein in transgenic cells revealed that the AGP31 protein was localized to the cell wall.
  • AGP31 promoter-beta-glucuronidase reporter gene analysis showed expression in the vascular bundle throughout the plant, except in the flower.
  • In the flower, beta-glucuronidase staining occurred throughout the pistil, except in the stigma.
  • The strong preferential expression in vascular tissues suggests that AGP31 may be involved in vascular tissue function during both the defense response and development.
  • [MeSH-major] Acetates / pharmacology. Arabidopsis / metabolism. Arabidopsis Proteins / metabolism. Cyclopentanes / pharmacology. Galactans / genetics. Galactans / metabolism. Gene Expression Regulation, Plant / drug effects. Mucoproteins / metabolism. Oxylipins / pharmacology. Transcription, Genetic / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Abscisic Acid / pharmacology. Amino Acid Sequence. Down-Regulation. Flowers. Molecular Sequence Data. Phylogeny. RNA, Messenger / genetics. RNA, Messenger / metabolism

  • Gene Ontology. gene/protein/disease-specific - Gene Ontology annotations from this paper .
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  • (PMID = 17885091.001).
  • [ISSN] 0032-0889
  • [Journal-full-title] Plant physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Plant Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / AGP31 protein, Arabidopsis; 0 / Acetates; 0 / Arabidopsis Proteins; 0 / COI1 protein, Arabidopsis; 0 / Cyclopentanes; 0 / Galactans; 0 / Mucoproteins; 0 / Oxylipins; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 1211-29-6 / methyl jasmonate; 72S9A8J5GW / Abscisic Acid; 9036-66-2 / arabinogalactan
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2048811
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27. Nali C, Francini A, Lorenzini G: White clover clones as a cost-effective indicator of phytotoxic ozone: 10 years of experience from central Italy. Environ Pollut; 2009 May;157(5):1421-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] White clover clones as a cost-effective indicator of phytotoxic ozone: 10 years of experience from central Italy.
  • Data collected at one site in central Italy using the NC-S/NC-R clover (Trifolium repens) biotype system during 1997-2007 were analysed in order to assess: (a) its performance under Mediterranean conditions;.
  • (b) variations of ozone damage linked with meteorological conditions;.
  • (c) if critical level approach is a good predictor of ozone risk on vegetation.
  • NC-S dry biomasses were systematically lower than those of NC-R, the mean ratio being 0.7.
  • Relevant relationship between ozone visible injury and cumulated values of AOT40 were also reported.
  • Temperature and number of rainy days were the most important factors associated with ozone presence and, as a consequence, with leaf injury index.
  • Photosynthetic gas exchange properties indicate that NC-S has higher values of stomatal conductance.
  • [MeSH-major] Air Pollution / statistics & numerical data. Environmental Monitoring / economics. Oxidants, Photochemical / analysis. Ozone / analysis. Trifolium / growth & development
  • [MeSH-minor] Cost-Benefit Analysis. Environmental Exposure. Italy. Meteorology. Oxidative Stress. Photosynthesis / drug effects. Plant Leaves / growth & development. Plant Leaves / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 18952332.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-6424
  • [Journal-full-title] Environmental pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Environ. Pollut.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Oxidants, Photochemical; 66H7ZZK23N / Ozone
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28. Lee SS, Hinshaw SP: Predictors of adolescent functioning in girls with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): the role of childhood ADHD, conduct problems, and peer status. J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol; 2006 Sep;35(3):356-68
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  • [Title] Predictors of adolescent functioning in girls with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): the role of childhood ADHD, conduct problems, and peer status.
  • Predictors of adolescent functioning were studied in an ethnically diverse sample of girls with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; n = 140) and age- and ethnicity-matched comparison girls (n = 88) who participated in naturalistic summer programs during childhood.

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  • (PMID = 16836474.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-4424
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical child and adolescent psychology : the official journal for the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, American Psychological Association, Division 53
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / MH045064-17; United States / PHS HHS / / 64226; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / R01 MH045064-17; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / R01 MH045064; United States / PHS HHS / / 45064
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS229559; NLM/ PMC2930194
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29. Wang JL, Tang BS: [Molecular basis of spinocerebellar ataxias subtype caused by nucleotide repeat expansion in noncoding region]. Zhonghua Yi Xue Yi Chuan Xue Za Zhi; 2008 Jun;25(3):293-6
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  • [Title] [Molecular basis of spinocerebellar ataxias subtype caused by nucleotide repeat expansion in noncoding region].
  • Hereditary spinocerebellar ataxias(SCA) are mainly caused by trinucleotide (CAG/CAA) repeat expansion in open reading frames of corresponding gene.
  • However, SCA8, SCA10 and SCA12 are caused by nucleotide repeat expansion in noncoding region.
  • Recent researches focus on the pathogenesis and hereditary traits, including the instability of nucleotide repeat, the alteration of penetrance, the bias of gender inheritance and the anticipation.
  • The pathogenesis of these three SCA subtypes is different from other subtypes because the repeat expansion in noncoding region has mild influence on translation of polyQ protein.
  • We suggest that the interference on DNA transcription by the abnormal nucleotide expansion, the post-transcriptional toxic effect of abnormal RNA, and the mechanism of bidirectional expression of repeat expansion transcripts play a critical role on SCA8, SCA10 and SCA12 pathogenesis.
  • [MeSH-major] Spinocerebellar Ataxias / genetics. Trinucleotide Repeat Expansion / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Models, Biological

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  • (PMID = 18543219.001).
  • [ISSN] 1003-9406
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua yi xue yi chuan xue za zhi = Zhonghua yixue yichuanxue zazhi = Chinese journal of medical genetics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Yi Xue Yi Chuan Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Number-of-references] 23
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30. Mizobuchi M, Morrissey J, Finch JL, Martin DR, Liapis H, Akizawa T, Slatopolsky E: Combination therapy with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and a vitamin D analog suppresses the progression of renal insufficiency in uremic rats. J Am Soc Nephrol; 2007 Jun;18(6):1796-806
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  • [Title] Combination therapy with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and a vitamin D analog suppresses the progression of renal insufficiency in uremic rats.
  • Monotherapy with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors has been shown to be beneficial in suppressing the progression of experimentally induced kidney diseases.
  • Whether such therapy provides additional benefits when combined with vitamin D or an analog of vitamin D has not been established.
  • Rats were made uremic by 5/6 nephrectomy and treated as follows: Uremic + vehicle (UC), uremic + enalapril (30 mg/L in drinking water; E), uremic + paricalcitol (19-nor; 0.8 microg/kg, three times a week), and uremic + enalapril + paricalcitol (E + 19-nor).
  • A group of normal rats served as control (NC).
  • BP was significantly elevated in the UC and 19-nor groups compared with the NC group but was indistinguishable from normal in the E and E + 19-nor groups.
  • The decrease in creatinine clearance and the increase in the excretion of urinary protein that were observed in the UC group were ameliorated by the use of E alone or by E + 19-nor (P < 0.05 versus UC).
  • The glomerulosclerotic index was significantly decreased in both the 19-nor (P < 0.01) and E + 19-nor groups (P < 0.01) compared with the UC group.
  • Tubulointerstitial volume was significantly decreased in both the E (P < 0.05) and E + 19-nor groups (P < 0.01) compared with the UC group.
  • Both macrophage infiltration (ED-1-positive cells) and production of the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were significantly blunted in E + 19-nor compared with E group.
  • TGF-beta1 mRNA and protein expression were increased in the UC group (mRNA: 23.7-fold; protein: 29.1-fold versus NC).
  • These increases were significantly blunted in the 19-nor group (mRNA: 7.1-fold; protein: 8.0-fold versus NC) and virtually normalized in the E + 19-nor group (protein: 0.8-fold versus NC).
  • Phosphorylation of Smad2 was also elevated in the UC group (7.6-fold versus NC) but less so in the 19-nor-treated rats (5.5-fold versus NC).
  • When rats were treated with E + 19-nor, the phosphorylation of Smad2 was normal (1.1-fold versus NC).
  • Thus, 19-nor can suppress the progression of renal insufficiency via mediation of the TGF-beta signaling pathway, and this effect is amplified when BP is controlled via renin-angiotensin system blockade.
  • [MeSH-major] Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors / pharmacology. Enalapril / pharmacology. Ergocalciferols / pharmacology. Renal Insufficiency / drug therapy. Uremia / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blood Pressure. Disease Models, Animal. Disease Progression. Drug Therapy, Combination. Female. Macrophages / pathology. Nephrectomy. Parathyroid Hormone / blood. Proteinuria / drug therapy. Proteinuria / pathology. Proteinuria / physiopathology. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley. Signal Transduction / physiology. Transforming Growth Factor beta1 / genetics. Transforming Growth Factor beta1 / metabolism. Vitamin D / analogs & derivatives

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  • (PMID = 17513326.001).
  • [ISSN] 1046-6673
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Ergocalciferols; 0 / Parathyroid Hormone; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Transforming Growth Factor beta1; 1406-16-2 / Vitamin D; 6702D36OG5 / paricalcitol; 69PN84IO1A / Enalapril
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31. Tam CW, Lam LC, Lui VW, Chan WC, Chan SS, Chiu HF, Chan WM: Clinical correlates of functional performance in community-dwelling Chinese older persons with mild cognitive impairment. Int Psychogeriatr; 2008 Oct;20(5):1059-70
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  • [Title] Clinical correlates of functional performance in community-dwelling Chinese older persons with mild cognitive impairment.
  • BACKGROUND: Increasing evidence suggests that functional impairment can be detected in older persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).
  • This study explores the functional profiles and the clinical correlates of a population-based sample of Chinese older persons with MCI in Hong Kong.
  • METHODS: A random sample of 765 Chinese elderly subjects without dementia was recruited, of which 389 were elderly normal controls (Clinical Dementia Rating = 0), and 376 had questionable dementia (CDR = 0.5).
  • The latter were categorized into an MCI group (n = 291) and a very mild dementia (VMD) group (n = 85).
  • Their functional performances were measured and compared with the normal controls (NC).
  • Multiple regression analyses investigated the associations between functional scores (Disability Assessment in Dementia) and clinical correlates (cognitive test scores, neuropsychiatric symptoms and motor signs) in the NC subjects and cognitively impaired subjects.
  • RESULTS: Subjects with MCI had intermediate functional performance between the NC and those with VMD.
  • Regression analyses revealed that lower scores of cognitive tests (delayed recall and categorical verbal fluency tests), apathy, aberrant motor symptoms and parkinsonism features were associated with lower functional scores in clinically non-demented subjects.
  • Functional scores had no correlation with age, education and medical illness burden.
  • CONCLUSION: Neuropsychiatric symptoms and parkinsonism features were associated with functional impairment in the clinically non-demented elderly in the community.
  • Assessment of these should be incorporated in the evaluation of older persons for early cognitive impairment.

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  • (PMID = 18498668.001).
  • [ISSN] 1041-6102
  • [Journal-full-title] International psychogeriatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int Psychogeriatr
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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32. Kim TH, Jung JA, Kim GD, Jang AH, Ahn HJ, Park YS, Park CS: Melatonin inhibits the development of 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice. J Pineal Res; 2009 Nov;47(4):324-9
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  • [Title] Melatonin inhibits the development of 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.
  • Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common disease in children, and epicutaneous treatment with a chemical hapten such as 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) evokes an AD-like reaction in NC/Nga mice under specific pathogen-free conditions.
  • Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is synthesized by the pineal gland, has several different physiologic functions, which include seasonal reproduction control, immune system modulation, free radical scavenging, and inflammatory suppression.
  • In the present study, we investigated whether melatonin suppresses DNFB-induced AD-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.
  • The topical administration of melatonin to DNFB-treated NC/Nga mice was found to inhibit ear thickness increases and the skin lesions induced by DNFB.
  • Furthermore, interleukin (IL)-4 and interferon (IFN)-gamma secretion by activated CD4(+) T cells from the draining lymph nodes of DNFB-treated NC/Nga mice were significantly inhibited by melatonin, and total IgE levels in serum were reduced.
  • Our findings suggest that melatonin suppresses the development of AD-like dermatitis in DNFB-treated NC/Nga mice by reducing total IgE in serum, and IL-4 and IFN-gamma production by activated CD4(+) T cells.
  • [MeSH-major] Dermatitis, Atopic / chemically induced. Dermatitis, Atopic / drug therapy. Melatonin / therapeutic use. Skin Diseases / chemically induced. Skin Diseases / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antioxidants / therapeutic use. Dinitrofluorobenzene. Male. Mice

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  • (PMID = 19817972.001).
  • [ISSN] 1600-079X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pineal research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pineal Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antioxidants; D241E059U6 / Dinitrofluorobenzene; JL5DK93RCL / Melatonin
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33. Segawa S, Hayashi A, Nakakita Y, Kaneda H, Watari J, Yasui H: Oral administration of heat-killed Lactobacillus brevis SBC8803 ameliorates the development of dermatitis and inhibits immunoglobulin E production in atopic dermatitis model NC/Nga mice. Biol Pharm Bull; 2008 May;31(5):884-9
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  • [Title] Oral administration of heat-killed Lactobacillus brevis SBC8803 ameliorates the development of dermatitis and inhibits immunoglobulin E production in atopic dermatitis model NC/Nga mice.
  • We have previously shown that the oral administration of heat-killed Lactobacillus brevis (L. brevis) SBC8803 strain inhibits IgE production in ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized BALB/c mice through improvement of the type-1 helper T (Th1)/Th2 balance toward Th1 dominance.
  • Atopic dermatitis is one of the most common skin diseases and is frequently associated with elevated immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies against many kinds of allergens.
  • In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of oral administration of L. brevis SBC8803 on the development of dermatitis and IgE elevation using the NC/Nga atopic dermatitis model mice.
  • Male 8-week-old NC/Nga mice were sensitized by the topical application of picryl chloride to foot pads and shaved abdomen.
  • These mice were boosted with picryl chloride by topical application onto the ears once a week for 9 weeks.
  • The mice (n=10 per group) were fed a diet containing 0%, 0.05% or 0.5% of heat-killed L. brevis SBC8803 from 2 weeks before the first sensitization to the end of the study.
  • Total IgE concentration in serum, clinical score, and ear thickness were periodically examined throughout the study.
  • Finally, cytokine (interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IFN-gamma and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta) productions from splenocytes and Peyer's patch (PP) cells of mice were measured.
  • Oral administration of L. brevis SBC8803 significantly inhibited IgE production and ear swelling, and suppressed the development of dermatitis in a dose-dependent manner.
  • Immunosuppressive cytokines such as IL-10 and TGF-beta production from PP cells significantly increased in the 0.5% group compared to the control group although Th1-type and Th2-type cytokines production was not affected.
  • [MeSH-major] Dermatitis, Atopic / prevention & control. Immunoglobulin E / biosynthesis. Immunosuppressive Agents / pharmacology. Lactobacillus brevis / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Oral. Animals. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Interleukins / biosynthesis. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred Strains. Peyer's Patches / cytology. Peyer's Patches / drug effects. Peyer's Patches / metabolism. Skin / pathology. Spleen / cytology. Spleen / drug effects. Spleen / metabolism. Th1 Cells / drug effects. Th1 Cells / immunology. Th1 Cells / metabolism. Th2 Cells / drug effects. Th2 Cells / immunology. Th2 Cells / metabolism. Transforming Growth Factor beta1 / biosynthesis

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  • (PMID = 18451512.001).
  • [ISSN] 0918-6158
  • [Journal-full-title] Biological & pharmaceutical bulletin
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biol. Pharm. Bull.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Interleukins; 0 / Transforming Growth Factor beta1; 37341-29-0 / Immunoglobulin E
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34. Beck JF, Baiz TI, Neshat A, Schmidt JA: Titanium imido complexes utilizing orthometallated derivatized acetophenone and piperonal imine ligands: synthesis, isolation, and characterization. Dalton Trans; 2009 Jul 7;(25):5001-8
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  • [Title] Titanium imido complexes utilizing orthometallated derivatized acetophenone and piperonal imine ligands: synthesis, isolation, and characterization.
  • A series of five ortho-lithiated imines (Li-L(n); n = 1-5) was synthesized via the reaction of an aryl or alkyl acetophenone imine with n-butyllithium.
  • The ortho-lithiated imines were subsequently reacted with Ti(NR)Cl(2)py(3) (R = C(CH(3))(3), 2,6-Me(2)C(6)H(3), 2,6-Et(2)C(6)H(3), or 2,6-(i)Pr(2)C(6)H(3)), yielding complexes of the form (L(n))(2)Ti(NR).
  • Several of the resulting complexes [(L(1))(2)Ti(NC(CH(3))(3)), 1a; (L(3))(2)Ti(N-2,6-Me(2)C(6)H(3)), 3b; and (L(5))(2)Ti(NC(CH(3))(3)), 5a] were structurally characterized using small molecule X-ray diffraction.
  • The C(2) symmetric complexes produced in these reactions displayed a distorted square pyramidal geometry.
  • In each complex the titanium center was located above the square plane of the two coordinated bidentate ligands and the chelating C approximately N ligands were folded away from the metal center.
  • When a less sterically demanding alkylimine was used (L(4)), the resulting complex was isolated as an equilibrium mixture of cis and trans isomers of the empirical formula (L(4))(2)Ti(NC(CH(3))(3))py (cis/trans 4a).

