[X] Close
You are about to erase all the values you have customized, search history, page format, etc.
Click here to RESET all values       Click here to GO BACK without resetting any value
Items 1 to 2 of about 2
1. Diegel CR, Cho KR, El-Naggar AK, Williams BO, Lindvall C: Mammalian target of rapamycin-dependent acinar cell neoplasia after inactivation of Apc and Pten in the mouse salivary gland: implications for human acinic cell carcinoma. Cancer Res; 2010 Nov 15;70(22):9143-52
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Mammalian target of rapamycin-dependent acinar cell neoplasia after inactivation of Apc and Pten in the mouse salivary gland: implications for human acinic cell carcinoma.
  • Cross-talk between the canonical Wnt and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways occurs at multiple levels in the cell and likely contributes to the oncogenic effects of these pathways in human cancer.
  • To gain more insight into the interplay between Wnt and mTOR signaling in salivary gland tumorigenesis, we developed a mouse model in which both pathways are constitutively activated by the conditional inactivation of the Apc and Pten tumor suppressor genes.
  • Loss of either Apc or Pten alone did not cause tumor development.
  • However, deletion of both genes resulted in the formation of salivary gland tumors with 100% penetrance and short latency that showed a remarkable morphologic similarity to human acinic cell carcinoma.
  • Treatment of tumor-bearing mice using the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin led to complete regression of tumors, indicating that tumor growth was dependent on continued mTOR signaling.
  • Importantly, we found that human salivary gland acinic cell carcinomas also express markers of activated mTOR signaling.
  • Together, these results suggest that aberrant activation of mTOR signaling plays a pivotal role in acinar cell neoplasia of the salivary gland.
  • Because rapamycin analogues are approved for treating other types of human malignancies, our findings suggest that rapamycin therapy should be evaluated for treating patients with salivary gland acinic cell carcinoma.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein / deficiency. Carcinoma, Acinar Cell / metabolism. PTEN Phosphohydrolase / deficiency. Salivary Glands / metabolism. TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antibiotics, Antineoplastic / pharmacology. Apoptosis / drug effects. Female. Flow Cytometry. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Mice. Mice, 129 Strain. Mice, Knockout. Salivary Gland Neoplasms / genetics. Salivary Gland Neoplasms / metabolism. Salivary Gland Neoplasms / pathology. Signal Transduction / drug effects. Sirolimus / pharmacology. Tumor Burden / drug effects


Advertisement
2. Psalla D, Geigy C, Konar M, Café Marçal V, Oevermann A: Nasal acinic cell carcinoma in a cat. Vet Pathol; 2008 May;45(3):365-8
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Nasal acinic cell carcinoma in a cat.
  • This case report describes the clinical, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-related, and pathologic features of a nasal acinic cell carcinoma in a cat.
  • Evaluation by MRI revealed an heterogeneous, space-occupying lesion that filled the left nasal cavity and was diagnosed by histopathologic examination as an acinic cell carcinoma arising from a minor salivary gland of the nasal cavity.
  • Acinic cell carcinoma is a rare tumor in veterinary medicine.
  • The tumor is composed mainly of cells resembling serous cells of salivary glands and originates from major or minor salivary glands.
  • Clinicians and pathologists should be aware of the occurrence of acinic cell carcinoma in the sinonasal tract and include the tumor in the differential diagnosis of feline nasal diseases.
  • [MeSH-major] Carcinoma, Acinar Cell / veterinary. Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms / veterinary
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cats. Keratins / analysis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Nasal Cavity / pathology. Salivary Glands, Minor / pathology

  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18487495.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-9858
  • [Journal-full-title] Veterinary pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Vet. Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 68238-35-7 / Keratins
  •  go-up   go-down






Advertisement