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  • (PMID = 19662292.001).
  • [ISSN] 1477-9226
  • [Journal-full-title] Dalton transactions (Cambridge, England : 2003)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dalton Trans
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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35. Ishii K, Soma T, Kono AK, Sofue K, Miyamoto N, Yoshikawa T, Mori E, Murase K: Comparison of regional brain volume and glucose metabolism between patients with mild dementia with lewy bodies and those with mild Alzheimer's disease. J Nucl Med; 2007 May;48(5):704-11
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  • [Title] Comparison of regional brain volume and glucose metabolism between patients with mild dementia with lewy bodies and those with mild Alzheimer's disease.
  • The aim of this study was to investigate regional differences between morphologic and functional changes in patients with mild dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) compared with those with Alzheimer's disease (AD).
  • METHODS: Twenty patients with very mild DLB (mean age, 74.5 y; mean Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] score, 24.0), 20 patients with very mild AD (mean age, 74.1 y; mean MMSE score, 24.0), and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers (normal controls [NC]) underwent both (18)F-FDG PET and 3-dimensional spoiled gradient echo MRI.
  • Fully automatic volumetry of the MRI data was used to obtain whole brain, hippocampal, occipital, and striatal volumes, which were compared with the results of a similar analysis of glucose metabolic data.
  • RESULTS: In DLB patients, volumetric data indicated a significant volume decrease in the striatum, whereas (18)F-FDG PET showed significant glucose metabolic reductions in the temporal, parietal, and frontal areas--including in the occipital lobe--compared with those in the NC group.
  • In contrast, in AD patients, both the hippocampal volume and glucose metabolism were significantly decreased, whereas the occipital volume and metabolism were preserved.
  • CONCLUSION: Comparison of very mild DLB and AD revealed different morphologic and metabolic changes occurring in the medial temporal lobes and the occipital lobe, demonstrating characteristic pathophysiologic differences between these 2 diseases.
  • [MeSH-major] Alzheimer Disease / metabolism. Alzheimer Disease / radionuclide imaging. Brain / metabolism. Brain / radionuclide imaging. Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 / pharmacokinetics. Lewy Body Disease / metabolism. Lewy Body Disease / radionuclide imaging
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Female. Humans. Imaging, Three-Dimensional / methods. Male. Radiopharmaceuticals / pharmacokinetics

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  • (PMID = 17475957.001).
  • [ISSN] 0161-5505
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Nucl. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Radiopharmaceuticals; 0Z5B2CJX4D / Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
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36. Atmaca A, Al-Batran SE, Neumann A, Kolassa Y, Jäger D, Knuth A, Jäger E: Whole-body hyperthermia (WBH) in combination with carboplatin in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer - a phase II study. Gynecol Oncol; 2009 Feb;112(2):384-8
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  • [Title] Whole-body hyperthermia (WBH) in combination with carboplatin in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer - a phase II study.
  • OBJECTIVE: Despite considerable progress in the front-line treatment in patient with advanced ovarian cancer, the outcome of patients with recurrent or refractory disease is still poor.
  • Based on promising results of a pilot study, we initiated a phase II study with WBH and carboplatin in pretreated patients with advanced ovarian cancer to investigate the toxicity and efficacy of WBH in combination with carboplatin.
  • METHODS: 47 patients with histologically confirmed epithelial ovarian carcinoma were enrolled in the study.
  • Patients were pretreated with at least one palliative chemotherapy regimen.
  • Of 47 patients 24 were classified as platinum refractory or resistant and 16 as platinum sensitive.
  • RESULTS: Main toxicity was hematological with grade 3/4 anaemia, leukopenia and thrombocytopenia occurring in 49%, 49% and 65%, respectively.
  • Cardiac complications occurred with grade 1/2 in 22 of 47 (47%) patients and with grade 3 in 1 patient (2%).
  • In 35 patients evaluable for response, the overall response rate was 45% [CR: 4/35 (11%), PR: 12/35 (34%), NC: 9/35 (26%].
  • In platinum refractory and resistant patients we observed CR in 6%, PR in 24% and NC in 24%.
  • The median overall survival and progression free survival were 61.5 weeks and 29 weeks, respectively.
  • CONCLUSION: This study confirms that WBH in combination with carboplatin is an active salvage treatment option in patients with advanced ovarian cancer.
  • However, significant hematological toxicity has to be considered and renders this regimen less suitable for palliative care setting.
  • There is no evidence yet, that whole-body hyperthermia contributes to any clinical improvement beyond chemotherapy alone.
  • This question can only be addressed in a randomized phase III trial.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Carboplatin / therapeutic use. Hyperthermia, Induced / methods. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local / therapy. Ovarian Neoplasms / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Drug Resistance, Neoplasm. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19059635.001).
  • [ISSN] 1095-6859
  • [Journal-full-title] Gynecologic oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gynecol. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial, Phase II; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; BG3F62OND5 / Carboplatin
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37. Hori T, Yagi S, Iida T, Taniguchi K, Yamagiwa K, Yamamoto C, Hasegawa T, Yamakado K, Kato T, Saito K, Wang L, Torii M, Hori Y, Takeda K, Maruyama K, Uemoto S: Optimal systemic hemodynamic stability for successful clinical outcomes after adult living-donor liver transplantation: prospective observational study. J Gastroenterol Hepatol; 2008 Jul;23(7 Pt 2):e170-8
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  • [Title] Optimal systemic hemodynamic stability for successful clinical outcomes after adult living-donor liver transplantation: prospective observational study.
  • BACKGROUND AND AIM: Most living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) recipients show characteristic systemic hemodynamics due to liver cirrhosis, and systemic hemodynamics after LDLT influenced postoperative graft function corresponding to outcomes.
  • However, identities of optimal systemic hemodynamics for excellent outcomes and precise parameters for clinical strategy remain unclear.
  • METHODS: Therefore, we performed prospective study in adult LDLT recipients from 2003.
  • Hemodynamic parameters were prospectively recorded, and were analyzed in 40 recipients classified into three groups: cirrhotic (group I-C) or non-cirrhotic recipients (group I-NC) with good outcomes, and cirrhotic recipients (group II-C) without good outcomes.
  • RESULTS: Group I-C retained characteristic hyperdynamics even after LDLT.
  • However, absolute values of parameters revealed no significant differences between groups I-C and II-C, because group II-C also tended to show hyperdynamics.
  • It is suggested that successful outcomes in cirrhotic recipients require maintenance of optimal hyperdynamic stability after LDLT, because cirrhotic vascular alterations still occurred.
  • Because hemodynamic behaviors were different between groups I-C and I-NC, absolute values were also significantly different even in these successful two groups.
  • Thus, absolute values themselves were not necessarily satisfactory for accurate evaluation of optimal hemodynamic stability.
  • Cirrhotic hyperdynamics are symbolized in large blood volume (BV) circulated by high cardiac output (CO); therefore, we standardized CO against BV.
  • CO/BV was significantly different between groups I-C and II-C, reflecting subtle variability of hyperdynamics in groups II-C, and was interestingly constant in the two successful groups.
  • Therefore, CO/BV reliably evaluated optimal hemodynamic stability after LDLT, and accurately predicted outcomes.
  • CONCLUSION: Identification of inappropriate hemodynamics after LDLT is advantageous to further improve LDLT outcomes.
  • [MeSH-major] Hemodynamics. Liver Cirrhosis / surgery. Liver Transplantation / adverse effects. Living Donors
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Blood Pressure. Blood Volume. Cardiac Output. Coloring Agents. Heart Rate. Humans. Indocyanine Green. Liver Function Tests. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome. Vascular Resistance


38. Villar J, Pérez-Méndez L, Flores C, Maca-Meyer N, Espinosa E, Muriel A, Sangüesa R, Blanco J, Muros M, Kacmarek RM: A CXCL2 polymorphism is associated with better outcomes in patients with severe sepsis. Crit Care Med; 2007 Oct;35(10):2292-7
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  • [Title] A CXCL2 polymorphism is associated with better outcomes in patients with severe sepsis.
  • OBJECTIVE: Several studies have implicated the CXCL2 chemokine as a mediator in the development of sepsis.
  • We hypothesized that a tandem repeat polymorphism (AC)n in the CXCL2 gene, previously associated with susceptibility to severe sepsis, contributes to morbidity and mortality in severe sepsis.
  • DESIGN: Prospective, observational, genetic study of septic patients.
  • SETTING: A network of Spanish postsurgical and critical care units.
  • PATIENTS: A total of 183 critically ill patients fulfilling the International Sepsis Criteria for severe sepsis.
  • INTERVENTIONS: None.
  • MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Patients were classified into three groups according to the presence of compound 24 +/- 1 (AC) repeat genotypes: homozygote 24 +/- 1 carriers (HC group), heterozygote 24 +/- 1 carriers (HTC), and non 24 +/- 1 carriers (NC group).
  • Mortality, development of acute respiratory distress syndrome, and number of failing organs were determined for each group.
  • Overall mortality was 46.4%.
  • HC patients had a lower mortality (39.9%) than HTC (52.2%) and NC (72.7%) patients (trend test p = .018).
  • This difference remained significant when using a multiple logistic regression analysis (p = .035).
  • The presence of population stratification was ruled out, since 20 independent genomic control markers demonstrated homogeneity among groups.
  • An exploratory analysis of the effect of acute respiratory distress syndrome on mortality showed a relative risk of 2.60 in the HC group (p = .0004), while in the nonhomozygote carriers (NHC) group the relative risk was 3.34 (p = .0001).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that a tandem repeat polymorphism (AC)n at position -665 in the CXCL2 gene may be an independent predictor of mortality for severe sepsis.
  • Additional studies are needed to confirm these results.
  • [MeSH-major] Chemokine CXCL2 / genetics. Polymorphism, Genetic. Sepsis / genetics. Sepsis / mortality
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Prospective Studies. Severity of Illness Index

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  • [Copyright] (C) 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
  • [CommentIn] Crit Care Med. 2007 Oct;35(10):2439-40 [17885380.001]
  • (PMID = 17944017.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-3493
  • [Journal-full-title] Critical care medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Crit. Care Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CXCL2 protein, human; 0 / Chemokine CXCL2
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39. Rosen DL, Schoenbach VJ, Wohl DA: All-cause and cause-specific mortality among men released from state prison, 1980-2005. Am J Public Health; 2008 Dec;98(12):2278-84
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  • [Title] All-cause and cause-specific mortality among men released from state prison, 1980-2005.
  • OBJECTIVES: We compared mortality of ex-prisoners and other state residents to identify unmet health care needs among former prisoners.
  • METHODS: We linked North Carolina prison records with state death records for 1980 to 2005 to estimate the number of overall and cause-specific deaths among male ex-prisoners aged 20 to 69 years and used standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) to compare these observed deaths with the number of expected deaths had they experienced the same age-, race-, and cause-specific death rates as other state residents.
  • RESULTS: All-cause mortality among White (SMR = 2.08; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.04, 2.13) and Black (SMR = 1.03; 95% CI = 1.01, 1.05) ex-prisoners was greater than for other male NC residents.
  • Ex-prisoners' deaths from homicide, accidents, substance use, HIV, liver disease, and liver cancer were greater than the expected number of deaths estimated using death rates among other NC residents.
  • Deaths from cardiovascular disease, lung cancer, respiratory diseases, and diabetes were at least 30% greater than expected for White ex-prisoners, but less than expected for Black ex-prisoners.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Ex-prisoners experienced more deaths than would have been expected among other NC residents.
  • Excess deaths from injuries and medical conditions common to prison populations highlight ex-prisoners' medical vulnerability and the need to improve correctional and community preventive health services.

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  • (PMID = 18923131.001).
  • [ISSN] 1541-0048
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of public health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Public Health
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / F30 MH077546; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / F30 MH077546-01A1
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2636544
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40. Cheng YH, Chao YC, Wu CH, Tsai CJ, Uang SN, Shih TS: Measurements of ultrafine particle concentrations and size distribution in an iron foundry. J Hazard Mater; 2008 Oct 1;158(1):124-30
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  • [Title] Measurements of ultrafine particle concentrations and size distribution in an iron foundry.
  • The number and surface area concentration of ultrafine particles in an iron foundry is of interest as freshly generated ultrafine particles are produced by metal melting, pouring and molding processes.
  • This study measured the number and surface area concentrations of ultrafine particles and their size distributions in an iron foundry using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS).
  • The 10-100 nm ultrafine particle number concentrations (NC(0.01-0.1)) and surface area concentrations (SC(0.01-0.1)) measured at the iron foundry were 2.07 x 10(4) to 2.82 x 10(5)particles cm(-3) and 67.56 to 2.13 x 10(3)microm(2)cm(-3), respectively.
  • The concentrations changed dramatically depending on on-site manufacturing conditions.
  • The NC(0.01-0.1) levels in the iron foundry were approximately 4.5 times higher on average compared with those in the outdoor ambient environment.
  • These measurement results indicate that the presence of extra particles in the workplace air is within the ultrafine range.
  • Additionally, the analytical results suggest that the number mode diameter can be used to estimate the SC(0.01-0.1) levels using the NC(0.01-0.1) levels.
  • Moreover, the ultrafine particle number mode diameter was found to be about 46.1 nm in the iron foundry.
  • [MeSH-major] Industrial Waste / analysis. Iron / analysis. Metallurgy. Particle Size
  • [MeSH-minor] Air Pollutants, Occupational / analysis. Environmental Monitoring / methods. Particulate Matter / analysis

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  • (PMID = 18313211.001).
  • [ISSN] 0304-3894
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of hazardous materials
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Hazard. Mater.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Air Pollutants, Occupational; 0 / Industrial Waste; 0 / Particulate Matter; E1UOL152H7 / Iron
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41. Liu L, Lu ZY, Lei MX, Wu J, Huang Z: [Effect of plasma glucose on the vascular endothelial function and analysis of relevant factors]. Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban; 2006 Dec;31(6):830-3
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  • [Title] [Effect of plasma glucose on the vascular endothelial function and analysis of relevant factors].
  • OBJECTIVE: To compare the flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) among the newly diagnosed impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and the normal controls (NC) and to analyze relevant factors under different glucose levels.
  • METHODS: The study included IGT (n=34), DM1 (n=52), DM2 (n=33) and NC (n=25).
  • Levels of fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-hour postprandial plasma glucose (PPG), fasting insulin (FINS), 2-hour postprandial insulin (PINS), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), and hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) were determined in all participants.
  • High resolution ultrasound examining FMD was performed to measure vascular endothelial function subsequently.
  • RESULTS: There was statistically significant difference between IGT, DM, HG and NC group in FMD (P=0.008).
  • Partial correlation analysis found that a significant negative correlation existed between FMD and homeostasis model assessment-index (HOMA-IRI), difference of plasma glucose (DPG), FPG and PPG (P<0.01), and a negative correlation between FMD and HbA1C (P<0.05).
  • Setting FMD as dependent variable to conduct multiple linear stepwise regression, in IGT group it was the waist/hip ratio (WHR) and HOMA-IRI that entered the regression equation; in DM1 group it was HOMA-IRI, PPG and DPG that entered the regression equation; in DM2 group it was FPG and HOMA-beta that entered the regression equation.
  • CONCLUSION: There exists a flow-mediated vasodilatation dysfunction in patients of newly diagnosed IGT and T2DM.
  • Effect of relevant factors on FMD differs with different glucose levels.
  • [MeSH-major] Blood Glucose / metabolism. Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / physiopathology. Endothelium, Vascular / physiopathology. Glucose Intolerance / physiopathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Case-Control Studies. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 17213577.001).
  • [ISSN] 1672-7347
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhong nan da xue xue bao. Yi xue ban = Journal of Central South University. Medical sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Blood Glucose
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42. Lin JJ, Jin CN, Zheng ML, Ouyang XN, Zeng JX, Dai XH: Clinical study on treatment of primary hepatocellular carcinoma by Shenqi mixture combined with microwave coagulation. Chin J Integr Med; 2005 Jun;11(2):104-10
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  • [Title] Clinical study on treatment of primary hepatocellular carcinoma by Shenqi mixture combined with microwave coagulation.
  • OBJECTIVE: To observe the short-term efficacy and safety of Shenqi mixture (SQM) combined with microwave coagulation in treating primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).
  • METHODS: Seventy-two patients with primary HCC of stage II-III, Karnofsky scoring > or = 50 scores and predicted survival period > or = 3 months were selected and randomly assigned into two groups, the treated group and the control group, 36 in each.
  • Microwave therapy was applied to both groups by double leads, 60 W, 800 sec once a week for two weeks.
  • To the treated group, SQM was given additionally through oral intake of 20 ml, three times a day for 1 month.
  • The changes in tumor size, main symptoms, serum level of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), immune function and adverse reaction were observed after treatment and the immune parameters of the patients were compared with 30 healthy persons in the normal control group. RESULTS:.
  • (1) In the SQM treated group, after treatment 3 patients got completely remitted (CR), 24 partial remitted (PR), 4 unchanged (NC) and 5 progressively deteriorated (PD), the effective rate being 75.00%; while in the control group, 1 got CR, 19 PR, 9 NC and 7 PD, the effective rate being 55.56%.
  • Comparison of the effective rate between the two groups showed significant difference (P < 0.05). (2) AFP level decreased after treatment in both groups, but the decrement in the treated group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.01). (3) After treatment, in the treated group, CD3(+), CD4(+), CD4(+)/CD8(+) and NK activity were improved, Karnofsky scores increased and liver function bettered, with these improvements significantly superior to those in the control group (P < 0.01). (4) The improvement in symptoms such as hepatic region pain, fever, weakness, poor appetite and jaundice in the treated group after treatment was also superior to that in the control group (P < 0.01). (5) The 12-month, 18-month and 24-month survival rates were higher and the recurrence rate was lower in the treated group than those in the control group, showing significant difference (P < 0.05).
  • CONCLUSION: Combined therapy with SQM and microwave coagulation could not only kill the tumor and residue tumor cells to prevent recurrence, but also enhance the cellular immunity of organism.
  • It is one of the effective therapies for patients with middle-advanced hepatocarcinoma, who have lost the chance of surgical operation.
  • It could improve clinical symptoms, elevate the quality of life, prolong the survival period of patients, but shows no evident adverse reaction.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / drug therapy. Drugs, Chinese Herbal / administration & dosage. Electrocoagulation / methods. Liver Neoplasms / drug therapy. Microwaves / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Leukocyte Count. Liver Function Tests. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. Survival Rate. alpha-Fetoproteins / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 16150196.001).
  • [ISSN] 1672-0415
  • [Journal-full-title] Chinese journal of integrative medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chin J Integr Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drugs, Chinese Herbal; 0 / alpha-Fetoproteins
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43. Ferguson SD, Coccaro EF: History of mild to moderate traumatic brain injury and aggression in physically healthy participants with and without personality disorder. J Pers Disord; 2009 Jun;23(3):230-9
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  • [Title] History of mild to moderate traumatic brain injury and aggression in physically healthy participants with and without personality disorder.
  • These data suggest that lifetime history of mild TBI is associated with history of aggression regardless of history of psychiatric disorder.
  • [MeSH-major] Aggression / psychology. Brain Injuries / epidemiology. Brain Injuries / psychology. Health Status. Personality Disorders / epidemiology. Personality Disorders / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Demography. Disruptive, Impulse Control, and Conduct Disorders / diagnosis. Disruptive, Impulse Control, and Conduct Disorders / epidemiology. Disruptive, Impulse Control, and Conduct Disorders / etiology. Female. Humans. Male. Severity of Illness Index

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  • (PMID = 19538079.001).
  • [ISSN] 1943-2763
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of personality disorders
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pers. Disord.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / K02MH00951; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / R01MH46948
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
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44. Clough CR, Müller P, Cummins CC: 6-Coordinate tungsten(VI) tris-n-isopropylanilide complexes: products of terminal oxo and nitrido transformations effected by main group electrophiles. Dalton Trans; 2008 Sep 7;(33):4458-63
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  • [Title] 6-Coordinate tungsten(VI) tris-n-isopropylanilide complexes: products of terminal oxo and nitrido transformations effected by main group electrophiles.
  • The nitridotungsten(vi) complex NW(N[i-Pr]Ar)(3) (-N, Ar = 3,5-Me(2)C(6)H(3)) reacts with (CF(3)C(O))(2)O followed by ClSiMe(3) to give the isolable trifluoroacetylimido-chloride complex -(NC(O)CF(3))Cl, with oxalyl chloride to give cyanate-dichloride -(OCN)(Cl)(2), and with PCl(5) to give trichlorophosphinimide-dichloride -(NPCl(3))(Cl)(2).
  • The oxo-chloride complex -(O)Cl, obtained from -N upon treatment with pivaloyl chloride, reacts with PCl(5) to give trichloride -(Cl)(3).
  • Synthetic and structural details are reported for the new tungsten trisanilide derivatives.

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  • (PMID = 18698449.001).
  • [ISSN] 1477-9234
  • [Journal-full-title] Dalton transactions (Cambridge, England : 2003)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dalton Trans
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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45. Cotton FA, Li Z, Murillo CA, Wang X, Yu R, Zhao Q: Crystal-to-crystal oxidative deprotonation of a di(micro-hydroxo) to a di(micro-oxo) dimer of dimolybdenum units. Inorg Chem; 2007 Apr 16;46(8):3245-50
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  • [Title] Crystal-to-crystal oxidative deprotonation of a di(micro-hydroxo) to a di(micro-oxo) dimer of dimolybdenum units.
  • A crystal-to-crystal transformation of (DAniF)3Mo2(micro-OH)2Mo2(DAniF)3 (1) to (DAniF)3Mo2(micro-O)2Mo2(DAniF)3 (2), where DAniF is the anion (p-anisyl)NC(H)N(p-anisyl), by dioxygen provides rare insight into the deprotonation process effected by dioxygen.
  • In this dimolybdenum system, the conversion occurs without significant loss of crystallinity.
  • Although no intermediates have been directly observed, a compound containing the [(DAniF)3Mo2(micro-OH)(micro-O)Mo2(DAniF)3]+ cation, a proposed intermediate, has been obtained independently.
  • Possible pathways for the overall conversion of 1 to 2 are discussed.

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  • (PMID = 17367130.001).
  • [ISSN] 0020-1669
  • [Journal-full-title] Inorganic chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Inorg Chem
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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46. Sato K, Hirakuri K, Izumi T: Significant improvement of luminance and stability of a red electroluminescent device using nanocrystalline silicon. J Nanosci Nanotechnol; 2005 May;5(5):738-41
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  • [Title] Significant improvement of luminance and stability of a red electroluminescent device using nanocrystalline silicon.
  • An electroluminescent (EL) device using nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) was fabricated by annealing after cosputtering of Si chips and silicon dioxide target and subsequent hydrofluoric acid solution treatment.
  • The device emitted a red light with a peak at 670 nm by applying a low direct current (DC) operating voltage of 4.5 V.
  • The external quantum efficiency (EQE) of red luminescence at 4.5 V was 0.35%.
  • Moreover, the intensity of red luminescence was very stable for an operating time of 15000 min.
  • These results are a strong indication that the HF-treated device can be adapted to future light-related devices.
  • [MeSH-major] Electric Wiring. Electrochemistry / instrumentation. Luminescent Measurements / instrumentation. Nanotechnology / methods. Nanotubes / chemistry. Photochemistry / instrumentation. Silicon / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Color. Crystallization / methods. Crystallography. Equipment Design. Equipment Failure Analysis. Luminescence. Materials Testing. Molecular Conformation

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  • (PMID = 16010931.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-4880
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of nanoscience and nanotechnology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Nanosci Nanotechnol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] Z4152N8IUI / Silicon
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47. Lü WY, Zhang J, Shao GJ, Zhou HF, Cao P: [Genetic correlations between quality traits and other economic traits in japonica rice]. Yi Chuan; 2005 Jul;27(4):601-4
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  • [Title] [Genetic correlations between quality traits and other economic traits in japonica rice].
  • Genetic correlations among brown rice rate, chalkiness grain rate, chalkiness area and AC, and correlations between these quality traits and plant height and panicle trait were analyzed using parental seeds of 3 x 3 NC II reciprocal mating and some F2 generation seeds by the genetic model given by Zhu Jun for the selection of japonica breeding progeny.
  • The results showed that milled rice weight and brown rice rate are highly significant correlation with maternal additive effect.
  • The genetic covariance between genetic effect components of quality traits and agronomy traits was not significant but that between quality and other plant traits was complicated.

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  • (PMID = 16120586.001).
  • [ISSN] 0253-9772
  • [Journal-full-title] Yi chuan = Hereditas
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Yi Chuan
  • [Language] CHI
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
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48. Wilensky RL, Macphee CH: Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) and atherosclerosis. Curr Opin Lipidol; 2009 Oct;20(5):415-20
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  • [Title] Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) and atherosclerosis.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There is substantial data from over 50 000 patients that increased lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) mass or activity is associated with an increased risk of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndromes and ischemic stroke.
  • However, only recently have data emerged demonstrating a role of Lp-PLA2 in development of advanced coronary artery disease.
  • Indeed, Lp-PLA2 may be an important link between lipid homeostasis and the vascular inflammatory response.
  • RECENT FINDINGS: Lp-PLA2, also known as platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, rapidly cleaves oxidized phosphatidylcholine molecules produced during the oxidation of LDL and atherogenic lipoprotein Lp(a), generating the soluble proinflammatory and proapoptotic lipid mediators, lyso-phosphatidylcholine and oxidized nonesterified fatty acids.
  • These proinflammatory lipids play an important role in the development of atherosclerotic necrotic cores, the substrate for acute unstable coronary disease by recruiting and activating leukocytes/macrophages, inducing apoptosis and impairing the subsequent removal of dead cells.
  • Selective inhibition of Lp-PLA2 reduces development of necrotic cores and may result in stabilization of atherosclerotic plaques.
  • SUMMARY: Recent data have shown that immune pathways play a major role in the development and progression of high-risk atherosclerosis, which leads to ischemic sudden death, myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndromes and ischemic strokes.
  • Persistent and sustained macrophage apoptosis appears to play a major role in the resulting local inflammatory response in part by effects elicited by Lp-PLA2.
  • Selective inhibition of Lp-PLA2 has been postulated to reduce necrotic core progression and the clinical sequelae of advanced, unstable atherosclerosis.
  • [MeSH-major] 1-Alkyl-2-acetylglycerophosphocholine Esterase / metabolism. Atherosclerosis / enzymology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Biomarkers / metabolism. Enzyme Inhibitors / pharmacology. Enzyme Inhibitors / therapeutic use. Humans. Oxidation-Reduction. Phospholipids / metabolism


49. Sceniak MP, Chatterjee S, Callaway EM: Visual spatial summation in macaque geniculocortical afferents. J Neurophysiol; 2006 Dec;96(6):3474-84
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  • [Title] Visual spatial summation in macaque geniculocortical afferents.
  • The spatial summation properties of visual signals were analyzed for geniculocortical afferents in the primary visual cortex (V1) of anesthetized paralyzed macaque monkeys.
  • Afferent input responses were recorded extracellularly during cortical inactivation through superfusion of the cortex with muscimol, allowing investigation of lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus (LGN) cell properties in the absence of cortical feedback.
  • Responses from afferent inputs were classified as magno-, parvo-, or koniocellular based on anatomical organization within the cortex, established through histological reconstructions, and visual response wavelength sensitivity.
  • More than 80% of afferents showed strong surround suppression [suppression index (SI) >0.5] and 14% showed negligible surround suppression (SI < 0.2).
  • Afferent responses with weak and strong surround suppression were found throughout cortical input layers 4C and 4A.
  • High-contrast estimates of the spatial extent of the classical surround were similar to the nonclassical surround.
  • The classical and nonclassical surrounds were, on average, 1.5-fold larger than the excitatory center.
  • Unlike neurons within V1, the spatial extent of excitatory summation for geniculocortical afferents was contrast invariant.
  • Nonclassical surround suppression showed slight contrast dependency with estimates larger (20%) at lower contrasts and stronger at higher contrasts (13%).
  • Surround suppression is inherent in cortical input responses and likely derives from lateral inhibition in either the LGN or retina.
  • Although surround suppression within afferent responses increases slightly with contrast, the spatial spread of excitation remains fixed with contrast.
  • This argues for distinct mechanisms of action for contrast-dependent modulation in cortical and subcortical responses.
  • [MeSH-major] Geniculate Bodies / physiology. Neurons, Afferent / physiology. Space Perception / physiology. Visual Cortex / physiology. Visual Perception / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Action Potentials / physiology. Anesthesia. Animals. Data Interpretation, Statistical. Feedback / physiology. Functional Laterality / physiology. Macaca mulatta. Macaca radiata. Microelectrodes. Photic Stimulation. Retina / physiology. Vision, Monocular / physiology. Visual Pathways / cytology. Visual Pathways / physiology

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  • (PMID = 16928793.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3077
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurophysiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurophysiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / EY 01742
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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50. Cheng HH, Anderson MM, Hankenson FC, Johnston L, Kotwaliwale CV, Overbaugh J: Envelope determinants for dual-receptor specificity in feline leukemia virus subgroup A and T variants. J Virol; 2006 Feb;80(4):1619-28
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  • [Title] Envelope determinants for dual-receptor specificity in feline leukemia virus subgroup A and T variants.
  • Gammaretroviruses, including the subgroups A, B, and C of feline leukemia virus (FeLV), use a multiple-membrane-spanning transport protein as a receptor.
  • In some cases, such as FeLV-T, a nonclassical receptor that includes both a transport protein (Pit1) and a soluble cofactor (FeLIX) is required for entry.
  • To define which regions confer specificity to classical versus nonclassical receptor pathways, we engineered mutations found in either FeLV-A/T or FeLV-T, individually and in combination, into the backbone of the transmissible form of the virus, FeLV-A.
  • The receptor specificities of these viruses were tested by measuring infection and binding to cells expressing the FeLV-A receptor or the FeLV-T receptors.
  • FeLV-A receptor specificity was maintained when changes at amino acid position 6, 7, or 8 of the mature envelope glycoprotein were introduced, although differences in infection efficiency were observed.
  • When these N-terminal mutations were introduced together with a C-terminal 4-amino-acid insertion and an adjacent amino acid change, the resulting viruses acquired FeLV-T receptor specificity.
  • Additionally, a W-->L change at amino acid position 378, although not required, enhanced infectivity for some viruses.
  • Thus, we have found that determinants in the N and C termini of the envelope surface unit can direct entry via the nonclassical FeLV-T receptor pathway.
  • The region that has been defined as the receptor binding domain of gammaretroviral envelope proteins determined entry via the FeLV-A receptor independently of the presence of the N- and C-terminal FeLV-T receptor determinants.

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  • (PMID = 16439518.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-538X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of virology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Virol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA051080; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 51080
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Receptors, Virus; 0 / Retroviridae Proteins, Oncogenic; 0 / Viral Envelope Proteins; 0 / feline leukemia virus receptor; 0 / glycoprotein gp70, Feline leukemia virus
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1367127
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51. Fernandez-Morera JL, Rodriguez-Rodero S, Tunon A, Martinez-Borra J, Vidal-Castineira JR, Lopez-Vazquez A, Rodrigo L, Rodrigo P, González S, Lahoz CH, Lopez-Larrea C: Genetic influence of the nonclassical major histocompatibility complex class I molecule MICB in multiple sclerosis susceptibility. Tissue Antigens; 2008 Jul;72(1):54-9
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  • [Title] Genetic influence of the nonclassical major histocompatibility complex class I molecule MICB in multiple sclerosis susceptibility.
  • It has been widely reported that the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II region provides the main genetic contribution to multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility.
  • However, recent studies have suggested that the MHC class I region may also contribute to the development of MS.
  • In this study, we investigated the possible association of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B, MHC class I chain-related gene B (MICB) and MHC class I chain-related gene A (MICA) genes, located in the MHC class I region, with MS susceptibility.
  • For this purpose, we analyzed the distribution of HLA-DR, HLA-B, MICB and MICA alleles in 121 MS patients and 156 healthy controls.
  • Neither HLA-B nor MICA alleles were found to be associated with MS susceptibility, and only the frequency of HLA-DRB1*01 allele was found to be increased in controls (31% vs 14%, P(c) = 0.011).
  • However, MICB*004 allele frequency was significantly increased in MS patients (46.3% vs 23.3%, P(c) < 0.001, odds ratio = 2.82, 95% confidence interval = 1.68-4.73).
  • Although, MICB*004 and HLA-DRB1*15 belong to the AH 7.1 ancestral haplotype, the association of MICB*004 to MS susceptibility was found to be independent of HLA-DRB1*15 in our population.
  • This and previous studies clearly suggest that the MHC class I, in addition to class II, could be involved in MS susceptibility.
  • [MeSH-major] Genetic Predisposition to Disease. Histocompatibility Antigens Class I / genetics. Multiple Sclerosis / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Female. Gene Frequency. HLA-B Antigens / genetics. HLA-DR Antigens / genetics. HLA-DRB1 Chains. Humans. Male

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  • (PMID = 18588574.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-2815
  • [Journal-full-title] Tissue antigens
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tissue Antigens
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / HLA-B Antigens; 0 / HLA-DR Antigens; 0 / HLA-DRB1 Chains; 0 / HLA-DRB1*15 antigen; 0 / Histocompatibility Antigens Class I; 0 / MHC class I-related chain A; 0 / MICB antigen
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52. Lehrbach NJ, Miska EA: Regulation of pre-miRNA processing. Adv Exp Med Biol; 2010;700:67-75
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  • [Title] Regulation of pre-miRNA processing.
  • microRNAs are endogenously expressed 21 nucleotide noncoding RNAs. microRNA-mediated regulation of the translation of specific mRNA is implicated in a range of developmental processes and pathologies.
  • As such, miRNA expression is tightly controlled in normal development by both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms.
  • This chapter is concerned with the control of pre-miRNA processing of individual miRNAs by specific factors.
  • It is focussed on the regulation of a subset of miRNAs by the RNA-binding protein Lin28/LIN-28.
  • We discuss how Lin28/LIN-28 can sequester pre-let-7 miRNA precursor to prevent Dicer-mediated processing.
  • We describe how interaction of pre-let-7 with Lin28/ LIN-28 leads to pre-let-7 uridylation and subsequent degradation.
  • Finally, we analyze how let-7 and Lin28/LIN-28 together act as a highly conserved developmental switch that controls stem cell differentiation in C. elegans and mammals.
  • [MeSH-major] Caenorhabditis elegans / genetics. RNA Precursors / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins / physiology. MicroRNAs / physiology. Repressor Proteins / physiology

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  • (PMID = 21627031.001).
  • [ISSN] 0065-2598
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in experimental medicine and biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv. Exp. Med. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Cancer Research UK / / /C13474; United Kingdom / Wellcome Trust / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins; 0 / LIN-28 protein, C elegans; 0 / MicroRNAs; 0 / RNA Precursors; 0 / Repressor Proteins; 0 / let-7 microRNA, C elegans
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53. Bonauer A, Dimmeler S: The microRNA-17-92 cluster: still a miRacle? Cell Cycle; 2009 Dec;8(23):3866-73
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  • [Title] The microRNA-17-92 cluster: still a miRacle?
  • MicroRNAs (miRs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding to target mRNAs, leading to translational repression or degradation.
  • The polycistronic microRNA cluster comprises seven mature micro-RNAs (miR-17-5p and -3p, miR-18a, miR-19a and b, miR-20a and miR-92a) and has initially been linked to tumorigenesis.
  • Meanwhile, additional functions have been assigned to the cluster such as the regulation of hematopoiesis and immune functions.
  • Recently, loss-off-function studies revealed a critically role of the miR-17-92 cluster in heart and lung development and the individual miRNAs encoded by the cluster such as miR-17 and miR-92a were shown to control lung development and postnatal neovascularization, respectively.
  • The present article summarizes the functions of the miR-17-92 cluster in health and disease and discusses the specific contribution and the targets of the individual miRNAs encoded by the cluster.
  • [MeSH-major] MicroRNAs / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Heart / growth & development. Humans. Lung / growth & development. Multigene Family. Neovascularization, Physiologic. Protein Biosynthesis / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 19887902.001).
  • [ISSN] 1551-4005
  • [Journal-full-title] Cell cycle (Georgetown, Tex.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cell Cycle
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / MIRN17 microRNA, human; 0 / MicroRNAs
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54. Shamovsky I, Nudler E: Isolation and characterization of the heat shock RNA 1. Methods Mol Biol; 2009;540:265-79
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  • [Title] Isolation and characterization of the heat shock RNA 1.
  • The heat shock (HS) response is the major cellular defense mechanism against acute exposure to environmental stresses.
  • The hallmark of the HS response, which is conserved in all eukaryotes, is the rapid and massive induction of expression of a set of cytoprotective genes.
  • Most of the induction occurs at the level of transcription.
  • The master regulator, heat shock transcription factor (HSF, or HSF1 in vertebrates), is responsible for the induction of HS gene transcription in response to elevated temperature.
  • Under normal conditions HSF is present in the cell as an inactive monomer.
  • During HS, HSF trimerizes and binds to a consensus sequence in the promoter of HS genes, stimulating their transcription by up to 200-fold.
  • We have shown that a large, noncoding RNA, HSR1, and the translation elongation factor eEF1A form a complex with HSF during HS and are required for its activation.

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  • (PMID = 19381566.001).
  • [ISSN] 1064-3745
  • [Journal-full-title] Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Methods Mol. Biol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / AI090110-01; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI090110; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM069800; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI090110-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cell Extracts; 0 / DNA-Binding Proteins; 0 / Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-1; 0 / RNA, Untranslated; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 0 / Transcription Factors; 0 / eukaryotic peptide initiation factor-1A; 0 / heat shock transcription factor
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS229951; NLM/ PMC2929134
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55. Lei FF, Zhao JX, Wang XX, Yao BT, Ding K: [An experimental observation of pulmonary fibrosis in rats and its transforming growth factor beta1 treated by total hedysarum polybotyssaccharide]. Zhong Yao Cai; 2008 Jun;31(6):873-7
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  • [Title] [An experimental observation of pulmonary fibrosis in rats and its transforming growth factor beta1 treated by total hedysarum polybotyssaccharide].
  • OBJECTIVE: To treat pulmonary fibrosis and study its mechanisms.
  • METHODS: Choosing randomly 24 Wistar rats with normal sodium intratracheal injection as normal control group, the rests with heomycin A5 induced fibrosis were divided randomly into model group 24 as positive control, prednisone group 24, total hedysarum polybotyssaccharide (THPS) group 24, THPS and small dose prednisone group 24, and treated with different drugs.
  • 6 rats of every group were put to death and observed pathological section, using imaging processing computer to quantitative analysis histomorphology, collagen, and transforming growth beta1, (TGF-beta1) on 7, 14, 30, 60 days.
  • RESULTS: The group treated by THPS combination small dose prednisone showed up the most effects in the 3 treatment groups.
  • CONCLUSION: THPS combination small dose prednisone to treat pulmonary fibrosis of rats is better than classic ways and its efficacy of inhibition TGF-beta1 may be a mechanism.
  • [MeSH-major] Drugs, Chinese Herbal / pharmacology. Fabaceae / chemistry. Polysaccharides / pharmacology. Pulmonary Fibrosis / pathology. Transforming Growth Factor beta1 / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Bleomycin. Collagen / metabolism. Disease Models, Animal. Female. Immunohistochemistry. Lung / drug effects. Lung / metabolism. Lung / pathology. Prednisolone / administration & dosage. Prednisolone / pharmacology. Prednisolone / therapeutic use. Random Allocation. Rats. Rats, Wistar

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  • (PMID = 18998573.001).
  • [ISSN] 1001-4454
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhong yao cai = Zhongyaocai = Journal of Chinese medicinal materials
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhong Yao Cai
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Drugs, Chinese Herbal; 0 / Polysaccharides; 0 / Transforming Growth Factor beta1; 11056-06-7 / Bleomycin; 9007-34-5 / Collagen; 9PHQ9Y1OLM / Prednisolone
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56. Warner JB, Philippakis AA, Jaeger SA, He FS, Lin J, Bulyk ML: Systematic identification of mammalian regulatory motifs' target genes and functions. Nat Methods; 2008 Apr;5(4):347-53
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  • [Title] Systematic identification of mammalian regulatory motifs' target genes and functions.
  • We developed an algorithm, Lever, that systematically maps metazoan DNA regulatory motifs or motif combinations to sets of genes.
  • Lever assesses whether the motifs are enriched in cis-regulatory modules (CRMs), predicted by our PhylCRM algorithm, in the noncoding sequences surrounding the genes.
  • Lever analysis allows unbiased inference of functional annotations to regulatory motifs and candidate CRMs.
  • We used human myogenic differentiation as a model system to statistically assess greater than 25,000 pairings of gene sets and motifs or motif combinations.
  • We assigned functional annotations to candidate regulatory motifs predicted previously and identified gene sets that are likely to be co-regulated via shared regulatory motifs.
  • Lever allows moving beyond the identification of putative regulatory motifs in mammalian genomes, toward understanding their biological roles.
  • This approach is general and can be applied readily to any cell type, gene expression pattern or organism of interest.

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  • (PMID = 18311145.001).
  • [ISSN] 1548-7105
  • [Journal-full-title] Nature methods
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nat. Methods
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] GEO/ GSE4460
  • [Grant] United States / NHGRI NIH HHS / HG / R01 HG002966-03; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / T32 HL007627; United States / NHGRI NIH HHS / HG / R01 HG002966-05; United States / NHGRI NIH HHS / HG / R01 HG002966-04; United States / NHGRI NIH HHS / HG / HG002966-05; United States / NHGRI NIH HHS / HG / HG002966-03; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / T32 HL07627; United States / NHGRI NIH HHS / HG / HG002966-04; United States / NHGRI NIH HHS / HG / R01 HG002966; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / F32 AR051287
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 9007-49-2 / DNA
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS112240; NLM/ PMC2708972
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57. Aliev SA, Aliev ES: [Evolution of the methods of peritonization of the vermiform process stump in acute destructive appendicitis complicated by typhlitis]. Vestn Khir Im I I Grek; 2006;165(1):67-72
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  • [Title] [Evolution of the methods of peritonization of the vermiform process stump in acute destructive appendicitis complicated by typhlitis].
  • A comparative assessment of effectiveness of various non-traditional and non-typical variants of appendectomy was made with using non-standard (non-classical) methods of treatment and peritonization of the vermiform stump developed by different authors for destructive forms of acute appendicitis complicated by inflammatory infiltration of the blind gut cupola and typhlitis.
  • An analysis of results of using the proposed non-typical technical methods and techniques as well as an assessment of the authors' technique used in 43 patients suggests that the above variants of peritonization of the vermiform process stump should not be considered as competing.
  • Each of the methods can be successfully used depending on the concrete clinical situations and for the corresponding indications as the most optimal method of choice or as an alternative of the classical variant of appendectomy in patients with acute destructive appendicitis complicated by inflammatory infiltration of the blind gut cupola and typhlitis.
  • [MeSH-major] Appendectomy / methods. Appendicitis / surgery. Enterocolitis, Necrotizing / etiology. Peritoneum / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Evaluation Studies as Topic. Humans. Reoperation. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16568860.001).
  • [ISSN] 0042-4625
  • [Journal-full-title] Vestnik khirurgii imeni I. I. Grekova
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vestn. Khir. Im. I. I. Grek.
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Russia (Federation)
  • [Number-of-references] 36
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58. Tomizawa K, Sugano K, Yamada H, Horii I: Physicochemical and cell-based approach for early screening of phospholipidosis-inducing potential. J Toxicol Sci; 2006 Oct;31(4):315-24
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  • [Title] Physicochemical and cell-based approach for early screening of phospholipidosis-inducing potential.
  • Some of the principal requisites of toxicity screening methods in drug discovery are their ease to perform and high throughput, as well as the possibility to predict the occurrence of clinical events.
  • Phospholipidosis is one of the toxicities often induced by potential drugs.
  • Several physicochemical methods for the prediction of phospholipidosis have been reported.
  • The purpose of the present study was to examine the predictability of methods based on lipophilicity and charge parameters.
  • We employed a test set of 33 compounds including 11 in-house compounds.
  • The phospholipidosis-inducing potential (PLIP) of the test set compounds was determined by the fluorescence-labeled lipid accumulation assay using isolated rat hepatocytes.
  • This assay was verified by transmission electron microscopy (EM).
  • The usefulness of the ClogP - most basic pK(a) (pK(a) -MB) plot to the PLIP of compounds was examined.
  • This plot was unable to predict the PLIP of zwitterions.
  • In order to improve its predictability, the net charge of a given molecule (NC) was introduced instead of pK(a) - MB, since the NC corresponds directly to the ionization state of compounds in the organelles.
  • Compounds with high ClogP (> 1) and high NC (1< or =NC< or =2) tended to be positive.
  • This finding was also confirmed using 30 additional validation set compounds obtained from the literature.
  • The ClogP - NC plot differentiated positive and negative compounds with more than 98% accuracy (62/63), indicating its usefulness in drug discovery.
  • [MeSH-major] Lipidoses / chemically induced. Phospholipids / metabolism. Toxicity Tests / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cells, Cultured. Hepatocytes / drug effects. Hepatocytes / metabolism. Hepatocytes / ultrastructure. Inclusion Bodies / drug effects. Male. Rats

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  • (PMID = 17077586.001).
  • [ISSN] 0388-1350
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of toxicological sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Toxicol Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Phospholipids
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59. Osweiler GD, Jagannatha S, Trampel DW, Imerman PM, Ensley SM, Yoon I, Moore DT: Evaluation of XPC and prototypes on aflatoxin-challenged broilers. Poult Sci; 2010 Sep;89(9):1887-93
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  • [Title] Evaluation of XPC and prototypes on aflatoxin-challenged broilers.
  • Various products and prototypes were added to poultry diets during an aflatoxin challenge on growth and histological parameters.
  • Male broiler chicks were randomly assigned to 8 treatment groups with 8 replicates/treatment and 3 birds/replicate.
  • Treatments were as follows:.
  • 1) negative control containing no aflatoxin (NC);.
  • 2) positive control containing aflatoxin (PC);.
  • 3) 0.1% glucomannan mycotoxin standard industry ameliorator (STD);.
  • 4) 0.1% prototype A, a proprietary mixture of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae product and diatomaceous clay;.
  • 5) 0.2% prototype A;.
  • 6) 0.15% prototype B, a proprietary mixture of a S. cerevisiae product and diatomaceous clay (PB);.
  • 7) 0.0625% XPC (S. cerevisiae fermentation product); and 8) 0.125% XPC (XPC2).
  • All treatments except NC contained 2,280 +/- 102 ng/g of aflatoxin and were fed for 28 d.
  • Body weight and feed intake were measured weekly.
  • Livers were collected on d 28, weighed, and used for histopathological evaluation.
  • Beginning weights were similar across treatments, but BW were lower (P </= 0.05) than NC for all treatments except PB and XPC2.
  • Total feed intake was lower (P </= 0.05) only for PC and STD compared with all other groups.
  • Feed efficiency was not significantly (P >/= 0.05) different among the treatment groups.
  • Liver weights relative to BW were higher (P </= 0.05) for all treatments compared with NC.
  • Liver vacuolar lesions were significantly higher (P </= 0.05) than NC for the PC, STD, 0.1% prototype A, and 0.0625% XPC groups.
  • However, vacuolar lesions in the 0.15% prototype B, PB, and XPC2 treatments were not significantly different (P >/= 0.05) compared with NC.
  • Overall, BW gain in treatment groups PB and XPC2 was not different from NC and that corresponded to protective effects against liver lesions.
  • Benefits observed during an aflatoxin challenge when broilers were supplemented with XPC, a fermentation product that does not contain any adsorbents, may be attributed to something other than adsorption as a primary mechanism.
  • [MeSH-major] Aflatoxins / toxicity. Chickens. Diatomaceous Earth / pharmacology. Poultry Diseases / chemically induced. Saccharomyces cerevisiae / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animal Feed. Animals. Diet / veterinary. Dietary Supplements. Drug-Induced Liver Injury / drug therapy. Drug-Induced Liver Injury / veterinary. Liver / drug effects. Liver / pathology. Male. Organ Size. Weight Gain / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 20709973.001).
  • [ISSN] 0032-5791
  • [Journal-full-title] Poultry science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Poult. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Aflatoxins; 61790-53-2 / Diatomaceous Earth
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60. Wei B, Ta N, Li J, Zhang JF, Chen BL: [Relationship between the inhibition of NF-kappaB and insulin resistance in uterrus of rats with gestational diabetes mellitus]. Xi Bao Yu Fen Zi Mian Yi Xue Za Zhi; 2010 Mar;26(3):235-7, 241
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  • [Title] [Relationship between the inhibition of NF-kappaB and insulin resistance in uterrus of rats with gestational diabetes mellitus].
  • AIM: To observe the expression of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4) in uteru of rats with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and to explore the relationship between inhibition of NF-kappaB and insulin resistance.
  • METHODS: Thirty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: normal pregnant control (NC) group, GDM group and PDTC group, 10 rats each group.
  • GDM rat model was established by intraperitoneal (ip) injection of streptozotocin (STZ).
  • PDTC (40 mg/kg) was ip injected in PDTC group.The rats were sacrificed on the 20-day of pregnancy before delivery.
  • The uterus were taken to observe the pathological changes.
  • The expressions of GLUT-4 and NF-kappaB in uteru tissue were detected by immunohistochemical staining and Western blot.
  • RESULTS: The renal NF-kappaB activity in GDM group was higher significantly than that in NC group (P<0.01); and NF-kappaB activity in PDTC group was lower than that in GDM group (P<0.01).
  • The expression of GLUT-4 in GDM group was significantly lower than that in NC group (P<0.01).
  • However, compared with GDM group, the expression of GLUT-4 in PDTC group was increased (P<0.01).
  • CONCLUSION: The inhibition of NF-kappaB activity can increase the expression of GLUT-4 in uterus of GDM rats, indicating that the occurrence of GDM in rats with uteru insulin resistance may be related with the intervention of NF-kappaB activity on the down regulation of the expression of GLUT-4.
  • [MeSH-major] Diabetes, Gestational / metabolism. Down-Regulation. Insulin Resistance. NF-kappa B / genetics. Uterus / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Disease Models, Animal. Female. Glucose Transporter Type 4 / genetics. Glucose Transporter Type 4 / metabolism. Humans. Pregnancy. Random Allocation. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley

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  • (PMID = 20230686.001).
  • [ISSN] 1007-8738
  • [Journal-full-title] Xi bao yu fen zi mian yi xue za zhi = Chinese journal of cellular and molecular immunology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Xi Bao Yu Fen Zi Mian Yi Xue Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Glucose Transporter Type 4; 0 / NF-kappa B; 0 / Slc2a4 protein, mouse
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61. Zhang L, Zhang L, Li YH, Chen ML, Zhang HY, Gao MM: [Effects of high dose glucose-insulin-potassium infusion on myocardial injury and serum sFas/ sFasL concentration in acute myocardial infarction]. Zhonghua Nei Ke Za Zhi; 2005 Jul;44(7):499-502
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  • [Title] [Effects of high dose glucose-insulin-potassium infusion on myocardial injury and serum sFas/ sFasL concentration in acute myocardial infarction].
  • OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to evaluate reperfusion therapy, co-administered with high dose glucose-insulin-potassium (GIK) treatment on serum soluble Fas/APO-1 (sFas) and Fas ligand (sFasL) concentration in Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) patients.
  • METHODS: Seventy-four patients with AMI underwent reperfusion therapy were randomized into GIK group (n = 35) receiving high-dose GIK for 24 hours or a vehicle group (n = 39).
  • Thirty-four control subjects (NC) were also enrolled in the present study.
  • Strepavidin-biotin ELISA was used to determine the serum sFas and sFasL concentration at baseline and different time point (24 h, 3 d, 7 d and 14 d) after reperfusion. RESULTS:.
  • (1) The serum concentration of sFas and sFas-L ([sFas] and [sFas-L]) of AMI patients were significantly elevated at baseline as compared with NC (P < 0.01). (2) The [sFas] in GIK and non-GIK group decreased 24 h after reperfusion (P < 0.01 vs. baseline) and then increased during 3-7 d period (P < 0.01 vs. 24 h). (3) The GIK group demonstrated reduced [sFas] at 14 d (P < 0.01 vs. 7 d), with no concomitant changes in the non-GIK group. (4) The [sFasL] in the GIK and non-GIK group were no significant difference during 3-14 d period.
  • CONCLUSION Owing to cardioprotective effects reported here and by others, a high-dose GIK infusion co-administered with the timely establishment of perfusion should be strongly considered as a treatment of choice for AMI.
  • [MeSH-major] Antigens, CD95 / blood. Membrane Glycoproteins / blood. Myocardial Infarction / therapy. Tumor Necrosis Factors / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary. Apoptosis / drug effects. Combined Modality Therapy. Fas Ligand Protein. Female. Glucose / administration & dosage. Glucose / therapeutic use. Humans. Insulin / administration & dosage. Insulin / therapeutic use. Male. Middle Aged. Myocardial Reperfusion Injury / prevention & control. Potassium / administration & dosage. Potassium / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 16080838.001).
  • [ISSN] 0578-1426
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua nei ke za zhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Nei Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD95; 0 / FASLG protein, human; 0 / Fas Ligand Protein; 0 / Insulin; 0 / Membrane Glycoproteins; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factors; 0 / glucose-insulin-potassium cardioplegic solution; IY9XDZ35W2 / Glucose; RWP5GA015D / Potassium
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62. Koide N, Morikawa A, Naiki Y, Tumurkhuu G, Yoshida T, Ikeda H, Yokochi T: Low susceptibility of NC/Nga mice to tumor necrosis factor-alpha-mediated lethality and hepatocellular damage with D-galactosamine sensitization. Clin Immunol; 2009 Feb;130(2):225-32
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  • [Title] Low susceptibility of NC/Nga mice to tumor necrosis factor-alpha-mediated lethality and hepatocellular damage with D-galactosamine sensitization.
  • The susceptibility of NC/Nga mice to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was examined by using sensitization with d-galactosamine (d-GalN).
  • Administration of TNF-alpha and d-GalN killed none of the NC/Nga mice, whereas it killed all of the BALB/c mice.
  • Treatment with TNF-alpha and d-GalN caused few hepatic lesions in NC/Nga mice but massive hepatocellular apoptosis in BALB/c mice.
  • Unlike BALB/c mice, there was no elevation in caspase 3 and 8 activities in the livers of NC/Nga mice receiving TNF-alpha and d-GalN.
  • On the other hand, administration of anti-Fas antibody definitely killed both NC/Nga and BALB/c mice via activation of caspases 3 and 8.
  • Treatment with TNF-alpha and d-GalN led to translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB in NC/Nga and BALB/c mice.
  • However, NF-kappaB translocation was sustained in NC/Nga mice, although it disappeared in BALB/c mice 7 h after the treatment.
  • NF-kappaB inhibitors activated caspases 3 and 8, and enhanced TNF-alpha-mediated lethality in NC/Nga.
  • Taken together, the low susceptibility of NC/Nga mice to TNF-alpha-mediated lethality was suggested to be responsible for the sustained NF-kappaB activation.
  • [MeSH-major] Apoptosis / immunology. Galactosamine / toxicity. Liver / drug effects. NF-kappa B / metabolism. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / toxicity
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antibodies, Monoclonal / pharmacology. Antigens, CD95 / antagonists & inhibitors. Antigens, CD95 / immunology. Antigens, CD95 / metabolism. Caspase 3 / metabolism. Caspase 8 / metabolism. Hepatocytes / drug effects. Hepatocytes / enzymology. Hepatocytes / immunology. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred BALB C. Mice, Inbred Strains. Recombinant Proteins / toxicity. Signal Transduction

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  • (PMID = 18945641.001).
  • [ISSN] 1521-7035
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical immunology (Orlando, Fla.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Immunol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies, Monoclonal; 0 / Antigens, CD95; 0 / Fas protein, mouse; 0 / NF-kappa B; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; 0 / anti-Fas monoclonal antibody; 7535-00-4 / Galactosamine; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspase 3; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspase 8
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63. Bond CS, Fox AH: Paraspeckles: nuclear bodies built on long noncoding RNA. J Cell Biol; 2009 Sep 7;186(5):637-44
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  • [Title] Paraspeckles: nuclear bodies built on long noncoding RNA.
  • Paraspeckles are ribonucleoprotein bodies found in the interchromatin space of mammalian cell nuclei.
  • These structures play a role in regulating the expression of certain genes in differentiated cells by nuclear retention of RNA.
  • The core paraspeckle proteins (PSF/SFPQ, P54NRB/NONO, and PSPC1 [paraspeckle protein 1]) are members of the DBHS (Drosophila melanogaster behavior, human splicing) family.
  • These proteins, together with the long nonprotein-coding RNA NEAT1 (MEN-epsilon/beta), associate to form paraspeckles and maintain their integrity.
  • Given the large numbers of long noncoding transcripts currently being discovered through whole transcriptome analysis, paraspeckles may be a paradigm for a class of subnuclear bodies formed around long noncoding RNA.
  • [MeSH-major] Intranuclear Inclusion Bodies / genetics. RNA, Untranslated / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Nucleus / metabolism. Cell Nucleus / ultrastructure. Gene Expression Regulation. Humans. Nuclear Matrix-Associated Proteins / genetics. Nuclear Matrix-Associated Proteins / metabolism. Nuclear Proteins / genetics. Nuclear Proteins / metabolism. Octamer Transcription Factors / genetics. Octamer Transcription Factors / metabolism. RNA-Binding Proteins / genetics. RNA-Binding Proteins / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19720872.001).
  • [ISSN] 1540-8140
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of cell biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cell Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / NONO protein, human; 0 / Nuclear Matrix-Associated Proteins; 0 / Nuclear Proteins; 0 / Octamer Transcription Factors; 0 / PSPC1 protein, human; 0 / PTB-associated splicing factor; 0 / RNA, Untranslated; 0 / RNA-Binding Proteins
  • [Number-of-references] 54
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2742191
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64. Missel E, Mintz GS, Carlier SG, Sano K, Qian J, Kaple RK, Castellanos C, Dangas G, Mehran R, Moses JW, Stone GW, Leon MB: Necrotic core and its ratio to dense calcium are predictors of high-risk non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome. Am J Cardiol; 2008 Mar 1;101(5):573-8
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  • [Title] Necrotic core and its ratio to dense calcium are predictors of high-risk non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome.
  • Increased creatine kinase-MB levels and ST-segment depression are well-known prognostic factors in the setting of non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (ACS).
  • We hypothesized a relationship between virtual histology intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS) findings and these prognostic factors.
  • We performed "whole vessel" VH-IVUS analysis in culprit arteries of 225 patients with ACS and measured the 4 basic VH-IVUS coronary plaque components--fibrous, fibrofatty, dense calcium (DC), and necrotic core (NC)--and calculated a NC/DC ratio.
  • Patients' age was 62 +/- 11 years; 72% were men and 23% had diabetes.
  • Only the NC/DC ratio had a positive association with creatine kinase-MB levels (r = 0.21, p = 0.03), and it was significantly higher for patients with ST-depression compared with those with non-ST-depression ACS (1.97 +/- 1.46 vs 1.58 +/- 1.10, p = 0.02).
  • Sensitivity and specificity curves determined that a NC/DC value > or =2 (odds ratio 3.8, p = 0.01) and percentage of NC > or =6 (odds ratio 3.1, p = 0.04) were thresholds that best separated patients with high-risk non-ST-elevation ACS from those without abnormal creatine kinase-MB or ST depression.
  • Patients with both predictors had significantly higher total cholesterol (204.7 +/- 60.5 vs 173.6 +/- 44.3 mg/dl, p = 0.01), higher low-density liprotein cholesterol (132.5 +/- 49.8 vs 101.3 +/- 33.2 mg/dl, p = 0.02), and more myocardial injury (creatine kinase-MB value of 42 +/- 38 vs 12 +/- 21, p = 0.01) than patients with no predictors.
  • In conclusion, VH-IVUS analysis showed that the percentage of NC and its ratio to DC in diseased coronary segments are positively associated with a high-risk ACS presentation.
  • [MeSH-major] Acute Coronary Syndrome / pathology. Calcinosis / pathology. Coronary Vessels / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers / blood. Cholesterol / blood. Coronary Artery Disease / pathology. Creatine Kinase / blood. Female. Fibrosis. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Necrosis. Prognosis. Prospective Studies. Registries. Risk Assessment. Sensitivity and Specificity. Severity of Illness Index. Smoking / pathology. Tunica Media / pathology. Ultrasonography, Interventional

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  • (PMID = 18308001.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-9149
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Cardiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 97C5T2UQ7J / Cholesterol; EC 2.7.3.2 / Creatine Kinase
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65. Sallinen J, Fogelholm M, Pakarinen A, Juvonen T, Volek JS, Kraemer WJ, Alen M, Häkkinen K: Effects of strength training and nutritional counseling on metabolic health indicators in aging women. Can J Appl Physiol; 2005 Dec;30(6):690-707
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  • [Title] Effects of strength training and nutritional counseling on metabolic health indicators in aging women.
  • PURPOSE: Effects of strength training (ST) and nutritional counseling (NC) on metabolic health indicators were examined in 50 aging women.
  • METHODS: Subjects performed ST for 21 weeks.
  • NC was given to obtain sufficient energy and protein intake, and recommended intake of fat and fiber.
  • RESULTS: NC increased intake of protein and polyunsaturated fat by 4.5% and 10.7% and decreased intake of saturated fat by 18.3%.
  • Serum concentrations of total cholesterol (TC), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), total and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio and triacylglycerols (TAG) decreased, and serum HDL-C increased in all subjects after ST.
  • Respectively, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and serum insulin concentration decreased in all subjects.
  • NC contributed to the decreases in levels of serum LDL-C after the first half of ST and serum TC and HDL-C ratio during both ST periods.
  • Changes in serum TAG concentrations correlated positively with intake of carbohydrates, and negatively with monounsaturated fat in all subjects.
  • Respectively, changes in serum TC levels were related to protein intake, and changes in serum HDL-C to intake of fat, and inversely to carbohydrate and protein in all subjects.
  • Relationships between serum TC and HDL-C levels and protein intake were only observable in the ST+NC group.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The long-term ST had favorable effects on serum lipids, lipoproteins, insulin concentration, and blood pressure.
  • However, NC further contributed to positive changes in serum lipids and lipoproteins.
  • [MeSH-major] Counseling. Exercise / physiology. Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Blood Pressure. Body Composition. Body Mass Index. Cholesterol / blood. Cholesterol, HDL / blood. Cholesterol, LDL / blood. Female. Heart Rate. Humans. Middle Aged. Muscle, Skeletal / physiology. Triglycerides / blood

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  • (PMID = 16485520.001).
  • [ISSN] 1066-7814
  • [Journal-full-title] Canadian journal of applied physiology = Revue canadienne de physiologie appliquée
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Can J Appl Physiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cholesterol, HDL; 0 / Cholesterol, LDL; 0 / Triglycerides; 97C5T2UQ7J / Cholesterol
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66. Chen LL, Carmichael GG: Altered nuclear retention of mRNAs containing inverted repeats in human embryonic stem cells: functional role of a nuclear noncoding RNA. Mol Cell; 2009 Aug 28;35(4):467-78
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  • [Title] Altered nuclear retention of mRNAs containing inverted repeats in human embryonic stem cells: functional role of a nuclear noncoding RNA.
  • In many cells, mRNAs containing inverted repeats (Alu repeats in humans) in their 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs) are inefficiently exported to the cytoplasm.
  • Nuclear retention correlates with adenosine-to-inosine editing and is in paraspeckle-associated complexes containing the proteins p54(nrb), PSF, and PSP1 alpha.
  • We report that robust editing activity in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) does not lead to nuclear retention. p54(nrb), PSF, and PSP1 alpha are all expressed in hESCs, but paraspeckles are absent and only appear upon differentiation.
  • Paraspeckle assembly and function depend on expression of a long nuclear-retained noncoding RNA, NEAT1.
  • This RNA is not detectable in hESCs but is induced upon differentiation.
  • Knockdown of NEAT1 in HeLa cells results both in loss of paraspeckles and in enhanced nucleocytoplasmic export of mRNAs containing inverted Alu repeats.
  • Taken together, these results assign a biological function to a large noncoding nuclear RNA in the regulation of mRNA export.

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  • (PMID = 19716791.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-4164
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular cell
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cell
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA045382-22; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA045382-23; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA045382; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA04382; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA045382-22; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA045382-23
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 3' Untranslated Regions; 0 / NONO protein, human; 0 / Nuclear Matrix-Associated Proteins; 0 / Nuclear Proteins; 0 / Octamer Transcription Factors; 0 / PSPC1 protein, human; 0 / PTB-associated splicing factor; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / RNA, Nuclear; 0 / RNA, Untranslated; 0 / RNA-Binding Proteins; EC 3.5.4.4 / ADARB1 protein, human; EC 3.5.4.4 / Adenosine Deaminase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS140395; NLM/ PMC2749223
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67. Inoue J, Aramaki Y: Suppression of skin lesions by transdermal application of CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides in NC/Nga mice, a model of human atopic dermatitis. J Immunol; 2007 Jan 1;178(1):584-91
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  • [Title] Suppression of skin lesions by transdermal application of CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides in NC/Nga mice, a model of human atopic dermatitis.
  • Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a pruritic inflammatory skin disease characterized by an elevation of the total IgE level in plasma, the infiltration of mast cells and eosinophils, and the expression of cytokines by Th2 cells.
  • NC/Nga mice kept in conventional conditions are known to develop skin lesions resembling human AD.
  • We examined in this study the alterations of immune response in NC/Nga mice kept in conventional conditions, following transdermal application of CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN), which plays a critical role in immunity via the augmentation of Th1-type and suppression of Th2-type responses.
  • CpG-ODN remarkably changed the immune response from type Th2 to Th1 as determined from cytokine mRNA and Ab levels.
  • The serum IgE level was decreased and the expression of IgG2a was up-regulated.
  • The application of CpG-ODN to the skin also decreased inflammatory infiltration of mast cells, and suppression in the skin lesions was observed.
  • Furthermore, the generation of regulatory T cells, which are considered immune suppressive T cells, was observed in the skin on treatment with CpG-ODN.
  • These results suggested CpG-ODN is effective for immunotherapy in patients with AD, which is characterized by Th2-dominated inflammation.
  • [MeSH-major] Dermatitis, Atopic / drug therapy. Oligodeoxyribonucleotides / administration & dosage. Skin / drug effects. Th2 Cells / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Cutaneous. Animals. Antibodies / blood. Cytokines / genetics. Cytokines / metabolism. Humans. Immunoglobulin E / blood. Immunosuppression. Mast Cells. Mice. Mice, Inbred Strains. Pruritus / drug therapy. RNA, Messenger / analysis. RNA, Messenger / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17182599.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-1767
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Immunol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antibodies; 0 / CPG-oligonucleotide; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Oligodeoxyribonucleotides; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 37341-29-0 / Immunoglobulin E
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68. Pinto HP, Enevoldsen GH, Besenbacher F, Lauritsen JV, Foster AS: The role of tip size and orientation, tip-surface relaxations and surface impurities in simultaneous AFM and STM studies on the TiO2(110) surface. Nanotechnology; 2009 Jul 1;20(26):264020
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  • [Title] The role of tip size and orientation, tip-surface relaxations and surface impurities in simultaneous AFM and STM studies on the TiO2(110) surface.
  • In this work we investigate some of the key factors in simultaneously recorded scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) images of the TiO(2)(110) surface, particularly the role of tip size and orientation in the obtained contrast pattern, and the importance of tip-surface relaxations and surface impurities in measured currents.
  • We show that, while using multi-channel scanning modes provides an increase in physical data from a given measurement and greatly aids in interpretation, it also demands much greater rigor in simulations to provide a complete comparison.

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  • (PMID = 19509443.001).
  • [ISSN] 1361-6528
  • [Journal-full-title] Nanotechnology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nanotechnology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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69. Xu RY, Wan YP, Tang QY, Wu J, Cai W: Carbohydrate-to-fat ratio affects food intake and body weight in Wistar rats. Exp Biol Med (Maywood); 2010 Jul;235(7):833-8
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  • [Title] Carbohydrate-to-fat ratio affects food intake and body weight in Wistar rats.
  • The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of carbohydrate-to-fat ratio on body weight and appetite regulation in Wistar rats.
  • Twenty-four Wistar rats were randomized to three dietary groups (n = 8): normal carbohydrate diet (NC), low-carbohydrate diet (LC) and high-carbohydrate diet (HC) for 12 weeks.
  • Body weight and food intake were recorded.
  • Circulating leptin and insulin levels were measured by radioimmunoassay method.
  • The expression levels of leptin receptor, insulin receptor, orexin, neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related protein (AgRP) and melanocortin-4 receptor (MC-4R) in the hypothalamus were also measured by realtime polymerase chain reaction (PCR).
  • In the LC group, food intake reduced while body weight increased significantly compared with the NC and HC groups.
  • Plasma leptin levels increased in the LC (18.5 +/- 8.2 ng/mL) group compared with the NC (8.6 +/- 3.8 ng/mL, P < 0.001) and HC (6.6 +/- 1.9 ng/mL, P < 0.001) groups.
  • Realtime reverse transcription-PCR revealed a decrease in the hypothalamic expression level of only leptin receptor in the LC (0.764, 0.471-4.648 copy/mL) and HC (0.357, 0.129-0.781 copy/mL) groups compared with the NC (1.323, 0.616-2.392 copy/mL; P = 0.01) group, and that there was no significant change in those of insulin receptor, AgRP, Orexin, NPY and MC-4R.
  • Low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet raised body weight, which led to a rising of circulating leptin levels and a reduced expression of leptin receptor in the hypothalamus.
  • [MeSH-major] Appetite Regulation / physiology. Body Weight / physiology. Dietary Carbohydrates / pharmacology. Dietary Fats / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Agouti-Related Protein / analysis. Animals. Eating / physiology. Hypothalamus / chemistry. Insulin / blood. Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins / analysis. Leptin / blood. Male. Neuropeptide Y / analysis. Neuropeptides / analysis. Orexins. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Rats. Rats, Wistar / metabolism. Rats, Wistar / physiology. Receptor, Insulin / analysis. Receptor, Melanocortin, Type 4 / analysis. Receptors, Leptin / analysis

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  • (PMID = 20558837.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-3699
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental biology and medicine (Maywood, N.J.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp. Biol. Med. (Maywood)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Agouti-Related Protein; 0 / Dietary Carbohydrates; 0 / Dietary Fats; 0 / Insulin; 0 / Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; 0 / Leptin; 0 / Neuropeptide Y; 0 / Neuropeptides; 0 / Orexins; 0 / Receptor, Melanocortin, Type 4; 0 / Receptors, Leptin; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor, Insulin
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70. Poerschmann J, Fabbri D, Górecki T: Investigation of the solvent extracts of humic organic matter (HOM) isolated from the Ravenna Lagoon to study environmental pollution and microbial communities. Chemosphere; 2007 Dec;70(2):206-14
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  • [Title] Investigation of the solvent extracts of humic organic matter (HOM) isolated from the Ravenna Lagoon to study environmental pollution and microbial communities.
  • Solvent extracts of HOM isolated from highly polluted sediments from the Ravenna Lagoon were studied.
  • Diagnostic indicators included polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nonylphenols as hazardous organic pollutants to characterize anthropogenic pollution, as well as fatty acids (FA, analysed as methyl esters, FAME) to characterize microbial communities responsible for natural attenuation processes.
  • The distribution of PAHs including cyclopentafused surrogates pointed to a significant pyrogenic origin, characteristic for methane combustion.
  • The PAH distribution was characterized by high concentrations of highly carcinogenic analytes with molecular weights of 276Da (benzo[ghi]perylene prevailing) and 300Da (coronene prevailing).
  • The PAH pattern as obtained by solvent extraction was very different from that obtained from pyrolysis/thermochemolysis of the HOM polymeric matrix.
  • The FA pattern indicated strong bacterial input, with a significant contribution from methanotrophic bacteria as revealed by monounsaturated members with n:1omega8 and n:1omega5 double bonds in the alkyl chain.
  • Terrestrial inputs as revealed by FAME analysis beyond C(20) with pronounced even-over-odd discrimination were of minor significance.
  • This was confirmed by the pattern of nC(24)-nC(30) alcohols in strong even-over-odd prevalence occurring in relatively low concentrations.
  • The hopane hydrocarbon distribution reflected a distinctive impact from industrial processes utilizing heavy fractions of petroleum as feedstock.
  • Hopanols along with the 17beta(H),21beta(H)-bishomohopanoic acid pointed to hopane producers, including methanotrophic and sulfate-reducing bacteria.
  • Nonylphenols, which could not be detected in the pyrograms of solvent-extracted HOM matrix, had a total concentration of about 70microg g(-1) referred to the HOM in the solvent extract.
  • In addition to common phytosterols including beta-sitosterol, coprostanol could be detected in the solvent extracts pointing to human fecal matter contamination.
  • Concentration of resin acids turned out to be very low, thus no harmful environmental effects are to be expected from these compounds.
  • [MeSH-major] Environmental Monitoring / methods. Environmental Pollutants / analysis. Geologic Sediments. Humic Substances / analysis. Solvents / chemistry. Water Microbiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Fatty Acids / analysis. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. Hot Temperature. Italy. Phenols / analysis. Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic / analysis

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  • (PMID = 17663998.001).
  • [ISSN] 0045-6535
  • [Journal-full-title] Chemosphere
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chemosphere
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Environmental Pollutants; 0 / Fatty Acids; 0 / Humic Substances; 0 / Phenols; 0 / Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic; 0 / Solvents; 25154-52-3 / nonylphenol
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71. Takahashi H, Kato A, Onodera K, Suzuki K: Fasting plasma ghrelin levels reflect malnutrition state in patients with liver cirrhosis. Hepatol Res; 2006 Feb;34(2):117-23
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  • [Title] Fasting plasma ghrelin levels reflect malnutrition state in patients with liver cirrhosis.
  • BACKGROUND AND AIM: Ghrelin plays an important role in controlling the feeding and nutritional states by signaling hypothalamic centers.
  • However, the role of ghrelin in cirrhotic patients in the malnutrition state remains unclear.
  • SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Thirty-four patients with liver cirrhosis (LC) and 10 healthy controls (normal controls, NC) were enrolled in this study.
  • Fasting plasma ghrelin levels (desacyl form) were measured using a newly developed ELISA and the relationship among biochemical parameters including plasma leptin, body composition and energy metabolism were evaluated using an indirect calorimeter.
  • RESULTS: Plasma ghrelin levels were slightly but not significantly elevated in patients with LC when compared with NC.
  • Plasma ghrelin levels showed a negative correlation (r=-0.432, p<0.01) with plasma leptin levels and positive correlations with blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, white blood cell count and C-reactive protein.
  • No correlation with the severity of liver damage based on the classification of Child-Pugh was noted.
  • Plasma ghrelin levels were significantly correlated with body mass index (BMI), arm muscular circumference (AMC), triceps skinfold thickness (TSF) (BMI, r=-0.389, p<0.05; AMC, r=-0.416, p<0.05; TSF, r=-0.459, p<0.01, respectively) and the substrate oxidation rates of glucose (%CHO), fat (%FAT) and non-protein respiratory quotients (npRQ) (%CHO, r=-0.391, p<0.05; %FAT, r=0.438, p<0.01; npRQ, r=-0.411, p<0.05, respectively).
  • Four factors (npRQ, TSF, total bilirubin, BUN) associated with plasma ghrelin levels were identified by multiple regression analysis.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that fasting plasma ghrelin levels may be a useful indicator reflecting malnutrition in patients with LC, although renal failure and inflammatory status are also closely associated with plasma ghrelin levels.

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  • (PMID = 16423559.001).
  • [ISSN] 1386-6346
  • [Journal-full-title] Hepatology research : the official journal of the Japan Society of Hepatology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hepatol. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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72. Boulton CJ, Finden JG, Yuh E, Sutherland JJ, Wand MD, Wu G, Lemieux RP: Ferroelectric liquid crystals induced by dopants with axially chiral 2,2'-spirobiindan-1,1'-dione cores. J Am Chem Soc; 2005 Oct 5;127(39):13656-65
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  • [Title] Ferroelectric liquid crystals induced by dopants with axially chiral 2,2'-spirobiindan-1,1'-dione cores.
  • The axially chiral dopants (R)-5,5'-, 5,6'-, and 6,6'-diheptyloxy-2,2'-spirobiindan-1,1'-dione ((R)-2, -3, and -4) were synthesized in optically pure form, and their absolute configurations were assigned by the exciton chirality method using circular dichroism spectroscopy.
  • These new compounds were doped in four achiral liquid crystal hosts to give chiral smectic C* (SmC*) phases with spontaneous polarizations (Ps) that vary with the core structure of the host.
  • The spontaneous polarization induced by the 5,5'-dialkoxy derivative (R)-2 is uniformly positive, whereas that induced by the 6,6'-dialkoxy derivative (R)-4 is uniformly negative and shows a different trend in host dependence.
  • Polarization power (delta(p)) values range from +21 nC/cm2 for (R)-2 in 2',3'-difluoro-4-heptyl-4' '-nonyl-p-terphenyl (DFT) to -1037 nC/cm2 for (R)-4 in 4-(4'-heptyl[1,1'-biphen]-4-yl)-1-hexylcyclohexanecarbonitrile (NCB76).
  • The unsymmetrical dopant (R)-3 behaves like a hybrid of the two symmetrical isomers, with lower absolute values of delta(p), on average, and varying signs of Ps.
  • 2H NMR spectra of the doped mixtures using racemic mixtures of 2-4 with -OCD2C6H13 side-chains, in combination with phase diagrams, show that relatively minor changes in the dopant structure, that is, moving the alkoxy side-chains from the 5,5' to the 6,6' positions of the spirobiindandione core, have profound effects on dopant-host compatibility, and on the propensity of the dopant to exert chiral perturbations in the host environment.
  • The variations in sign and magnitude of delta(p) as a function of alkoxy group positions are rationalized based on an analysis of zigzag conformations that conform to the binding site of the SmC host according to the Boulder model.

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  • (PMID = 16190731.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-7863
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Chemical Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Chem. Soc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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73. Stoeckius M, Maaskola J, Colombo T, Rahn HP, Friedländer MR, Li N, Chen W, Piano F, Rajewsky N: Large-scale sorting of C. elegans embryos reveals the dynamics of small RNA expression. Nat Methods; 2009 Oct;6(10):745-51
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  • [Title] Large-scale sorting of C. elegans embryos reveals the dynamics of small RNA expression.
  • Caenorhabditis elegans is one of the most prominent model systems for embryogenesis, but collecting many precisely staged embryos has been impractical.
  • Thus, early C. elegans embryogenesis has not been amenable to most high-throughput genomics or biochemistry assays.
  • To overcome this problem, we devised a method to collect staged C. elegans embryos by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (eFACS).
  • In a proof-of-principle experiment, we found that a single eFACS run routinely yielded tens of thousands of almost perfectly staged 1-cell stage embryos.
  • As the earliest embryonic events are driven by posttranscriptional regulation, we combined eFACS with second-generation sequencing to profile the embryonic expression of small, noncoding RNAs.
  • We discovered complex and orchestrated changes in the expression between and within almost all classes of small RNAs, including microRNAs and 26G-RNAs, during embryogenesis.

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  • (PMID = 19734907.001).
  • [ISSN] 1548-7105
  • [Journal-full-title] Nature methods
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nat. Methods
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / R01 HD046236; United States / NHGRI NIH HHS / HG / U01 HG004276; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / HD046236-06; United States / NHGRI NIH HHS / HG / HG004276-03; United States / NHGRI NIH HHS / HG / U01 HG004276-03; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / R01HD046236; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / R01 HD046236-06
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / RNA, Small Interfering
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS138678; NLM/ PMC2756031
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74. Lin WC, Li SC, Lin WC, Shin JW, Hu SN, Yu XM, Huang TY, Chen SC, Chen HC, Chen SJ, Huang PJ, Gan RR, Chiu CH, Tang P: Identification of microRNA in the protist Trichomonas vaginalis. Genomics; 2009 May;93(5):487-93
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  • [Title] Identification of microRNA in the protist Trichomonas vaginalis.
  • MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs that have important regulatory roles in multicellular organisms.
  • However, miRNA has never been identified experimentally in protist.
  • Direct cloning of 438 expressed miRNA tags by microRNA serial analysis of gene expression from the parasitic protist Trichomonas vaginalis identified nine candidate miRNAs.
  • Bioinformatics analysis of the corresponding genomic region revealed that these miRNA candidates contain a classical stem-loop-stem structure of pre-microRNAs.
  • Analysis of the 20 nt long mature tva-miR-001 showed that it is an intergenic miRNA located at the scaffold DS113596.
  • Tva-miR-001 was differentially expressed in the trophozoite, pseudocyst and amoeboid stages.
  • Based on the experimental results of the present study, we provided solid evidence that protist possesses a miRNA regulating network comparable with multicellular organisms for the first time.
  • [MeSH-major] Gene Expression Regulation. MicroRNAs / genetics. Trichomonas vaginalis / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Acid Sequence. Animals. Base Sequence. Chromosome Mapping. Cloning, Molecular. Genome, Protozoan. Molecular Sequence Data. Nucleic Acid Conformation

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  • (PMID = 19442639.001).
  • [ISSN] 1089-8646
  • [Journal-full-title] Genomics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Genomics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / MicroRNAs
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75. Smith CD, Shu S, Mungall CJ, Karpen GH: The Release 5.1 annotation of Drosophila melanogaster heterochromatin. Science; 2007 Jun 15;316(5831):1586-91
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  • [Title] The Release 5.1 annotation of Drosophila melanogaster heterochromatin.
  • The repetitive DNA that constitutes most of the heterochromatic regions of metazoan genomes has hindered the comprehensive analysis of gene content and other functions.
  • We have generated a detailed computational and manual annotation of 24 megabases of heterochromatic sequence in the Release 5 Drosophila melanogaster genome sequence.
  • The heterochromatin contains a minimum of 230 to 254 protein-coding genes, which are conserved in other Drosophilids and more diverged species, as well as 32 pseudogenes and 13 noncoding RNAs.
  • Improved methods revealed that more than 77% of this heterochromatin sequence, including introns and intergenic regions, is composed of fragmented and nested transposable elements and other repeated DNAs.
  • Drosophila heterochromatin contains "islands" of highly conserved genes embedded in these "oceans" of complex repeats, which may require special expression and splicing mechanisms.

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  • (PMID = 17569856.001).
  • [ISSN] 1095-9203
  • [Journal-full-title] Science (New York, N.Y.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Science
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NHGRI NIH HHS / HG / U54 HG004028; United States / NHGRI NIH HHS / HG / HG000747-16; United States / NHGRI NIH HHS / HG / R01-HG000747; United States / NHGRI NIH HHS / HG / R01 HG000747-16; United States / NHGRI NIH HHS / HG / P41 HG000739-15; United States / NHGRI NIH HHS / HG / U54 HG004028-01; United States / NHGRI NIH HHS / HG / R01 HG000747
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA Transposable Elements; 0 / DNA, Complementary; 0 / Drosophila Proteins; 0 / Heterochromatin; 0 / RNA, Untranslated; 0 / Retroelements
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS172547; NLM/ PMC2819280
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76. Giri PK, Bhattacharyya S, Kesavamoorthy R, Panigrahi BK, Nair KG: Intense ultraviolet-blue photoluminescence from SiO2 embedded ge nanocrystals prepared by different techniques. J Nanosci Nanotechnol; 2009 Sep;9(9):5389-95
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Intense ultraviolet-blue photoluminescence from SiO2 embedded ge nanocrystals prepared by different techniques.
  • We have made systematic studies on the ultraviolet-blue photoluminescence (PL) from Ge nanocrystals (NCs) grown embedded in SiO2 matrix.
  • Embedded Ge NCs are grown by two different methods, namely, radio-frequency magnetron sputtering (SPT) and ion implantation (IMP).
  • For comparison, Ar implanted SiO2 layer was processed similarly and studied to isolate the contribution of Ge atoms in the observed PL.
  • X-ray diffraction, optical Raman and low frequency Raman scattering studies confirm the presence of Ge NCs in samples prepared by SPT and IMP methods, and Si nanoclusters in Ar implanted sample.
  • Room temperature PL studies with 325 nm excitation show very strong UV-blue emission bands in the range 342-420 nm, and PL studies with 246 nm excitation show two strong UV emission bands at approximately 285 nm and approximately 393 nm in implanted samples.
  • Deconvolution of UV-blue bands show that most of the emission peaks are not unique to the presence of Ge in the samples.
  • Time resolved PL studies in the blue wavelength region show a fast decay dynamics (time constant of approximately 1.0 ns), irrespective of the NC size.
  • PL excitation spectroscopy measurements show a large Stoke's shift for the UV emission bands.
  • Our results indicate that contrary to the literature reports, the approximately 400 nm PL emission is band is not unique to the presence of Ge in the SiO2 matrix and it is likely to originate from a defective NC/SiO2 interface, irrespective of the species of NCs.
  • Origin of various UV emission bands is discussed in the light of the experimental findings and literature reports.
  • [MeSH-major] Nanoparticles. Silicon Dioxide
  • [MeSH-minor] Light. Spectrum Analysis, Raman. X-Ray Diffraction

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  • (PMID = 19928230.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-4880
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of nanoscience and nanotechnology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Nanosci Nanotechnol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 7631-86-9 / Silicon Dioxide
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77. Nikolova L, Saint-Jacques RG, Ross GG: Characterization of Si nanocrystals by different TEM-based techniques. Ultramicroscopy; 2010 Jan;110(2):144-50
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  • [Title] Characterization of Si nanocrystals by different TEM-based techniques.
  • Silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) embedded in SiO(2) matrix and obtained by ion implantation (50keV, 1.0x10(17)Si/cm(2)) were characterized by means of three different transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques: Dark Field (DF), Scanning TEM Annular Dark Field (STEM-ADF) and Z contrast.
  • The strengths and weaknesses of each technique for the characterization of the Si-nc were evaluated and discussed.
  • DF imaging, which has the best contrast, was chosen to give the average Si-nc size evaluated to 5.6nm.
  • On the other hand, STEM-ADF, which is only sensitive to the crystalline phase, provided an evaluation of the Si-nc density of 3.27x10(17)nc/cm(3).
  • Finally, comparison between the STEM-ADF and Z contrast imaging permitted to evaluate the amorphous phase remaining after the annealing to around 12%.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 19944535.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-2723
  • [Journal-full-title] Ultramicroscopy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ultramicroscopy
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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78. Shiku H, Goto S, Jung S, Nagamine K, Koide M, Itayama T, Yasukawa T, Matsue T: Electrochemical characterization of enzymatic activity of yeast cells entrapped in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) microwell on the basis of limited diffusion system. Analyst; 2009 Jan;134(1):182-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Electrochemical characterization of enzymatic activity of yeast cells entrapped in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) microwell on the basis of limited diffusion system.
  • A highly sensitive and quantitative analysis was performed using a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microwell array in a scanning electrochemical microscopy setup.
  • A microelectrode with a relatively large seal radius was used to cover the top of the cylindrical PDMS microwell (96 pL).
  • The voltammogram for 4 mM ferrocyanide resulted in a charge value of 38 nC, suggesting that almost 100% of the reductant in the microwell was converted to the oxidation current.
  • When genetically modified yeast cells were entrapped in the microwell, the accumulation of p-aminophenol (PAP) produced by expressing beta-galactosidase (betaGAL) was successfully observed.
  • [MeSH-major] Saccharomyces cerevisiae / enzymology. beta-Galactosidase / analysis
  • [MeSH-minor] Diffusion. Dimethylpolysiloxanes. Electrochemistry / instrumentation. Electrochemistry / methods. Microchemistry / instrumentation. Microchemistry / methods. Microelectrodes

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  • (PMID = 19082191.001).
  • [ISSN] 1364-5528
  • [Journal-full-title] The Analyst
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Analyst
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dimethylpolysiloxanes; EC 3.2.1.23 / beta-Galactosidase
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79. Calloni GW, Le Douarin NM, Dupin E: High frequency of cephalic neural crest cells shows coexistence of neurogenic, melanogenic, and osteogenic differentiation capacities. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A; 2009 Jun 2;106(22):8947-52
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  • [Title] High frequency of cephalic neural crest cells shows coexistence of neurogenic, melanogenic, and osteogenic differentiation capacities.
  • The neural crest (NC) is a vertebrate innovation that distinguishes vertebrates from other chordates and was critical for the development and evolution of a "New Head and Brain."
  • In early vertebrates, the NC was the source of dermal armor of fossil jawless fish.
  • In extant vertebrates, including mammals, the NC forms the peripheral nervous system, melanocytes, and the cartilage and bone of the face.
  • Here, we show that in avian embryos, a large majority of cephalic NC cells (CNCCs) have the ability to differentiate into cell types as diverse as neurons, melanocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes.
  • Moreover, we find that the morphogen Sonic hedgehog (Shh) acts on CNCCs to increase endochondral osteogenesis while having no effect on osteoblasts prone to membranous ossification.
  • We have developed culture conditions that demonstrate that "neural-mesenchymal" differentiation abilities are present in more than 90% of CNCCs.
  • A highly multipotent progenitor (able to yield neurons, glia, melanocytes, myofibroblasts, chondrocytes, and osteocytes) comprises 7-13% of the clonogenic cells in the absence and presence of Shh, respectively.
  • This progenitor is a good candidate for a cephalic NC stem cell.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain / cytology. Melanocytes / cytology. Multipotent Stem Cells / cytology. Neural Crest / cytology. Neurogenesis. Osteogenesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Differentiation. Core Binding Factor Alpha 1 Subunit / genetics. Core Binding Factor Alpha 1 Subunit / metabolism. Gene Expression / drug effects. Hedgehog Proteins / metabolism. Hedgehog Proteins / pharmacology. Oncogene Proteins / genetics. Quail. Trans-Activators / genetics

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  • (PMID = 19447928.001).
  • [ISSN] 1091-6490
  • [Journal-full-title] Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Core Binding Factor Alpha 1 Subunit; 0 / Gli protein; 0 / Hedgehog Proteins; 0 / Oncogene Proteins; 0 / Trans-Activators
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2690024
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80. Madkaikar M, Gupta M, Ghosh K, Swaminathan S, Sonawane L, Mohanty D: Optimising methods of red cell sedimentation from cord blood to maximise nucleated cell recovery prior to cryopreservation. Br J Biomed Sci; 2007;64(4):157-9
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  • [Title] Optimising methods of red cell sedimentation from cord blood to maximise nucleated cell recovery prior to cryopreservation.
  • Human cord blood is now an established source of stem cells for haematopoietic reconstitution.
  • Red blood cell (RBC) depletion is required to reduce the cord blood unit volume for commercial banking.
  • Red cell sedimentation using hydroxy ethyl starch (HES) is a standard procedure in most cord blood banks.
  • However, while standardising the procedure for cord blood banking, a significant loss of nucleated cells (NC) may be encountered during standard HES sedimentation protocols.
  • This study compares four procedures for cord blood processing to obtain optimal yield of nucleated cells.
  • Gelatin, dextran, 6% HES and 6% HES with an equal volume of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were compared for RBC depletion and NC recovery.
  • Dilution of the cord blood unit with an equal volume of PBS prior to sedimentation with HES resulted in maximum NC recovery (99% [99.5 +/- 1.3%]).
  • Although standard procedures using 6% HES are well established in Western countries, they may not be applicable in India, as a variety of factors that can affect RBC sedimentation (e.g., iron deficiency, hypoalbuminaemia, thalassaemia trait, etc.) may reduce RBC sedimentation and thus reduce NC recovery.
  • While diluting cord blood with an equal volume of PBS is a simple method to improve the NC recovery, it does involve an additional processing step.
  • [MeSH-major] Blood Sedimentation. Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation / methods. Erythrocytes. Fetal Blood / transplantation
  • [MeSH-minor] Blood Banks. Cryopreservation / methods. Female. Humans. Pregnancy

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  • (PMID = 18236736.001).
  • [ISSN] 0967-4845
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of biomedical science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br. J. Biomed. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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81. Fuchs LS, Geary DC, Compton DL, Fuchs D, Hamlett CL, Bryant JD: The contributions of numerosity and domain-general abilities to school readiness. Child Dev; 2010 Sep-Oct;81(5):1520-33
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  • [Title] The contributions of numerosity and domain-general abilities to school readiness.
  • Contributions of domain-general and domain-specific numerical competencies were assessed on first graders' number combination skill (NC) and word-problem skill (WP).
  • Students (n=205) between 5 and 7 years of age were assessed on 2 aspects of numerosity, 8 domain-general abilities, NC, and WP.
  • Both aspects of numerosity predicted NC when controlling for domain-general abilities, but domain-general abilities did not account for significant additional variance.
  • By contrast, when controlling for domain-general abilities in predicting WP, only precise representation of small quantities was uniquely predictive, and domain-general measures accounted for significant additional variance; central executive component of working memory and concept formation were uniquely predictive.
  • Results suggest that development of NC and WP depends on different constellations of numerical versus more general cognitive abilities.

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  • [Copyright] © 2010 The Authors. Child Development © 2010 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.
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  • (PMID = 20840238.001).
  • [ISSN] 1467-8624
  • [Journal-full-title] Child development
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Child Dev
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / R01 HD053714-01A1; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / P30 HD015052; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / R01 HD053714; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / HD15052; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / R37 HD045914
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS221870; NLM/ PMC2941220
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82. Kim EC, Lee HS, Kim SK, Choi MS, Lee S, Han JB, An HJ, Um JY, Kim HM, Lee NY, Bae H, Min BI: The bark of Betula platyphylla var. japonica inhibits the development of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice. J Ethnopharmacol; 2008 Mar 5;116(2):270-8
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  • [Title] The bark of Betula platyphylla var. japonica inhibits the development of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.
  • The bark of Betula platyphylla Sukat. var. japonica Hara (Asian White Birch, AWB) is one of the herbs used in Eastern countries for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases including atopic dermatitis (AD).
  • The present study was performed to examine if and how the bark of AWB inhibits the development of AD-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice induced by repeated application of picryl chloride (PC).
  • With this aim, we examined the skin symptom severity, itching behavior, serum immunoglobulin (Ig) E level and mRNA expression of cytokines at iliac and cervical lymph nodes in the mice.
  • Oral administration of AWB extracts (25, 100 and 250 mg/kg) to the PC-treated mice inhibited the development of AD-like skin lesions as exemplified by a significant decrease in the total skin severity scores, itching behavior and a decrease in hypertrophy and infiltration of inflammatory cells into dermis.
  • The serum IgE level was also significantly reduced by AWB extract.
  • In the RT-PCR results, the expression of interleukin-4 mRNA was reduced by AWB extract, whereas the expression of interferon-gamma mRNA was not changed.
  • These results suggest that AWB inhibits the development of AD-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice through the suppression of the T-helper 2 cell response.
  • [MeSH-major] Betula / chemistry. Dermatitis, Atopic / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Base Sequence. Cytokines / genetics. DNA Primers. Female. Immunoglobulin E / blood. Mice. Pruritus. RNA, Messenger / genetics. RNA, Messenger / metabolism. Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

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  • (PMID = 18191513.001).
  • [ISSN] 0378-8741
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of ethnopharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Ethnopharmacol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cytokines; 0 / DNA Primers; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 37341-29-0 / Immunoglobulin E
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83. Proeschold-Bell RJ, LeGrand SH: High rates of obesity and chronic disease among United Methodist clergy. Obesity (Silver Spring); 2010 Sep;18(9):1867-70
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  • [Title] High rates of obesity and chronic disease among United Methodist clergy.
  • We used self-reported data from United Methodist clergy to assess the prevalence of obesity and having ever been told certain chronic disease diagnoses.
  • Of all actively serving United Methodist clergy in North Carolina (NC) 95% (n = 1726) completed self-report height and weight items and diagnosis questions from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS).
  • We calculated BMI categories and diagnosis prevalence rates for the clergy and compared them to the NC population using BRFSS data.
  • The obesity rate among clergy aged 35-64 years was 39.7%, 10.3% (95% CI = 8.5%, 12.1%) higher than their NC counterparts.
  • Clergy also reported significantly higher rates of having ever been given diagnoses of diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, angina, and asthma compared to their NC peers.
  • Health interventions that address obesity and chronic disease among clergy are urgently needed.
  • [MeSH-major] Arthritis / epidemiology. Asthma / epidemiology. Cardiovascular Diseases / epidemiology. Clergy / statistics & numerical data. Diabetes Mellitus / epidemiology. Obesity / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Body Mass Index. Chronic Disease. Female. Health Surveys. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. North Carolina / epidemiology. Prevalence. Protestantism. Self Report


84. Coutellier L, Friedrich AC, Failing K, Würbel H: Variations in the postnatal maternal environment in mice: effects on maternal behaviour and behavioural and endocrine responses in the adult offspring. Physiol Behav; 2008 Jan 28;93(1-2):395-407
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  • [Title] Variations in the postnatal maternal environment in mice: effects on maternal behaviour and behavioural and endocrine responses in the adult offspring.
  • According to the maternal mediation hypothesis, brain and behavioural development in rodents is affected by environment-dependent variations in maternal care.
  • Thus, it has been shown that early handling results in reduced behavioural and neuroendocrine responses to stressors and that these effects are associated with increased maternal care received during infancy.
  • To investigate this further in mice, we chose a less artificial paradigm that is not confounded by human manipulation and reflects a more natural form of early environmental variation.
  • We housed lactating C57BL/6 dams and their litters in cage systems composed of a nest cage (NC) and a foraging cage (FC) connected by a tunnel, and varied the dams' access to food by providing food either in the NC (NC dams) or FC (FC dams) until postnatal day 14.
  • FC dams were more frequently observed in the FC than NC dams, and although the frequency of the dams being in physical contact with the pups did not differ between the two treatments, FC dams showed lower levels of active nursing than NC dams during the first week of lactation.
  • These environment-dependent variations in maternal behaviour had sex-specific effects on the adult offspring's behavioural and HPA responses to stressors and altered their social behaviour in the home cage, with NC offspring showing higher levels of socio-positive behaviours than FC offspring.
  • These results provide further independent evidence for the maternal mediation hypothesis and demonstrate that even subtle variations of the maternal environment can affect maternal care and induce persistent changes in offspring phenotype.
  • [MeSH-major] Corticosterone / blood. Maternal Behavior / physiology. Social Behavior. Social Environment. Stress, Psychological / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Adaptation, Physiological. Adaptation, Psychological. Animals. Environment. Exploratory Behavior / physiology. Female. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Sex Factors. Statistics, Nonparametric

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  • (PMID = 17961613.001).
  • [ISSN] 0031-9384
  • [Journal-full-title] Physiology & behavior
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Physiol. Behav.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] W980KJ009P / Corticosterone
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85. Mosqueira VC, Legrand P, Barratt G: Surface-modified and conventional nanocapsules as novel formulations for parenteral delivery of halofantrine. J Nanosci Nanotechnol; 2006 Sep-Oct;6(9-10):3193-202
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  • [Title] Surface-modified and conventional nanocapsules as novel formulations for parenteral delivery of halofantrine.
  • The aim of this work was to develop a stable injectable formulation of the antimalarial drug halofantrine (Hf) based on nanocapsules (NC) prepared from biodegradable polymers with Miglyol 810N as the oily core.
  • Poly(D,L-lactide) PLA and its copolymers with poly(ethyleneglycol) (PLA-PEG) were used together with the surfactants poloxamer 188 and lecithin to yield NC with different surface properties.
  • Highly efficient loading of the free base form of Hf was obtained; zeta potential measurements indicated that a part of the associated Hf was at the NC surface, interacting with the lecithin.
  • NC were 150-250 nm in diameter and more stable on storage than nanoemulsions formed from oil and lecithin without polymer.
  • The most stable NC, showing minimal size changes and flocculation, were those with a high density of 20-kDa PEG chains covalently grafted at the surface.
  • Hf release from NC occurred mainly by partition with the external medium.
  • In PBS, even when Tween 80 was added, release was limited to 20% of the total content, whatever the formulation.
  • Addition of serum to the medium allowed complete and rapid release from PLA NC stabilized with adsorbed poloxamer 188, because of the high affinity of Hf for lipoproteins.
  • However, the presence of covalently grafted PEG chains at the surface limited release by providing a hydrophilic steric barrier at the particle surface.
  • A dense coverage with long PEG chains provided the best reduction of release.
  • Such systems could constitute a long-circulating intravenous formulation of Hf for treating severe malaria.
  • [MeSH-major] Capsules / chemistry. Drug Carriers / chemistry. Infusions, Parenteral / methods. Nanostructures / chemistry. Phenanthrenes / administration & dosage. Polyesters / chemistry. Polyethylene Glycols / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Antimalarials / administration & dosage. Antimalarials / chemistry. Diffusion. Drug Compounding / methods. Particle Size. Surface Properties

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  • (PMID = 17048536.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-4880
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of nanoscience and nanotechnology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Nanosci Nanotechnol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antimalarials; 0 / Capsules; 0 / Drug Carriers; 0 / Phenanthrenes; 0 / Polyesters; 0 / polylactide-polyethylene glycol-polylactide; 30IQX730WE / Polyethylene Glycols; Q2OS4303HZ / halofantrine
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86. Hemmi H, Kumazaki T, Yoshizawa-Kumagaye K, Nishiuchi Y, Yoshida T, Ohkubo T, Kobayashi Y: Structural and functional study of an Anemonia elastase inhibitor, a "nonclassical" Kazal-type inhibitor from Anemonia sulcata. Biochemistry; 2005 Jul 19;44(28):9626-36
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  • [Title] Structural and functional study of an Anemonia elastase inhibitor, a "nonclassical" Kazal-type inhibitor from Anemonia sulcata.
  • Anemonia elastase inhibitor (AEI) is a "nonclassical" Kazal-type elastase inhibitor from Anemonia sulcata.
  • Unlike many nonclassical inhibitors, AEI does not have a cystine-stabilized alpha-helical (CSH) motif in the sequence.
  • We chemically synthesized AEI and determined its three-dimensional solution structure by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.
  • The resulting structure of AEI was characterized by a central alpha-helix and a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet of a typical Kazal-type inhibitor such as silver pheasant ovomucoid third domain (OMSVP3), even though the first and fifth half-cystine residues forming a disulfide bond in AEI are shifted both toward the C-terminus in comparison with those of OMSVP3.
  • Synthesized AEI exhibited unexpected strong inhibition toward Streptomyces griseus protease B (SGPB).
  • Our previous study [Hemmi, H., et al. (2003) Biochemistry 42, 2524-2534] demonstrated that the site-specific introduction of the engineered disulfide bond into the OMSVP3 molecule to form the CSH motif could produce an inhibitor with a narrower specificity.
  • Thus, the CSH motif-containing derivative of AEI (AEI analogue) was chemically synthesized when a Cys(4)-Cys(34) bond was changed to a Cys(6)-Cys(31) bond.
  • The AEI analogue scarcely inhibited porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE), even though it exhibited almost the same potent inhibitory activity toward SGPB.
  • For the molecular scaffold, essentially no structural difference was detected between the two, but the N-terminal loop from Pro(5) to Ile(7) near the putative reactive site (Met(10)-Gln(11)) in the analogue moved by 3.7 A toward the central helix to form the introduced Cys(6)-Cys(31) bond.
  • Such a conformational change in the restricted region correlates with the specificity change of the inhibitor.
  • [MeSH-major] Avian Proteins / chemistry. Sea Anemones. Trypsin Inhibitor, Kazal Pancreatic / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Acid Motifs. Amino Acid Sequence. Animals. Crystallography, X-Ray. Disulfides / chemistry. Humans. Leukocyte Elastase / antagonists & inhibitors. Molecular Sequence Data. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular. Ovomucin / chemistry. Ovomucin / physiology. Pancreatic Elastase / antagonists & inhibitors. Protein Structure, Secondary. Protein Structure, Tertiary. Serine Endopeptidases / metabolism. Serine Proteinase Inhibitors / chemical synthesis. Serine Proteinase Inhibitors / physiology. Streptomyces griseus / enzymology. Structure-Activity Relationship. Substrate Specificity. Swine. Turkeys

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  • (PMID = 16008348.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-2960
  • [Journal-full-title] Biochemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biochemistry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] PDB/ 1Y1B/ 1Y1C
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Avian Proteins; 0 / Disulfides; 0 / Serine Proteinase Inhibitors; 37281-36-0 / Ovomucin; 50936-63-5 / Trypsin Inhibitor, Kazal Pancreatic; EC 3.4.21.- / Serine Endopeptidases; EC 3.4.21.36 / Pancreatic Elastase; EC 3.4.21.37 / Leukocyte Elastase; EC 3.4.21.81 / streptogrisin B
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87. Hoshikawa M, Hashimoto S, Kawahara T, Ide R: Postural instability at a simulated altitude of 5,000 m before and after an expedition to Mt. Cho-Oyu (8,201 m). Eur J Appl Physiol; 2010 Oct;110(3):539-47
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  • [Title] Postural instability at a simulated altitude of 5,000 m before and after an expedition to Mt. Cho-Oyu (8,201 m).
  • To clarify the effects of altitude acclimatization on postural instability at altitudes, six female climbers stood with their eyes open or closed on a force-measuring platform under normoxia (NC) and hypobaric hypoxia, equivalent to a 5,000 m altitude (HC), before and after an expedition to Mt.
  • Cho-Oyu (8,201 m).
  • The expedition extended over 84 days.
  • We recorded sways in the center of foot pressure, electromyograms (EMGs) of lower-leg muscles, blood components and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO(2)).
  • Before the expedition, the maximum amplitude of sway with the eyes open and integrated EMG from the medial gastrocnemius increased for HC.
  • After the expedition, red blood cell (from 423.4 ± 15.4 to 498.0 ± 24.5 × 10(4) μl(-1)), hemoglobin content (from 12.6 ± 0.32 to 14.5 ± 1.00 g/dl) and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (from 1.93 ± 0.21 to 2.24 ± 0.34 μmol/ml) increased.
  • The SpO(2) under HC increased from 69.2 ± 9.6 to 77.2 ± 10.0%.
  • The maximum amplitude of sway with the eyes open decreased for HC.
  • No difference in the sway path length and integrated EMGs was observed between NC and HC.
  • These results suggest that acclimatization can improve the impaired postural stability on initial arrival at altitudes.
  • However, it is still unclear how long acclimatization period is needed.
  • Further studies are needed to reveal this point.
  • [MeSH-major] Acclimatization / physiology. Altitude. Expeditions. Mountaineering / physiology. Postural Balance / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate / blood. Adult. Electromyography. Erythrocyte Count. Erythrocyte Indices / physiology. Female. Foot / physiology. Foot / physiopathology. Hematocrit. Hemoglobins / metabolism. Humans. Hypoxia / blood. Hypoxia / physiopathology. Japan. Leg / physiology. Leg / physiopathology. Middle Aged. Muscle, Skeletal / physiology. Muscle, Skeletal / physiopathology. Oxygen / blood. Pressure

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  • (PMID = 20549513.001).
  • [ISSN] 1439-6327
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of applied physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Appl. Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hemoglobins; 138-81-8 / 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate; S88TT14065 / Oxygen
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88. Middelburg KJ, Haadsma ML, Heineman MJ, Bos AF, Hadders-Algra M: Ovarian hyperstimulation and the in vitro fertilization procedure do not influence early neuromotor development; a history of subfertility does. Fertil Steril; 2010 Feb;93(2):544-53
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [MeSH-major] Fertilization in Vitro / methods. Infertility / complications. Movement Disorders / epidemiology. Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome / physiopathology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 19361794.001).
  • [ISSN] 1556-5653
  • [Journal-full-title] Fertility and sterility
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Fertil. Steril.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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89. Liu G, Liu Y, Zhang X, Yuan X, Zhang M, Zhang W, Jia M: Characterization and catalytic performance of porous carbon prepared using in situ-formed aluminophosphate framework as template. J Colloid Interface Sci; 2010 Feb 15;342(2):467-73
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  • [Title] Characterization and catalytic performance of porous carbon prepared using in situ-formed aluminophosphate framework as template.
  • A series of porous carbon (NC) materials were prepared by using in situ-formed aluminophosphate framework as template, and citric acid and sucrose as carbon precursors.
  • The structure and surface chemistry properties of these carbon materials were studied by N(2) adsorption, XRD, DRIFT, and XPS measurements.
  • The catalytic properties of these NC materials were investigated in the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol with air as oxidant source.
  • Compared with other carbon materials, such as active carbon, mesoporous CMK-3, and carbon molecular sieves, NC materials exhibited much higher catalytic activity with nearly 100% selectivity to benzaldehyde.
  • The presence of abundant surface quinone groups, which originates from the special preparation process of NC material, is likely responsible for the high catalytic property of these porous carbon materials.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 19919862.001).
  • [ISSN] 1095-7103
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of colloid and interface science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Colloid Interface Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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90. Rosengarten B, Auch D, Kaps M: Effects of initiation and acute withdrawal of statins on the neurovascular coupling mechanism in healthy, normocholesterolemic humans. Stroke; 2007 Dec;38(12):3193-7
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  • [Title] Effects of initiation and acute withdrawal of statins on the neurovascular coupling mechanism in healthy, normocholesterolemic humans.
  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Recent clinical trials imply increased risk of vascular events after statin withdrawal.
  • There is evidence that this observation relates to an impaired nitric oxide system.
  • The present analysis investigates the effect of initiation and withdrawal of statin therapy on resting and functionally activated cerebral hemodynamics in healthy young volunteers.
  • METHODS: Sixteen healthy students (aged 23.7+/-3.3 years, 10 male) were subjected to a placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study with a washout phase between blocks of 4 weeks.
  • In the verum group, 20 mg pravastatin was taken for 2 weeks followed by 40 mg for 4 weeks.
  • Withdrawal effects were investigated the day after discontinuation.
  • Total cholesterol levels, blood pressure, resting and evoked hemodynamic responses due to a visual stimulation task in the posterior cerebral artery were obtained at baseline and then weekly and the day after discontinuation.
  • RESULTS: In the verum group, cholesterol levels significantly decreased after 2 weeks (from 183+/-30 to 150+/-28 mg/dL; P<0.001) and then remained nearly stable (147+/-21 mg/dL after 6 weeks).
  • Blood pressure, resting and evoked hemodynamic responses remained constant throughout the study.
  • The day after statin withdrawal, evoked flow velocity responses were significantly lower (11+/-4% versus 13+/-5% at baseline; P<0.01) indicating inappropriate blood supply of active neurons.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Reduction in evoked flow velocity responses reflects reduced nitric oxide bioavailability and therefore supports molecular findings of acute statin withdrawal.
  • Questions arise if the present data might give a link to reports of increased vascular events in patients at vascular risk after acute statin withdrawal.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticholesteremic Agents / pharmacology. Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Adult. Cholesterol / metabolism. Cross-Over Studies. Double-Blind Method. Female. Hemodynamics. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Nitric Oxide / chemistry. Nitric Oxide / metabolism. Placebos. Pravastatin / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 17962596.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4628
  • [Journal-full-title] Stroke; a journal of cerebral circulation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Stroke
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticholesteremic Agents; 0 / Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors; 0 / Placebos; 31C4KY9ESH / Nitric Oxide; 97C5T2UQ7J / Cholesterol; KXO2KT9N0G / Pravastatin
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91. Thorp E, Cui D, Schrijvers DM, Kuriakose G, Tabas I: Mertk receptor mutation reduces efferocytosis efficiency and promotes apoptotic cell accumulation and plaque necrosis in atherosclerotic lesions of apoe-/- mice. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol; 2008 Aug;28(8):1421-8
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  • [Title] Mertk receptor mutation reduces efferocytosis efficiency and promotes apoptotic cell accumulation and plaque necrosis in atherosclerotic lesions of apoe-/- mice.
  • OBJECTIVE: Atherosclerotic plaques that are prone to disruption and acute thrombotic vascular events are characterized by large necrotic cores.
  • Necrotic cores result from the combination of macrophage apoptosis and defective phagocytic clearance (efferocytosis) of these apoptotic cells.
  • We previously showed that macrophages with tyrosine kinase-defective Mertk receptor (Mertk(KD)) have a defect in phagocytic clearance of apoptotic macrophages in vitro.
  • Herein we test the hypothesis that the Mertk(KD) mutation would result in increased accumulation of apoptotic cells and promote necrotic core expansion in a mouse model of advanced atherosclerosis.
  • METHODS AND RESULTS: Mertk(KD);Apoe(-/-) mice and control Apoe(-/-) mice were fed a Western-type diet for 10 or 16 weeks, and aortic root lesions were analyzed for apoptosis and plaque necrosis.
  • We found that the plaques of the Mertk(KD);Apoe(-/-) mice had a significant increase in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL)-positive apoptotic cells.
  • Most importantly, there were more non-macrophage-associated apoptotic cells in the Mertk(KD) lesions, consistent with defective efferocytosis.
  • The more advanced (16-week) Mertk(KD);Apoe(-/-) plaques were more necrotic, consistent with a progression from apoptotic cell accumulation to plaque necrosis in the setting of a defective efferocytosis receptor.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In a mouse model of advanced atherosclerosis, mutation of the phagocytic Mertk receptor promotes the accumulation of apoptotic cells and the formation of necrotic plaques.
  • These data are consistent with the notion that a defect in an efferocytosis receptor can accelerate the progression of atherosclerosis and suggest a novel therapeutic target to prevent advanced plaque progression and its clinical consequences.

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  • (PMID = 18451332.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4636
  • [Journal-full-title] Arteriosclerosis, thrombosis, and vascular biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL75662; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL075662-05; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / P01 HL054591; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL075662; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL075662-05; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL054591-130004; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL54591; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / P01 HL054591-130004
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Apolipoproteins E; 0 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins; EC 2.7.1.10.1 / Mertk protein, mouse; EC 2.7.10.1 / Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS48779; NLM/ PMC2575060
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92. Hochman A, Leviatan Y: Rigorous modal analysis of metallic nanowire chains. Opt Express; 2009 Aug 3;17(16):13561-75
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  • [Title] Rigorous modal analysis of metallic nanowire chains.
  • Nanowire chains (NCs) are analyzed by use of a rigorous, full-wave, Source-Model Technique (SMT).
  • The technique employs a proper periodic Green's function which converges regardless of whether the structure is lossless or lossy.
  • By use of this Green's function, it is possible to determine the complex propagation constants of the NC modes directly and accurately, as solutions of a dispersion equation.
  • To demonstrate the method, dispersion curves and mode profiles for a few NCs are calculated.
  • [MeSH-major] Metals / chemistry. Models, Chemical. Nanotubes / chemistry. Refractometry / methods. Surface Plasmon Resonance / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Computer Simulation. Light. Scattering, Radiation

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  • (PMID = 19654764.001).
  • [ISSN] 1094-4087
  • [Journal-full-title] Optics express
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Opt Express
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Metals
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93. Li XM, Huang CX, Wang TS, Zhuang SW, Zhou H, Tian B: Comparison of coronary plaque composition among patients with acute coronary syndrome and stable coronary artery disease. Chin Med J (Engl); 2008 Mar 20;121(6):534-9
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  • [Title] Comparison of coronary plaque composition among patients with acute coronary syndrome and stable coronary artery disease.
  • BACKGROUND: The identification of vulnerable plaques before rupture is an important clinical goal.
  • The purpose of the present study was to assess the difference in plaque composition among patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) by intravascular ultrasound virtual histologic analysis.
  • METHODS: One hundred and thirty-nine patients were divided into ACS group and SCAD group according to clinical presentation.
  • A total of 229 de novo lesions with >50% stenosis in native coronary arteries with diameters >2.5 mm were studied with intravascular ultrasonography.
  • Geometric and compositional data were obtained using intravascular ultrasound virtual histology software.
  • RESULTS: There were no significant differences in overall lesions for fibrous ((52.0+/-11.9)% vs (54.3+/-8.5)%, P>0.05), fibrolipidic ((12.3+/-10.1)% vs (13.8+/-9.5)%, P > 0.05), calcium ((14.0+/-9.1)% vs (19.3+/-13.1)%, P>0.05), or necrotic core ((22.0+/-11.1)% vs (19.7 +/- 5.4)%, P > 0.05) percentages in ACS and SCAD patients, respectively.
  • There were also no significant differences in culprit lesions for fibrous ((46.4+/-12.0)% vs (53.6+/-8.8)%, P>0.05), fibrolipidic ((9.1+/-9.0)% vs (12.9+/-9.7)%, P>0.05), calcium ((16.6+/-9.7)% vs (21.8+/-26.3)%, P>0.05), or necrotic core ((28.0+/-12.6)% vs (20.6+/-5.2)%, P>0.05) percentages in ACS and SCAD patients, respectively.
  • High density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels >1.04 mmol/L were associated with more fibrolipidic ((14.5+/-10.4)% vs (7.1+/-6.5)%, P<0.05) and less necrotic core ((20.6+/-9.7)% vs (27.9+/-12.6)%, P<0.05) percentages in the cohort with ACS.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In this study, coronary plaque composition assessed by intravascular ultrasound virtual histologic analysis was not significantly different between ACS and SCAD patients.
  • The anatomic relationship of the specific plaque components to the lumen of the vessel was more important than the quantitative information of plaque composition for plaque stability.
  • [MeSH-major] Acute Coronary Syndrome / pathology. Coronary Artery Disease / pathology. Coronary Vessels / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Cholesterol, HDL / blood. Cholesterol, LDL / blood. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Ultrasonography, Interventional

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  • (PMID = 18364141.001).
  • [ISSN] 0366-6999
  • [Journal-full-title] Chinese medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chin. Med. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cholesterol, HDL; 0 / Cholesterol, LDL
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94. Lee CH, Lee HJ, Son KR, Chun EJ, Lim KY, Goo JM, Im JG, Heo JN, Song JW: CT analysis of the anterior mediastinum in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Korean J Radiol; 2006 Jul-Sep;7(3):173-9
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  • [Title] CT analysis of the anterior mediastinum in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia.
  • OBJECTIVE: We wanted to determine whether the amount and shape of the anterior mediastinal fat in the patients suffering with usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) or nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) was different from those of the normal control group.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: We selected patients who suffered with UIP (n = 26) and NSIP (n = 26) who had undergone CT scans.
  • Twenty-six controls were selected from individuals with normal CT findings and normal pulmonary function tests.
  • All three groups (n = 78) were individually matched for age and gender.
  • The amounts of anterior mediastinal fat, and the retrosternal anteroposterior (AP) and transverse dimensions of the anterior mediastinal fat were compared by one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni's test.
  • The shapes of the anterior mediastinum were compared using the Chi-square test.
  • Exact logistic regression analysis and polychotomous logistic regression analysis were employed to assess whether the patients with NSIP or UIP had a tendency to show a convex shape of their anterior mediastinal fat.
  • RESULTS: The amount of anterior mediastinal fat was not different among the three groups (p = 0.175).
  • For the UIP patients, the retrosternal AP dimension of the anterior mediastinal fat was shorter (p = 0.037) and the transverse dimension of the anterior mediastinal fat was longer (p = 0.001) than those of the normal control group.
  • For the NSIP patients, only the transverse dimension was significantly longer than those of the normal control group (p < 0.001).
  • The convex shape of the anterior mediastinum was predictive of NSIP (OR = 19.7, CI 3.32-infinity, p < 0.001) and UIP (OR = 24.42, CI 4.06-infinity, p < 0.001).
  • CONCLUSION: For UIP patients, the retrosternal AP and transverse dimensions are different from those of normal individuals, whereas the amounts of anterior mediastinal fat are similar.
  • UIP and NSIP patients have a tendency to have a convex shape of their anterior mediastinal fat.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / radiography. Body Composition. Lung Diseases, Interstitial / radiography. Mediastinal Diseases / radiography. Pulmonary Fibrosis / radiography. Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted / methods. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Humans. Male. Middle Aged


95. Keene SE, King SR, Telesnitsky A: 7SL RNA is retained in HIV-1 minimal virus-like particles as an S-domain fragment. J Virol; 2010 Sep;84(18):9070-7
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  • [Title] 7SL RNA is retained in HIV-1 minimal virus-like particles as an S-domain fragment.
  • HIV-1 is known to package several small cellular RNAs in addition to its genome.
  • Previous work consistently demonstrated that the host structural RNA 7SL is abundant in HIV-1 virions but has yielded conflicting results regarding whether 7SL is present in minimal, assembly-competent virus-like particles (VLPs).
  • Here, we demonstrate that minimal HIV-1 VLPs retain 7SL RNA primarily as an endoribonucleolytic fragment, referred to as 7SL remnant (7SLrem).
  • Nuclease mapping showed that 7SLrem is a 111-nucleotide internal portion of 7SL, with 5' and 3' ends corresponding to unpaired loops in the 7SL two-dimensional structure.
  • Analysis of VLPs comprised of different subsets of Gag domains revealed that all NC-positive VLPs contained intact 7SL while the presence of 7SLrem correlated with the absence of the NC domain.
  • Because 7SLrem, which maps to the 7SL S domain, was not detectable in infected cells, we propose a model whereby the species recruited to assembling VLPs is intact 7SL RNA, with 7SLrem produced by an endoribonuclease in the absence of NC.
  • Since recruitment of 7SL RNA was a conserved feature of all tested minimal VLPs, our model further suggests that 7SL's recruitment is mediated, either directly or indirectly, through interactions with conserved features of all tested VLPs, such as the C-terminal domain of CA.

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